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Full text of "Variety (January 1908)"

Thirty-Two Pages 



TEN CENTS 




VOL. IX., NO. 4. 



JANUARY 4, 1908. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 




Entered as :coon4-oUu, matter December 22, 1905, at the post office at New York, N. Y., under the act of Congress of March 8, Mm 



GREAT SUCCESS! 
NEW YORK THEATRE 






WHIT CUNLIFFE 



,i 



SINGING F. D. A H. SONGS 

(•eSCBVED) 

"It's a Different Girl Again** "Up in Scotland'* "l-W-l Double L" "Girls, Girls, Girls** 

"Women Get the Best ot It** "Oh, the Steamer,** 4c, &c, Ac. 



■ 



. D. & 

the Firm that Delivers the Hits 



FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 

NEW YORK, 15 WEST 30th STREET 




WARNING TO AGENTS and MANAGERS 








THE WANDERING MINSTREL 

Singing, Talking and Dancing Comedian, Will Appear at 

PASTOR'S. Week of Jan. 6th, TWICE DAILY 

15 Minutes In "ONE" and Something Doing All the Time 
MATERIAL ALL NEW AND ORIGINAL AND FULLY PROTECTED 

Permanent Address, White Rats of America 



Mist an Artist Advertise to Eseape a Knock ? 

About two week* ago, while playing the Dewey, everyone in my company was 
ASKED TO ADVERTISE in a certain daily newspaper by a messenger from its critic, 
WHO IS ALSO ITS' ADVERTISING SOLICITOR. 

On Dec 29 this same CRITIC- SOLICITOR in a review sought to give those who 
not seen my act the impression that it is a poor one. 

The answer is that MESSRS. JACOBS, BUTLER & LOWRY, after reading the re- 
ef the joke critic, laughed at his statements and OFFERED TO SIGN ME FOR 
NEXT SEASON ON THE SPOT. 




DENT 



The only man in the world who juggles 8 plates. 



En Route Champagne Girls. 



I 

WANT 
ACTS 



That are willing to kcop going on "the ■mall time," wall* waiting for th» M* 
place. No room for hea?7 acrobatic acta. Oomedj specialties and noTelty singles 
desired. Address 

NORMAN JEFFERIES, Ninth and Arch, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



■* 





RESTAURANT 
— CHICAGO 



[W \. 



Mr. Abe Frank, for the part five yean sole 
Manager of the Sherman House and College BM 
Chicago, which connection he has severed 
announces his association with Rector's. Clark 
and Monroe Streets. Chicago, as part owner 
and Managing Director. 

Mr. Frank extends to his friends and acquaint- 
ances among the profession a cordial welcome 
to Rector's, assuring them of a continuation of his 
personal solicitude for their comfort and entertainment. 



A POSITIVE HIT 

James T. Kelly and 
Lillian M. Massey 

ASSISTED BY SHERIDAN HOLMES IN 

"Two Kings and a Queen" 

BY EDGAR SELDEN 

This Week - - PASTOR'S THEATRE 



INSTANTANEOUS SUCCESS 




CLIFF 



ENGLAND'S GREATEST BOY COMEDIAN; 

PERCY WILLIAMS' ORPHEUM THEATRE, BROOKLYN, THIS WEEK 

WEEK JAN. 6, ALHAMBRA, N. Y. 



ADA 




IV V AXTDl 
THIS WEEK, KEITH'S, PHOVTDEHCE, B, L 









Wasn Sftstoertftf tutcrrtisementt 



Direction IRA KE88NEB. 

kindly mention Vabhtt. 



Per. Add., slo. 9 Hubbard It, Ulrasr Pack, Brooklyn, BT, 



.i 



Thirty-Two Pages 






TEN CENTS 




VOL, IX., NO. 4. 



JANUARY 4, 1908. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



CLEVELAND HIPPODROME 

HAS B RILLIAN T OPENING 

With Seats Sold Far Ahead Big New Amusement 
Place Throws Wide Its Doors. Booked by 

William Morris. 



Cleveland, Jan. 3. 

Cleveland has been obsequiously bow- 
ing to Max Faetkenheuer since Monday 
night, when Mr. Faetkenheuer opened his 
magnificent $2,000,000 Hippodrome. 

Everybody had agreed the indefatigable 
Faetkenheuer "couldn't do it," so the ac- 
clamation which greeted the new house 
was the more sincere tribute to his 
achievement. 

The new Hippodrome is a palace for 
any city; for Cleveland it's a wonder, 
with a seating capacity of 4,100; a width 
of 130 feet, and a depth of 220 feet. 

In general plan it is modeled along the 
linos of the New York Hippodrome, with 
improvements on the latter, especially in 
the accoustics. They are perfect. 

Knox & Elliot, the architects who de- 
signed the amphitheatre, not alone gave 
the auditorium the handsomest proscenium 
arch in the country, but combined with it 
a sounding bell which causes the accoustic 
properties to be so nearly perfect that 
talking in an ordinary conversational tone 
may be easily understood in the gallery, 
the uppermost seat reaching 80 feet above 
the stage level. 

The stage itself is 122 feet deep, with 
a water tank, 40x55 feet, having a ten- 
foot depth. 

The Hippodrome is the court of a city 
block. On all sides a 12-story office build- 
ing surrounds it. Two entrances are had 
to the theatre, the main box office being 
situated on the Euclid avenue side, while 
the other is on the Prospect avenue open- 
ing. 

It is the report about town that the 
rental for the Hippodrome will be nil if 
charged off against the profits accruing 
from tenants. 

The cost of the weekly shows, gauged 
by the opening bill this week (not over 
$4,000) will not require over a fair aver- 
age attendance for a net return. 

As the new house impressed Cleveland, 



so did the show. The program is divided 
into three sections, with 35-minute ends 
for spectacular productions, a vaudeville 
performance dividing it. 

The stage management is superb, about 
sixty girls and twenty-five young men, 
for the greater part recruited locally, 
make up the ensemble. It is "raw ma- 
terial," yet the hit of the bill Monday 
was the drilling of the chorus in the finale 
of "Coaching," the opening piece. 

"Coaching" is a picturesque story of 
early days in England, with plenty of 
action, little comedy, but nicely produced, 
and is run off swiftly. An absence of a 
real comedian or two mars what could 
otherwise be a humorous side of both 
spectacles, and one is especially needed 
in "The Cloudburst," designed as the 
thrilling climax of the bill. 

The water tank is utilized in this, and 
there is a storm effect, including the 
bursting of a dam, and some poorly paint- 
ed scenery, not forgetting an illusion of 
water falls, not at all deceptive. 

Among the usual mishaps of a first 
performance occurred an accident Monday 
evening spoiling the big finale, and not 
permitting the ''diving horses" to dive, 
but the audience entered no complaint, 
and the local press reviews h.id nothing 
but praise for theatre, show and manage- 
ment. 

The vaudeville portion was greatly ham- 
pered by insufficient light on the stage 
and the inexperienced handling of the 
"spots." 

The Sharp Brothers, Mabel Berra and 
the Musical Avolas were the more un- 
fortunate in this respect, although the 
Sharp Brothers, who opened, were the hit 
of the variety features. The Avolas also 
pleased, while Baron's Burlesque Menage- 
rie, closing the list, scored a screaming 
success. 

Patty Brothers, with the "Head 

(Continued on page 15.) 



MORE "HIPS" EXPECTED. 

Cleveland, Jan. 3. 

William Morris, of New York, Geo. M. 
Leventritt, Mr. Morris' attorney, together 
with Max Faetkenheurer, manager of the 
new Hippodrome, and a local man, largely 
interested financially in it, left here on 
Tuesday for Detroit. 

The successful opening of Cleveland's 
vest amusement place, will cause, it is 
said, other like structures to be built in 
the West. While in the city, Mr. Morris 
met Carleton Macy, and the newspapers 
have jumped to the belief Mr. Macy will 
play vaudeville in his suburban theatre, 
the Majestic. 

The Majestic is under its first season 
of Mr. Macy's management, playing dra- 
matic stock at present, and is a success- 
ful enterprise. 



MANAGER DOCKING TO MOVE. 

Scranton, Pa., Jan. 3. 
Manager Docking, who has been in 
charge of the Poli Theatre here since its 
opening and who has had no small share 
in building it up to the place it occupies 
as the most successful of all the Poll 
houses, is about to be transferred to an- 
other of the houses on the circuit. No 
reason is given and the suggestion is 
hazarded that one of the other theatres 
needs bolstering. 



MORE K. & E. ACTS FOR UNITED. 

The managers of the United Booking 
Offices remained in conference until late 
in the evening Tuesday routing a new 
batch of twenty-five Klaw & Erlanger 
acts, contracts for which, beginning Jan. 
6 and 13, were delivered to them on Tues- 
day afternoon. 

This makes 175 acts booked by Klaw 
& Erlanger, which are now playing out 
their time on the different circuits allied 
with the United. Seventy of these acts 
are on the Orpheum Circuit. 



BECK NEAR HOME. 

Martin Beck sailed from Liverpool on 
the steamship Lusitania Saturday. He 
will arrive in New York to-day if he is 
not already here. The Orpheum Circuit's 
general manager traveled direct from 
Vienna to Liverpool last week in time to 
catch the westward bound steamer. 



MAY FORFEIT $15,000. 

Papers have been prepared and may al- 
ready have been served upon Manager 
Shean, of the Tremont Theatre, Boston, 
who is the United States Amusement 
Company's Massachusetts agent, in a suit 
to prevent K. & E. from attempting to 
recover possession of the Nelson Theatre, 
Springfield, and Franklin, Worcester, now 
held by the William Morris Amusement 
Company under a sub -lease from the "Ad- 
vanced Vaudeville" promotors. 

The Massachusetts court has issued a 
writ of equity containing an injunction 
forbidding the United States Company 
from attempting to oust the Morris con- 
cern from either place. The argument 
cannot possibly come up for several weeks 
and meanwhile Morris cannot be disturbed. 

The point of this is that under the com- 
promise agreement between the United 
Booking Offices and K. & E. the latter 
agreed to turn over to S'. Z. Poli the Nel- 
son and Franklin by Jan. 13 under pain 
of forfeiture of $15,000. It is the opinion 
of lawyers that Poli will have an oppor- 
tunity to claim this amount. 



MAY CLOSE COLUMBIA. 

Chicago, Jan. 3. 

It appears from a statement attributed 
to Jacob Oppenheimer that the American 
Theatre in St. Louis will play vaudeville 
under all circumstances. It was reported 
recently that a deal had been made with 
Middleton & Tate by which the Garrick, 
Columbia and American would be operated 
in conjunction with each other. It is now 
said that the Columbia will close, being 
converted into a department store. 

When the Orpheum Circuit takes pos- 
session of the Sam S. Bhubert in Kansas 
City, the present Orpheum will be discon- 
tinued as a vaudeville theatre. It is now 
said that John D. Hopkins is prominent in 
the Cincinnati coterie which takes pos- 
session of the Mary Anderson in Louisville. 

There is every prospect of a contest 
over the bookings of the American. Will- 
iam Morris' contract to book that house 
still holds good. In all probability the 
Columbia will give place to a department 
store, in which case the Orpheum book- 
ings will be transferred to the American. 

Mr. Morris said this week that he would 
prevent the American playing vaudeville 
booked by any other agency but his own. 



VARIETY 



CELLA DEAL NOW CLOSED. 

Kansas City, Jan. 3. 

A hitch in the deal bv which Loui8 Cel!a 
passes over the possession of the four 
Western vaudeville theatres controlled by 
the American Theatre Company, threatend 
until Wednesday to block the transaction 
entirely. . 

The local manager of the Sam S. Shu- 
bert here wa9 officially notified Friday 
night that the deal was off, but Wednes- 
day morning he received word that the 
program a# originally arranged would be 
put through and the same day the final 
papers were signed in New York between 
George Middleton, of Middleton & Tate, 
and Mr. Cella, which closed the affair. 
Meanwhile George Evans, who had jumped 
on here from Boston, and Mme. Emmy's 
Pets, which came from St. Louis, were not 
permitted to go on at the Shubert, where 
they had been routed by the Klaw & Er- 
langer staff. They reported for perform- 
ances, but the Oppenheimers refused to 
let them go on, on the ground that it was 
a return engagement at too short notice. 
When news reached here, however, of the 
closing of the transfer, they were admit- 
ted to the bill. 

George Middleton and Louis Cella were 
in New York from Friday until Tuesday. 
The clause in the sub-lease by which the 
American Company took over the K. & E. 
houses provided that only vaudeville 
should be played. When the new lessees 
noticed this, they immediately notified Mr. 
Cella that they could not take over his 
lease until this article had been stricken 
out. The vteit of Cella and Middleton to 
the "Advanced Vaudeville" headquarters 
was for the purpose of straightening out 
this detail. The business occupied only a 
few hours on Monday and Tuesday night 
they left for Chicago, the papers having 
been executed. 



QUESTION AFFILIATION AGREE- 
MENT. 

The question as to the force of the af- 
filiation agreement between the White 
Rats of America and the Variety Artistes 
Federation of England is again the subject 
of discussion by the Actors' Union. The 
latter organization contends that whereas 
the V. A. F. is associated with the British 
Trades Council, which in turn is represent- 
ed by fraternal delegates in the American 
Federation of Labor, of which the Actors' 
Union is a part, the English artists can as 
a union body affiliate only with the union 
body in this country, the White Rats hav- 
ing no official union connection. Resolu- 
tions to this effect were addressed last 
week by the Actors' Union to the British 
Trades Council. 



NC MORE BIG TYPE. 

The United Booking Offices managers 
are endeavoring to put in operation a 
scheme for doing away with the headline 
names on their advertising matter in an 
effort to educate the public to look for 
standard shows without depending on one 
or more acts to draw tha multitudes. 

They figure that the reduction in the 
size of the type in which the headline 
r*mes appear will proportionately reduce 
the salaries — or at least do away with 
any requests for increase of weekly wage. 
For many years this was the policy of 
the Keith circuit whenever possible and 
the plan f<>r its general adoption un- 
doubtedly emanates from that quarter. 



POLICE INTERFERE WITH "PASSION 

PLAY. 

Cleveland, Jan. 3. 

A platoon of policemen prevented the 
public from witnessing "The Passion 
Play," a moving picture series, at the 
Lyric (Sullivan-Considine) last Sunday. 

Inside the theatre the pictures were 
shown, but only the house staff viewed 
them. 

No arrests were made. Manager N. 
Hoyt Burnett, of the Lyric, pleaded with 
Chief of Police Kohler to be arrested, but 
the city guardian ignored him, instruct- 
ing the men of the law to inform every- 
bodv seeking admittance there would be 
no show. 

The public was not forcibly restrained 
from entering the Lyric, but in order to 
obtain admission it would have been nec- 
essary to shove three 190-pound police- 
men out of the theatre entrance. 

Mr. Burnett says he -will appeal to the 
courts. Chief Kohler replies if he has not 
the right to station his men in front of 
the theatre, they will be withdrawn, but 
the policy of "police repression" will be 
continued meanwhile. 



CLOSED ON SHORT NOTICE. 

Chicago, Jan. 3. 

Another instance of the seemingly never 
ending cancellation evil came to view a 
week ago when Manager CKeefe of the 
Grand, Madison, Wis., refused to play the 
acts booked for his house by William Mor- 
ris' Chicago office. 

He notified Arthur Fabish late on Sat- 
urday preceding the opening that he had 
booked another show through Henderson's 
Exchange. Fabish protested that the acts 
were bocked in good faith and not having 
had sufficient time to advise them, de- 
clared they would have to be played ac- 
cording to the agreement or he would take 
the matter into court. The manager was 
obdurate. 

The Morris acts reported for rehearsal 
but were not played, and Fabish, accom- 
panied by Attorney Thomas 8. Hogan, left 
for the Wisconsin town and instituted suit 
against the manager for breach of con- 
tract. The case will be heard in a few 
weeks. 



23D STREET OFFICE BUILDING. 

At last an explanation for the aban- 
donment of vaudeville at the Twenty- 
third Street Theatre is at hand. AH in- 
dications pointed to the fact that the 
house was doing a good business under 
direction of Harry Leonhardt. 

F. F. Proctor's lease of the house ex- 
pires on the fir,st of May, when the thea- 
tre is to be replaced by a modern office 
building, it is said. It has been deter- 
mined to divert the vaudeville patronage 
to the Fifth Avenue Theatre and permit 
the picture shows to pay the rental for 
the unexpired term of the lease. 

It is pointed out that it is not likely 
the owners of so valuable a piece of prop- 
erty would permit their theatre to de- 
teriorate to the extent of permitting a 
moving picture show to replace the pres- 
ent style of entertainment unless they 
contemplated devoting the property to 
other purposes in the immediate future. 



CANCELLED ACT STILL WORKING. 

Pittsburg, Jan. 3. 

"Cancelled, but still working" might be 
the billing for Lew Sully's monologue 
this week. Mr. Sully is at the Grand 
Opera House (Harry Davis). A short 
time ago while playing in a New England 
theatre under a Klaw & Erlanger con- 
tract, Mr. Sully was forced to close his 
engagement through illness. 

A clause in the K. & E. agreement 
specifically covers sickness. The clause 
was interpreted in Mr. Sully's case to 
give K. & E. an optional right on his 
further services. He was informed the 
contract was ended. 

A New York lawyer wrote Klaw & 
Erlanger, it is said, calling their atten- 
tion to the error made in attempting to 
cancel Mr. Sully. His engagement here 
is the result, and the blackface monologist 
will play out his K. & E. time on the 
United circuits. 



MUSIC PUBS. LEAVE CHICAGO. 

U was rumored in New York this week 
that early in January Jerome K. Remick 
Company wouhl discontinue its profes- 
sional department branch in Chicago, now 
under the management of Homer Howard. 
Mose Gumble, the New York professional 
manager, declared that such a move was 
under discussion, but said that it had not 
yet been decided upon definitely, although 
the Chicago branch would in all prob- 
ability be eliminated. Mr. Howard has 
not yet decided upon his plans for the 
future. 

Jos. W. Stern Company have also de- 
cided to eliminate the Chicago branch 
office. 

. Harry Werthen will continue to act as 
the Remick sales agent in Chicago when 
the firm gives up its professional de- 
partment there on Feb. 1. 



. HEARING ON COPYRIGHT BILL. 

Pretty much all the members of the 
Words and Music Club and many repre- 
sentatives of the big music publishers 
throughout the country are in Washington 
preparing next week to go before the 
Committee on Patents which is consider- 
ing two bills regulating the manufacture 
of mechanical musical instruments. 

Senator Kittridge's bill provides that it 
shall be a misdemeanor to make any 
record, roll or disk of a musical compo- 
sition without paying a royalty to the 
composer, while another measure, spon- 
sored by Senators Smoot and Currier, 
gives the manufacturers full scope for the 
theft of such property. 

Charles K. Harris had an audience with 
Chairman Smoot of the Committee yester- 
day and put before him the music pub- 
lishers' and composers' side of the ques- 
tion. The copyright bill comes up some 
time in January. 



Lyons and Parks, formerly of Gus Ed- 
wards' "Rube Kids," are booked on the 
Keith & Proctor circuit for the rest of the 
winter. 



OFFERED MONEY BACK. 

Johnstown, Pa., Jan. 3. 

On account of the non-appearance of one 
act on the bill the management of the 
Majestic Theatre here announced that any 
person in the audience who was dissatis- 
fied with the show could have his money 
back. 

Louis B. Madden, of Madden, Fitzpat- 
rick and Company, the headliners, was 
taken sick late last week and they did not 
appear Monday. No one took advantage 
of the offer. 



IT'S UP TO "MYSTICUS." 

Hymack, who claims to be the origi- 
nator of the change act which was shown 
in America by one "Myotic" (or "Mysti- 
cus"), made his American debut at the 
Orpheum, Brooklyn, last Monday, and was 
viewed there by George M. Young, Va- 
kiety's representative in Philadelphia, 
who also reviewed the so-called "copy" 
act when it appeared at the Chestnut 
Street Opera House, Philadelphia. 

In speaking to Variety's representative 
at the theatre, Mr. Hymack said: "All 
that I know regarding the appearance of 
'Mystic' in America I read in Variety. 
It was n«>t hin* strange to me that this 
man was doing a copy of my act, for he 

did it in England before he came here. 
The per.son who calls himself 'Mystic' ap- 
peared in several halls in England, being 
billed at the Bedford as 'McWerne.' When 
he first appeared he was announcing the 
act as an imitation of mine, but later did 
the act boldly and claimed to be the orig- 
inal. I am the original, and can furnish 
plenty of proof and affidavits if neces- 
sary. 

In England I called upon his agents 
and demanded that he be stopped, threat- 
ening suit. I later made up my mind to 
allow him to go ahead, as his act was such 
a poor copy that I felt that the reaction 
would make itself felt, and later when I 
heard from America that the 'White 
Rats' had taken hold of the matter, I 
made no further move." 

When Hymack's attention was called 
to the letter from "Mysticus" which was 
printed in Variety on Dec. 21, Hymack 
said: "Any statement to the effect that 
the matter had been healed between us, 
or that there was any understanding be- 
tween us, is absolutely false. The real 
name of 'Mysticus' is Granville Malvern, 
and he is well known in England as pro- 
ducing a copy of my act.". 

At the time "Mysticus" played in Phila- 
delphia, Percy Williams held a contract 
for the appearance of the original in 
America. Klaw & Erlanger were made 
aware of the situation at that time 
through Variety's statement that it was 
a deliberate copy act. "Mystic" was billed 
to appear as a big feature on the K. & E. 
bills, but after his debut in Philadelphia 
he gradually disappeared. In his letter to 
Variety, Dec. 21, "Mysticus" stated that 
he intended to remain in America until 
Hymack's arrival to have the matter set- 
tled. Hymack declares he will gladly 
prove his claims. 



BIG BILLS IN "POP" HOUSES. 

San Francisco, Jan. 3. 

The battle between the Acme (S.-C.) 
and the Grand (Western States), Sacra- 
mento, waxes warmer. 

The Western people have followed the 
Acme's lead by the introduction of a 
stock company in conjunction with their 
vaudeville olio. 

Gus Leonard is at the Grand pitted 
against James Post, who produces at the 
Acme. Even figuring on capacity houses 
neither place would show much of a mar- 
gin, and it looks like a fight to a finish. 
A well informed showman estimates the 
opposing bills for week Dec. 23', Acme, 
$1,700; Grand, $1,900. The range of prices 
at both houses is 15, 25. 



VARIETY 



Akiety 

A Variety Paper for Variety People. 

Published every Saturday by 
THE VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
1102 Broadway, New York City. 



Telephone 



/ 4022 1 
\ 4023 J 



3Sth St. 



SIME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 22, 
190. r >, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., 
under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

CHICAGO OFFICE,^ 
Chicago Opera House Block 
(Phone, Main 4380). 
FRANK WIESBERO, Representative. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

1115 Van Ness Ave. (Room 112). 

W. ALFRED WILSON, Representative. 

LONDON REPRESENTATIVE, 

C. C. BARTRAM, 

49 Rupert St., W. 



PARIS REPRESENTATIVE, 
0. M. SEIBT. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 

13 cents an agate line, $2.10 an Inch. One 
page, $100; one-half page, $30; one-quarter page, 
$23. 

Charges for portraits furnished on application. 

Special rate by the month for professional card 
under heading "Representative Artists." 

Advertising copy should be received by Thurs- 
day at noon to Insure publication in current issue. 



COUNCIL $ 89 




SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

Annual ? » 

Foreign 3 

Six and three months In proportion. 
Single copies ten cents. 

VARIETY will be mailed to a permanent ad- 
dress or as per route as desired. 

VARIETY may be had abroad at 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS CO.'S OFFICES 

Breams Building, Chancery Lane, 

LONDON, E. C, ENGLAND. 

Advertisements forwarded by mall must be ac- 
companied by remittance, made payable to Varletv 
Publishing Co. 

Copy r I ght. 1907, by Variety Publishing Co. 



Vol. IX. 



JANUARY 4. 



No. 4. 



Alice Mngill, of Walker and Magill, is 
seriously ill in New York with throat 
trouble. 



George Homans' "Country Kids" are to 
i pen on the Western States Association 
Jan. 13 for 20 weeks. 

Steed's Pantomime sailed from London 
Dec. 23 on the Patricia. They open Dec 
• '• and play on the Orpheum Circuit until 
dune. 

The Majestic opened at Ann Arbor. 
Mich,, this week. The Chicago oflice of 
the William Morris agency will furnish 
attractions. 



James L. Lederer hns taken a lease of 
the Howard Theatre, Chicago, and proposes 
to conduct it ns a popular juiced vaude- 
ville house. 



Arnold Melds, of the Fields Hoys, has 
leeovered from his recent illness and will 
rejoin the act Jan. 5 at the Kitty eighth 
Street 'I heat re. 

I». Obermayer, the foreign booking agent, 
and American representative for SoQiera 



& Warner, sails for England in April, to 
be gone all summer. 

Georgine Brandon, leading woman of the 
"Rentz-Santley" Company, received a sil- 
ver-mounted toilet set as a Christinas gift 
from the chorus girls of that organization. 



Morris Alburtus, of Alburtus and Jessie 
Millar, has recovered from a serious illness, 
and the pair opened on the Stoll tour Dec. 
9 at the Olympia, Liverpool, England. 



Louis Grenner, manager and lessee of 
the Asbury Park Opera House, has sold 
his interest in the establishment to a na- 
tive named Brady. Mr. Grenner is out of 
it entirely. 



The vaudeville act formerly known as 
Allen and Mueller Company, playing "The 
Haunted Cave," will hereafter be billed as 
the A. I). Allen Company in "A Visit of 
the Spirit*. 



Edward Wuilf, a foreign rider, opened 
at the Hippodrome last week. He did not 
appear Monday night owing to the delay 
in the landing of the Steamship "Mesaba," 
on which he arrived. 

Max Hart, general booking representa- 
tive for the Jesse L. Lasky attractions, has 
l>oen notified by the United Hooking Offices' 
folks that he must not handle outside acts 
on penalty of exclusion. 



The building at 1340 Pacific avenue. Ta- 
coma, Washington, will be remodeled for 

a vaudeville theatre. A. O. Sherman has 
the plans and it is likely that he will be 
the manager of the new place. 

The Musical Simpsons open at the Em- 
pire, San Francisco, shortly, for 20 weeks 
on the Western Vaudeville Association 
time, beii'g booked by Louis Pineus. 



Fred Rivenhall, an Australian comedy 
singer, who has been appearing in vaude- 
ville the past season, has been engaged by 
Charles Frohman for an Important role in 
"The Little Cherub." replacing Will II. 
West. 



Llewelyn Johns, who is now the per- 
manent American representative for the 
Mi»s & Stoll circuit, is due to arrive 
here today, after a couple of months' visit 
to England for consultation with his 
principals. 



Joseph S. Nathan, for the pist three 
years connected with Leo Feist, has once 
more opened a publishing house of his 
own. doe tried it before for ;« few 
months but eventually sold his catalogue 
to Feist. 

Arthur Vule, assisted by Allie Simpson, 
will show a new sketch at Pastor's week 
of Jan. 0. Paul Wolff, the new booking 
representative of the Empire Circuit (West- 
ern Burlesque Wheel >, secured the en- 
gagement. 



With all the unsatisfactory Imixjiic.hh of 
the vaudeville houses in New York la«>1 
Sunday Archie L. Shep.ird's "advanced 
vaudeville" moving picture -how at the 

old Manhattan Theatre turned crowds of 
people away. 



At the close of last week in Philadelphia 
George Fuller Golden was again compelled 
to postpone all his present engagements 
indefinitely, through illness, and he and 
his wife have returned to their home in 
Saranac Lake. 

Charles T. Aldrich, now on a vaude- 
ville tour of Europe, will return to 
America in time to start out next season 
under the management of Al. H. Woods 
in a new melodrama called "Secret Ser- 
vice Sam Abroad." » 

Following this week's engagement in 
Brooklynj the Dunedin Troupe of bicy- 
clists start on the Orpheum Circuit. Upon 
the completion of that time they will 
sail for England June 8, playing 30 weeks 
on the Moss-Stoll tour. 

■ — ■ — 

Leo Feist, who has been confined to 
his home for the past three months and 
undergone a series of operations that ne- 
cessitated the removal of a portion of 
his jaw-bone, is now reported to be 
rapidly on the mend. 

William Morris recently made Cecelia 
Loft us an offer to play his Springfield and 
Worcester houses on a percentage basis, but 
the mimic declined, stating that her services 
were at the disposal of anyone who cared 
to pay $1,500 for them. Miss Lot'tus 
underwent an operation for appendicitis 
this week in New York and will not be 
able to appear for some time. 

The Original Colibri, Hungarian midget 
handcuff expert, played his first Ameri- 
can date nt the London Monday afternoon 
as a tiyont. Colibri is less than o*C inches 
: n height. He is *_'.*{ years old and is ac- 
companied by li is parents. 

Pali Patter, the ••boost" paper issued by 
Manager Harry A. Bailey in the interests 
of Poll's Hart foul, got out a special Christ- 
inas edition printed on green paper and 
with an interesting symposium of the sea- 
son's greetings from artists. 



tion for this week, ami is now confined to 
his bed. 



The Olympic, Brooklyn (Eastern Bur- 
lesque Wheel), started a series of Sunday 
night concerts this week. The house has 
been one of the few which remained dark 
during the seventh day. Sunday's was 
the first Sabbath performance in the house 
in several years. 



Joe Bernstein and "Kid" Griffo, the 
pugilists, have been booked for an in- 
definite engagement with ''The High School 
Girl.s" burlesque show. They open ns the 
added attraction at the Star, Toronto, 
Jan. 27, and remain with the same organi- 
ze tion on the road. 



Announcement is made of the marriage 
of Mabel Ferguson to Bert Hall, a Boston 
business man. The ceremony took place in 
Boston, Nov. 30, the Key. Mr. Earl offici- 
ating. Miss Ferguson is leading woman 
with "The Blue Cadets" Company. 



Daisy Leon, formerly at the head of 
Gun Edwards' "Schoolboys and Girls," 
las replaced Eulalie Young in Jos. Hart's 
• Tolly Pickle's Pets in Pel land." which is 
n«»w headed for the Pacific Coast. Miss 
Leon will rot return to New York until 
May I. 



Maysville. Ivy., Jan. .'{. 
John Hiiulev. of Hauley and Leslie, 
who bii.s been visiting relatives in this 
city the past few weeks, was run down 
b\ a vehicle in VYe*I Second Street mid 
received most painful injuries. Besides 
ether bruises, hi* right car w is almost 
torn oil". 

doe Mitehel!. of Ollitlll MIm| Miti'eli. 

fini-licd la-t week at Keith's. Cleveland. 
with ;i physician in attendance upon him 
during performances, (in Saturday night 
he was forced to give notice of eaneella- 



Hanvey and Clark, after closing with 
"The Girl From Happyland" Company, 
have added unto themselves a third mem- 
ber, Stephen Prideau, formerly tenor with 
tie Trocadero Quartet, and are now doing 
a singing act called "The Boys Who Can 
Sing." They are now playing on Western 
Vaudeville Association time. 



Tioja, the singer, who has been a feature 
of one of the Western Wheel burlesque 
shows, has received an offer from the Sul- 
livan-Considine people for sixteen weeks' 
contracts beginning Feb. 10. A difference 
of opinion as to salary remains to be set- 
tled before the contracts are closed. 



Genaro and Bailey are playing their first 
New York date at the Metropolis this 
week as stars in "Tony, the Bootblack 
Detective," under the management of Al. 
H. Woods. The Monday matinee estab- 
lished a new high record for the house, 
2,000 pet sons witnessing the performance, 

Lily Flexmore, the English singer and 
dancer, arrived last week on the White 
Star liner Adriatic, going directly to Chi- 
cago, where she made her American debut 
at the Auditorium. Whit Cunliffe, Harry 
Mountford, Nellie Wallace and other Eng- 
lish artists were passengers on the same 
ship. 



Ben Beyer and Brother claim to have 
established a record for playing Sunday 
dates in New York and mnking out-of-town 
stands. They appeared in Newark, N. J., 
jumped from there to play a club date in 
New York and took a train for Auburn, 
N. Y., at 1J :20, playing the Monday mati- 
nee there. 



Cliff Gordon. Julian Pose, Eddie Clark, 
Louis Katz. Charles Wilshire, Fred Barnes 
and a host of other vaudeville and general 
theatrical folk celebrated the coming of 
the new year with a banquet in the Col- 
lege Inn. Chicago, Other banquets were 
given at Rector's, where Abe Frank, for- 
merly manager of the Inn. has just taken 
charge. • 

Charles J. Carter, the illusionist, i.s now 
playing Australia with his own company, 
being beaded westward on a tour of the 
world. Tli" organization is scheduled for 
:i seven months' stay in Australasia, after- 
ward playing the Philippines, Japan, 
China. India. Egypt, franco, England, and 
I hence back to America. The show opened 
in Sydney Nov. 10 to capacity business. 
In the company are Allen Shaw, magician. 
:md Abigail Price, mind reader and thought 
transference export. 



VARIETY 



BIG BURLESQUE BUSINESS. 

The extremely bad business done re- 
eently by the legitimate attractions on the 
road give special point to the statement 
of an experienced showman that the bur- 
lesque theatres in the country are play- 
ing to as large or larger receipts on the 
average than was the ca,se at this time 
last year. 

A dispatch to Variety yesterday report- 
ed the statement of Pedley & Birch, oper- 
ating about twenty houses in the West, 
that 125 legitimate attractions had can- 
celled their time on account of unprofit- 
able business. 

On the other hand, a statement of the 
business of the fifteen theatres controlled 
by the Columbia Amusement Company 
(Eastern Burlesque Wheel) for the four 
weeks ending Dec. 30 recently drawn up, 
shows an improvement of $8,000. As a 
comment upon the theatrical situation it 
i* here Rhown with comparative figures 
for the same period in 1900. 

1900. 1907. 

Cleveland $10,807.40 $12,582.00 

Philadelphia (Casino) 13,503.10 14,106.35 

Cincinnati 13,670.05 13,015.80 

Indianapolis 6,801.80 0,790.95 

Buffalo 7,758.50 9,994.30 

Birmingham 7,934.10 7,671.65 

Albany 7,741.10 8,951.95 

New Orleans 13,010.85 13,585.70 

Kansas City 9,256.45 9,160.40 

Toledo 9,473.90 8,519.50 

Detroit 11,666.60 10,723.60 

St. Louis 19,075.90 18,444.35 

Chicago (Troc.) 12,938.50 13,309.30 

New York (Mur. H'l) 8,676.3t) 12,732.05 
Baltimore 16,559.60 17,195.05 

In favor of 1907, $7,908.80. 

A considerable portion of this total, it 
will be noticed, is made up of gains at 
the Murray Hill Theatre, New York, and 
in Cleveland where the house is under 
new management. 



NEW BURLESQUE STAND. 

By arrangement with Walter J. Plim- 
mer, Harry Martell's "High School Girls" 
(Western Burlesque Wheel) will spend 
the first three days of next week in Ches- 
ter, Pa., playing Thomas Hargfeaves' 
Grand Opera House. 

The latter establishment was without 
an attraction for those days ana booked 
in the burlesque organization as an ex- 
periment. If the trial is successful it is 
possible that Chester will become an op- 
tional stand preceding the Scranton half- 
week, on the return date. The Martcll 
show goes in on a guarantee. 



STOPPING "WINDOW ADVERTISING." 

Washington, Jan. 3. 
The theatrical managers of Washington 
and Baltimore have come to an agree- 
ment to eliminate all store window ad- 
vertising beginning with the New Year. 
This sort of advertising has been paid for 
in free admissions. Several of the man- 
agers figured out that on an average this 
proceeding was expensive out of all pro- 
portion to the benefit derived. 



STAR AND GARTER OPENS 19. 

Chicago, Jan. 3. 
The Star and Garter, Hyde & Behman's 
new burlesque house (Eastern Wheel) is 
reported as being scheduled for opening 
Jan. 19 with Sam Seribner's Big Show 
as the attraction. It is probable that 
vaudeville will run in conjunction with 
the burlesque after the manner of the 
Howard in Boston, Mass. N. J. Herman, 
advertising representative of the Chicago 
Opera House, will manage the property 
for llvde & Behman. 



ARTIST ORGANIZES OWN SHOW. 

Will Morrow, of the vaudeville team of 
Morrow & Schellberg, one of the many 
acts that was cast out when the recent 
merger went into effect, is organizing a 
traveling organization to while away the 
idle hour* pending the call of the St.^ 
James building. 



ELECTRA READY FEB. 3. 

Schenectady, N. Y., Jan. 3. 

It is promised that the New Electra, the 
Western Burlesque Theatre now building 
here, will be opened Feb. ?, the attraction 
for the opening week having been already 
selected. 

Since Mrs. Barry, of Albany, retired to 
a subordinate place in the promoting of 
the enterprise, building operations have 
progressed rapidly. The theatre is now 
held by the Empire Theatre Company of 
Schenectady, with stock held by a coterie 
of Western Wheel managers, including 
Mrs. Barry. 



HASTINGS STARTS. 

The new burlesque show, under the 
management of Harry Hastings, organized 
to play one night and independent stands, 
will play its first engagement at Orange, 
N. J., Monday. 

The show, entitled "The French Maids," 
will play three days in Orange, finishing 
the week with a series of one-night stands 
in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 



HILL AND WHITAKER. 

Hill and Whitaker's portraits are 
shown on the cover of this week's issue 
of Variety. The pair have just returned 
from England, and are now playing the 
United Booking Oilice's time, under the 
booking direction of Jenie Jacobs. Their 
American engagements will keep them oc- 
cupied until June, when they will return 
to the other side for an extensive tour 
over the Moss-Stoll time. This will keep 
them busy during season of 1908-09. 

A special feature of the team's vaude- 
ville offering is the lavish wardrobe of 
Mis,s Whitaker. 



SISTERS TO SUE FOR SALARY. 

Although the Murray Sisters are laying 
off this week, they hope ultimately to 
recover their salary. To this end they 
are journeying daily to Yonkers and re- 
porting for each performance at the 
Orpheum Theatre. 

In this way they intend to fulfil a con- 
tract made with Henry Myers when he 
owned and conducted the Doric, Yonkers. 
Some months ago he booked a big show 
for the holidays. When the house passed 
to the control of Jesse Lasky, the Mur- 
ray Sisters and another act were notified 
that they had been cancelled. The Sisters 
say no good reason for this action was 
given. 

Upon advice of their agent, Albert 
Sutherland, they will institute a law suit 
to recover the amount of the agreement 
with Myers. 

Coleman, the foreign act which is to 
open at the Hippodrome week after next, 
pails on the steamer La Lorraine to-day. 



BEHMAN SHOW'S BIG BUSINESS. 

The Behman Show, under the manage- 
ment of Jack Singer, continues to do phe- 
nomenal business on the Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel. Records have been broken in a 
number of houses since the season opened, 
and at this writing the production has prac- 
tically paid for itself. This is particularly 
significant in view of the fact that the in- 
vestment totaled $10,000, the ordinary cost 
of two or three burlesque shows. 

Last week in Pittsburg the gross was 
around $7,000, establishing a new record 
at the Eastern Burlesque Wheel house 
there for a single matinee and night per- 
formance, playing to $2,253.35 on Christ- 
mas Day. This was in the face of un- 
usually strong opposition. The Behman 
Show carries no extra attraction. 

Even during the hoodoo ante-Christmas 
week the show piled up a gross of $4,457 
in Washington, a surprise even to the 
managers. Up to the first of the year the 
show has averaged $3,000 a week and the 
profits up to the Washington week repre- 
sented $0,400. 



MONTREAL'S OPENING NEXT SEA- 
SON. 

The new Eastern Burlesque Wheel the- 
atre, at present building in Montreal, 
Canada, will not open for business before 
next September. 

By rushing the operations a late open- 
ing date could be settled upon before the 
end of the present season. It is thought 
inadvisable to expedite matters, however, 
and the idea of having a Montreal date 
jtflixed to the Eastern schedule before 
1008-1900 has been abandoned. 

PUT SCOTT ON THE GRILL. 

Harry Scott, manager of the Family 
Theatre, Pittston, Pa., received a hurry 
call from back stage Christmas Day, a 
breathless stage hand announcing that the 
players on the bill were in revolt. Scott 
had ordered an extra performance, and 
fearing that the artists had refused to go 
on, hurried back. * 

The players met him with angry looks 
and protested with one voice that they 
would not work four shows, there being no 
such stipulation in their contracts. While 
Scott was still in a paroxysm of pleading, 
Hindu Yogi announced that lie was chair- 
man and commissioned to act for the rest. 
He then handed Scott this statement of 
the strikers' demands and grievances: ' 

We chanced to be at Pittston, 
We're there on Christinas Day; 

They sprung an extra show on us, 
But sprung no extra pay. 

Canard, who did contortion stuff, 

And Doherty's little dogs; 
And Helen Murry's singing act. 

Whose notes jump out like frogs; 

The Bragdons in their novel act, 

Are clever, also neat, 
And Hismor with his Hindoo stunt, 

And Aza really sweet — 

Well, we all put up a job on Scott, 

To send him in the air, 
By saying we would not work a show, 

We had poor Scott for fair. 

lint "Merry Christmas" is the word 

To Mr. Scott and wife; 
We hope success and happiness 

Will he with them through life. 



SOME BURLESQUE FIGURES. 

Christmas week business on both bur- 
lesque wheels was unusually big. In 
Washington Al Reeves' Beauty Show 
rolled up a total of $5,600 on the week, 
establishing a new record for the house, 
while Fred Irwin's Big Show did in the 
neighborhood of $0,000, exceeding the best 
previous figure by a trifle over $200. 

The Eastern Wheel manager declared 
that the Transatlantics did $4,000 in 
Waldman's, Newark, N. J., pointing out 
that opposition has not afTected the busi- 
ness there, although the Western Wheel 
theatre, newly opened to burlesque 
(Shubert) was well patronized. 



"MERRY WIDOW" IN BURLESQUE. 

Both burlesque wheels will have on 
their circuit a "Merry Widow" company 
for next season, despite the announce- 
ment of vigorous prosecution on the part 
of Henry W. Savage. All proclamations 
to the contrary, the music is not copy- 
righted and anyone who cares to may 
produce an adaptation from the original 
in America. 



ARTISTS AID MINE SUFFERERS. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Jan. 3. 

•'Jack" Singer, manager of "The Beh- 
man Show" (Eastern Burlesque Wheel), 
turned over $:?45 to the managers of the 
big benefit held here last week in aid of 
the Darr Mine sufferers. James C Mor- 
ton and Frank Moore, members of the 
Singer company, dressed as "the scarecrow" 
and "woodman." went through the streets 
of Pittsburg acorn panied by Mr. Singer. 

They did their specialty while Mr. Singer 
went through the crowds with a hat. 
James Rosen, of "Buster Brown" Com- 
pany, and Williams and Walker likewise 
made collections, while the girls of "The 
Follies of 1007" sold tickets and flowers in 
the streets. The theatrical people turned 
a large amount of money into the fund by 
this means. 



WANT LOWER RAILROAD RATES. 

The National Producing Managers' As- 
sociation, which was formed a week ago, 
was in session yesterday at the Hotel 
Astor. The members considered certain 
measures in reference to the bettering of 
railroad conditions in the South, where 
the party rate was recently abolished and 
where now traveling companies are com- 
pelled to pay full fares. 

The association met on Friday and 
framed up a program for yesterday's con- 
ference. Sam Seribner represented the 
burlesque interests in the association, 
while Qua T Til 1 appeared for the popular- 
priced producers. The burlesque managers 
of the Eastern Wheel are among those 
most seriously afTected by the high rates 
in the south, owing to the necessity for 
long jumps to and from New Orleans, 
where Greenwall's Theatre is one of their 
stands. 

The legitimate managers are also repre- 
sented in the association, among the num- 
ber being Klaw & Erlanger, the Shubert s, 
Henry W. Savage and William A. Brady. 

The differential rates favoring theat- 
ricil companies were abolished last, 
spring by the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission and it is not easy to see what 
real good the association can do along 
this line. 



VARIETY 






LEO CARRILLO'S CARTOON OF THE WEEK 



• 



f /»GAlM I 









ON THE JOB 



OPPOSITION SPLITTING BUSINESS. 

A burlesque man in speaking of the con- 
ditions between the opposing burlesque 
wheels (Western and Eastern) said the 
other day: 

"The opposition seems to be splitting up 
the business in most citie,s. In Washing- 
ton the New Gayety (Eastern) is doing 
extremely well, but there has been no 
complaint from Neman's Lyceum (West- 
ern). 

'"In Seranton, a town probably too small 
for both opposition houses to do average 
business, the patronage has been split up 
to surh :>n extent that it is snid neither 
the Gayety (Eastern )nor Star (Western) 
is milking a profit at present, although it is 
generally understood the Star is receiv- 
ing the greater share of burlesque patron* 
Rge there. 

"The Empire Circuit is reported to have 
made an ofTcr to purchase the Eastern 
house in Seranton, as the Star will have 
to he rebuilt next spring, and the ofTer 
mav be under consideration bv the Colum- 

• * 

bia Amusement Company. Unless a new 
theatre is erected to compete with the 



modern house of the Eastern Wheel, the 
latter will unquestionably draw away the 

I * % 

business in time. 

"No one places much faith in the an- 
nouncement that the Eastern will invest 
money in St. Paul and Duluth. Business 
in both cities is not up to the mark, even 
now, without opposition. 

"By the opening of next season, ljoth 
Wheels will have three houses each in Chi- 
cago, and the same number will be play- 
ing in Brooklyn. 

"In Newark since the Western played 
the Empire (ShUbert) patronage lias been 
Wonderfully good, hurting Waldman's 
(Eastern) accordingly. 

"Next season the Western expects to 
have a house in Rochester, and the busi- 
ness will be split up in that city. The 
same condition will probably result in 
Paterson. Sam Scribner, Gus Hill and J. 
Herbert Mack were over there last week, 
and are about to close for a site for an 
Eastern theatre. It is located near the 
Grand Opera House. A model theatre in 
Paterson will out-class the present Bijou 
(Western) 



"The Bon-Ton (Western), Jersey City, 
has been affected by the picture shows 
and the cheap prices of the Keith-Proctor 
vaudeville house, while in New York City 
the greatest loss of business has been suf- 
fered by the Dewey and Gotham, two Sul- 
livan & Klaus' houses (Western). The 
loss in comparison with last season is said 
to be 40 per cent., caused in part by the 
speculators who are allowed in the lobby of 
each theatre, charging an advance for 
seats. 

"This has caused Harlem people to leave 
the Gotham for the opposition on the 
west side of 125th street, while the Dewey 
has sent its loss of business to the Bow- 
civ houses. 

'Til two years from now, when the lease 
of the Academy of Music. Pittsburg, ex- 
pires, the Williams estate intends putting 
Up a new house for burlesque. 

"The new Western houses in Schenectady 
and Wilkes Barre are due to be finished in 
four weeks. Neither city holds an opposi- 
tion theatre. 

"It is a possibility that the Western at- 
tractions will erase Kvansville, Ind., from 



the route as a 'lay-off stand, finding 
either some other city or Maying off' alto- 
gether, and they will eventually stop over 
in Terre Haute for a Sunday perform- 
ance alone, instead of remaining there 
three days, as at present." 



On Monday night last Louis Pincus 
was scheduled to furnish talent for a 
private entertainment of the Empire 
City ( ha {iter, one of the local masonic 
lodges. The bill announced was as fol- 
lows: Tied Xib!o. Cerritv Sisters, Duffy 
and Saw telle. Taseott, Werner and Wer- 
ner. Avery and ( I rant, and Kinpire City 
Quartette. On the bottom <>f the p»* > 
grannie 1 WflS'n line leading: 'This pro- 
gramme subject to change." The show 
actually furnished was: Cogan and Ban- 
croft, Kaiherinc Miiey, Swift and Buck- 
lev, Prank Maltese and Harry Thompson. 



Manager S. R. Simon, of the Gayety 
Theatre, Milwaukee (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) « tendered a Christmas banquet to 
the house stalT and members of Hobie's 
"Knickerbockers" last week. 



8 



. 



VARIETY 



ARTISTS' FORUM 

Confine your letters to 150 worde end write on one side of peper only. 
Anonymous communications will not be printed. Name of writer must be signed and will 
be beld In strict confidence. If desired. 



Philadelphia, Dec. 25, liK)7. 
Dear Sirae : 

Being Christmas Day I address you 
familiarly, knowing full well such action 
breeds contempt, though that contempt 
emanates from me. 

I am sending by same post a copy of 
the world's greatest variety paper, "The 
Era," wherein you will see I reproduce a 
copy of your well conceived criticism (?), 
my one object being that ehould the cir- 
culation of your paper fail to have reached 
all whom you des'red it to (my friends 
being far greater than yours) the "Era" 
would reach them quicker and have far 
more effect, hence I have given your re- 
marks the most prominent position in my 
advertisement. 

In conclusion let me remind you that 
"criticism is wholesome," at least for the 
critics, as it helps to relieve the pains of 
journalistic dyspepsia. 

Yours with kind thoughts, 

Marie Lloyd. 

P. S. — My sister Alice arid Tom Mc- 
Naughton send their love. 

(We do not know whether the above let- 
ter was written us for publication. It is 
printed, however, as it relates to criticisms 
of Miss Lloyd's work on the stage. We 
have been informed that either Miss Lloyd 
or her husband, Alec Hurley, has said the 
unfavorable reviews were printed because 
Miss Lloyd did not advertise in Variety. 
We were also informed by a prominent 
manager that, as Miss Lloyd was the most 
popular artiste among the artists in Eng- 
.land, it was poor business policy for us 
to remark adversely upon her act. We 
have printed many times of Miss Lloyd's 
popularity, and if she desires to join her 
private with her professional life, as evi- 
denced by the offense shown in the fore- 
going letter over the criticisms, that is a 
matter entirely for her to decide. 

There were other causes attributed by 
Miss Lloyd or her husband also for the 
reviews in VAFaKTY. What we have been 
told, while absolutely without foundation, 
is entirely too personal to publish. We 
have no idea of the significance of Miss 
Lloyd's "P. S." It is possibly added to 
the letter as a biting bit of sarcasm which 
does not sting. 

The advertisement Miss Lloyd refers to 
as appearing in the London "Era" of Pec. 
7 is headed "A Few Press Notices of Marie 
Lloyd. See what Alan Dale, Acton Da- 
vies, Ashton Stevens and Variety sny, and 
compare them." 

The advertisement is headed by Hush's 
review of Miss Lloyd at the Colonial, ap- 
pearing in Vaiuety of Oct. 12. — Ed.) 



Melbourne, Australia, Nov. 23, 1907. 
Editor Variety : 

Just a few lines from far off Australia 
to register a little complaint and warn 
artistes coming to Australia to Ix'ware of 
a certain theatrical paper in Sydney which 
has the habit of placing the imported art- 
istes' adverts in its columns, without the 
artistes' permission or consent. If the 
payment is not forthcoming the results am 
disagreeable. This has been going on for 
sonic time. 

We are now in our 11th week for Mr. 



Riekards, and so far have had one of the 
grandest! engagement! an artiste rould 
wish. From Mr. Riekards himself down, 
the management seems to take a real de- 
light in making the performer feel at home 
and comfortable, and they succeed. The 
engagement is one big holiday. 

Any artiste coming down here would 
drop us a line we shall only be too happv 
to g|ve them any information they may 
desire. Hayman ami Franklin. 



Dec. 25, 1007. 
Dear Varikty : 

The criticism by "Dash" of The Great 
Richards act, Dec. IT), at Kee"fley*s, reflects 
upon me, the electrician of the act. For 
the past seven years I have given this 
portion of the act my whole attention, and 
some critics have said through their papers 
that the light effects were little short of 
marvelous. So if your reviewer will con- 
descend to explain why or how the act 
suffered severely through improper han- 
dling of the lights, I assure you it will be 
greatly appreciated. 

Chas. J. Shay, 
Electrician for The Great Richards. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Dec. 2S. 
Editor Variety : 

Irresponsible Louie Dacre is responsible 
for the continuous rhyme press matter as 
printed in the issue of Variety Dec 28 
and used by Chas. E. Taylor's "Parisian 
Relies" Company. 

Chas. E. Taylor, 
Mgr. "Parisian Belles." 



Oxford, Mass., Dec. 22, 1007. 
Editor Variety : 

As a subscriber and constant reader of 
your paper I noticed under the Artists' 
Forum a communication from "No. 7503," 
Dannemora Prison. I have written him 
and am al.so sending a set of mandolin 
strings, professional copies of mandolin 
music and the Christinas number of Va- 
riety. 

I have an idea he has been in the pro- 
fession some time in his life. 

Blanch G. Lynne, 
Representing Cox and Reich. 



Philadelphia, Jan. 2. 
Editor Variety: 

In answer to the letter from Billy 

a 

Stanford, printed in Variety last week, 
in which he states that while the article 
written by me for the anniversary num- 
ber of Variety was correct so far as he 
remembered, I had forgotten a number of 
acts which were well known twenty 
years ago, I would like to reply that it 
was not my intention to name all the 
acts I remembered, for space would not 
permit it. I do remember Alice Cilmore, 
Charlei Diamond, the harpist; Manchester 
and Jennings and one or two others 
among the list he names, but I simply 
used those which came to my mind at the 
time of writing and which gave me my 
first impressions of vaudeville. As I was 
only a boy twenty-five years ago, I can 
hardly claim to remember many of the 
"old school" artists who antedated that 
time. George M. Young. 



ANOTHER K.-P. PICTURE SHOW? 

Klizalx'th, N. J., Jan. :*. 

A seeminylv well founded minor is in 

circulation here that F. F. Poctor's local 

vaudeville theatre is about to be turned 

into a picture show house, following the 

lead of the Twenty third Street in New 
York. A newspaper article printed this 
week even hints that Mr. Proctor may 
give the enterprise up altogether owing 
to his dissatisfaction with earnings. The 
local manager, F. VV. Lloyd, denies this. 

Last week there were only five acts on 
the bill and these were brought over from 
the early end of the Union Square Thea- 
tre, New York, the week previous. There 
seems to be a disposition on the part of 
the booking manager to economize in the 
selection of bills for Elizabeth. 

UNION AND K0N0RAH AT ODDS. 

There has been an exchange of tart cor- 
respondence between Max Berol-Konorah 
and Harry DeVeaux, of the Actors' Union, 
over the latter's address to the New York 
Central Federation of Labor in which he 
severely criticized the Internationale Ar- 
tisten Loge for its alleged threat to ad- 
dress a petition to the governor of New 
York State setting forth its objection to 
Sunday performances. 

Mr. Konorah declared that the interna- 
tional body, of which he is president, had 
no such intention, but pointed out that 
even if the report had been true, Mr. 
DeVeattx's point that such an action would 
be unwarrantable interference with Ameri- 
can artists, was not well taken, inasmuch 
as the Artisten Loge numbered 200 Ameri- 
cans in its membership. 

In return DeVeaux retorted rather 
sharply that any independent action by 
the European organization aimed at the 
correcting of American theatrical condi- 
tions would be considered as interference 
unless the union were fully advised in ad- 
vance of such a move and consulted as to 
its advisability. 



BURNED ON EVE OF REOPENING. 

San Francisco, Tan 3. 

Tarrytown-on-the-Pike, the vaudeville 

house, which was to have reopened Dec. 

23 at Long Beach, Cal.. is a smouldering 

ruin, having been gutted by fi r e which 

originated mysteriously and spread rapidly 
between 3 and 4 o'clock on the morning 
of Dec. 22. An alarm was turned in 
promptly, bit the fire had already gained a 
start which could not be checked. 

Mr. Ralph Chand'er, secretary of the 
Long Beach Recreation Company, which 
owns Tarrytown, this morning estimated 
the loss at about $20,000. There was no 
insurance, a rate of $7.75 being demanded. 
The place was to have been run in con- 
nection with the Western States Circuit. 

Booth and Cordon, bicycle r\ct, saved 
enough of their paraphernalia to do their 
net at another local house the same even- 
in" 



PLAN ANOTHER FOR CHICAGO. 

Chicago, Jan. 3. 
Jones, Linick & Shaefcr have leased ihe 
property at 208-272 State street on which 
they will build a new vaudeville theatre. 
Construction will begin May 1. Kohl & 
Castle negotiated for the property but 
abandoned the project. 



CO-OPERATIVE BOOKING SCHEME. 

II. It. Marinelli, the international agent, 
has under consideration a plan to incor- 
porate his business, and put the shares 
on the market. He has already finished 

the preliminary steps and it is believed 
that the plan will be carried through. 

The Warner agency in London, England, 
is conducted somewhat after this manner. 

The advantages of the scheme arise 
from the fact that artists will be in- 
vited to purchase shares and so, being in- 
terested in the agency financially, can be 
induced to place their bookings in Mari- 
nelli's hands. Under such an arrangement 
they would be paying the usual agent's 
commission to themselves. 

MALDEN FLOPS BACK. 

The vaudeville theatre managed by 

Wiliam Baylies in Maiden, Mass., is back 

in the United Booking Offices fold, after 

being booked for five weeks by James 

Plunkett, the vaudeville agent. 

The management had expressed itself 
as entirely satisfied with the line of at- 
tractions furnished by Plunkett, and the 
change of booking connection came as a 
complete surprise to that agent.' 

The house was formerly booked by the 
United. Plunkett took charge of this end 
when it passed from Andrew Hathaway 
to Baylies. Inside pressure from the 
United agency brought about the return 
to the St. James building combination. 



LISTEN TO THE RUMOR FACTORY. 

The report was in circulation this week 

that William Morris had an option on the 

lease of the Broadway Theatre here, which 

is to be vacated by Litt & Dingwall on 

May 1 next. The theatre belongs to the 
Klliott Zborowski estate and the price 
asked for its rental is $75,000 a year. At 
first glance this might be considered 
enormous. 

But there is an office building attached 
which yields a goodly portion of the rental. 
When it is also considered that F. F. 
Proctor paid close to $(30,000 a year for 
the Fifth Avenue just before he joined is- 
sues with B. F. Keith and that Keith & 
Proctor are said to pay some $72,000 for 
the Harlem Opera House, the Broadway 
Theatre, with its very desirable location 
and enormous seating capacity, might not 
be so very dear for a vaudeville house at 
$7. r >,0<)0 a year. 

No verification of the report could be 
had. 



COMEDY CLUB'S NEW OFFICERS. 

The annual election of officers of the 
Vaudeville Comedy Club, held las*t Sun- 
day at the club house, 147 West 45th 
street, resulted in the unanimous election 
of the followinjr: 

lames J. Morton, president. 

Fred, \iblo, vice-president. 

R. S. Knowles, second vice-president. 

Francis Morey, third vice-president. 

(ieorge Abel, secretary. 

A. O. Duncan, treasurer. 

Charlei H. Smith, chairman of house 
committee. 

Following is the make-up of the new 
board of directors: Francis Morev, Will. 
M. Cressy, Lee Harrison, W. H. Maxwell, 
Harry Corson Clarke and Bobby 
Matthews. 



VARIETY 



GIRGUS NEWS. 



The Ringling Circus does not play at 
Madison Square Garden, N. Y., this 
spring as has been so widely understood. 
Circus traditions in this respect will not 
be disturbed for the present. The Ring- 
ling Brothers will devote the first year 
of their proprietorship of the Barnum- 
Bailey property to putting that show back 
upon the same footing of excellence that 
obtained under the management of the late 
James A. Bailey. To this end the street 
parade will be re-established with the 
coming season. The Ringling show will 
open in Chicago as usual this season, but 
in 1909 Madison Square Garden may be 
its opening stand. 



The Pawnee Bill Wild West exhibition 
will not take to the road this summer. 
That much has been decided upon and 
Major Lillie has written to a number of 
agents expressing his desire to be booked 
in summer parks and like amusement 
places for the season of 1908 either in 
this country or abroad. This announce- 
ment would seem to contradict the general 
impression, doubtless arising from state- 
ments emanating from the Pawnee Bill 
staff, that the show was a financial suc- 
cess last year. 



Ralph Peckham, listed as chief excur- 
sion agent for the Ringling Brothers, but 
really exercising a much more important 
function in that concern, is the first of 
the advance guard to take up quarters in 
the Barnum & Bailey building in the 
offices recently turned over to the new 
owners of the Big Show by the retiring 
management. Mr. Peckham, who for 15 
years was stationed in Chicago, is estab- 
lished in the private office formerly given 
over to W. W. Cole, who has moved his 
belongings to the inner office of the Buf- 
falo Bill suite on the same floor. He is 
said to be engaged in laying out the print- 
ing orders for the two big shows and han- 
dling other important preliminary work. 
Otto Ringling runs into town frequently 
from winter quarters at Bridgeport. 



After all the discussion pro and con 
and the indignant denials of "Dick" Bell 
that such was to be the case, it is now 
announced that the Circo Bell will play 
the Orrin Theatre in Mexico City some 
time in the latter part of February. This 
is possibly due to the fact that the Pubil- 
lones Circus preceded Boll into the capital. 
The Bell show has been strengthened with- 
in the last two weeks by the addition of 
the Melrose Troupe of acrobats, Eddie 
Martyne, Borsini and Winohermann's 
Bears. The latter act was scheduled to 
join the Boll outfit earlier this season, 
but was hold in this country until two 
works ngo by United Booking Office con- 
tracts. Ten more acts will join the Bell 
show within the next two months, before 
the Moxico City opening. The engage- 
ment thorn will run six weeks or two 
months. 



J. Frank Longbotham, New York agent 
for the Pubillones Circus, sailed last 
week, joining the show at Progroso. 



weeks' stay, during which he closed up 
what business was left over from the ex- 
hibition's last season. The suit brought 
against Major Lillie by Arthur Voeglin, 
the scenic artist, for the paraphernalia of 
"The Great Train Robbery," an attrac- 
tion with the Lillie outfit, was comprom- 
ised. Upon Mr. Krouse's arrival in Paw- 
nee it is probable that Maj. Lillie will 
start for an Eastern trip. 



Riccabonna Horses have been booked for 
the Ringling Brothers' Circus next season 
by Richard Pitrot. 



The Aerial Lowes sailed for Cuba on 
Dec. 27 to join a carnival company for a 
tour of that territory. 



"Big Mike," an African elephant, said 
to have been one of the largest in America, 
died at the Ringling headquarters in 
Bridgeport last week. It was part of the 
Foropaugh-Sells outfit, and was injured a 
month ago en route for the Connecticut 
town, when the car in which it was being 
transported burned down. "Mike" was onej 
of a herd purchased in 1878, and was 
worth $9,000. 



Circus people are wondering what has 
become of the winter circus which Willie 
Sells announced last summer he was going 
to take out for a tour of South and Cen- 
tral America. Not a word has been heard 
of the enterprise since young Sells gave 
out his first prospectus. 



Reports from Mexico indicate that Dick 
Bell is having rather the best of his op- 
position with Pubillones. The Bell outfit 
t.i doing profitable business, but it is 
rumored that the opposition show has not 
fared so well. The somersaulting auto- 
mobile, Pubillones' leading feature, has at- 
tracted wide attention, and is said to be 
responsible for what business the show has 
done. 



For the first time in eighteen years 
Joe La Fleur says that next summer will 
not find him with a circus. He is now 
on the Orpheum Circuit. 



"Irma G." and "Joe Bailey," the per- 
forming horses with Buffalo Bill last sea- 
son, opened at the Crystal Palace last 
week. They are being shown by their 
owner, Ray Bailey, and will be with the 
Wild West outfit again next season. 



Norris & Rowe have purchased the en- 
tire zoological collection from the Chutes 
Company, in San Francisco, which con- 
sists of elephants, camels, dromedaries, 
lions, tigers, jaguars, etc., comprising thirty 
animals in all. This addition to their al- 
ready well selected menageries places the 
firm well to the fore among the big circus 
menageries of this country in equipment. 
The animals were transferred to the win- 
ter quarters of the circus at Santa Cruz 
without any mishap. 



Oscar K rouse, general agent for the 
Pawnee Bill Wild West, left Now York 
last week for Pawnee, Okla., after a two 



Art Adair, principal clown last season 
with the Hagenbeck* Wallace Circus, is 
booked solid on the Western Vaudeville As- 
sociation time until March 30. His tour 
is directed by Jake Sternad of that cir- 
cuit. Following his engagements in the 



continuous, he returns to the circus for the 
season of 1908. 






R. H. Dockrill has been engaged by Nor- 
ris & Rowe as equestrian director for the 
coming season. There are few men in the 
circus world that are better known than 
Mr. Dockrill. 



The Peerless Potters have been engaged 
by Norris & Rowe for their forthcoming 
season. 



The work on Norris & Rowe's new big 
Hippodrome is being pushed rapidly. The 
billing of the big show will be commenced 
immediately. The opening date has been 
set for Saturday, Jan. 11. Performances 
will be given twice daily, and the engage- 
ment is to be indefinite. It is the intention 
of Norris & Rowe to keep their hippodrome 
running the year round and to change the 
acts from time to time. 



Charles Cory, general manager for the 
Flafrenbeck-Wallace Circus, who has been 
in Europe for two months in the interests 
of Ben Wallace, the present proprietor of 
the show, sailed from France last Satur- 
day, having given up his proposed trip into 
Russia. He is reported to have booked 
few attractions during his presence on the 
other side. 



William Bell, an animal trainer, well 
known to tent men, died of heart disease 
at Kansas City last week. 



In a few days Lou Jordan, of the Fly- 
ing Jordans, who i,s now playing in the 
Guianas, West Indies, will move over to 
Caracas, Venezuela, where the show will 
play for a month under a guarantee ar- 
rangement with the government. The 
outfit is traveling under its own canvas 
top. It is to be augmented by several 
acts, scheduled to sail to-dav. 



News has reached this country that 
Frank Fillis, known a,s the "P. T. Barnum 
of South Africa," and for many years the 
proprietor of the biggest circus in that 
territory, has gone bankrupt. He is now 
traveling with a circus organization, and 
has assured several American creditors 
that he will settle up all indebtedness 
within a short time. He had a plan for 
bringing a big circus over to this country 
the coming .season, but his friends have 
dissuaded him from such a project. Mr. 
Fillis produced the "Boer War" spectacle 
in this country and has a large number 
of friends here. 



The staff of Cole Brothers, who are 
wintering just outside Erie, Pa., were not 
forgotten by Santa Clans. Manager Mar- 
tin .V. Downs, General Agent Ed. C. Knupp 
and Railroad Contractor Harry B. Potter 
were the commissioned agents of the 
good old benefactor. Mark Monroe had 
transformed the ring barn with holly and 
Christmas greens, and in the centre stood 
a big Christmas tree. 

The men. some 40 in number, gathered 
in the ring bam at 8 o'clock Tuesday 
evening and enjoyed a vaudeville pro- 
gramme. 

At 10 o'clock, when the distribution of 
gifts was made, every man employed in 
the winter quarters received a large box 
containing a full kit of winter clothes. 



PICTURE MEN SEEK INJUNCTION. 

The proprietors of ninety moving pic- 
ture theatres in Greater New York were 
able to bid defiance to the police last Sun- 
day as a result of a sweeping injunction 
that was granted on Saturday by Justice 
Greenbaum. The owners of all these 
places are members of the recently or- 
ganized Moving Picture Association which 
was formed at the instigation of Miles 
Brothers to fight the apparent discrimina- 
tion of the authorities in closing places 
of amusement on the Sabbath. McDon- 
ald & Bostwick, counsel for the associa- 
tion, dug up an old law about a half cen- 
tury old and with its aid they succeeded 
in securing from the Ju/stice a blanket or 
omnibus injunction restraining the police 
from interfering with the business mem- 
bers of the organization. The plan worked 
so well last Sunday that application will 
again be made to-day for another injunc- 
tion that will protect from police inter- 
ference -all motion picture. .theatre promot- 
ers whose names have been added to the 
association membership roll this week. 



PROSECUTOR "WONT PLAY." 

Seattle, Wash., Jan. 3. 
Theatrical people are rejoicing over the 
fact that nine juries rendered verdicts of 
"Not Guilty" where managers had been 
charged with violating the Sunday closing 
law. The result is the District Attorney 
is so thoroughly disgusted that he refuses 
to prosecute further, and the matter will 
soon be taken to the Supreme Court for 
final adjustment. In the meantime, the 
houses remain open for Sunday perform- 
ances. 



WOULD WELCOME VAUDEVILLE. 

New Orleans, La., Jan. 3. 

The Jackson Brewing Co., who hold a 
ten-year lease on the W r inter-Gardcn in this 
city, would be only too glad to transfer 
their option on the resort to a vaudeville 
promoter of recognized standing. 

The Winter-Garden was operated last 
season under the guidance of Thomas Pres- 
ton Brooke. Mr. Brooke installed his Chi- 
cago Marie Band, which failed to draw. 

A musical stock organization is occupy- 
ing the place at present, with but little 
financial success. The interior of the Win- 
ter-Garden could l>e remodeled to seat .".000 
people. 



SHUBERT "TO LET." 

New Orleans, La., Jan. 3. 
Rumor has it that the Shubert in this 
city will soon be "To Let" for an indefinite 
term, commencing with next season. When 
Klaw & Erlanger took over the lease for- 
merly held by the Shubert s. they bound 
themselves to play out all previous con- 
tracts made by the Shubert s. The theatre 
has been operated with but little monetary 
returns, Western Wheel burlesque is men- 
tioned as a possible tenant at the Shubert. 



MOZART TAKES UNI0NT0WN, PA. 

E. B. Mo/art will open the West End, 
Uniontown, Pa., Jan. 13, ;i« a new stand 
in hi.s Pennsylvania circuit. 



The fifth Avenue Theatre becomes a 
vaudeville house again commencing Mon- 
day. A big bill is advertised, including 
"The Song Birds," Flo Irwin, "Our lioys 
in r.lue."' IVfthbv North and others. 






10 



VARIETY 




London, Dec. 21. 
That grand variety theatre of many 
vicissitudes, the London Coliseum, opened 
last Monday, Dec. 10, to fine houses both 
afternoon and night. The place had been 
dark for 18 months. The venture looks to 
be in the running this time. Every num- 
ber went big, Albert Chevalier, the topping 
feature, doing four songs, while Tom Hearn 
as the next in a place of honor kept the 
house in a continual roar. Irene Lee with 
her "Candy Boys," as Mr. Stoll has re- 
christened them, opened in fine style, prov- 
ing a pleasing item herself, while the 
dancing of the boys was considered particu- 
larly smart. She has brought us a new 
idea, and we appreciate it. The whole 

m 

show moves Saturday night, and next week 
Ilayden Coffin ta the topping feature, 
George Ley ton 'vith his patriotic renditions 
also being conspicuous ; Heeley and Meeley 
are on, too, and Dandy George and dog. 
Others are Millie Engler and Company, 
Kathleen Gray, Campbell and Barber, 
Seven Perezoffs, Lady Mansell and Juve- 
niles, Charles Robinson, Frazer's Iona, 
Tom Davies Trio, Empire Living Pictures 
and Bioscope. 

"My new policy for the Coliseum," says 
Oswald Stoll, "will be based on short runs 
and low prices of admission, with nothing 
cheap except the prices. What with fre- 
quent repetitions of the same artists ap- 
pearing for six weeks at a time in West- 
end variety houses and long runs in West- 
end theatres, only those people are now- 
adays catered for in the. West-end proper 
who care to pay high prices to see the 
same performance over and over again, or 
are expected to keep away from any par- 
ticular house for a considerable length of 
time, a very important fact about the 
new arrangement for the Coliseum is that 
the programs will be changed entirely 
every week, thus enabling me to stage lit- 
erally hundreds of acts in a year, and six 
times as many as a house giving apparent- 
ly a similar number of attractions weekly, 
but changing its program entirely only 
once in six weeks. The system of one per- 
formance every afternoon and one every 
evening will obtain. There are fourteen 
turns in this week's program. Any who 
might display all the talent they have in 
the space of a minute or less, and are 
merely shot on and off the stage for the 
purpose of adding to the program, I do not 
deem necessary in the case of the Coliseum. 
Every number will have a time allowance 
appropriate to its proper presentation." 



Mr. Stoll said he did not believe in high 
prices and long runs, his reason being that 
an immense section of the public obviously 
does not. "That this is so," said he, "is 
shown by the precarious condition of thea- 
tres proper in this country, a condition 
easily traceable to these two factors. 
North, south, east and west you find thea- 
tres being converted into variety houses, 
their owners imagining that the popularity 
of music halls is entirely due to a change 
of public taste, and the unpopularity of 
theatres in no way due to their own cast 
Iron system." 

It is interesting to see Mr. Stoll break- 
ing away from English conservatism. A 
disposition to run in the same old ruts Is 
the worst feature here. Most London 



managers want to cram the same fare down 
the public throat forever. One absolutely 
grows sick of seeing the same stale old 
names year in and year out. One doesn't 
care to see even a "star" a million times. 
No use being bluffed by the word "star" ; 
there are other things to see. Mr. Stoll 
has probably worked around to the weekly 
turnover idea through a close study of 
American shows. At the Coliseum of old 
days people were indeed shot on and off, 
and the curtain that hung overhead was 
like the hair-hung sword of Damocles, like- 
ly to descend at anv moment. 



Harry Lauder, whom you wished to hold 
in America for Alan Dale's delectation, 
cabled "Dinna be feart" to his pantomime 
chief in .Liverpool, ?ii'J. no more was .heard 
of him until he got off the Cunarder Car- 
mania. "Man, I never had sic a time in 
ma life," said Lauder. Accompanied by 
his wife and boy Jack, the famous Scotch 
star was greeted by cheer after cheer from 
his friends on the crowded dock. Lauder 
spoke in highest terms of his treatment. 
lie brings back a $1,000 motor car for his 
son Jack. He writes from Liverpool that 
he is very busy with pantomime rehearsal. 
Asked to compare English and American 
nudiences he says, "The New Yorkers give 
you a welcome when you come on, and 
then show their appreciation by listening 
to you until you are finished. While you 
nre on the stage they sit as quiet as mice, 
and at the end of your effort they show 
how much they appreciate you. Rut they 
give you a fair chance right through your 
turn." 



An important resolution covered the 
point that in all benefits and anniversaries 
hereafter permission for V. A. F.'s to ap- 
pear must be sought from the Executive 
Committee, which has power to grant or 
decline. Also that 2% P?r cent, of all 
charity benefits must be assigned to the 
Variety Benevolent Fund, newly formed. 
The case of Alfred Butt and Marie Dress- 
ier had incidental mention. Marie was 
willing to appear at the Water Rats' mati- 
nee benefit, but the power behind the throne 
nt the Palace said "Nay." Thereupon 
Harry Tate, whose name was on the Pal- 
ace anniversary bill, declined to ornament 
the program. 



A building agreement has been signed 
for the new Syndicate hall at llford, and 
erection starts forthwith. A dispute is 
pending over the estate of the late George 
Adney Payne. Messrs. Smiles & Co., so- 
licitors, of Bedford Row, W. C, acting for 
the widow, are searching for a will or 
codicil or other testamentary document 
dated subsequent to May 10, 1004. 



The boy who does the Little All Right 
rope slide with Ando's Japanese troupe 
had a curious mishap at the Bradford Em- 
pire. He struck his fan against the ceiling 
:is he neared the summit of his mount at 
the gallery rails, this slight disturbance 
causing him to lose his balance and topple 
over, but he seized the rope instead of fall- 
ing 40 feet to the pit on the heads of the 
spectators, and managed to slide back to 
the stage. He then mounted the rope again 
as if nothing hnd happened, and this time 
performed the feat without mishap. 



HENRY MILES PLUNGES TO DEATH. 

Henrv Miles, manufacturer of moving 
picture apparatus, Wednesday met instant 
death when he plunged down seven stories 
to the rear of the Concord Hall Apart- 
ments, at the northeast corner of 119th 
street and Riverside Drive, New York. 

Miles lived with his brother, Herbert 
Le Roy, on the seventh fioor. It is said 
that for several years he has suffered 
severely from insomnia. 



BERLIN NOTES 



BERTIE AND CARRIE ARE "PALS." 

A veracious Western newspaper reports 
this highly diverting conversation between 
Bertie Fowler and Carrie Nation when 
the pair met in the local railroad depot a 
few days ago : 

"Hello, Carrie! Don't you remember 
Bertie — Bertie Fowler?" 

"O yes, I remember, but you seem to 
have grown stouter." 

Bertie confessed, alas, 'twas too true. 

"ATi. T ' sighed Carrie; "liquor again. It 
will ruin you. You are going to the devil." 

"Perhaps, but I'm seeing some beautiful 
scenery en route." 

"Say, Carrie," continued Bertie, "remem- 
ber the time you went to the manager at 
Boston and told him he ought to fire me? 
\'ou told him that any person who imper- 
sonated an intoxicated person was setting 
a bad example and should not be permitted 
to do so. (Jot my salary raised and booked 
for two weeks longer. You see, it's an ill 
wind that blows no one good. I feel in- 
debted to you for it, and when we get on 
the train I'll buy a — " and then Bertie 
suddenly remembered. 

Instead she offered to share her berth 
on the train with the "Kansas Cyclone," 
and the latter accepted, promising that she 
would convert Bertie to the water wagon 
before they left the train. 



AMERICAN QUITS NEXT WEEK. 

Monday sees the beginning of the last 
week of vaudeville in the four Western 
houses of the American Theatre Company. 
The following week only the Auditorium, 
Chicago, and the New Y'ork here will play 
"advanced vaudeville." Both these houses 
are scheduled to close Jan. 18. 



KEITH OWNS PHILADELPHIA AGAIN. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 3. 

With the exception of the old Lyceum, 
where family vaudeville is being given, 
and the Ninth and Arch Dime Museum, 
the Keith management has the local field 
to itself again, the Forrest having closed 
its "Advanced Vaudeville" career last 
Saturday night. The Forrest will be used 
for first-class attractions, being managed 
by Nixon & Zimmerman, with Thomas 
Love, resident manager. The "Follies of 
1007" was the initial attraction. Dazie, 
the dancer, was treated as the feature, 
scoring a pronounced hit. 

Manager H. T. Jordan, of the Keith 
house here, wa,s called upon to furnish 
two acts on Saturday last to help out at 
the Forrest. Clark, Bergman and Ma- 
honey played afternoon and night, replac- 
ing the Okabe Japs, who jumped from here 
to Des Moines, Iowa, leaving Friday night. 
The Rialto Four took the place of Clinton 
and Jermon, who left Saturday evening 
for Memphis, Tenn. They were due to 
open Monday matinee, and at 1 o'clock on 
Monday a dispatch received stated that 
the team was 300 miles from Memphis 
and still jumping with the train twenty- 
five hours behind time. 



Berlin, Dec. 21. 

At the Apollo Theatre foremost on the 
program may be mentioned Sylvester 
Schilffer, Jr., the "whole show" man, who 
is now in his fourth and concluding month ; 
and though an extremely clever fellow, his 
show of 1 hour and 30 minutes is growing 
tiresome owing to such an extended run. 

Siegwart Genthes, the comedian, in his 
"Opera Rehearsal," is the hit of the bill, 
which he justly deserves, for he is an 
original artist. 

The Ballet "Die GMeksfee," a Parisian 
importation, is a ballet— "that's all," and! 
am sure the directorate could do better 
with a home product. The best of the 
numbers is the Sisters Fiocati, who "make 
good" with their "Dance Hypnotic." Miss 
Darwin with her performing cats (a good 
turn for America) is worthy of special 
mention, a petite lady, very chic, a good 
stage setting, show not too long, and very 
interesting. Good business prevails, not- 
withstanding the nearness of the holidays. 

Director Steiner of the Wintergarten, 
with his knowledge of American and Eng- 
lish acts, succeeds in always putting an 
interesting show on here. One could al- 
most imagine the place an American vaude- 
ville hall, as there are always two or three 
American and English turns, owing to the 
patronage of English-speaking Berlin. 
This month Kitty Gordon from "The Lon- 
don Pavilion" appears and has a diffi- 
cult road to travel, for the bill is com- 
posed (that is the feminine portion) of a 
veritable "Haven of Beauty," and a turn 
dependent on "looks" must consequently 
suffer, epeeially if the said turn is "Eng- 
lish." you know. 

"La Berat" is a big success, well-known, 
and a favorite. 

The Tiller Troupe of Girls, all very much 
"American," although English lassies; good 
to look upon, well dressed and a good 
show. This is their second engagement at 
this house in three months. 

Liane de Vries, the Parisian eccentrique, 
occupies third place ; big reception. 

The Boganys, "Lunatic Bakers." are still 
here, and a tremendous success. 

The Tenji Troupe, Japanese balancers, 
are also good. 

Flood Brothers, American eccentrics, 
have "caught on." 

Star and Leslie, Americans, also receive 
splendid recognition. Robert Steidl, hu- 
morist, does well. The Brunins, "billiard- 
ists," appear successfully. Tan Kwai 
Troupe, Chinese acrobts, are received cor- 
dially. 

At the Passage Theatre are the "Singing 
Angels' Heads" (novelty here). Was done 
in America when George Washington was 
alive. Others, Martin Kettner and Erna 
Frohlsi. 

At the Passage Cabaret Hedda Herdina, 
a clever little woman with a wonderful 
voice is the attraction. 

The W r alhalla Varicte" has a splendid 
program. This is really a "tryout" house. 

The Metropole Theatre with a musical 
comedy and a chorus in which American 
and English girls have the place of honor 
is packed to the doors nightly. Edith 
Whitney, the beautiful New York show 
girl, left last week for America to take 
part in Ziegfeld's new revue. 

The "Fest" at Hamburg, where usually 
gather the "elite" of the Continental man- 
agers, is not a success, as all seem to com- 
plain of the scarcity of "new acts." 



VARIETY 



11 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 

Initial Presentation, First Appearance or 
Reappearance in New York City. 

Hitachiyama, Hammerstein's. 

Kitts and Windrum, New York. 

Flo Irwin and Company, Fifth Avenue. 

Billy Broad, Pastor's. 

Annie and Maude Kramer, Pastor's. 

Libby and Dupree (New Act), Pastor's. 

Arthur Yule and Company, Pastor's. 

Two Pecks, Pastor's. 

Webb and Norton, Pastor's. 



[ NEW AGTS OP THE WEEK ) 



Owing to the widespread practice 
of managers keeping "Variety's" New 
Acts on file, care will be taken in the 
future to have these pages so ar- 
ranged that matter shall not be 
printed on both sides of the same 
page. "Variety" is indebted to E. J. 
Grecnstadc, manager- of — KdH&V 
Cleveland, for this suggestion. 



Hymack. 

Lightning Change Novelty. 
15 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Orpheum, Brooklyn. 

This is the initial American appearance 
of the original 'Chameleon Comedian," a 
copy of whose work was shown on this 
side a< a "novelty feature" by "Mystic," 
afterwards called "Mysticus." Mr. Hv- 
mack fust appears in fashionable street 
attire, and while apparently under some 
mysterious spell portions of his attire 
undergo lightning changes. Close-fitting 
gloves are removed and cast upon the 
stage and at intervals glove* of various 
hues encase the hands, being donned by 
simply passing the hands under the tail 
of the coat, as though in the act of reach- 
ing into a rear pocket. Cutis, collars, ties 
and boutonniers are also changed, but it is 
the changing of gloves which gives dis- 
tinct novelty to the act. For the close 
an almost complete costume change is 
made to evening attire, the change of 
coat and hat being made with remark- 
able rapidity. As in the "copy" act 
rambling talk is kept up throughout, di- 
rected in part to the audience and part 
to a pn»p pump, which with a milestone, 
Used to conceal a portion of the clothing 
used for the final change, is the only stage 
accessory. There does not seem to be any 
real need for the appearance of the pump 
any more than for the street box which 
was used by "Mystic." The conversation 
addressed to the pump is of the lightest 
texture, ami aside from the appeal for 
comedy through its being mistaken for a 
person and the workings of the handle 
and a miniature figure fixed to it, it has 
no direct bearing on the art. A mono- 
logue, more understandable than the talk 
used by Hymack would be much better. 
It is doubtful if any in the audience 
solved the problem of the changing of 
gloves, the wonder being plainly expressed 
in audible exclamations. As a noveltv 
Hymack '§ act can claim distinction, and 
will no doubt be accepted with favor on 
this side. There is little comparison 
necessary to prove that the act shown by 
"Mvstic" is a direct eopv of TTvmack's. 
The latter> changes are cleanly made, 
while that of the copy act were bungling, 
slower and a poor imitation of the orig- 
inal, though the attempt to follow the 
original as closely as possible was at all 
times discernible. George .If. Young. 



Brindamour. 
"Jail Breaker." 
30 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Fifty-eighth Street. 

This is Brindamour's first metropolitan 
showing, although he has been in this 
country some time and played about out- 
of-town exten3ively. He is a clean cut 
showman above all else, and seems to 
work with an ease and confidence which 
indicates he knows his business to the 
bottom. His offering differs in routine 
and material from those that have been 
made familiar in the local houses. The 
preliminary announcements are made by 
his assistant, but following his introduc- 
tion Brindamour does his own talking. He 
impresses- oaa - fa y rftfely— uyca his to st- 
appearance with bis graceful stage pres- 
ence and well modulated voice. The usual 
committee is invited from the audience, 
and the escape opens with the undoing of 
their handcuffs, Brindamour working for 
this in full sight of the audience, with 
hi,s hands concealed onlv bv a black cloak 
hung from his shoulders to half-way be- 
tween the knees and hips. The trick of 
putting on and removing a coat with the 
bands tied follows, and the finish is an 
escape from an iron cell with wrists and 
ankles manacled to the bars. On Tues- 
day night, when the performance was wit- 
nessed, much the most interesting feature 
was the escape from a hand-iron, brought 
upon the stage by a member of the audi- 
ence. Brindamour repeated the man's 
statement that the instrument was 200 
vears old and had been used in Siberia. 

• 

He said that he had never seen one of 
the kind before but attempted the test. 
After working under the cape for five min- 
utes or so, he told the owner that the 
broad bands cut his wrists and asked that 
he remove them. When the latter lifted 
the cape the "jail breaker" held the open 
iron in his hands. The exhibition had 
every indication of being bona fide. Even 
the house attaches watched it with in- 
tense interest, and the audience was 
worked up to a point of strain. Brinda- 
mour was extremely well liked at the 
Fiftv-eighth Street, and should be a sue- 
cess everv where. He works rapidlv and 
smoothlv, and the turn finishes with in- 
terest at its highest point. Ruth. 



Nellie Wallace. 
Character Songs. 
14 Mins.; One. 
Colonial. 

"Miss Wallace goes in for comic effects 
running to extremes of the grotesque. 
Her business is to make her audiences 
laugh at any cost, and to this end she 
sacrifices all attractiveness of appearance. 
Tuesday night's audience at the Colonial 
left the issue of her .success in New York 
verv much in doubt. After the last of 
her three songs there was some applause, 
and the comedienne took three bows, but 
Colonial audiences are wont to deal more 
generously with those whom they have 
taken to their heart-. Miss Wallace is 
crudelv funnv at moments, but her humor 
is of the rougher and more obvious sort 
that appeals more surely to the upstairs 
contingent. Rush. 



Whit Cunliffe. 
Character Songs. 
24 Mins.; Two. 
New York. 

Whit Cunliffe is what one might de- 
scribe as a "dashing young chap" in the 
language of his home city, London. His 
engaging good humor is at once infectious, 
and a bubbling energy, together with his 
.smiling, blond youthfulness, admirably 
set off by no end of "smart" clothes, won 
him the instant good will of his first 
American audience. Of his first three 
songs, "Girls, Girls, Girls" and "It's a 
Different Girl Again" are conventionally 
English, but he closes with a series of 
topical verses, sung to the air of "Dixie" 
and touching upon matters of present 
-fufel?? intorcst r -8«?h ae ths^*»liminat.ior oJL. 
the motto from the gold coins, the sleepi- 
ness of District Attornev Jerome, the 
slowness of Philadelphia and finally a 
reference to President Roosevelt's married 
daughter that is not in "the best of taste 
and has become altogether too common 
over here of late. This sort of thing, 
even in the hands of an American, is not 
strikingly novel and by a foreign visitor 
widely advertised a,s an Englishman it ap- 
proaches presumptuousness. Mr. Cunliffe 
wears nothing but brown in his natty 
costumes and an immaculate dress suit 
of that color in a pronounced shade at- 
tracted attention. He was warmly re- 
ceived in the No. 4 place. Rush. 



Henry and Young. 

"The Loneville Jollier" (Comedy). 

17 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Pastor's. 

"The Loneville Jollier" is the name of 
a mythical newspaper in "Loneville," Ne- 
vada. Bessie Scribbler (Dorothy Young) 
is the editor, that is, that's her regular 
job, but when occasion demands she is 
also the town manicurist and does a lit- 
tle real estate business on the side. On 
the particular morning that we are in- 
terested in she receives a telephone mess- 
age to the effect that one Mr. Smith will 
be right over to have his nails done. 
Patsy Lvneh (James K. Henrv) star, pro- 
prietor, manager and everything else in 
connection with Ly neb's Moving Picture 
show, which is stranded in the town, 
drops into the "Jollier" office to try to 
make a touch. Someone told him all 
newspaper men were easy. He is mis- 
taken by the editor for her manicure pa- 
tient, and she insists upon giving him a 
polish. Finally things are straightened 
out and the editor and the actor discover 
that they were kids together in Steubcn- 
ville. While they are finding this out a 
letter arrives for the young woman with 
a check for a hundred enclosed, and she 
immediately becomes the "angel" and 
puts Lynch's Moving Pictures on the road 
again, bigger and better than ever. There 
is a quantity of good material in the of- 
fering, and it runs through briskly with 
no unnecessary or talky moments. Mis f s 
Young makes about the best appearing 
Western girl that has been seen to date. 
She plays the character in a straight for- 
ward manner, without a bint of exaggera- 
tion. James E. Henry does very well as 
the "hick" actor, but the role conld be 
toned down. Dash. 



Terley. 

Impersonator. 

9 Mins.; Full Stage. 

New York. 

Terley has evolved a novel and extreme- 
ly effective arrangement for the presenta- 
tion of his impersonations of famous men. 
At the rise of the curtain the stage is 
bare of furniture except for a large cabi- 
net in the centre. Red velvet hangings 
and half lights give an impression of 
richness and when the curtains of the 
cabinet are drawn and the figure of Terley 
is disclosed under a strong light, concealed 
above and at the sides of the cabinet, the 
simplicity of the settings has the effect 
of concentrating attention upon the main 
figure. Only the bead and bare shoulders 
of Terley are visible, the rest of his body 
being completely concealed by a trick de- 
vice of black drapings. A pedestal seems 
to support the bust statue. During the 
whole act and until the (finish when Terley 
corries~ddwn to" the footlights," thfc figure 
makes not a motion. A girl assistant, 
who does the announcing in charmingly 
broken English, makes up the motionless 
face and shoulders in full sight of the 
audience, and as she gently rubs the fea- 
tures with a brush, the expression 
changes. Julius Caesar was the first. The 
transition from this to a countryman was 
a splendid bit of work. Perhaps the best 
of the series was Pope Leo XI IT., although 
the impersonations of three or four Ameri- 
can presidents won thunderous applause, 
particularly a good bit of mimicry show- 
ing President Roosevelt. Placed at the 
opening of the intermission, the noise of 
a returning audience worked against the 
act Monday evening, hut the number un- 
doubtedly made good and should become a 
standard act in this country. In countless 
small details of presentation it gets away 
from the familiar routine of impersona- 
tors, and the figures upon their own merits 
stand out as exceptionally good. There is 
an attractive artistic atmosphere about 
the whole specialty that recommends it 
for distinction. Rush. 



Dorsch and Russel. 

The Musical Railroaders (New Version). 
15 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). 
Twenty-third Street. 

Dorsch and Russel have given their 
musical offering a corking new Betting 
and have made a few changes of detail, 
but, the act in the main ,stands much the 
same as formerly. They have secured a 
good looking back drop showing a moun- 
tain scene, river flowing through a valley 
with a railroad bridge spanning. There is 
some new talk at the opening which is 
bright and snappy although the comedian 
talks so low that it is bard to understand 
him a few rows back. The straight man 
looks every inch a railroader. The tramp 
doe,s not go in very heavily for Comedy, 
in fact, the comedy is not allowed 1<> in- 
terfere with the music at any time. The 
music is first rate. There is not too much 
attempted, and what is offered is handled 
with judgment. A small train crossing 
the bridge while the men 1 ' <y some Sort 
of bell arrangement on switch levers gives 
the act a good finish. Alt « -get her the pair 
have greatly improved their offering ,-in<-e 
last seen. Four legitimate curtain* re- 
warded their efforts Tuesday »ftcnv»nn. 

{Conlinurd on pagi 1". 1 



12 



VARIETY 



A BAD BOY AND HIS TEDDY BEARS. 
"A Bad Boy and His Teddy Bears" is 
mi extenuating circumstance in Charles E. 
Blaney's career as a producer of popular 
priced melodrama. It goes a long way 
toward making up for the damage he has 
done in leading the tastes of his own par- 
ticular public to a gloating delight in blood- 
shed, firearms and theatrical freaks, if only 
by the clean amusement it has added to 
the Christmas delight of New York's 
youngest generation during its short stay 
at the Lincoln Square Theatre, where it 
was produced last week. 

It is a "kid" show pure and simple. The 
grown-up who ventures into the Lincoln 
Square will imagine that he has intruded 
upon a kindergarten in full session. There 
is not a great deal on the stage to interest 
him, but he will find rare entertainment in 
the audience. The children enjoy the piece 
keenly and express their approval ""with"" 
frank enthusiasm. If Mr. Blaney wants 
any better testimonial for his work, I 
don't know where he is to look for it. 

And indeed, he has done well by the lit- 
tle ones. "A Bad Boy and His Teddy 
Bears" is, even from a showman's stand- 
point, a really earnest attempt. A vast 
deal of care and thought has been put into 
it, not to mention the amount of money 
represented by an unusual cast and an 
elaborate mounting. There are evidences 
that the company was selected with more 
care than is usually devoted to this de- 
partment of the Blaney show mill. It is 
an extremely good organization, almost 
without a discordant note. 

Seventeen people are programmed as 
principals, in addition to a chorus of four- 
teen, a list that compares in number with 
much more pretentious productions. A 
simple score has been provided by Ted 
Coleman. It contains any quantity of the 
right sore of "jingly" music, although there 
are times when the numbers are vaguely 
reminiscent, and the singing is uniformly 
excellent. The average in this particular 
is surprisingly high. 

William Barrows is the "star" in the 
part of "the Bad Boy," a role which he 
handles with nicety. He looks the part 
to the life and plays with a natural boy- 
ish exuberance that is never buffoonery. 
His performance is a smooth, intelligent 
bit of work. 

William Rhodes, Lew Engel, E. T. 
Scott and William Piatt are the "Teddy 
Bears," the friends of the "Bad Boy." who 
really isn't bad at all, and his chief aides 
in all the mischief. They make up for 
their pantomimic parts in close resemblance 
to the "Teddy bear" of commerce, and their 
awkward tumblings about the stage kept 
the youngsters in a fever of wild amuse- 
ment. One of the quartet, presumably 
Scott, does some quiet pantomime that com- 

ft 

pares with the little specialty so excellent- 
lyu worked up by George Ali, nnd prob- 
ably if the young members of the audience 
were questioned, it would be he who would 
be accorded the Stellar honors of the piece. 
Harry Pilcer, formerly of Ned Way- 
burn's "The Big Show" in vaudeville, has 
the second juvenile role, the chief require- 
ments of which seem to be the faculty of 
getting out of and into quick costume 
changes. This matter of clothes appears 
to have become an obsession of Pilcer's. 
lie has at least a dozen changes in the 
three acts. Every time he appears he has 
on a different suit. He is a nice looking 
youngster and his costumes are in the 
pink of fashion. The program gives him 



credit for staging the dances, all of which 
are neat, though simple. In the last act 
he has trained six girls to a close copy of 
the clog steps introduced in the Wayburn 
act. 

Richard Burton has a good idea of the 
"terrible grown-up" with a ponderous bass 
voice and all sorts of frowning severity, 
and George C. Clennett makes a rather 
pale father of the "Bad Boy" with an un- 
certain German dialect. There is little of 
the "gagging" of the vaudeville German 
about him, however, and much was to be 
forgiven him for that. A male quartet was 
also in the masculine contingent, but they 
were not permitted to sing except for a 
few minutes in the final act. It was good 
judgment that kept them in the back- 
ground. A farcical policeman (Johnny 
Inglis) contributed frequent laughs by his 
"sissy" manners beside an extramely good 
dance." 

Alice Cook was a winsome soubrette, 
the sweetheart of the "Bad Boy" and his 
aid and comfort in times of stress. She is 
a sprightly, energetic young person, and 
good to look upon. Eileen Sheridan, the 
innkeeper's daughter, has a pretty, soft 
voice. This was her chief recommenda- 
tion. She and William Naughton in a 
straight part, had the pick of the musical 
numbers. They are both sadly lacking in 
grace of stage deportment, but their really 
agreeable singing made up for this. 

There is a miniature plot running through 
the piece. The innkeeper's daughter and 
the impecunious Clayton love each other, 
but Percy Harrington, the son of a fabu- 
lously wealthy railroad president, would 
have her for his wife by fair means or 
foul. The "Bad Boy" looks with favor 
upon the suit of Clayton, and while the 
millionaire and his son try to force the girl 
to marry unwillingly into the Harrington 
millions, the "Bad Boy" with an infinity 
of resource and the aid of the "Teddy 
bears" outwits the conspirators at every 
turn, until by strategy the right pair win 
out in the race to the altar and all is hap- 
piness. 

The obvious opportunity is furnished 
here for the introduction of violence, and 
it was a pity that Mr. Blaney could not 
forego his life-long addiction to firearms. 
At the finish of the first two acts the 
"Teddy Bears" and the "Bad Boy" hold 
back the villain at the point of revolvers, 
a crude expedient and Mr. Blaney's only 
fall from grace. 

The second act, much the most novel as 
to setting and fairy story prettiness, shows 
the home of the "Teddy Bears" in the 
mountain. Here the "Bad Boy" and the 
persecuted lovers are hidden from the pur- 
suing millionaire for forty minutes while 
the young eyes in the audience grew round 
with interest and young sides nearly burst 
themselves in laughter at the nonsense of 
the ridiculous bears at home. 

Appropriate lyrics were written by 
Frank Dupree. They jingle along with 
the music and are simply written, although 
some of the humor of the verses is a bit 
grown up. if uft h. 



At their last meeting the proposition to 
build a new club house was brought up 
and favorably considered by the Friars. 
A number of wealthy members expressed 
a willingness to finance the improvement, 
and it is declared that the new order will 
l»e housed in its own home within a short 
time. 



PLAYING THE PONIES. 

In putting on "Playing the Ponies," the 
management has without doubt conscien- 
tiously endeavored to bring the show up to 
the New York standard. There has been 
no sparing of expense in the matter of 
principals, costume and scenery. A lively, 
well-dressed chorus of twenty-four girls, 
above the average in the beauty depart- 
ment, would seem almost enough in itself 
to ensure success, if this asset were prop- 
erly employed. 

The main trouble seems to be in the 
handling of the girls. In the first place 
there are not enough numbers introduced 
for a show of this kind. Among those that 
are introduced several employ new effects. 
There are good ideas a-plenty in the pro- 
duction, but they are not logically carried 
out. 

The piece, by Aaron Hoffman, is a sort 
of a GeWI»-Cobail J Ml!*iu»i - MeKttk u ma . ■ - 
The story of course is of light texture, but 
it is cleverly treated through two rather 
long acts. There is the usual bad man — 
it would, of course, be impossible to have a 
melodrama without a bad man. There's 
likewise the good old colonel who owns a 
string of horses and has a beautiful daugh- 
ter. Let's see; there must be something 
else that goes with a melo. O, yes, a mort- 
gage. The colonel mortgages his string of 
horses and in some way or other gets into 
the hands of the bad man. In other 
words the villain has it on him. Being a 
conventional sort of a villain he naturally 
wishes to marry the beautiful daughter. 
This can never be, for has she not already 
given her heart to her father's discarded 
trainer? 

Finally, after much manoeuvering upon 
the part of the trainer and his pal, a 
jockey, who is in love with the bad man's 
daughter, the villain is overcome and sent 
to the home for old and decrepit villains 
and all live happy ever after. 

Yorke and Adams are very much in the 
show. They don't have anything to do 
with the plot particularly. They are a 
couple of Hebrews of the familiar stage 
type who are in search of a son. They 
don't know which one is the father of the 
boy, as l>oth had sons who were mixed up 
when they were a day old. One died, and 
they never knew which one it was that 
was living. At any rate the jockey turns 
out to be the sought for offspring. 

The author graciously omitted the 
straight tenor lover who just has to sing 
every time he throws his lamps on his lady 
love. Yorke and Adams make a very good 
team of Hebrews, scoring laughs easily 
and quietly. There are several bits of 
familiar comedy business introduced, but it 
is handled differently and gets by nicely. 
The old-time dining scene is well worked 
up and offers plenty of opportunity for 
good legitimate comedy. It is carried out 
too long, however. The pair sang several 
new parodies which made distinct hits with 
the house, but neither of the comedians has 
any kind of a voice and it is doubtful 
whether they could get away with the 
parody thing in vaudeville. While the 
dressing of the pair is funny, the facial 
makeup is far from good. They are 
bewhiskered beyond necessity and neither 
is pleasant nor wholesome to look at. 

Georgie Mack has probably the most 
prominent figure next to the principals. 
He did very well as the jockey, looking 
every inch the popular jockey with a 
swelled head. A couple of very nifty suits 
mr.y be also credited to Georgie. 



Chas. H. Prince played the bad man as 
though he enjoyed the job. He did a bit of 
legitimate acting in a masquerade makeup 
that won a round of aplpause. 

Harry Lester was the down and out 
trainer and earned some distinction through 
the rendition of a Cohanesque song, "I'd 
Rather Be the Lobster Than the Wise 
Guy After All." Harry Lester, usually a 
good dresser on the stage, is letting George 
Mack make him take a second place. Even 
a down and out racing man can be there 
with the clothes. 

Joseph Clark as Colonel Honey had lit- 
tle to do and did it very badly. Jack Clin- 
ton was the detective, romping on and off 
the stage about every other minute. He 
never got wise to anything, but nobody 
paid any attention to him anyway, so it 
must have been all right. 

There were only three women principals. 
but_ they__made up in ability what they 
lacked in numbers. Josephine Davis was 
an altogether too nice a little daughter for 
the bad man, but she took after her mother 
so that let her out all right. Miss Davis 
is a sweet looking girl with a voice that 
is far ahead of what is usually heard in 
musical comedy. She wore several dainty 
costumes and led three numbers., The 
prettiest 'was "Wind Yourself Around Me, 
Dearie" ; kind of a mussy title but a very 
pretty song. Miss Davis' only shortcoming 
seemed to be in the dancing, a defect that 
was noticeable throughout the entire com- 
pany. 

Adele Rafter was a very statuesque ad- 
venturess. She sang several songs in a 
rather pleasing manner and looked well all 
the time. Her entrance in an all-black 
costume was the signal for the women folks 
to get their heads together. Her first song, 
"Moon Beams," was quite the prettiest 
thing during the evening. 

Maude Campbell was the other principal 
woman. She did very nicely in a small 
way, looked well and put plenty of life 
into her songs. Her voice is small and not 
very tuneful. 

Theodore Morse wrote the music for the 
piece and the only kick that you can make 
is that he didn't write enough. There are 
several very tuneful airs. 

Frank Smithson staged and produced 
and managed to think out several new 
ideas but rather fell a bit in carrying 
them out. The opening of the second act 
shows the helter skelter at Luna Park. 
The pony ballet, about the poorest one 
that has been seen, makes its entrance down 
into view. It is very good, but it only 
lasts three seconds, nnd as the rest of the 
chorus is grouped about the stage half the 
house couldn't see where the "ponies" were 
coming from. Further use of the skelter 
might result in adding some much needed 
merriment. The horse race at the end of 
the first act should also be rearranged. 
After working up the race to a good pitch 
of excitement the whole is spoiled by 
breaking off into a song. Several other 
things on the same order could be remade 
to a good advantage. 

Taking all in all "Playing the Ponies" 
makes the Circle a good place to spend an 
evening. Dash. 



Cohan & Harris dined Victor Moore and 
the entire "Talk of New York" company 
at the Cafe Ambassadeurs Wednesday 
night. Covers were laid for 150, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Jerry Cohan occupied the seats 
of honor in the r>iir banquet hall. The 
guests assembled at midnight. 



VARIETY 



13 



THE ROLLICKERS. 

Burlesque managers of both wheels will 
profit by a visit to the Dewey this wee!:. 
The Rollickers is the attraction. It is a 
new show in the Western Wheel and the 
property of Mortimer M. Thiese. Bur- 
lesque has need of such. 

The two act piece "B. Dunne Goode & 
Company" is a burlesque show without 
pretence to any higher classification, but 
it stands as a shining example of what 
can be done in this field of theatricals by 
one who brings originality and wide- 
awake ideas to the task of burlesque 
production. The show is a combination of 
the best things in "Bankers and Brokers" 

and "The Maid and the Millionaire," ju- 
diciously picked. 

No better organized company of enter- 
tainers has been seen on the burlesque 
slage in many moons. None of the prin- 
cipals stands out with particular brilliancy 
from his fellows and no one person is 
forced to the fore at the expense of the 
general effect, but all hands work to- 
gether with vim and enthusiasm to keep 
a consistent entertainment running swift 
ly and smoothly with an extremely high 
average of interest from curtain to cur- 
tain. Better team work has never been 
done in burlesque. The result is that 
there is scarcely a dead minute in the two 
and one-half hours. 

The piece is decidedly well written. 
There is a plot, a light skeleton of play 
structure that holds the action together 
but does not obtrude itself by excessive 
dialogue or explanation. It works itself 
out in real action and not talk. 

The whole show has lately been revised. 
In this process Mr. Thiese has injected a 
good deal of the material in use last sum- 
mer with "The Maid and the Millionaire," 
which held forth a-top the Madison 
Square Garden Roof, it fits into the bur- 
lesque splendidly. 

Ed. F. Morton, the coon shouter par 
excellence, has the principal straight role. 
Strange as it may seem, his inimitable 
specialty was not introduced until the 
middle of the second act. So full was the 
rest of the piece of good things, that 
there was no need to bolster up the early 
part with it. He makes an extremely 
pleasing straight man, playing simply and 
directly and with a smoothness that is 
without pose or affectation. His coon 
songs won him encores to the limit of his 
material, and several of his other num- 
bers arc almost as well received. 

Violet Pearl stands out as a distinct 
figure among burlesque soubrettes of the 
season. She displays a nervous energy 
in her songs and dances that rival in rest- 
lessness Eva Tanguay's electric gyrations. 
She has odd attractive ideas for stage 
dressing, bordering on the bizarre, which 
command instant notice, and above all 
else, is endowed with an unusual degree 
of personal beauty. She handles her 
dialogue gracefully enough and the only 
particular in which she falls short is her 
singing. There is a harsh, strained qual- 
ity in her voice that proper training could 
probably correct. She should see to this 
detail without delay, it is all that stands 
between her and swift advancement. 

Kathryn Pearl i9 leading woman, a 
statuesque and graceful young person, 
and an exceedingly handsome woman with 
an exceptional pleasing stage presence and 



manner. Grace Patton completed a trio 
of woman principals that could alone 
have been depended upon to carry a bur- 
lesque production provided far less richly 
with capable support. She had not a 
great deal of important work to do, but 
she fulfilled satisfactorily the require- 
ments of appearance and dressed nicely. 

Joseph H. Watson and Will H. Cohen 
labor together in holding up the comedy 
department. Both are in Hebrew comedy 
make-up and their points are made to 
tell with certainty without once descend- 
ing to stale jokes or horseplay. They 
have been provided with unlimited sure 
fire dialogue and bits of really funny 
business and every minute of their pres- 
ence on the stage could be counted in 
spontaneous laughter from the audience. 

With the two Misses Pearl they were 
concerned in one of the musical hits of 
the show, "What Would You Do?" in 
the second act. The pair held the stage 
alone for a little too long at one time 
just before this point, but for the rest 
restrained themselves admirably both as 
to time and method in spite of what 
might have been an excusable temptation 
to make the most of an obvious good 
thing. A series of parodies in their hands 
practically held the show up near the end. 

Alfred Hall contributed an excellent 
clog dance and made himself liked 
throughout the piece by his flittings back 
and forth at opportune moments and the 
utterance of a catch line, which never 
failed to get a laugh. 

Eddie Barto's talents were somewhat 
hidden by the company he was in. He 
drew a role that offered him little oppor- 
tunity, but he handled his small part 
skillfully and with intelligence, contri- 
buting not a little to the speed of the 
action. Grover Shepp in a part that 
would ordinarily be handed to the undcr- 
stander of an acrobatic act selected for 
the olio's sake, did very well indeed. 

Fourteen girls make up the chorus, 
divided according to the Thiese pattern 
into "ponies" and show girls. A number 
of novel chorus arrangements are shown, 
all of them interesting and several strik- 
ing. The "ponies" have been trained to 
handle a first rate routine of wooden shoe 
dances with good style and are kept to 
the top notch of ginger in all their work. 
Five changes are shown in each act — the 
equipment of chorus costuming being ex- 
ceptional for its good taste and pretty 
color effects. 

There is no olio in the usual sense of a 
series of specialties introduced between 
pieces, but four semi-vaudeville turns are 
given during the action of the second 
piece. Ed. Morton sang "A Friend of the 
Family" and "Gratitude," both of which 
he used with the Thiese summer show. 
The specialty was extremely well re- 
ceived. The Rollickers' Quartette did 
most of its work in strengthening the en- 
semble numbers, but sang one song at the 
opening of the second act. They sing 
well enough, but do not stand out par- 
ticularly. Watson and Cohen's parodies 
made another incidental act. Only one of 
the collection is familiar, the others be- 
ing fresh. Sadie Lamar, who probably 
came from the chorus, offered a solo toe 
dance which lasted only a minute or two 
but was well done. 

The show is absolutely clean. There is 
not a suggestive line in the whole per- 
formance, and its entertainment is offered 
along legitimate lines. Rush. 



PASTOR'S. 

It is a question whether Tony Pastor 

has had a better bill at his house this 

winter than the one he is offering this 

week. Every act on the program uses 

dancing to a greater or less extent. It 

would hardly seem from this that the bill 
could frame up well, but the dancing is, 
with apologies to the pickle man, of fifty- 
seven different kinds and for the most part 
is so good that it becomes enjoyable rather 
than tiresome. 

Hallen and Hayes, the special attrac- 
tion, must be awarded the palm in the 
dancing department. Both men are danc- 
ers of more than ordinary ability. They 
get down to business from the jump and 
keep things going without a stop to the 
finish. The comedian is funny outside of 
his excellent eccentric dancing, while the 
straight man feeds nicely and contributes 
one of the best wooden shoe dances that 
comes to mind. 

It's happened, of course. It had to 
happen. When you have seen two children 
performing for several years you sort of 
hate to think of their growing up. Well, 
the Pucks have grown up; they may not 
have wanted to, but they've done it just 
the same. But the very strange part is 
that they are using much of the same ma- 
terial they did as "Child Wonders" and 
are giving a 50 per cent, better perform- 
ance with it. The boy — I suppose we 
should say man now — is singing Harry 
Lauder's song, "She's My Daisy," and 
giving the monologue that goes with it. 
He handles both extremely well. He is 
also doing some entertaining piano play- 
ing. Little Miss Puck is one of vaude- 
ville's prettiest and daintiest soubrettes. 
She wore two stunning costumes, carrying 
them with a most becoming air of grace. 
The tough dance has been cut and the act 
stands better without it. 

Jack and Marie Rossley also offered a 
bit of Harry Lauder's repertoire. They 
use Scotch stuff entirely, the man doing 
only fairly well with the songs, but get- 
ting away better with the dancing. 

Al. Carleton started them laughing be- 
fore he opened his mouth, and when he 
began to talk he just kept them at it. Mr. 
Carleton is funny, but there is a quantity 
of his material that he has been using for 
a long, long time. A little new stuff 
would freshen things up a bit. 

Bertina and Brockway scored in an 
early position, mostly through the contor- 
tions of Miss Bertina. She is rather a 
heavily built woman for this kind of work, 
but does very well with it. She is a bit 
posoy at times, taking too long to get 
down to the real contortions. 

Sinirl and Kessnor showed their first- 
rate dancing and acrobatic act to an ap- 
preciative house. Harry Smirl is one of 
the best of tumblers iu his particular line 
and Rose Kessner is a lively person who 
manages to keep things on the run. The 
trick dog, a cute little poodle, came in for 
its share of applause. 

Adams and Gordon sang, talked and 
danced. The two features first mentioned 
were superfluous. 

Fagan and Merrian also did much bet- 
tor in the dancing line. They uncovered 
a waltz clog that was first rate. 

Zarrell Brothers closed the program 
with some excellent hand to hand work. 

James T. Kelly and Lillian M. Massey, 
Henry and Young and Keene and Adams 
are under New Acts. Dash. 



TWENTY-THIRD STREET. 

There is a good average vaudeville bill 
at the Twenty-third Street house this, 
its closing week. One or two unavoid- 
able waits are occasioned by a lack of 
acts in "one," but the orchestra fills in 
these gaps acceptably and the bill runs 
with the accustomed smoothness and 
speed. 

It doesn't make any difference how 
many times you see W. C. Fields, the 
juggler, he will always have a little some- 
thing to show that • was not there the 
last time. He is working several new 
bits this week that are both amusing 
and catchy. When it comes to handling 
three and four balls Mr. Fields has a little 
something on most all of them. The easy 
way with which he works and the quiet 
comedy method he employe are most ef- 
fective. 

Walter C. Kelly, the other single en- 
tertainer on the bill was down next to 
closing and "the Judge" had them all 
his own way. His southern darkey dia- 
lect is immense and that trial of the 
"Dago," Irishman and the darkey will 
hand you a laugh every time you hear it, 
if your sense of humor is normal. Mr. 
Kelly always keeps his stuff up to date 
and it is rich in irresistible humor. 

Urbani and Son scored strongly in the 
early portion of the programme The 
run through the regular routine of head 
and hand balancing, showing a few new 
ones in the latter department. The boy's 
work is especially noticeable. He is a 
pleasing looking little chap and works 
with an ease and grace that makes him 
a big favorite with the feminine portion 
of the audience. Some of his work on 
one hand is the best that has been shown. 
It might be advisable to cut the two 
tricks where the boy is used as under- 
stander. It is always good for applause, 
very likely and the boy may suffer no 
ill effects from the tricks, but it looks 
rather brutal from the front of the house. 

Felix and Caire call their offering "Just 
Kids," a title used for some time by 
Rawson and Clare. The pair are clever 
undoubtedly, but their success is due in 
a good measure to the diminutiveness of 
the boy and the good looks of the girl. 
At any rate whatever degree of success 
they do obtain is entirely due to their 
own efforts. Whoever framed up their 
specialty handing them a big handicap. 
Imitations that are nearer burlesques 
than anything else form the basis of the 
offering. The only imitation that is real 
is the George Cohan of the boy, and it 
is safe to say that Young Felix docs a 
better imitation of the much imitated 
Cohan than many of his elders. There 
are many little details that have been 
overlooked and the costumes throughout 
should be replaced. A good dancing mas- 
ter and producer could do a world of 
good for the two youngsters. 

Harry Corson Clarke and Company are 
still suffering through the use of a poor 
vehicle. Mr. Clarke and Miss Owen are 
both players of ability and .vith the 
proper material their efforts would meet 
with a leady response. 

Macarte's Monkeys gave the show a 
first rate finish. Tim was to have put 
on a new act, but owing to the arrange- 
ment of the bill this was not possible, 
and "The Pullman Porter Maids" was 
shown instead. Dash. 



14 



VARIETY 



NEW YORK. 

The inability of W. S. Harvey to reach 
New York in time for the Monday night 
performance from Chicago, where he 
played Sunday, completing a week's en- 
gagement in Kansas City, made the show 
one number short on that day, but even 
without a substitute it ran the conven- 
tional length, thanks to an unusually 
long (and interesting) moving picture. 

Vesta Victoria was the headline attrac- 
tion on a return engagement. Since her 
last appearance here she has taken unto 
herself a new song called "He Blamed My 
Dreamy Eyes," a catchy melody with 
plenty of neat quiet comedy in the lyrics. 
It gets away from the rougher character 
songs with which Miss Victoria was 
identified upon her last year's tour over 
here, and displays her in a graceful and 
altogether agreeable light. Monday night 
she "tried out" a new number for the 
first time. It i« cal>d "Mary,... Queen of 
Scots." It gives her opportunity for 
about the same grade of clowning as her 
old song "And I Don't Know Where I 
Live." The roughness incidental to its 
first trial ]^onday night may have af- 
fected it. At any rate it left behind the 
impression that Miss Victoria is much 
more effective in her prettier, swinging 
melodies and neater costumes. In the 
next to last position Monday night she 
held the stage thirty-five minutes and 
took her 'steenth bow after the Dankmar- 
Schiller Troupe had attempted vainly to 
start their turn. 

Burton and Brookes were moved from 
the beginning of the second half to the 
opening position. This proved an almost 
murderous spot for a comedy sketch. The 
early talk naturally fell on barren 
ground, but the song at the finish called 
"Smoke, Smoke, Smoke," was well re- 
ceived and won the pair fair applause. 

John Birch was second. He is working 
the travesty with the hats splendidly, 
building up his laughing climaxes with 
certain skill. There is a running fire of 
sure fire farcical incidents and the novelty 
of the idea holds attention. Finley and 
Burke, who followed, likewise sought 
laughs with travesty. There was not a 
a great deal of it, however, and their 
funniments caught on. Lottie Burke 
makes a stunning appearance in a pink 
dress of varied shades in striking com- 
bination and her first appearance was the 
signal for a gasp of admiration from the 
masculine part of the audience. They 
have a quantity of first rate pantomimic 
comedy for their close. 

Jewell's Manikins hold over for the sec- 
ond week with a few changes. The num- 
ber bears repetition and its finish makes 
it particularly seasonable. 

In spite of an unfortunate start — they 
were compelled to leave the stage after 
their opening parade by the audience's de- 
mand for Miss Victoria— Dankmar- 
Schillers worked the acrobatic turn up 
to a splendid climax. The girls, who 
handle the large proportion of the acro- 
batic work, are a good-looking, well-de- 
veloped trio. Notwithstanding their sex 
and youth— the oldest is little over 
twenty— they have a truly European 
polish of style. The hand-to-hand and 
hand-to-head feats were exceedingly well 
conceived and executed and the number 
was a large applause getter. 

Terley, impersonator, and Whit Cunliffe, 
vJto make their American debut, are un- 
der 1 New Acts. Rush. 



COLONIAL. 

It was an indulgent and thoroughly ap- 
preciative audience that watched the show 
New Year's eve, but bv no means a 
demonstrative one. The show went well, 
but no one on the bill received anything 
like an ovation except perhaps Clifton 
Crawford, thanks to the fire he put into 
the Kipling recitation, "Gunga Din" at the 
finish. The quietness of Tuesday night's 
audience may perhaps be explained by 
the occasion. They were a particularly 
well dressed and prosperous looking lot — 
the sort that looked as though they might 
have tables reserved in the Broadway 
cafes, and perhaps their minds were on 
the festivities of the later evening and 
the show was regarded as a preliminary 
to the real occasion. 

Louis Mann was the headliner with his 
comedy sketch, an excerpt from "All on 
Account of Eliza." It was easily the 
laughing hit- -of the whok entertainment. 
Mr. Mann gets his effects quietly and 
without any straining, and brings a deal 
of originality iind 'MnilTil r n,lil111 I " llil 
interpretation of the farcical German. 
There is nothing of the familiar uncouth- 
ness in his comedy creation, and the fidel- 
ity of his dialect and interpretation to 
the German of real life leads one to hope 
for good things from him in his promised 
invasion of the field of legitimate char- 
acter acting. He is singularly fortunate 
in his support. Muriel McArthur, who 
makes an altogether charming, simple fig- 
ure, does exceedingly well with the role 
of "Eliza," the persecuted school teacher. 
She plays with ease and is without pose 
or pretense. Beside, she is a particularly 
beautiful young person with a wealth of 
bronze hair and regular features. Will- 
iam F. Carroll gives a capable perform- 
ance as the village sport and Mrs. Cather- 
ine Carroll and Louise Sydmoth realized 
the popular idea of village shrews to a 
nicety. 

Horace Goldin, in his second week, con- 
tributed a fast twenty minutes or so of 
his own inimitable magic. His system of 
working in absolute silence is recommend- 
ed to the attention of the great majority 
of illusionists. Goldin gives himself no 
time to talk, and he has developed his 
specialty to so high a degree of skill that 
the usual patter is unnecessary as a means 
of concealing the mechanism of his won- 
ders by distracting the audience's atten- 
tion from faulty technique. There is in- 
telligent showmanship in every detail of 
the number, and not the least manifesta- 
tion of his cleverness as a producer is his 
selection of an extremely comely girl, 
Jeanne Fransoli, as assistant. The act 
fared exceedingly well at the hands of 
the holiday audience, which may be ac- 
counted a severe test, the house being 
representative of the highest degree of so- 
phistication. 

The Permane Brothers opened and won 
a fair volume of exit applause by reason 
of their clever pantomime. Dill and Ward 
followed. The latter pair make up a neat 
team of singers and dancers and— this is 
likewise recommended to specialists in 
their class — confine themselves to singing 
and dancing and offer no talk. The 
woman has two pretty costume changes 
and looks well at all times. 

Felix and Barry, "The Boy Next Door," 
and Friend and Downing, a large laughing 
success, opening the intermission, were 
the others. Nellie Wallace (New Acts) 
had fourth place. Rush. 



HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

Taking a flash at the names displayed 
on the sheet in front of Hammerstein's 
this week, the bill gave promise of enter- 
tainment far above the average. Just 
why it doesn't come up to the promised 
expectations is hard to tell, it mav have 
been that on Tuesday evening the holi- 
day crowd was thinking of other things 
than vaudeville, but the facts remain that 
it is seldom that any bill is received 
with such noticeable indifference as that 
displayed by the audience on New Year's 
eve. 

The whole trouble can hardly be kid 
at the door of the audience, however, a 
bright snappy comedy act in the early 
portion of the bill would have worked 
wonders. The bill dragged slowly along 
until Byron and Langdon, the second act 
after intermission, jumped in and gave the 
proceedings a much needed boost. 

Byron and Laiigdovi have placed the 
house a number of times in the last year. 
That the audience was familiar with the 
UffiTlng was plainly shown in Mr. Byron's 
song, "I Lost Another Chance to Be a 
Hero," for they caught on the first verse 
and had plenty of fun with the comedian, 
making him sing all the verses he knew. 
The tramp "sissy" characterization of 
Mr. Byron's is screamingly funny without 
being offensive in any way. Miss Lang- 
don in that becoming bright red gown 
supplied the brightness and life that the 
house had so patiently waited for. 

Ethel Levey, following "The Dude De- 
tective," caught the house in a good 
humor and held 'em easily. Every one 
straightened up with an air of "Well, it 
was worth waiting for," when the come- 
dienne appeared in a wondrous fluffy, 
flimsy frock and a hat that was a mar- 
vel. Miss Levey has sought variety in 
her selections of songs. She is using an 
Irish song, a rather odd Hebrew and 
a coon number. The Hebrew number has 
a tuneful melody but seems a bit out of 
Mi3S Levey's line. Miss Levey's voice 
shows marked improvement and when it 
comes to dancing she is in a class by 
herself. 

Cressy and Dayne closed the rnter- 
mission with "Town Hall To-night." The 
playlet has been shown about New York 
so much that each line is anticipated and 
not even the ridiculous "Flatiron Build- 
ing" drop caught more than a passing 
buzz. 

The Basque Quartette sang three songs 
and everyone was satisfied. It was hardly 
an audience that had the endurance to 
stand for grand opera, but most of them 
stuck it out. 

Joe Welch carried his talk through to 
indifferent success. Mr. Welch is in need 
of some new material. He did not use 
the parodies Tuesday night. 

Kartelli has a swiftly moving wire act 
of just about the proper duration. The 
artist wastes no time with unnecessary 
"stalling" or bowing, but gets down to 
business and sticks to it. Several strik- 
ing feats are shown and considering that 
it was an unusually undemonstrative au- 
dience did remarkably well. 

Charles Sweet did fairly in an early 
position. He has a quantity of ancient 
talk that should be brightened. A cleaner 
and fresher tramp make-up would aho 
not be amiss. 

Shields and Rogers made a first class 
opening number with their lariat throw- 
ing. The Bedouin Arabs closed. Dash. 



ORPHEUM. 

There is a decided foreign atmosphere 
permeating the bill at the Orpheum this- 
week, five of the nine acts being imported. 
One of the five is Hymack, the English 
"Chameleon Comedian" (New Acts), who* 
made his American debut this week. 
Mayme Gehrue and Company presented 1 
"June," a sketch. 

The bill offers first class entertainment, 
and met with the warmest approval of an. 
audience which packed the Orpheum to- 
capacity. Laddie Cliff, the English youth 
who fixed himself firmly in American 
vaudeville at the Colonial last week, 
pleased just as well across the bridge. 
Cliff seems to have mastered much more 
of the American, style of delivering a coon 
song than is usually the case with foreign* 
artists and with a personality that reaches 
his audience instantly, he scored deserved- 
ly on his closing number. Cliff should 
prove a big hit on this side. 

Karno's comedians found ready recog- 
nition with the pantomime "A Night in. 
an English Music Hall," the familiar rou- 
tine being retained. Billy Reeves is work- 
ing exceedingly well, and the appreciation 
was unmistakable. The Dollar Troupe put 
a good finish to the bill with their showy 
acrobatic work, the twisting somersaults- 
and tricks from the springboard being 
cleverly executed. 

The "Six English Rockers" have made 
several changes in the act since last re- 
viewed by the writer, but there appear 
several points which might stand further 
improvement. This is most noticeable at 
the very opening and later where the girls 
make their appearance feet first through, 
the dresses. There is not enough made out 
of this latter "bit." Nellie Florede em- 
ploys her excellent vocal ability with good 
results, singing a song different from the 
one announced for her on the program. 
It is better than the one used formerlv, 
but she could help it by making the 
points more emphatic and making a talk- 
ing song out of the chorus. The revolving 
chair finish took the act off nicely, al- 
though without winning the appreciation 
the act seems to deserve. 

Rice and Prevost proved one of the sure 
fire hits of the bill. Rice worked under a 
handicap, suffering from a badly sprained 
arm. He has fattened the principal por- 
tion of his pantomime work, and no artist 
in his line is within calling distance of his 
skill, while the clean cut floor tumbling 
of Prevost and the team work with the 
table was right up to its usual high stand- 
ard. 

The Elite Musical Four opened the show 
with practically the same instrumental 
program as when last reviewed. These 
musicians have a neat looking act, and it 
only needs care taken with the selections 
to improve the music. The songs of olden 
days rendered by Spencer Kelly and Fred- 
eric Rose reached the right spot with the 
Orpheum patrons and the pair were re- 
called to finish out a rather pleasing rep- 
ertoire. 

An act in "one" not announced, fur- 
nished by the stage sweeper with orches- 
tra accompaniment completed an excel- 
lent bill to usher in a new year. 

George M. Young. 



Al. Gallagher and Jules Ruby have been 
placed in charge of the booking depart- 
ment of the Charles K. Harris Music Pub- 
lishing Company. They will book singer* 
and small acts under the Harris license. 



VARIETY 



IS 



NEW ACTc OF THE WEEK. 

(Continued from page 11.) 

James T. Kelly and Lillian M. Massey. 
"Two Kings and a Queen" (Comedy), 
a i Mins.; Open in One; Close Full Stage. 
Pastor's. 

Edgar Sfelden is responsible for "Two 
Kings and a Queen." The author has 
provided the players with an offering 
along broad farcical lines that is well 
suited to their capabilities. The opening 
is a bit out of the ordinary. There are 
three minutes of sidewalk conversation 
in one between James T. Kelly and 
Sheridan Holmes, the latter being a third 
member. Both are Irish comedians of the 
old-time sort and do nicely with the char- 
acter. The plot is not distinctly new, but is 
entertaining and well handled. The two 
Irishmen are courting the same widow, 
and both have an appointment for the 
same evening. Napoleon McGnniis (SI>t»i- 
dan Holmes) arrives first and in the mid- 
dle of hte love making, Washington Mc- 
Sweeney (James T. Kelly) conies upon 
the scene. McGinnis is hustled into a 
side room by the widow. McSweeney's 
attempts at love making and the untime- 
ly interruptions of the other Irishman 
supply the fun. The comedy is a trifle 
rough at times, but it comes in a good- 
natured, easy manner and is never forced. 
Lillian Massey as the Widow Reilly 
looked and played the part to a nicety. 
The house enjoyed the playlet immensely 
Monday night. Dash. 



Robert Henry Hodge and Company (4). 
"Troubles of Bill Blithers, Bachelor" 

(Comedy). 
22 Mins.; Full Stage (Interior). 
Fifty-eighth Street. 

The sketch belongs in the make-'em- 
laugh-at-any-cost class. Of really intelli- 
gent integral humor it has almost none, 
but Mr. Hodge, by the excellence of his 
own work, manages to put some resem- 
blance to entertaining farce in it, and 
pulls it through. The Fifty-eighth Street 
audience laughed uproariously with scarce- 
ly a let up after the preliminary five min- 
utes of explanation. Mr. Hodge has an 
odd conception of the farcical old man 
part, and gets over ►several entertaining 
bits, but the vehicle is far from worthy 
of his best efforts. The incident of the 
bachelor sewing a button in the back of 
his shirt could be made more of and a 
few other points occur that could be de- 
veloped. His support could be improved 
in appearance, the three women — Blanche 
Craig, Elinor Sidney and May Stuart 
being badly made up and not very at- 
tractively costumed. The sketch will go 
in houses where the audiences are not par- 
ticular a3 to the quality of their com- 
edy so long as it makes them laugh. A 
fifth character is introduced in the person 
of a servant. He is probably a member of 
the back stage force of the Fifty-eighth 
Street Theatre. Rush. 



Keene and Adams. 
"Pierrot's Carnival." 
17 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Pastor's. 

The pair are evidently an English im- 
portation. They have that peculiar style 
of speech that has been the means of 
making many an act popular over here. 
The title, "Pierrot's Carnival," means 
nothing. The pair simply wear the Pier- 



rot costume. They could just as well 
appear in any other. In fact, another 
costume would probably be advisable. At 
least one change should be shown. After 
a very light opening the team get down 
to some of the neatest conversational 
singing stuff that has been heard. Neither 
have particularly good voices, but handle 
them exceptionally well. Both are young 
and good looking. Indeed, they look 
enough alike to be brother and sister. The 
single numbers of both should be dropped. 
Their work together is too good by far 
to allow of either taking a chance singly. 
A neat soft shoe dance and a song about 
"Bobby and His Banjo" used for an en- 
core were the best liked numbers. The 
act was on early at Pastor's this week, 
and was very well liked in that position. 
It is really deserving of a much better 
spot. Dash. 



CLEVELAND HIPPODROME HAS BRIL- 
LIANT OPENING. 
(Continued from page 3.) 

Walker," caused a buzz of amazement, 
and Powers' elephants, the feature, made 
a big circus act for the stage. 

Max Faetkenhauer, the promoter and 
father of Cleveland's Hippodrome, was a 
musician at Keith's theatre three years 
ago. He is receiving unstinted credit for 
his enterprise and perseverance in having 
brought the mammoth structure success- 
fully into being. 

The capacity attendance Monday af- 
fected all other theatres in town. All 
will feel it for a couple of weeks, until 
the novelty has worn off. 

H. A. Daniels, manager of Keith's, which 
will be the house to first feel the incom- 
ing of the Hippodrome, said he did not 
think it would make much difference after 
a short while. "There are any number of 
theatre-goers here who have now one extra 
evening of entertainment added to their 
usual rounds, remarked Mr. Daniels. 

The admission at the Hippodrome is up 
to $1 in the boxes, with a 50-cent scale at 
matinees. 

William Morris, the booking agent, at- 
tended the premier. Geo. M. Leventritl, 
the New York theatrical lawyer, accom- 
panied Mr. Morris. 

The Hippodrome is practically sold out 
for a week ahead. 



RAISED THE ANTE. 

A year ago the United Booking officials 
had some negotiations with Henry Corn, 
owner of the building on the northeast 
corner of Sixth avenue and Forty-second 
street, facing Bryant Park, with a view to 
leasing an entire floor of the then brand 
new edifice. Mr. Corn asked a rental of 
$17,000 and the United folks went so far 
as to offer $10,000, which was declined. 

The floor in question has been practical- 
ly unoccupied ever since, and the vaude- 
ville business men thought the real estate 
man might be more amenable at this time. 
To their consternation, when they lately 
reopened negotiations, they were informed 
that the rental was now $21,000 a year, in 
order to make up for the amount lost in 
rentals during the past year. 



Leila Dell I.ennon, who won a prize of- 
fered by a New York newspaper to the 
prettiest "Fluffy Ruffles" girl, will seek to 
enter vaudeville under the chaprionage of 
Phil. Mindil. 



VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK JAN. 6 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED. 

(The routes here given, bearing no dates, are from JAN. 6 to JAN. 13, inclusive, de- 
pendent upon the opening and closing day* of engagements in different pert* of the country. 
vThen an address follows the name the not is "laying off" for the week and may be written 
or telegraphed to accordingly. All addressee are furnished VARIETY by artiste end may be 
relied upon as accurate. Addresses care managers or agents will not be printed.) 

"B. R." in the list indicates the route of the burlesque oompany named, with which the 
artist or aot is with and may be found under "BURLESQUE ROUTES." 



Abel, Geo. A Co., Maryland, Baltimore. 

Abbott-Andrew Co., 207 W. 88, N. Y. 

Adair Art. Gaiety, Sprlngneld. 111. 

Adamlni-Taylor, Keeuey's, Brooklyn. 

Adams. E. Kirke, A Co., P. O. Box 21, Guyan- 
dotte, W. VI .-..,.. 

Adams Bros., Imperials, B. R. 

Adama A Drew, 281 W. 43, N. Y. 

Adams A Kirk, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Addison A Livingston, Palmetto Beach, Tampa. 

Adler, Harry, Park, Alameda, Cal., indef. 

Adler, Flo, Urpbeum, Des Moines. 

Abearn, Chan. & Vesta, Garden, Buffalo. 

Abearn, Charles, Golden Crook, B. R. 

Ahern & Baxter, Bachelor Club. 

Aberns, The, 290 Colorado, Chicago. 

Albani, 1410 Broadway, New York. 

Albene & La Brant, Lyric, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Aldo A Vannerson, 331 Roebllng, Brooklyn. 

All A Pelser, High Jlnke, B. R. 

Alpine Troupe, Majestic, Mobile. 

Allen, Eva. Ideals, B. R. 

Allen, Josle, 306 W. 112, N. Y. 

Allen A Kenna, Crystal. Anderson, Ind. 

Allen, Searl & Violet, Poll's, Hartford. 

Alllster, Harry, 11 Rue Geoffrey Marie, Paris. 

Alroua Zoeller Trio, Orpbeum, Canton, O. 

Alvarettas. Three, Trocadero, B. R. 

Alvora, Golden Crook, B. R. 

American Dancers, Six, Proctor's, Troy. 

American Newsboys' Trio, Wisconsin Hotel, Mari- 
nette, Wis. 

Americus Comedy Four, Keith's, Providence. 

Ampere, Electrical, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 

Anderson, Carl, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 

Apollo Orch., Century Club, Elkhart, Ind. 

Apollos, The, 65 8th Ave., N. Y. 

Anderson, Richard, Orpbeum, Omaha. 

Archer. LaDella A Davey, Jolly Girla, B. R. 

Ardo A Eddo, 817 Hoyt Ave., Astoria, L. I. 

Arlington Four, Orpbeum, San Francisco. 

Arltonas, The, 148 W. 68, N. Y. 

Arminta A Burke, 610 Ringgold, Cincinnati. 

Arnold, Lucia, Boston Belles, B. R. 

Arnot A Gunn, 215 6th Ave., N. Y. 

Astrellas, The. G. O. H., Pittsburg. 

Ashton A Earle, Majestic, Wooater, O. 

Atkinson, Geo., Star, Homestead, Pa. 

Auberts, Les, 14 Frobel Str. III., Hamburg, Qer. 

Auburns, Three, Orpbeum, Springfield, 0. 

Auers, The, Lyric, Tulsa, Okla. 

Austin, Claude, Alvln, Mansfield, O. 

Austins, Great, Rockville, Conn. 

Austins, Tossing, Palace, Gloucester, Eng. 

Avery A Pearl, 653 Wash. Boul., Chicago. 



Baader La Wile Troupe, 383 Christiana, Chicago. 

Baggessens, The. Orpbeum, Denver. 

Baker, Nat C, 32 Division, N. Y. 

Balno A Shew, Hippodrome, N. Y., Indef. 

Banks, Chas., Boston Belles, B. R. 

Barton, Joe. Bohemians, B. R. 

Barrett. Grace, Pat White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Barrett A Belle, Century Girls, B. R. 

Barrett, Charles, High Jinks, B. R. 

Barry, Katie. 541 W. 168, N. Y. 

Barry, Mr. A Mrs. Jimmle, Columbia, Cincinnati. 



Barry A Wolfurd, Chase's, Washington. 

Barto, Eddie, Rolllckers. B. R. 

Bartlett, Al, Hunt's Hotel, Chicago. 

Bates * Neville, 46 Gregory, New Heron. 

Beard, Billy, 1401 Drayton, Savannah. 

Iteattles, Juggling, 137 Park, I'atejefjb. 

Beauvals, Arthur, A Co., Calety, Galesburg, 111. 

»<*d»H Hc"«,n H, HatavlH. N. T, 

Bedinl, Donat, A Dogs, 220 W. 38, N. Y. 

Beecher A Maye, Pulaee, Charleroi, Pa. 

Belford Bros., 223 First, Jersey City. 

Belford, Allan G., Washington, N. J. 

Belmont, Harriette, Jolly Glrla, B. R. 

Bellclalre Bros., Haymarket, Chicago. 

Bell Boy Trio, Woonaocket, R. I. 

Bell, Frank. 1653 Broadway, N. Y. 

Bell, Norma, Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

Belmont A Brennan, Imperials, B. R. , 

Bennett, Laura, 14 Linden, Jersey City. 

Beuaons, Musical, Genl. Del., Chicago. 

Bent ley, Harry, Imperials, B. R. 

Benton, Maggie, 136 Taylor, Springfield, O. 

Berkes, The. 400 W. 30, N. Y. 

Bernard, Cassle, Rose Sydell, B. R. 

Bernier A Stella, 22 Howard, Providence. 

Berzac's Circus, Orpbeum, St. Paul. 

Berry A Berry, Haymarket, Chicago. 

Beyer A Bro., Orpbeum, Allentown. 

Big Four, High School Girls, B. R. 

Big City Quartet. Cropsy A Bey 26, Bensonbaret. 

Bijou Comedy Trio, Watson's Burlesquers, B. R. 

Bingham, Kittle, Orpbeum, Springfield, 0. 

Bingham, Orpbeum, Springfield. O. 

Binney A Chapman, Garden, Memphis, Indef. 

Birch, John, 133 W. 45th, N. Y. 

Bishop. Frances, Century Girls, B. R. , 

Blssett A Miller, Poll's, Scranton. 

Blxlcy, Edgar, Boston Belles, B. R. < 

Blancbard Bros.. 51 W. 28, N. Y. 

Block. John J., Harry Bryant's, B. R. 

Blue Cadets, 61 Hanover, Boeton. 

Blush, T. E., 3241 Haywood, Denver. 

Blanchet Bros. A Randolph, Watervllet. N. Y. 

Bobker, Henry, 63 Forsyth, N. Y. 

Rohannan A Corey, Century Girla, B. R 

Bolses, Five. 44 Curtis, Grand Rapids. 

Bottamley Troupe, Circo Bell, Mexico. 

Bouldon A Qulnn, Nlcklet, Windsor, N. S. 

Bowers, Walters A Crooker, Bennett's, Ottawa. 

Bowery Comedy Quartet, 821 Charles, W. Hex 

boken. 
Bowen Bros., 1553 Broadway, New York. 
Bowman Bros., 326 W. 43. N. Y. 
I toy re Bros.. 874 No. Randolf, Philadelphia. 
Boyce, Lillian, Jolly Girls, B. R 
Boyce, Jack. Trocaderoe, B. R. 
Boyd A Veola. 110 E. 14. New York. 
Bragg, John D., Toreadors, B. R. 
Bradna A Derrick, Keith's, Cleveland. 
Bradys. The. 721 Copeland, Pittsburg. 
Brady A Maboney, Irwin's Big Show, B. B. 
Brinn, L. B.. 23 Haymarket, I»ndon, Eng. 
Brennan A Downing, Falrhope, Ala. 
Brennen A Rlggs, Century Girls, B. R. 
Brant ford, Tom. Park Hotel, Port Chester, N. Y. 
Broadway Quartette. 1553 Bway., N. Y. 
Broadway Trio, Wine, Women A Song, B. R. 
Rrobst Trio, Jan. 10-21, Lyric. K. Liverpool, O. 
Brown Bros. A Kealey, 13 Family, Butte. 
Brooks A Vedder. 210 E. 17. N. Y. 
Brooks A Jeauette, Unique, Minneapolis. 



USE THIS FORM IF YOU HAVE NO ROUTE CARDS 



N 



a me 



Permanent Address. 
Temporary 



N 



Week 



Theatre 



City 



State 



CARDS WILL BE MAILED UPON REQUEST 



16 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



FR A IM K FOG ERT Y nZZ^££Li 



Booked Solid until June, 1908. K. A P. Circuit 



BERRY 



AND 



BERRY 



"Berry and Berry, in a musical act, can produce good music from any old thing, and carry on the 
side a lot of talk and funny stuff that does certainly entertain. They are one of the hits of the 
bill."— (Orpheum)— St. Paul "Dispatch." Dec. 9. 

JAN. 6, HAYMARKET. CHICAGO. ALF T. WILTON.Ag ent. 




Afrrlr 



$rtb 



Jtror ml* ArttBtfl 

Jrrsrnttng • ttmttl fHngittrj and flanrina Bprrialty 

M per route, or 248 W. 45th 8t., V. T. City. 

Hct staged by JSed dUyburn 




IV VAUDEVILLE PORTRAYED 



Delmore 



and 



Darrell 



Gee, what a small stage. I wonder where the mail box iaf 



IN/lclN/IAHOIM'S 




e* 



PORTER MAIDS 



• * 



MAIDA DUPREE 



"High School Girls." 



Singing and Danoing Comedienne. 

Jan. 8, L. 0.; 18-15, Gayety, Albany; 18-18, Lyceum, Troy. 



FRED. DUPREE 

PARODIST AND COMEDIAN. 

Finishing 80 successful weeks on the BuUiran-Oonsidlne Circuit. 

Per. Address, 480 GLENMORE AVE., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Mill 





("THE GIRL IN BLUE") 

THE RECORD BREAKER 

Acknowledged by press and public, Tbe Queen of all Wild Eccentric Dancers 

Address LEW ROSE, Hurtig <SL Seamon's 125th St. Music Hall, New York 






THAT VERSATILE VENTRILOQUIST 



HUCHJ.EMMETT 

VENTRILOQUIST 

Is again playing the S.-C. Circuit in the Northwest, opening at the Coliseum, Seattle, Deo. 80. 

21 weeks in Seattle inside of four seasons. 

SCOTT I WH ALEY 

ECCENTRIC COLORED COMEDIANS. 

NOW ON KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 

OPEN TIME FOR CLUBS 

JANUARY TO MARCH 1st 

Klein, Ott Bros. & Nicholson 

Addren, Week Jan. O, Grand Opera Houi«, Syracuse, N. Y. 



THE 



A SENSATIONAL EUROPEAN NOVELTY. 




ERNESTS 



TRAMPOLINE HORIZONTAL BAR ARTI8T8. 
A featured attraction on 8ulUran-Conaidiae Cirouit. Address oare VARIETY. 

"Tom" Kelley 



PIANIST AT PASTOR'S THEATRE. 



WINSTON'S SEA LIONS 

Ditreducing the famous sea lion "Jockey." Featured with Barnum & Bailey show, season 1007. 

JAN. 6, ORPHEUM, READING, PA. 



VAUDtviLLi surprise; 



JOLLY JOHN LARKINS 



ORIGINAL 
CONCEPTION IN OWE 

Wesley & Pincus 

Exclusive Agents 



Wtm t mwiM i n $ SSNfSwwS 



VARIETY 



17 



Brooks A Clark, 2464 Patton. Philadelphia. 
B rooks, Jeanne, Parisian Widows, B. It- 
Brown A Bartolettl, City Sports, B. B. 
Brown A W 11 mot, 71 Glen, Maiden. 
Brown A Wright, 344 W. 45. N. Y. 
Browning, Mr. A Mrs., 126 W. 83, N. Y. 
Browning A Le Van, 805 Cauldwell, N. Y. 
Bruce, Al„ Toreadors, B. B. 
Bruno A Russell, Keith's, Jersey City. 
Bryant, May, Boston Belles, B. R. 
Bryant & Savllle, Bijou. Battle Creek. 
Burke, Minnie, Boston Belles, B. R. 
Burton & Brooks, Fair Haven, N. J. 



BUCKNEK 

SENSATIONAL CYCLIST. 

Touring Europe. 
Address Central Hotel, Berlin, Germany. 
Associated with AL. SUTHERLAND, Vaude- 
ville Booking, St. Jamea Building. 



Buckleys, Musical, 297 Ave. B, N. Y. 
Buckeye Trio, 646 E. Center, Marlon, 0. 
Burdette, Madeline. 212 W. 44. N. Y. 
Buckeye State Four, 2364 K. 67, Cleveland. 
Burke A Urline. 119 E. 14, N. Y. 
Burke, Win. H., 84 Barston. Providence. 
Burnbam A White, Jan. 6, Majestic. Madison, Wis. 
Burns, Morris, A Co., 54 Hermen, Jersey City. 
BurtlnoB, The, 1370 Richards. Milwaukee. 
Burton A Burton, 309 W. 55, N. Y. 
Burton. Matt, 1185 Valencia, San Francisco. 
Burton A Shea. Ill 7th Ave., N. Y. 
Burton & Vans, 25 Haskin, Providence. 
Burrows Travera Co., 116 E. 25th, N. Y. 
Busch Family, Excelsior Springs, Mo., indef. 
Bussler, Walter H., Orphla, Madison, Wis., indef. 
Bulla A Raymond, Wash. Society Girls, B. It. 
Butley A Lamar, 2319 8. Bouvier. Philadelphia. 
Buxton, Chaa. C, Crystal. Menasha, Wis., indef. 
Byers A Herman, Sheedy's, Fall River. 
Byron A Blanch, Coliseum, Seattle. 
Byron A Langdon. K. A P. 58th Street. New York. 
Byrne, Golson, Players. Bijou. Lansing. 
Byrons* Musical Five, 5138 Indiana, Chicago. 



Caeaar. Frank, A Co., 802 Mechanics, Decorah, la. 
Callahan A St. George, K. A P. 125th St., N. Y. 
Cameron A Flanagan, Proctor's, Newark. 

Camp, Sheppard, Kentucky Belles, B. R. 
Campbell A Cully, 1633 Bourbon, New Orleans. 

Caldera, A. K., St. Charles Hotel, Chicago. 

Calvin, James, 445 W. 64. Chicago. 
Caprice, Mile., Temple, Detroit. 

Campbell, W. S.. Rose Sydell, B. R. 

Carbrey Bros., 1347 E. Oxford, Phlla. 
Carberry A Stanton, Lyric, Danville, 111. 

Carrillo, Leo. Nyack, N. Y. 

Carr, Jessie, Toreadors, B. It. 

Carlln A Otto, Orpbeum, Salt Lake. 
Carol Sisters, Lyric, Joplln, Mo. 

Carroll A Cooke, Hotel York. N. Y. 

Carroll, Joe, 231 Liberty, Paterson. 

Carroll, Great. Fay Foster, B. R. 

Casad A De Verne, 312 Valley, Dayton. 

Carton A Wlllard, 2210 No. Lambert. Phlla. 
Carson Bros., 168 Bergen. Brooklyn. 

Carter, Taylor A Co., 444 W. 187. N. Y. 

Carter A Taylor. 256 W. 43, N. Y. 

Carter A Waters, 158 Greenfield, Buffalo. 

Cartwell A Harris, 1031 McDonough. Baltimore. 
■Carver A Murray, Keeney's, Brooklyn. 

Carver A Pollard, 1922 W. 6th, Davenport, la. 
Casper, Will A Mabel, Sheedy's, New London. 

(> swell. Maade, Gibbons Tour. 

Castano*. "Tie. 104 W. 61. N. Y. 

Chadwick Trio, 229 W. 38, N. Y. 

Chameroys. The. 60 Manhattan ave., N. Y. 

Chandler, Anna, City Sports, B. R. 
•Chantrell A Rhuyler, 219 Prospect, Brooklyn. 

Cbapla, Benjamin. Lotos Club. N. Y. 
Chester A Jones, Orpheum, Reading. 

Cbrlaty, Great, Knickerbockers, B. R. 

Christy, Wayne G., 776 8th av*., N. Y. 

Church City Four. Strollers, B. R. 

Clairmont. 2051 Ryder Ave., N. Y. 
Clark A Duncan, Grand, Marlon, Ind. 

Clark, Edward, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Clark, Geo. Q.« Gem, Monongahela, Pa. 

Clark, John F.. 425 Forest. Arlington, N. J. 

Clark A Temple. Star, Chicago. 

Clarke, Harry Corson, Lambs Club, N. Y. 

Clarke. Wilfred, Lambs Club, N. Y. 

Claudius A Scarlet, 50 Cbapln, Canandaigua. M. Y. 
Clans. Martha. Orpheum. Cambridge, O. 

Claus A Radcllff, Trocadero. B. R. 
Clermonto, Frank A Etta, 129 W. 27. New York. 

Cleveland, Claade A Marlon, 215 Shurtleff, Chel- 
sea, Mass. 

Clipper Sisters. 466 Blewett, Seattle. 
■CI I to A Sylvester. 214 No. 8. Philadelphia. 

Clivette. 274 Indiana, Chicago. 

Coate, Charlotte 8t Sunflower, 1553 Broadway. 
•Coccla A Amato, Grand, Sacramento. 

COgan A Bancroft. 1553 Bway.. N. Y. 
•Cohen. Louis W., Orpheum. Newark, O. 

Colleens, Singing, 104 W. 38. N. Y. 

Collfos, Eddie, Oshkosh. Wis., Indef. 

Collins. Nina. Lady Birds, B. R. 

Collins. James J., Jolly Girls. B. R. 

Collins A Brown, 148 Kosciusko, Brooklyn. 

Coltone, The, Champagne Girls, B. R. 
•Columbians. Five, Majestic, Houston. 

Connolly A Klein, Empire Show, B. R. 

Comrade*. Four, 834 Trinity, N. Y. 

Contlno A Lawrence. 149 So. May, Chicago. 

Cohen, Will II., Rolllckers, B. R. 

Comerferd, Vaughn, Broadway Gaiety Girls. B. R. 
•Conn, Downey A Willard, Columbia, St. Louis. 

Connelly, Pete, Weast's, B. R. 

Conway. Nick, 207 W. 26, B. R. 

Cook, Billy, Toreadors, K. R. 

Cook, Frank. Austin A Stone's, Boston, Indef. 

Cooke A Rothert, Bijou. Racine. 

Cooper A Robinson, Keith's, Boston. 

Cooper, Harry, High Jinks. B. R. 

Cooper, Harry L., Fay Foster, B. R. 

Oeesar, Mr. and Mrs., 203 W. 121, N. Y. 
•Cotton. Lola, Temple, Detroit. 



Cottons, The, Champagne Girls, fl. R. 
Couthoui. Jessie, 6532 Harvard Ave., Chicago. 
Courtlelgb, Win., Poll's, New Haven. 
"Covington, Mur.se, " Orpheum, Los Angeles. 
Coyne & Tinlln, 1036 Washington. Chicago. 
Craig, Rlchy, 335 Third Avenue, New York. 
Crawford A Manning, 258 W. 43, N. Y. 
Creo A Co., Bijou, Marinette, O. 
Crickets, Keith's, Cleveland. 
criterion Male Quartette, 156 5tb Ave., N. Y. 
Cronln, Morris, 21 Alfred pi., London, Eng. 
Cross, Will II.. A Co.. 440 No. Normal, Chicago. 
Crystal. Herman, Parisian Widows, B. R. 
Cumnilngs A Merley, Unique, Los Angeles, indef. 
( ii in minus. Thornton A Co., People's, Los Angeles. 

Cal. 
Cunningham, Al., 2<K) W. 44, N. Y. 
Cunningham A Smith, 183 E. 94, N. Y. 
Curt in A Blossom, 91 Newell, Greenpolnt, Bklyn. 
Curtis, Palmer A Co., 2096 Nostrand, Brooklyn. 
Cinzon Sisters, Orpheum, Minneapolis. 
Cushman A Le Claire, Lady Birds, B. R. 
Cuttys, Musical, 3034 E. Baltimore, Baltimore. 
Cyril, Herbert, Bennett's, Montreal. 



D'Aliza, Flor, Bennett's, London. 

Dacre, Louie, Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Dagneau A Bruce, Orientals, B. R. 

Dagwell, Aurle, Bennett's, London. 

Daley, James, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

D'A! vinl. Rocky Point, R. I., indef. 

Dale, Wm., Crystal. Elkhart, Ind., Indef. 

Daly A Devere. 115 E. 115, N. Y. 

Dale, Dotty Dainty, 252 W. 36th. N. Y. 

Dale, Hvdnev Guv Bros. 1 Minstrels. 

Dale, Will, Bucklen Hotel, Elkhart. 

Dailey Bros., 1379 No. Main. Fall River, Mass. 

Darling. Fay, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Darmody, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 

Davenport, Edna, Yankee Doodle Glrla, B. B. 

Davis, Edwards, Orpbeum, Allentown. 

Davis, Floyd, Temple, Boulder, Col., indef. 

Davis, Hal, A Co., Grayling, Mich. 

Davis, H., Air- Dome, Murpbysboro, 111., Indef. 

Davis, Roland, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Davis A Davis. Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 

Dawson A Whitfield, Family, Pittston, Pa. 

Deavee, Harry, A Co., Trent. Trenton. 

De Camo, Chas. A Dog, 8 Unlou Sq., New York. 

Deery A Francis, 328 W. 30th, N. Y. 

Delavoye A Fritz, G. O. H., Grand Rapids. 

Dell A Miller, Hippodrome, Buffalo, Indef. 

Dell A Sonda, 207 Eo. 14, N. Y. 

Deltons, Three, Jolly Grass Widows, B. R. 

Delmore A Darrell, Family, Lafayette, Ind. 

Delmore, Misses, Gotham, Brooklyn. 

De Chautal Sisters, Park, Johnstown, Pa. 

De Graff Sisters, Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

De Lisle, Mae, Colonial Belles, B. R. 

Delaphone, 54 Willoughby, Brooklyn. 

De Coe. Harry, Dominion, Winnipeg. 

De Haven A Sidney, Poll's, Vaterbury. 

Demonio A Bell, Crystal, Tacoma. 

De Mont. Robert, Trio. Majestic, Dallas. 

DeMora A Graceta, Imperial, B. R. 

De Muths, The, 26 Central, Albany. 

De Velde A Zelda, Lady Birds, B. R. 

De Toy A Miller. 209 B. 14. N. Y. 

De Witt, Burns A Torrance, Shea's, Buffalo. 

Deming, Joe, Poll's, New Haven. 

Dervln. Jas. T., 516 So. Flower, Los Angelea. 

Diamond A May, Fischer's, Los Angelea, indef. 

Diamond, Jas., Kentucky Belles, B. R. 

Dlerlck Bros.. Circo Bell. Mexico City, to Jan. 4. 

Doherty, Lillian, Jan. 1-31, Hausa, Hamburg, Ger. 

Donald A Carson, Colonial, N. Y. 

Doner. Joe A Nellie. High Jinks, B. R. 

Donnelly A Rotall, Star, Spokane. 

Donnette, Ira, 114 W. 40, N. Y. 

Doherty, Jim, High Jinks, B. R. 

Douglas, Chaa. W., Broadway Gaiety Glrla, B. B. 

Dove A Lee. 422 W. 48, N. Y. 

Dowlln, John, Toreadors, B. R. 

Downey, Leslie T., to Feb. 3, Electric, Racine, 

Wie. 
Doyle, Phil., Lady Birds, B. R. 
Doyle, Maj. Jas. D., Gotham, Brooklyn. 
Dreano, Josh., Revere House, Chicago. 
DuBois, The Great, Vaudeville, Youngstown, 0. 
Dudley, O. E., Crystal, Ind.. Indef. 
Duffy. Thoa. H., High School Glrla, B. B. 
Dunedin Troupe, Poll's, Hartford. 
Dunne. Thos. P., 128 B. 19, N. Y. 
Dunham, Heslln A Barardi. Jolly Glrla, B. B. 
Duncan, A. O., G. O. H., Pittsburg. 
Dupree, Bob. Canvas. Provo, Utah, indef. 
Dupree, George A Llbby, 251 W. 37, N. Y. 
Dupree. Jeanette, Hotel Albany, N. Y. 



Kekhoff A Gordon. 246 W. 20th, N. Y. 

Edmonds A Haley, 308 E. 00, Chicago. 

Edmonds A Monte, 308 B. 60. Chicago. 

Edwards, M. A C. E , Hippodrome, Buffalo, indef. 

Edwards, Jennie, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 

Edwards, Ralph, Parisian Widows. B. R. 

Edwards A Vaughn. Grand, New Kensington, Pa. 

Edwin. George, Majestic. Chicago. 

Ehrendall Bros., 1344 Leffingwell, St. Louis. 

Elser, Carrie, Tiger Llllles, B. R. 

Elastic Trio. Majestic. Pittsburg, indef. 

Eldredge, 59 No. Broadway. Streator, 111. 

Blen, Gus, Edith Villa, Thurlelgh Ave., Balhaai, 

London. 
Eltinge. Julian. 1014 E. 163. N. Y. 
Elliott A West. 2902 Ellsworth, Phlla. 
Eller, Goldle, Fay Foster, B. R. 
Elllnore Sisters, Shea's, Buffalo. 
Elliott, Belair A Elliott, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
Ellsworth, 4, Tiger Lilies, B. R. 
Emery. Maude, 2110 E. Federal, Baltimore. 
Emerald Trio, 443 Central Ave., Brooklyn. 
Emerald, Monnle. 41 Holland rd., Brixton, S. W., 

London, Eng. 
Emerson A Wright, Kansas City, Mo., Indef. 
Emmett, Oracle, Poll's. Scranton. 
Emperora of Music, Four, 431 W. 24, N. Y. 
Empire Comedy Four, Jan. 1-31, Rounachers, 

Vienna. 
Engleton, Nan. A Oa.. Elite, Davenport, la. 
Erb A Stanley, Mollne. 111. 

Ergottl A King, Circus eminent, Warsaw. Russia. 
Esmeralda, 8 Union Sq.. N. Y. 
E«pe. Dutton A Rape, 209 E. 14, N. Y. 



Esterbrooks, The, Miss, N. Y., Jr., B. R. 
Estelle A Wills, Jolly Grass Widows, B. R. 
Eugene A Mar, 1746 W. 103, Chicago. 
Evans A Lloyd, 208 Am. Bank Bldg.. Seattle. 
Evans Trio, 24 Bulnnch, Boston. 
Evans, Billy, Colouial Belles, B. R. 
Everett, Ruth, Ideals, B. R. 

Everett, Sophie, A Co., South and Henry, Jamaica, 
L. I. 



Fairchllda, Mr. A Mrs. Frank, 1040 47, Chicago. 

Falke A Coe, Jolly Grass Widows, B. R. 

l'u Ike, Elinor, Grand, Indianapolis. 

Fantas, Two, 211 E. 14. N. Y. 

I arli, Dave, 515 W. 6. Cincinnati. 

Farrell, Charlie, 332 Main, W. Everett, Mass. 

Farrell, Billy, Moss A Stoll, Eng. 

Favar's, Marguerite, Saratoga Hotel, Chicago. 

Fay, Ray F., Alamo, Cedar Rapids, la., ludef. 

Fay. Coley A Fay, 1553 Bway, N. Y. 

Faye, Elsie, Poll's. Scranton. 

Felix A Barry, Orpbeum, Brooklyn. 

Fentelle A Carr, Sheedy's, Fall River. 

Ferguson, Dave, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 

Ferguson A Du Pree, 313 B. 71. N. Y. 

Ferguson. Barney A Dick, 68 W. 53, Bayonne. 

Fern A Mack, Paterson, N. J. 

Fiddler A Shelton, 2713 Dearborn, Chicago. 

Field Boys, 148 B. 97. N. Y. 

Fields A Hanson, Lyric. Danville, 111. 

Fields A Wooley, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

Fllson A Errol, 122 So. Austin, Austin Station. 

Chicago. 
Fink, Henry, 150 Potomac, Chicago. 
Fisher, Mr. A Mrs. Perkins, 531 Washington, 

Brook 1 1 no, Mass. 
Finlay A Burke, Box 4193 Onset, Mass. 
Fisher, Robert, Lady Birds. B. R. 
Fisher A Berg, Rentz-Santley, B. R. 
Fltsgerald A Qulnn, Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

Flatow A Dunn, 205 E. 14. N. Y. 

Fleming, May Agnes, White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Flemen A Miller. Kentucky Belles, B. It. 

Flora. Mildred. Night Owls. B. R. 

Fletcher. Charles Leonard, K. A P. 58th St., N. Y. 

Flower, Dick J., Orpheum, Salt Lake. 

Flynn. Jas. A., 1213 Penn. Ave., Waiblngton. 

Fogerty, Frank, Empire, Paterson. 

Follett, Lonnle, 150 B. 107, N. Y. 

"Fords, Famous," 391 Gates, Brooklyn. 

Foreman, Edgar, A Co., Elks' Club, N. Y. 

Forrest. Edythe, Innocent Malda, B. R. 

Forrester, Sidney, Novelty. Denver. 

Foster A Dog, Keith's, Philadelphia. 

Fox, Will H.. Empire, Bradford, Eng. 

Fox, Mort, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

Fox A Du Ball, Bijou, Muskegon. Mich. 

Fox A Hughes, Empire, Boise, Idaho, indef. 

Fox, Will, Lady Birds. B. R. 

Francis, Adeline, Dodge's, Keokuk, la. 

Frank, George. Lady Birds. B. R. 

Franklin A Green, Dayton. O. 

Frani. Cogswell A Franc, 246 W. 21, N. Y. 

Francis, Harry, Jolly Girls, B. R. 

Frederic Bros. A Burns, Bennett's. Quebec. 

Frellgb, Lizzie. Trans-Atlantlcs. B. R. 

Frevoli, Frederick, O. H., Youngstown, O. 

Frey A Allen, Ideals, B. R. 

Fredo A Dare, 207 E. 14, N. Y. 

Frederick, Snyder A Poole, 200 N. Oay, Baltimore. 

Freeman Bros., Novelty, Topeka. 

French, Henri, Sherman House, Chicago. 

Frey Trio. Chicago Post, Chicago. 

Frosto. Chris. 917 W. 6. Faribault. Minn. 

Fullerton A Derry. Scenic, No. Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Futurity Winner. Temple, Detroit. 



O 



Galando, 82 Sumner, Brooklyn. 
Galetti's Monkeys, 864 N. Maplewood. Chicago. 
Gallagher A Barrett, Orpheum, San Francisco. 
Galloway, Albert B.. Orpheum. Turtle Creek, Pa, 
Garden A Somers, Toreadors, B. R. 
Gardiner Children. 1958 No. 8. Philadelphia. 
Gardner, Eddie. Orpheum. Newark. 0. 
Gardner A Maddern, Orpheum, Yonkers. 
Gardiner A Vincent, Empire. Coventry, Eng. 
Gardiner, Jack, Proctor's, Troy. 



HYDE & BEHMAN'S 

Amusement Enterprises 

Bijou Theatre, Brooklyn 

Folly " 

Hyde & Behman's, 

Olympic Theatre 

Star " 

Qayety " 

Newark •• Newark, N. J. 

Qayety " Pittsburg 

^ & Garter Theatre, Chicago 

We Use High-Class, Extra and Speoial Fea- 
tures at All Timea. Address All Communica- 
tions to the 

HYDE & BEHNAH AMUSEMENT CO., 

TEMPLE BAH 2UILDINC, 
BROOKLYN, N. T. 



44 



44 



(4 



44 



44 



Gardner, Andy, Bohemians, B. R. 

Gardner, Arline, 1958 N. 8, Phlla. 

Gartelle Bros.. 416 S. Main, Gloversvllle, N. T. 

Oath, Karl A Erina, Lyric, Joplln, Mo. 

Gavin, Piatt A Peaches, 4417 3d Ave., N. Y. 

Gaylor A Graff, 244 W. 16. N. Y. 

Gaylor, Bobby, 5108 Princeton, Chicago. 

Gehrue, Mayme, A Co., Alhainbra, N. Y. 

Celger A Walters, Orpheum, Oakland. 

Genaro-Theol Trio, Jan. 1-31, Appolo, Chemnitz, 

Ger. 
Gennero's Band, Ilammerstein's, New York. 
Gibson, Fay, Standard, Davenport, la., indef. 
Gillespie, Ed., Orpheum, Salt Lake. 
Oilbert, Jane, Rochester, N. Y. 
Gillette Sisters. Majestic, St. Paul. 
Gllmore, Stella. Jolly Glrla. B. R. 
Gllroy, Hayes A Montgomery, (J rand. Butte. 
Gladstone. Ida, 335 W. 50. N. Y. 
G locker, Chaa. A Anna, Rents- Sant ley, B. B. 
Godfrey A Henderson. 208 W. 34, N. Y. 
Goets, Nat., 1818 Tree, Donora, Pa. 
Goldsmith A Hoppe, Bennett's, Montreal. 
Gofortb A Doyle, Majestic, Ft. Worth. 
Gordon A Chalor, Bijou, Sheboygan, Wis. 
Gordon A Marx, 236 W. 38, N. Y. 
Gordon, Amy, Rose Sydell, B. R. 
Gordon, Cliff, 8 E. 108, N. Y. 
Gordon, Max, Reevea' Beauty Show, B. R. 
Gorman A Weat, Howard, Boston. 
Gosa, John, Star, Sisters vl lie. W. Va. 
Gossans, Bobby, 400 So. Smith, Col., O. 
Gotham Comedy Quartet, City Sports, B. R. 
Graces, Two, Miner's Americans, B. R. 
Grant, Anna, Pat Whlte'a Gaiety Glrla, B. R. 
Grant, Sydney, 10 W. 65, N. Y. 
Graham, Geo. W., Scenic, Providence, Indef. 
Oray A Graham. 34 Bullett, Roanoke. Va. 
Green. Sam, Whlte'a Gaiety Girls, B. R. 
Gregg, Frank, Tiger Lilies. B. R. 
Gregory, Geo. L.. A Co., 943 Lorlmer. Brooklyn. 
Gregorys, Five, Lleblrhs, Breslau, Ger. 
Grimes, Tom A Gertie, 1616 No. Front, Phlla. 
Grnet, Jack, Al. Marie Ideals, B. R. 



Hale, Corbln, A Miss Allen, 107 E. 31, N. Y. 
Hale A Harty. 319% Ind., Indianapolis. 
Hall, Isabel, Lady Birds, B. R. 



Leonard 



AND 



In an original act in one, "THE HEBREW FATHER AND SON." 



Ward 

2R AND SON." 



BOOKED SOLID. 



Also do a novelty in Italian. 



JOE M. WOOD, Agent. 



FOUR HOLLOWAYS 

Sailed per 8s. Adriatic Jan. 1; open Jan. 13, Coliseum, London, after a successful tour of 58 weeks 

in America. Good-bye to all friends. 

BOOKED SOLID TO 1910. 

ARODI 

Twenty-five Cents Each, Any Five for One Dollar 

Fifteen great Parodies to select from— "Dreaming," "He's a Cousin of Mine," " 'Neath the Old 
Cherry Tree, Sweet Marie," "Poor John," "San Antonio," "Honey Boy," "Everyone Was Meant for 
Someone," "Waiting at the Church," "Cheyenne," "My Irish Rosy," "Somebody's Waiting for You," 
"Grand Old Flag," "I Wonder if Tou Miss Me," "When You Know You're Not Forgotten, etc," 
and "Idaho." 

My Sketches, Monolopa and Parodies are the beat in the business. 8pecial price for special work. 
Song words, oomic or sentimental, $10.00. Melediea to words, $10.00. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED. EDDIE KELLEY, P. O. Box 404. Chicago, 






When anstocring advertisement* fctWJy mention Vablety. 



18 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



JUST A LITTLE DIFFERENT FROM THE BEST. 



Le MAIRE -a Le MAI 




RAPID FIRE HEBREW COMEDY 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST JUGGLER. 





INT! 



Recognized all over the world as tuch. 
The jufffler that they all try to copy. 
Booked solid two yean. Knockout. Management, BUTLER, JACOBS & LOWRIE. 

e» HALL s COLBORN ^ 

"The SWEDE and the HAPPY G IRL" 

Big success on Western States Vaudeville Asi'n. Booked solid until 
IMPERSONATIONS, MIMICRY AND TRICK PIANO PLAYING. 




HftKWY 



FIDDLER and SHELTON 

DOING THINGS WHICH COME TO SOME, BUT ALL "NEVER," 
En route, hooked by Western Vaudeville Association. Per. Add., 2701 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



THE DANCING WONDERS 



BROWN I WRIGHT 



Per. Address, 844 W. 45th St., N. Y. C. 



Management JACK LEVY. 



HARRY TATE'S (2. 

FISHING ^MOTORING 



INe 
England 
Australli 
Africa 



EIGHTEEN MINUTES OF COMEDY. 



HARRY L. WEBB 

THE MAN WHO TALKS AND SINGS. KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE LAUGH PRODUCER, 
Scoring BIG on the Western Vaudeville Association time and a long; route booked. 



HART TRIO 

INSTRUMENTALISTS AND VOCALISTS 



Exclusive Management 

MR. ALF. T. WILTON 



Suite 920, St. James Building 
NEW YORK CITY 



Anna s Effie Conley 



The Dainty Little Comedienne!, in STORY SONGS. 



Direction of JACK HVY 



Clarence Sisters 

"THE AUSTRALIAN NUGGETS." 
BOOKED SOLID. Direction AL M AYER, 

MORGAN and McGARRY 

Introducing Refined Singing. Expert Soft and Wooden Shoe and Aorobatio Dancing. 

Exclusive Agent, ALF T. WILTON. 



WILBUR AMOS 

THE CLEVER COMEDY JUGGLER. 

Not the greatest in the world, but a high-olass specialty that always pleases. 
THE CANDY KID OF THE WEST— Now Enjoying California. 



THE DAINTY SINGER OF DAINTY SONGS. 



MISS 



LILY LENA 



THIS WEEK AND NEXT, ORPHEUM, BOSTON. 



WIURRY 



LILLIAN 



CLAYTON and DREW 

"A Knight in Rome." 



HAVE YOUR CARD 



VARIETY 




Chas 



■ 




Burkhardt 



cc 



The Man With the Funny Slide" 

Late off Joe Weber's Co. 

Is ready to consider offers for the balance of this season 

Address all communications to L. H. FRANK, care Variety, Chicago Office, Chicago Opera House Block. 



Correspondents Wanted Wherever There is a Variety Performance. 

When answering advertisement* kindly mention Vartety. 



VARIETY 



19 



Cobb's Comer 

SATURDAY, JAN. 4, 1908. 

No. 97. A Weekly Word with WILL the 
Wordwrlght. 

COBB&EDWARDS' 

LATEST, VOW BEING BUNG BT 

MAY IRWIN 

■ The Pud) Tut Tastes the Sweetest 
Hm$s the Highest on the Tree." 

WILL D. COBB 

Wordwright, • 
1612 Broadway, NEW YORJL 



Ha'.:. Alfred. Rolllckers, E. I*.. 

Hall. Geo. F., 180 Center, Boston. 

Haley, Harry B., 236 Ogden, Chicago. 

Halperln, Nan, Bijou, 1'iqua, 0. 

Hammond ft Forrester, 101 W. 88, N. Y. 

Haney, Edith, ft Lee, Jr., 4118 Winona, Oenrer. 

Hanson ft Nelson, 092 10th St., Brooklyn. 

Hanson ft Drew, G. G. H., Grund Rapids. 

Hanvey, Clark & I'rldeau, Bijou, Lansing, Mich. 

Harris ft Baudall, Palace Hotel, Chicago. 

Harcourt, Frank, 44 Pleasant, Worcester. 

Hart, Fred, 393 8th Are., N. Y. 

Hart, J. C. ft Co.. Tiger Lilies, B. R. 

Hayes ft Carew, Bohemians, B. B. 

Hart, Sadie, 1163 Jackson, N. Y. 

Hart, Willie & Edith. 1918 S. 11. Philadelphia. 

Harland ft Bolllson, 224 W. 14, Kansas City. 

Harlowe, Beatrice, High Jinks, B. B. 

Harris, Sam. Lyric. K. Liverpool, O. 

Harrlty ft Herr, 123 Church. Lancaster, Pa. 

U arson, Jules, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. B. 

Harrington. Hilda, Bose Sydell, B. B. 

Harris, Bobby, Toreadors, B. B. 

Harris, Charley. Harry Bryant's, B. B. 

Harrison, Minnie, Brigadier. B. B. 

Harvey & Adams, Thomasville, Ga. 

Harvey ft De Vora, Bialto Bounders, B. B. 

Harvey. Elsie, 138 E. 14, N. Y. 

Harvey, Harry, 3110 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Haskell, Loney, 47 Lexington, N. Y. 

Hawtrey, Win., ft Co.. Grpheum, Minneapolis. 

Hayes ft Haley, 147 W. 127, N. Y. 

Hayes, Edmund, Jolly Girls, B. B. 

Haynes, Beatrice, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Hayes ft Wynn, 539 Bergen, Newark. 

Healy ft Vance, 215 W. 106. N. Y. 

Hearn, Tom, Pantomime, Liverpool, Eng. 

Heath, Thomas G., Grpheum, New Orleans. 

Heclow, Charles ft Marie, 452 N. High, Chilli 

cot he, O. 
Helm Children, Majestic, Montgomery. 
Hallbacks, The, 2910 Armour, Chicago. 
Hellman, Benj., Toreadors, B. B. 
Heath ft Emerson, 200 Berriman, Brooklyn. 
Henly ft Elliott, 4925 Cypress. Pittsburg. 
Heuman Trio, 155 So. Channing, Elgin, 111. 
Henry ft Francis, Jolly Grass Widows, B. R. 
Henry ft Young, 270 W. 39th, N. Y. 
Herbert, Mabel, 404 Main, Worboru, Mo. 
Herbert the Frog Man, Crystal. Trinidad, Col. 
Herron, Bertie, Novelty, Brooklyn. 
Herttman, Julia, Imperials, B. B. 
Herrmann, Adelaide. Grpheum, Youngstown, O. 
Hess Sisters, 258 W. 55. N. Y. 
Heumnn Trio, Grand, Danville, Pa. 
Hewlettes, The, Fritz. Portland, Ore., indef. 
Hlbbert ft Warren, Gotham. Brooklyn. 
Hickman, George, Grass Widows, B. B. 
Hiestand, Chas. F., 2639 Iowa Ave., St. Louis. 
Hill, Cherry ft Hill, Gay Morning Glories, B. B. 
Hill, Edmons Trio. 262 Neilson, New Brunswick. 
Milliard. Robert, Proctor's. Troy. 
Hlltons, Marvelous, Fay Foster, B. R. 
Hlllyers. Three, Wonderland. Du Bois, Pa. 
Ml dps & Remington, Harrison, N. Y. 
Hlnman, Capt. Sidney, Hippodrome, Pittsburg. 
Hobelman, Martha, Harry Bryant's, B. B. 
Hoch, Emil, ft Co.. Colonial. Norfolk. 
Uolman Bros., Clrco Bell. Yuertan, Mexico. 
HolmaD, Al & Mamie, Olympic. Kleff, Bussia. 
Holmes, Gertrude Bennett, 13 Central, Greendale, 

Mass. 
Holiuan, Harry, Majestic, Little Bock. 
Holt. Alf.. Moss-atoll Tour, England, Indef. 
Houston, Fritz, 292 King, London, Ont., Can. 
Howard Bros.. 229 W. 38, N. Y. 
Howard ft Cameron. 479 No. Clinton, Bochester. 
Howard ft Esher, Family, Davenport, la. 
Howan ft Kearney, Orientals, B. B. 
Howard ft Howard. Detroit, Mich. 
Howard ft St. Clair, Charing Cross rd., London. 
Howard. Geo. F.. Canton. O. 

Howard, Harry ft Mae, 155 So. Halsted, Chicago. 
Howard, Jos. B., Aleda, I1L, Indef. 
Howard, May, 8603 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 
Howard's Ponies ft Dogs, Blooralngton, 111. 
Hoyden ft Hoyden, Crystal, Anderson, Ind. 
Hoyle, William, 16 5, Attleboro, Mass. 
Iloyt, Frances, ft Co., Sherman House, Chicago. 
Haehn, Musical, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Huegel Bros., 2417 French. Erie, Pa. 
Hughes, Florence. Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
Hnested, Sadie, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. R. 
Hurleys, The, 185% So. Orange, Newark. 
Huston, Arthur, Majestic, Houston. 
Hyde, Walt. M.. ft Co., 8506 5. Pittsburg. 
Hyde, Mr. ft Mrs. Robert, Camp Rett, Cbemu 

Lake, Clifton, Me., Indef. 



Imhof ft Corlnne, Empire, B. R. 

Imperial Musical Four, 148 Dearborn, Chicago. 



Inn.an, The Great, 312 W. 24, N. Y. 
Irwin, Jack, Tiger Lilies, B. B. 
Italia, 356 Mass. Ave., Boston. 



Jack Lew ft Bro.. 9249 So. Chicago, So. Chicago. 
Jackson Family, Moss ft Stoll Tour. 
Jackson, Harry ft Kate, Grpheum, Boston. 
Jacobs ft West, Sam Devere, B. B. 
James, Byron, Bijou. Flint, Mich., indef. 
Jenkins ft Clark, Box 205, Appleton, Wis. 
Jennings ft Jewell, Knickerbockers, B. B. 
Jennings ft Benfrew, 338 Spruce, Chelsea, Mass. 
Jennings, William, White's Gaiety Girls, B. B. 
Jerome, Nat. S., 1287 Washington, N. Y. 
Jess, John W., Lid Lifters, B. B. 
Johnson, Chester, 333 3d Ave., N. Y. 
Johnson, Mark, Star, Chicago. 

Johnsou Bros. & Johnson, 515 Brushton, Pittsburg. 
Johnson, Geo., Scribner's Big Show, B. R. 
Johnsou, Jess P., 622 So. 4, Camden, N. J. 
Johnsons, Musical, Alhambra, London, Eng. 
Johnston ft Buckley, Empire, B. B. 
Jones & Sutton. 102 W. 17, N. Y. 
Jones ft Walton, 13, Star, Hannibal, Mo. 
Jorden, Tom, Lady Birds, B. B. 



Kallnowskl Bros., Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 
Kalmo, Chas. ft Ada, May wood. N. J. 
Keegan ft Mack. 92 3d Ave., N. Y. 
Keife, Zena. 508 W. 135, N. Y. 
Keeley Bros., Poll's, Scran ton. 
Keene, Juggling, 1360 Boston Bd., N. Y. 
Kelly, Sam & Ida, Grand, Madison, Wis. 
Kelly, John T., Elmhurst, L. I. 
Kelly ft Bose. 40 W. 28, N. Y. 
Kelly, M. J., 46 Johnson, Brooklyn. 
Kelly, Walter C, Bennett's, Ottawa. 
Kelly ft Massey, Family, Chester. Pa. 
Keltners, The, Spark's, Kansas City. 
Kemp's 'Pales of the Wild, Keith's, Portland, Me. 
Kennedy Bros, ft Mac, 32 Second, Dover, N. H. 
Kennedy ft Wllkens, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Keno & D'Arville. Santa Barbara. 
Keno, Walsh ft Melrose, Hatbaway's, New Bed- 
ford. 
Kenton, Dorothy, Columbia, Cincinnati. 
Keogh ft Francis, Majestic, Birmingham. 
Kherns, Arthur M., 6 Wisconsin, Chicago. 
Klein, Ott Bros, ft Nicholson, 16 W. 36. Bayonne. 
Kingsbury, The. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
King, Sam. ft Nellie, 2374 Pitkin, Brooklyn. 
Kins Ners, 343 N. Clark, Chicago.' 
K bisons. The, 21 E. 20, N. Y. 
Klrschhorns. 207 So. 13, Omaha. 
Knight ft Seaton, 1806 Morgan, Springfield, 0. 
Knight Bros, ft Sawtelle, 1710 Cornelia, Chicago. 
Knowles, Harry, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Knox, W. H., Ely sinn Grove, Tucson, Aria. 
Koeper, Harry J., High Jinks, B. B. 
Kokln, Prince, 400 Concord, Chester, Pa. 
Kolfage, Duke, Crystal, Elwood, Ind., Indef. 
Koppe, Orpheum, Portsmouth, O., Indef. 
Kratons, The, Bennett's, Montreal. 
Kretore, 119 Wash, Altoona. 
Kurtis-Busse. 6 W. 8. Erie. Pa. 
Kyle, Ingram, Allegheny, Pa. 



Ln Centra ft La Kue, 532 E. 18. N. Y. 
Le Clair & West, Star, Wllkensburg, Pa. 
La Dells, Four, Orpheum. Portsmouth, 0. 
Ladell ft Crouch, Orpheum, St. Paul. 
La Fleur, Joe, Orpheum, Kansas City. 
La Toska. Phil, Bijou, Muskegon, Mich. 
Lakola, Harry, Orpheum. Canton, O. 
Lambert ft Williams. 149 E. 22. N. Y. 
Lamb ft King, 353 State. Chicago. 
Lamb's Manikins, 465 Pippin, Portland, Ore. 
Larklns ft Burns, Luna Pk.. Mexico City, Met. 
Latona, Frank ft Jen., Empire, Hackuey, Loudon, 

Eng. 
Lawler ft Daughters. 100 W. 105. N. Y. 
La Maze Bros., Poll's. Waterbury. 
La Mont's Cockatoos, 254 E. Ontario, Chicago. 
Laredo ft Blake, 325 E. 14, N. Y. 
La Man-be. Frankle, 436 E. 26, Chicago. 
1* Tell Bros., O. II., Allentown. 
La Toy Bros., Parisian Widows, B. B. 
La Van ft La Valette. Majestic. Pittsburg, indef. 
La Veen & Cross, Hatbaway's, Lowell. 
La Velle ft Grant. 226 E. 14. N. Y. 
Lavette ft Doyle, 840 N. 2, Hamilton, O. 
La Vine Cimaron Trio, Keith's, Jersey City. 
LtVine & Leonard, Empire, London. Eng.. Indef. 
Lavine ft Hurd. New Century Maids, B. B. 
Langdons. The, 704 6th Ave., Milwaukee. 
Lauder. Harry, Court. Liverpool. Eng. 
Lawrence, Pete, Al Beeves' Big Show, B. B. 
La Gray, Dollle, Bijou. Bacine, Wis., indef. 
Lee Tung Foo, 1223 2d, E. Oakland. 
Le Clair ft Bowen, Arcade, Toledo, indef. 
Le Clairs, Two. 403 W. 51, N. Y. 
Le Pelletiers, 144 E. Elizabeth. Detroit. 
Leahy, Frank W., Manhattan. Norfolk, Va., Indef. 
Leeds, Adelaide, Parisian Widows, B. R. 
La Fevre ft St. John, BIJou. Duluth. 
Le Malre ft Le Malre. 673 Lenox. N. Y. 
Leigh. Andrew, Lady Birds, B. B. 
Leightons, Three, Majestic, Chicago. 
Lennon, Herbert Bert, Majestic, Houston. 
Leonl ft Leon I. Marlon, Marlon. O. 
Leonard, James F., Yankee Doodle Girls, B. B. 
Leonard. Jos. and Sadie. Orpheum, Omaha. 
Leonard, (Jus, Acme, Sacramento, indef. 
Leontlna. Marie. 17 E. 97. N. Y. 
Leonore ft St. Claire, 4948 East on, St. Louis. 
LeBoy ft Woodford, 2417 Wylle Ave., Pittaburg. 
Italic, Bert, ft Co., Orpheum, Salt Lake. 
Lester, Will. 281 John B., Detroit. 
Levllle ft Sinclair. Orpheum, Easton. Pa. 
Levlno. Dolph ft Susie, 14 Prospect, Weathave», 

Conn. 
Levy, Bert. Jan. 20, Maryland, Baltimore. 
Levy, Mrs. Jules, and Family. 162 W. 98, N. Y. 
Lewis ft Chapin, Fay Foster. B. B. 
Lewis ft Harr, 125 W. 10, N. Y. 
Lewis. Phil, 121 W. 110. N. Y. 
Lewis, Oscar. White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 
Lewis ft Thompson, Merry Maidens, B. R. 
Le Witt ft Ashmore. 296 No. State. Chicago. 
Llbbey ft Trayer, 302 W. 47, N. Y. 



Llna ft Calljul, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Linn. Benn, Half Dime, Jersey City, N. J., indef. 

Loder, Chas. A., Bose Lawn, Areola, Pa. 

Lomlsou, Wllliard, 228 Montgomery, Jersey City. 

Long. John, Family, Erie, Pa., Indef. 

Louise and Dottle, Bowery Burlesquers, B. B. 

Lovltts, The, 314 Beverly rd., Brooklyn. 

Low.-ll ft Lowell, Moss ft Stoll, Eng., to Nov. 28. 

Lucas Jlmmie, Trent, Trenton. 

Luce & Luce, Empire, Albany. 

Lucier, Marguerite, (Juincy Adams Sawyer Co. 

Luckies, Two, 397 Sumter, Brooklyn. 

Lucy ft Lucier, Hayinarkct, Chicago. 

Lulgi Plcaro Trio, Gaiety, Galesburg, 111. 

Lutz Bros., Bijou, Quincy, 111. 

Lukena, 4, Beading, Pa. 

Lynton, Chris, Empire, Loa Angeles, Indef. 

Lyons, Jr., Champagne Girls, B. B. 



Macarte's Monkeys, Trent, Trenton. 

.Macarte Sisters, Bennett's, Montreal. 

Mack, Wilbur. Bennett's, Ottawa. 

Macks. Two. 245 N. 59. Phi la. 

Muck ft Dugal, Acme, Sacramento. 

Mack, James, Wesley, Bose Sydell, B. B. 

MacDonaugh, Ethel, 08 W. 107, N. Y. 

Magulre, H. S., North Adams, Mass. 

"Madle," 403 W. 51, N. Y. 

Mnlir. Agnes, Maryland, Baltimore. 

Majestic Musical Four, Colonial, Norfolk. 

Makarenkos Duo, 306 E. 5, N. Y. 

Malcbow, Geo., Bijou, Osbkosh, Wis., indef. 

Malvern Troupe, White's Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Manbasset Comedy Four, Bose Sydell, B. R. 

Manley ft Ncrrls, 517 Walnut, Hamilton, G. 

Mantells, Marionette, Family, Butte. 

Marablni Lulgi, Gaiety, Galesburg. 

Marlon & Pearl, Majestic, Dallas. 

Marco Twins, World Beaters. B. R. 

Mario Trio, Clrco Pubillones, Mex., Mex. 

Marks, Clarence, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Marion ft Lillian. Tiger Llllles. B. R. 

Marlowe, Plunkett ft Co., 27 Gay lord, Dorchester, 

Mass. 
Marsh, Joe, 3122 Lucas, St. Louis. 
Martin, Dave & Percie, Lyric, Decatur, 111. 
Martinetti ft Sylvester, 2051 North Carlisle. Pblla. 
Martynne, C. It., Orpheum, Leavenworth, Indef. 
Martynne, Great, Bose Sydell, B. R. 
Martin ft Crouch, Coeur D'Alene, Spokane, indef. 
Marshall ft King, Rentz-Sautley, B. B. 
Martini ft Maximilian, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. R. 
Marty. Joe, 1623 Hancock. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Maruna, Nevaro Maruna, Keeney's, New Britain. 
Mason A Fllburn, Coeur D'Alene, Spokane, Indef. 
Mason ft Keeler, Shea's, Toronto. 
Masse, Ed ft Nettie, Portland, Pa. 
Mathews, Joca, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. K. 
Mau's Dogs, O. H., New Brunswick. N. J. 
Maxwell ft Dudley, 106 W. 00th, N. Y. 
May, Arthur O., P. O. Box 523, Norman, Okla. 
Mayer, Bobert, High Jinks, B. R. 
Mayne, Elizabeth. Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
McCabe, Jack, Century Girls, B. R. 
McCabe ft Peters, Ashland Hotel, Kansas City. 
McCale, Larry, Imperials, B. R. 
McCarthy, Myles, Union Hotel, Chicago. 
McCarvers. The. 218 W. 28. N. Y. 
McCree, Junle, La Salle, Chicago, indef. 
McCUllough. Walter, Alexander Hotel, Chicago. 
McCune ft Grant. 3 Banton, Pittsburg, Pa. 
McFarland, Frank. 311 W. 142. N. Y. 
McFarland ft McDonald, Colonial Belles, B. R. 
McFarland ft Murray, Champagne Girls, B. B. 
McGlnnls Bros., 75 Bradford. Springfield, Mass. 
McGrath ft Paige, 58 Wash, Middletown. Conn. 
McGregor, Lulu, Grand, Altoona, Pa., indef. 
McLaughlin, L. Clair, Sherldanvllle, Pa. 
McLeod, Andy, Kentucky Belles, B. R. 
McMahon's Watermelon Girls, Proctor's, Jersey 

City. 
McKenzie & Shannon, K. & P., Albany. 
McKinley, Nell. Jersey Lilies. B. B. 
MeNamee, Whitney, Fitcbburg, Mass. 
Mc Williams, G. B., Orpheum, New Orleans. 
Meaney, Lottie, ft Co., Bijou, Winnipeg. 
Melville ft Higglns, 272 So. 2d, Brooklyn. 
Melvln Bros., Kentucky Belles, B. R. 
Melvey Trio, 97 Psrk, Chicago. 
Merrltt, Raymond, Empire, Los Angeles, Indef. 
Middleton. Gladys, Fischer's, Los Angeles, indef. 
Mlgnon. Helene, Empire, St. Paul, Indef. 
Mills, Joe, Rolllckers, B. B. 
Mills, Wm., 20th Century Maids, B. R. 
Millard, Frank. Lady Birds, B. K. 
Millard Bros., Cracker Jacks, B. B. 
MUIership Sisters, Watson's. B. R. 
Miller, Elizabeth, 1726 W. 31 PI.. Cleveland. 
Miller, Grace, Phillips'. Richmond, Ind., indef. 
Mills ft Lewis. 114 E. 11, N. Y. 
Millers. Three Musical, Dodge's, Keokuk, la. 
Millman Trio. Tlvoli. Bremen. Ger. 
Mills ft Morris, Clarendon Hotel, N. Y. 
Mitchell ft Cain, 611 Sterling PI., Brooklyn. 
Mitchell Sisters, Monarch, Lawton, Okla., Indef. 
Mitchell ft Qulnn, 20 Bay 26. Bensonhurst, L. I. 
Mitchells, The. Elmira. N. Y. 
Monroe, George. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Montambo ft Hurl Falls, Empire, B. R. 
Montrose, Louise, Majestic. Chicago. 
Montague's Cockatoos, 54 W. 26, N. Y. 
Montgomery, Geo. P., Box 488, Harrlsburg. Pa. 
Montgomery ft Moore, 1009 Buttonwood, Phlla. 
Montray, 814 Western Ave., Allegheny, Pa. 
Morette Sisters. 1237 Lee. Phllsdelphia. 
Moon. Eddie. Majestic. Ft. Worth. 
Mooney & Holbein, Hippodrome, Accrlngtnn, Eng. 
Moore. Billy. National. Steubcnvllle, O. 
Moore ft Dillon, Fay Foster, B. B. 
Moore. Tom, Colonial, Lynn, Mass. 
Moorehead. Harry (Dreamland), Norfolk, Va. 
Morgan ft Chester, Vanity Fair, B. R. 
Morgan, Lou, Parisian Belles, B. R. 
Morgan ft McC.arry. 18, Novelty, Denver. 
Morre, Chas., Lady Birds. B. B. 
Morre. Helen J., Nlgbt Owls, B. R. 
Morrelle, Marie, 1724 Mi Main, Parsons. Kan. 
Morris ft Kramer, Dainty Duchess, B. R. 
Morse, Billy, Anheuser's. Aberdeen, Wash., indef. 
Morton, James J.. 147 W. 45, N. Y. 
Morton, Ed., Rolllckers. B. B. 
Mozarts, The, Olympic, So. Bend. 
Muehlners. The, Valley, Junction. la. 
Mullen ft Corelll, Orpheum, San Francisco. 
Mueller ft Mueller, Lyric. Dayton, O. 
Muller, Chum ft Muller, 10, Charlotte. Ashville. 



Tha Chat. K. Harris Caurier 

Devoted to the interests of Songs and Singers. 

Address all communications to 

CHAS. K. HARRIS. 81 W. 81st St., V. Y. 

(Meyer Cohen, Mgr.) 



Vol. 9. 



New York. Jan. 4, 1908. 



No. 5. 



Have you heard Chas. K. Harris' New 
Baby song 

" There's Another Picture 
In My Mamma's Frame" 

Write or call for it at once. Slides 
now ready for this beautiful baby song; 
every slide a hit with any audience. The 
best baby song since "ALWAYS IN THE 
WAY." Slide* $5.00 per set. Write at 
once. 



Muiiini Sisters, Washington Society Girls, B. K. 

Munger, Mort M.. Frankfort, Ind. 

Murphy, Whitman ft Co., National, San Fraucisco. 

Murphy ft Andrews, 116 Washington pi., N. 1*. 

Murphy ft Magee, Ideals, B. R. 

Murphy ft Palmer, 309 3d ave., N. Y. 

Murphy ft Wlllard, 605 No. 7th. Philadelphia. 

Murphy, Geo. P., Tiger Lilies, B. R. 

Murray, Elizabeth M., 13. C. O. II., Indianapolis. 

Murray Sisters, 239 W. 52, N. Y. 

Murray, Wm. W., 223 E. 14, N. Y. 

Murtba, Lillian, 211 E. 10. N. Y. 

Murray ft Williams. Crystal, Elkhart, Ind. 

Musketeers, Three, Jolly Grass Widows, B. R. 



Nagel ft Adams, Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 

Narelle, Marie, Chrlstchuich, New Zealand, Indef. 

Natus, Julie, Tiger Lilies. B. U. 

Nawn, Tom, ft Co.. 420 W. 52, Pblla. 

NefT. John. 130 Main, Brldge|»ort. 

Neills, Nelll ft Chapman, 1652 E. Main. Rochester. 

Nelson Fariuini Troupe, 3141 Beverly rd., Brooklyn. 

Nelson, Katherlne, 10 Howland, Roxbury, Mass. 

Nelson ft Egbert, 483 Atlantic, Pittsburg. 

Nevada ft Eden, 243 W. 43, N. Y. 

Newell Sisters. Jolly Girls, B. R. 

Newell ft Nlblo, Empire, Popular, London, Eng. 

Newman, Jules, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Niemeyer ft Odell, Blue Ribbon Girls, B. R. 

Nlcolal, Ida, Bohemians, B. R. 

Night With the Poets, Orpheum, New Orleans. 

Noble, Billy, 20th Century Maids, B. R. 

Nolan, Fred, Boston Belles, B. R. 

Norman's, Juggling Six, 5804 Mansfield, Chicago. 

North. Bobby, 45 W. 116th, N. Y. 

Nosses, The, 179 W. 47th. N. Y. 

Nugent, Eddie, Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

Nugent, J. 0., The Oaks, Canal Dover, O. 



O'Brien-Havel. 616 52. Brooklyn. 
Odell ft Hart, 2063 Strand, Seattle. 
Odell & Kinley. 127 W. 21, N. Y. 
Ogden, Helen, 279 Clybourue, Chicago. 
O'Hanna, Nan, (>. O. II., Indianapolis. 
Olivette, 225 Pacific. Brooklyn. 
Omega. Ollle, Parisian Widows, B. R. 
"Onetta." Park Hotel, Port Chester, N. Y. 
Ontbank ft Blanchetto, P. O., Boston, Mass. 
O'Neill, J. II., ft Co., National, Erie, Pa. 
O'Nell. Tommle. White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 
Orbasany's Inna, Majestic, Birmingham. 
Ollfans, Three, Castle, Bloomington, 111. 
O'Regan, Box 305, Ottawa, Can. 
Orloff. Olga, Toreadors, B. R. 
O'Rouke ft Marie. Merry Makers, B. R. 
Otto Bros., 10 Howland, Roxbury, Mass. 



Palmer & Dockman, Majestic, Waco, 1\i%. 

Palmer & Sax ton, 110 B. 14. N. Y. 

Palfrey ft Hoelller. Itlverslde, L. I. 

Paradise Alley, Bennett's, Ottawa. 

Parisian Grand Opera Co.. 636 Lexington, N. Y. 

Parks, Dick, 1208 E. 25, Los Angeles. 

Parmelee ft Mack, Lyric, Cleveland. 

Patton, Grace, Kolllckers, B. R. 

Paullnetti ft Plquo. 242 Franklin. Phlla. 

Peudletons, The, 185 Pittsburg, New Castle. 

Pero ft Wilson. 3.15 Temple, Washington, O. 

Pearl, Katbryn, Rolllckers, B. R. 

Pearl, Violet. Kolllckers. B. R. 

Pelot, Fred ft Annie, 101 Westminster, Atlantic 

City. 
Popper Twins. Lindsay. Ont., Can. 
Perry ft White. Miss N. Y., Jr.. B. R. 
Perry, Frank L , 747 Buchanan. Minneapolis. 
Perry. Clayton. Ideals. B. R. 
Fetching Bros., Orpheum, Minneapolis. 
Peters. Phil ft Nettle. Bennett's, Ixmdon. 
Pbllbrooks ft Reynolds, 220 E. 78, N. Y. 
Phillips Sisters, Majesties, B. R. 
Piercy ft Fulda, 1928 I'atterson. Baltimore. 
Piccolo Midgets. Orpheum, New Orleans. 
Pike. Lester, Fairbaven. N. J. 
Plottis. The. Family. Butte. 
Plum. Anna. Tacomab, Taeomah, Wash. 
Polrer's Three. Castle Bloomington, 111. 
Pollard. Jeanne. World Beaters. B. R. 
•Polly Pickles' Pets ln Petland," G. 0. II.. 

Syracuse. 
Posner. Allan II.. 430 Central Park W., N. Y. 
Potter ft Hartwell. Champagne Glrli, B. R. 
Powers Bros., 15 Trask. Providence. 
Power. Coletta ft Co.. 170 Field. Detroit. 
Prampin Trio. .147 W. 4<>. N. Y. 



1 \\'hcn answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




AND \A/HI 




POSITIVELY THE BEST DANCING ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



Week Jan. 6, Heeney'i, New Britain 



Curtis, Palmer 

In " MAMA'S DARLING BOY," By AARON HOPFMAN 

Booked solid by our Mascot, Harry Leonhardt. 
Verdict of press and public, bigger hit than the School Act. 



AND 
CO. 



JAMES 



»■ LUCIA COOPER 



"CHATTERING CHUMS." 
WEEK JAN. 6, OATETY. MILWAUKEE. "Gee, Blutch made me laugh." 

PRINCE and VIRGINIA 

In a Novelty German Comedy and Character Singing Act. 

Want engagement with good Dramatic or Burlesque Company for next season. 
Both play strong parts in comedy and soubrette. 

Keith's Theatre, Phila., This Week. Per. Address, 615 Creig-hton St., Phila., Pa. 

JENNINGS and JEWELL 



GERMAN COMEDIANS. 



Second Season Robie's "Knickerbockers." 



Tdiiedn,Fel ix £Cldxton 

Open for Clubs and Sunday Nights, 
January, February. Week March qth 
and later open. 

Per Add., 831 E. 03d Street. New York City. 
OPEN FOR SUNDAY NIGHTS AND CLUBS. 

Tel. 6480— 79th St. 




THE ASTRELLAS 

Presenting Their Original Song and Dancing* Novelty in Vaudeville. Address, care VARIETY. 

SNITZ MOORE 

In the Comedy-Dramatic Playlet "A SELF-MADE MAN." 
One of the best offerings of the new year, as acknowledged by press and public everywhere. 

Address VARIETY, Chicago Office. 




x. 



AND 




ULVEY 



Under the Direction of MISS JENIE JACOBS, 1402 Broadway, New YorK 



Two NOVELTIES of MERIT I (la one not) Presented by 



JNO.ZOUBOULAKIS 

CLAY CARTOONIST AND MUSICAL VIRTUOSO 

14 Minutes. (Seven la "one"; open or olose.) 




se 



K1ETY 



KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY. 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADING OF 

REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS " 

AT FOLLOWING RATES: 



1-2 Inch tingle ©ol, $3.00 monthly, net 

Inch S ■ 6.00 M 

1-2 Inoh double ©ol, 6.00 " " 

1 Inoh » 10.00 ■ " 



2 Inohee double ool., $20.00 monthly, not 
1-2 Inoh aoroee page, 13.60 M M 

1 Inoh Jf 22.00 " " 

* 44.00 " " 



2 Inohee " 

Larger Space Pro Rata 
No advertiaetnent under this 'heading aooepted for less than one month and no preferred position 
r given. Remittance must accompany advertisements forwarded by mail. 

Cash discount for 6 and IS months. 



"The sort of Entertainment that Advances Vaudeville." 



«MAS p 

E. ■— 



PRESENTING 

GEORGE 
ARLISS' 
FARCE 



V 
EVANS 



"ITS 
UP 
TO 
YOU. 



WILLIAM" 

cegto" 

PERMANENT ADDRESS. CHICOPEE FAXL8. MASS. 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 




AUOH 




Trained Australian Cockatoos 

DELIVERING THE GOODS 

It is known by press and public to be the act of merit No posing, stalling or faking with any mechanical device. It is the act that has trained birds. Yes tht 
act has birds doing back somersaults, and they do it in mid-air. 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



21 



Gus 

Edwards 
Says: 

that he wishes all his friends a 
HAPPY NEW YEAR! So does "THE 
HOUSE MELODIOUS," 1512 Broad- 
way. 

P. S. — Maude Earle is doing fine 
with the Schoolboys and Girls now 
playing on the Orpheum Circuit. 

MORE P. S— That was some Party, 
that "Blonde Party" GUS gave New 
Year's eve at Martin's. Did you catch 
it? Say Martin was tickled to death. 

GUS EDWARDS MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 



Price, Bob. Natlonoacope, Montreal. 
Price. John U., & Co.. 211 E. 14. New York. 
Prltxkow, Louis, Century Girls, B. R. 
Pronlt Trio, & E. Main, Springfield, O. 
Pryors, The, 30 No. Main, Providence. 
Psycho, Mile., Mansfield, O., indef. 
Pudgle A Emmett, 464 Blewett, Seattle. 
Pullen, Louella, 194 Jefferson, Trenton. 
Pullman Porter Mulds, Hammersteln's, N. Y. 



Quaker City Quartet, 408 Macon, Brooklyn. 
Quigg, Mackey & Nickerson, Penberg Stock Co. 

(Eastern). 
Qulnn * Mitchell, 20 Bay 26. Bensonburst, L. I. 



Radford A Valentine, Oxford, London, to Feb. 10. 

Ratlin's Monkeys, Novelty, Brooklyn. 

Rain Dears, Majestic, Chicago. 

Rainbow Sisters. Dreamland, McKeesport. Pa. 

Raleigh A Harrington, 233 Winter, Hagerstown, 
Md. 

Ralston & Son, Phillips, Richmond, Ind. 

Rastus A Banks, Flora, Amsterdam, Holland. 

Ranfs, The. Grand, Fargo, N. D. 

Rankin, Virginia, Tbeatorium, Wassilon, Mo. 

Rankin & Von Kaufman, Temple, Ft. Wayne. 

Rawson A Juue, Phoenicia, N. V. 

Raymond & Harper. 6400 Lexington, Cleveland. 

Ray doh', Al., Bull Dogs, 13 Burtls, Auburn, N. Y. 

Razarfs, The. 4503 No. 20, Phlla. 

Ray, Fred, & Co., Hopkins, Louisville. 

Raymond, Frederlcka, 16 E. 88th. N. Y. 

Raynor, Val, Trans-Atlantics, B. R. 

Reattlno & Stevens. 114 E. 11. N. Y. 

Reded & Hadley, World Beaters, B. R. 

Red Raven Cadets, Cincinnati. 

Redford & Winchester, Proctor's, Troy. 

Reed Bros., 48 Saxtou, Dorchester, Mass. 

Reed & St. John, 454 Manhattan, N. Y. 

Regal Trio. 116 W. Washington pi., N. Y. 

Reld Sisters. 53 Broad, Elizabeth. 

Reed & Earl. Chester Park. Los Angeles. 

Reed, Harry L. , Washington, Buffalo, indef. 

Reeves. Al, Reeves' Beauty Show, B. R. 

Remington, Mayme, Travel, 13, Orpheum, St. 
Paul. 

Renards, Three, Lyric, Dayton, O. 

Rennee Family. Sodinl's, Clinton. la. 

Reno, Geo. B., & Co., Empire, Cardiff. Wales. 

Renshaw. Bert, Majestic, La Salle. 111., Indef. 

Reuzetta & Lyman, Trocadero, B. R. 

Rever & Yulr. Champagne Girls. B. R. 

Reynard, Ed F.. Proctor's, Albany. 

Reynolds, Abe. Miss N. Y.. Jr., B. R. 

Rhodes & Engel. 223 Chauncey, Brooklyn. 

Rice. Al. 262 Springfield, Newark. 

Rice & Cohen. Orpheum, San Francisco. 

Rice, True, 1229 State, Milwaukee. 

Rice & Rimer. 343 E. 142d, N. Y. 

Rice & Provost. Athamhra, N. Y. 

Rice Ac Walters. Boston Belles. B. R. 

Richards. Chris, Columbia, Cincinnati. 

Rich Duo, Roseland, Rowland, III. 

Rich. Jack ft Bertha, Grand, Portland, Wash. 

Rlley. Frank. Orientals, B. R. 

Ronaldos, The. Blpes, Kokomo, Ind. 

Richards. Great, Keeney'a, New Britain. 

Richards & G rover, Bijou, Quincjr, III. 

Ring & Williams. 102 Liberty. Baltimore. 

itltter «& Foster, Alhamhra, Paris, France. 

Roberts, Four, 140 W. 36. N. Y. 

Roberta, Hayes ft Roberta, Gaiety, Galeshurg. 

Roberts. Slgna. Majestic. St. Paul. 

Robcrt-de-Mont Trio, 722 W. 14th PL, Grand 
Rapids. 

Roblsch & Chlldrcis, G. O. H.. Grand Rapids. 

Robinson & Grant, 200 8th ave.. N. Y. 

Robinson, Parquet te Trio, Allentowil, Pa. 

Robinson, Tom. Scribner's Big Show. B. R. 

Rockawnv & Conway, Temple, Ft. Wayne, 

Rogers & Mackintosh. 121 W. 42d. N. Y. 

Romola. Boh. BI|ou, Davenport. la.. Indef. 

Rooney & Bent. K. & P. 23d St.. N. Y. 

Rooney, Kntie. Poll's, Springfield. 

Rooney Sisters. 807 N. Patterson Pk. Ave., Bal- 
timore. 

Roscoe & Sims. Rentz-Santley. B. R. 

Rose A Fills. Yankee Doodle Girls. B. R. 

Ross & Lewis, Surrey, London. Fng. 

Rosso & Slmms. Bowery Burlesquers. B. R. 

Rousek. Jack. Air-Dome. Leavenworth. Indef. 

Rowland. Franklin. Atlantic Garden, N. Y. 

Royal Musical Five, 240 So. Oth. Brooklyn. 



Russell A Held, Sheedy's, Fall River. 
Russell, Fred. Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 
Russell, Fred P., Empire, Plttsfleld, Masa. 
Russell ft Davis, Pastime, Atlanta, Indef. 
Ryan ft Richfield, Colonial, N. Y. 
Ryan ft White, Keeney'a, New Britain. 

8 

Sattler, Chas., Lady Birds, B. R. 

Sanford ft Darlington, 2422 So. Adler, Phlla. 

Salvaggis, 0, Miss N. Y.. Jr., B. R. 

Sandow ft Lampert, Orientals, B. R. 

Schaar Trio, Varieties, Terre Haute. 

Schack, Nat, O. H., Greenville, O. 

Schell's, Mme. Clrco Bell, Mexico City, to Jan. 4. 

Schepp, Grover, Rolllckera, B. R. 

Schmldllng. Harry H.. 287 W. Monroe, Chicago. 

Schuster, Milton, Palace, Boston, Indef. 

Schrock ft Rice, Academy, Chicago. 

Scott, Edouard, Grand, Reno, Nev., indef. 

Sears, Gladys, Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Sefton, Harry, & Co.. Empire, Springfield. 111. 

Seguln, Wood, Eugenia. 2314 Hollywood, Toledo. 

Septette, Olympic, Chicago. 

Seymour Sisters, Orpheum. Portsmouth. O. 

Seymour, O. G., ft Co., Dominion, Winnipeg. 

Seyons, The, Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Shannons, Four, Olympia, So. Bend. 

Sharpe, Dollie, Family, Pottsvllle, Pa., Indef. 

Sharrocks, The, 521 Main, Lewlston, Ida. 

Shaws, Aerial. 266 W. 24, N. Y. 

Sbean ft Warren, 31 Chester, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Sherman ft Fuller, 853 N. 8, Reading, Pa. 

Sherman, De Forest, Co., Sherman Farm, Central 

Pk.. L. I. 
Shirhart, Anson. Crystal, Detroit, Indef. 
Short ft Edwards. 57 Mlddagb, Brooklyn. 
Sbroded, Chas. ft Alice, K. & P., J,-is,-y City. 
Slmms, Toe Mystic, Box 360. Dobba Ferry, N. Y. 
Sieger. Lillian, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
Sidman, Sam, Columbia, Oak.and, CaL. Indef. 
Sldonne ft Kellie, 424 E. Chicago ave., Chicago. 
Silver Stars, 51 Hanover, Boston. 
Simpsons, The Musical, Wigwam, San Francisco. 
Sineay's Dogs ft Cats, 101 W. 40, N. Y. 
Slater & Finch, Savoy, Fall River. 
Sloan, (trace, Orpheum, Salt Lake. 
Smith & Arado. H25 Converse, E. St. Louis, 111. 
Smith ft Convey, Trans-Atlantics, B. R. 
Smith Bros., 66 Hawthorne, Hartford. 
Smith, Wm. M.. Broadway Gaiety Girls. B. R. 
Smith ft Brown. Morning Glories, B. R. 
Smythe, Wm. IL. Gay Morning Glories, B. R. 
Snyder ft Buckley, Columbia, St. Louis. 
Sommers ft. Storke, Ideals. B. R. 
Somers. Zalmar, Pat White's Gaiety Girls. B. R. 
Some Quartet. Merry Maidens, B. R: 
Sonnett. Annette. City Sports, B. R. 
Song Birds, K. ft P. 5th Avenue, New York. 
Soper, Bert. Star, Altoona, Pa., Indef. 
Spencer, Lloyd, Lyric. Houston, Indef. 
Spoler. Lew H., Empire, B. R. 
Stanford, Billy, Star, McKeesrocks, Pa. 
Stanley, Mr. ft Mrs. W. H., Grand, Homestead. 

Pa. 
Stanley, Minna. City Sports, B. R. 
Stanton ft Sandberg, 711 Orcb, Chicago. 
Stelnert ft Thomas, 120 W. 185, N. Y. 
Steger, Julius, ft Co., Poll's, Bridgeport. 
Sterns. AL. 253 W. 30. N. Y., care Dunn. 
Stevens. Leo. Washington Society Girls, B. R. 
Stevens ft Boehm. 325 E. 14. N. Y. 
Stewarts, Musical. Bohemians, B. R. 
Stewart, Harry, Rose Sydell, B. R. 
Stlckney'a Pony ft Dogs, Hempstead, L. I. 
Stirk ft Dan, 28 Hancock. Brockton, Mass. 
St. Onge Bros., 22 Portland, Worcester. 



= 




SPI5SELL BROS. <Eb MACK 

IN "CAFE DE PARIS." 
Jan. 6, Keith's Union Bq., N. Y. 



Stone, Beth. Lyric, Lincoln, Neb. 

Strickland. E. C, Majestic. Ann Harbor, Mich. 

Stuart & Keeley. Main, Peoria, 111. 

Sturgls, Ida, Imperials. B. R. 

Stutaman & Crawford. Unique. Eau Claire. 

Sullivan, W. J., Bijou, Jamestown, N. D., indef. 

Sully & Phelps, (). IL, Hudson. N. Y. 

Suiters. Emlle, Olympia, Chicago. 

Sullivan & Paaqnelena, Dominion. Winnipeg. 

Summers ft Winters. Spellman. C. R. 

Sutcllffe Troupe, Empire, Cardiff. Wales. 

Sutton ft Sutton. High School Girls, B. R. 

Svengala, Franklyn. Worcester. 

Sweet. Eugene, 25 Cherry, Providence. 

Sweeney. John S., 452 Turner. Allentown, Pa. 

Swor Bros.. 713 w. oa, Chicago. 

Sylows. The. Parisian Belles. B. R. 
Symons. Jack. Lyric, Danville, III. 
Sytz ft Sytz, Lyric. Galveston. 



Tanenns. Griawold, Troy. 

Tanean. Felix ft Glavto'n. 831 E. 03d St., N. T. 

Talcota, The. Crystal. Marlon, Ind. 

Taylor. Tell. La Salle. Chicago, indef. 

Tegge ft Daniel. 214S No. Rohly. Chicago. 

Tempest Trio, Bijou. Superior. Wis. 

Tenors. Four. Pat White's Gaiety Girls. B. R. 

Thomas. David, cjo Mover, Atlanta. 

Thompson ft Carter, City Sports. B. R. 

Thompson, Harry. 112 Covert. Brooklyn. 

Tliorne. Mr. ft Mrs. Harry. Hotel Rraddock. N. Y. 

Tlddlewlnks ft Dugan. *<).'{ Hudson, N. Y. 

Tlerney. Belle, 74 N. Main. Woonsocket, R. I. 

Tinney. Frank IL. S12 Moo.e. Fhlla. 

Tlvoll Quartette, Orpheum. Minneapolis. 

Tomklns, Wm., Orpheum. Salt Lake 

Toieat, Bennett's, London. 

Travera, Belle. Orientals, B. R. 

Trillers. The. 346 E. 20. N. Y. 

Troubadours, Three. Lyric. Mobile. 

Trover Lafe. Irwin. Goshen. Ind.. Indef. 

Trueadell, Mr. ft Mrs. Howard, Hathaway's, New 

Redford. 
Trocadero Quartet, Dixieland. Jacksonville. Fla. 
Turner, Bert. Crystal. Logansnort, Ind. 
Tyce. Lillian. 7.'13 Mt. Prospect. Newark. 
Tyioleans, Fourteen. L'42 K. North, Chicago. 

When answering advnrtiscm 



Ullrich, Fritz. 2418 N. 16, Phlla. 

Usher, Claude ft Fannie, 38 Henry, Jersey City. 



Valadons, Aerial, Broadway, Mlddletown, O. 

Vuldare ft Varno, Greencastle, Ind. 

Valmore, Mildred, Toreadors, B. R. 

Valveno Bros., 107 E. 31, N. Y. 

Van Cleve, Denton ft. Pete, 236 E. 14, N. Y. 

Van Gofre ft Cotrely, Fischer's, Los Angeles. 

Van Lee, James, Yankee Doodle Girls. B. R. 

Vardaman, 270 W. 30, N. Y. 

Vardon, Perry A Wilbur, Crackerjacks, B. R. 

Variety Quartet, Pbila., Pa. 

Veda ft Qulntarow, Wetland, Morganstown, 
W. Va. 

Vedmars, The, 749 Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Vermette-Carpottle Trio, 451 Rue Brebocuf, Mon- 
treal. 

Verna, Belle, Orpheum, Springfield, (). 

Viola ft Bro., Family, Scrantoa. 

Voelker. Mr. ft Mrs. Frederick, 13, Keith's, Phila. 

Von Dell, Harry, 458 Notre Dame, Manchester, 
N. H. 



Waddell, Fred ft Mae, Temple, Alton, 111. 

Waggand & Waggand, 13, Gem, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Wahlund, Tekcla Trio, 205 W. 22, N. Y. 

Walters, Harry, 1553 Bway, N. Y. 

Watson's Farm Yard, Poll'a, Bridgeport. 

Watson, Fred, Orpheum. Salt Lake. 

Walton, Irving R., Irwin's Majestic, B. R. 

Waller A Maglil. 102 7th ave.. N. Y. 

W« r d. Alice Lillian, T^os Angeles. 

Ward, Klare ft Co., Los Angeles. 

Ward Trio, 640 32, Milwaukee. 

Warren ft Brockway, Reilly ft Woods, B. R. 

Wangdoodle Four, Vanity Fair, B. R. 

Washer Bros., Oakland, Ky. 

Walsh-Lynch ft Co.. Irwin's Big Show, R. R. 

Walsh, George, Toreadors, B. R. 

Washburn, Blanche, Broadway Gaiety Girls. B. R. 

Waterbury Bros. ft. Tenuey, K. ft P. 58th St., 

N. Y. 
Waters. Harry, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Watson, Jos. K., Rolllckers, B. R. 
Webb ft Connelly, Majestic, Little Rock. 
Webb, Harry L.. Beatrice, Neb. 
Webb, Josle, Tiger Lilies, B. R. 
Webb. Mabel, Pat Whlte'a Gaiety Girls, B. R. 
Weber, Chas. D., Bowery Burleaquera, B. R. 
Weber. John. Broadway Gaiety Glrla, B. R. 
Welch ft Maltland, Vanity Fair, B. R. 
Wells, Pauline, Parisian Wldowa, B. R. 
Wells. Billy K.. Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
Wentworth, Vesta ft Teddy, Armory, Binghamton. 
Werden ft Saylor, Keith's, Providence. 
West, John A., 161 W. 66, Chicago. 
West ft Benton, Oak Park, Sacramento, indef. 
West, Harry, Washington Society Girls, B. R. 
Wast, Ed., Parisian BeUea, B. R. 
Weston. Emma. Empire, B. R. 
Weston, Sadie. Parisian Belles, B. R. 
Wheeler Children. 2614 No. 25, Phlla. 
Wheeler ft Rosey, 15 So. Clark. Chicago. 
Whalley ft Whalley, Shelby, Shelby, O. 
Whelan ft Searles. 1520 Glenwood. Phlla. 
White, Dennison ft White, Nixon, Washington. Pa. 
White. Fd. ft Rolla, Family, Butte. 
White Hawk, 750 Westchester, N. Y. 
White, Pat, Pat White'a Gaiety Glrla, B. R. 
White. Tom, Lady Birds, B. R. 
Whittle. W. E., Majestic, Johnstown, Pa. 
Whitehead, Joe, 408 W. 33, N. Y. 
Wliltely. James. Trans Atlantics, B. R. 
Whiteside, Ethel. Empire, Mt. Adlesbourgh, Eng. 
Whitman, Frank, 604 No. 2, Reading. 
WIggans. Joe, Imperials, B. R. 
Wilbur, Caryl, Empire, Islington, London, Eng. 
Wilder. Marshal P.. 256 W. 07, N. Y. 
Wilfred ft Lottie, RJJou, Flint. Mich. 
Williams, C. W., 3313 Jamaica, Richmond Hill, 

L. I. 
Williams, Frank ft Delia. (J rand. Homestead, Pa. 
Williams ft Mayer. 300 W. 55. N. Y. 
Williams, Jud. Wasson's. .Toplln, Mo. 
Williams, Joe, Jersey Lilies. B. R. 
Williams, Sam. Orpheum, Ilarrlsburg, Pa. 
Williams ft West. High Jinks, B. R. 
Wilson. Tony. Helolse ft Armoros Slaters, 1 Prima 

rd.. Brixton. London. S. E.. Eng. 
Wilson. Alf ft Mal>e. 256 W. 37. N. Y. 
Wilson Bros., Proctor's. Jersey City. 
Wilson, Jack, ft Co., Keith's. Utlea. 
Wilson. Lizzie N.. 175 Franklin, Buffalo. 
Wilson. Sam. High Jinks. B. R. 
Wilton. Belle. Vanity Fair. B. R. 
Wlncherman, V. F., Bennett's, Hamilton. 
Winkler ft Kress, G. O. II. . Morganstown, W. Va. 
Wlxon ft Eaton. People's, Evansvllle. 
Wood Bros., 207 E. 14, N. Y. 
Wood. Ralph. Lyric, Ft. Smith. Ark.. Indef. 
Woodford's Animals. Rose Sydell, B. U. 
Woodford ft Marli*>ro, Greenville, o. 
Wonnser Tots, 502 W. 3. Davenport, la. 
Woi.lette. Estelle. ft Co.. 40 W. 34, N. Y. 
World ft Kingston. Shea's. Buffalo, 
Work ft Ower. Auditorium, Lynn. 
Worthley. Mlnthorne. 125 Lexington, N. Y. 
Wynn ft Lewis, poll's, Worcester. 



Yackley ft Runnel. Elm Villa. R. F. D. 6. Laa 

caster. Pa. 
Yalto Duo. 220 W. 38. N. Y. ^ 
Yomamato Bios., Emerald. Adams Co., O. 
Young ft De Vole, S Lower 5. Kvsnsvllle. 
Young ft Manning, 2130 Grant, Denver. 
Young. Harry C. Lady Birds. B. R. 
Young, Ollie, ft Bros.. .'»s Chittenden, Columbus, • 



Kftmloch ft Co., 10M> 02 st.. Oakland. CaL 

Zanoras, Cvcllng. Lyric. Danville, 111. 

Zaras. 4. 104 W. 40. N. Y. 

Zed a, II. L.. 211 R. 14. N. Y 

Zenda, Parisian Widows. R. R, 

Zeno. Bob. 848 H 1. Portland. Ore. 

Kolas, The. Bijou, Dubuque, la. 

Zimmerman. AL. Empire. B. R. 

Zinn'a Famous Dancing Girls, Empire, San Fran 

cIsco. 
Zlska ft King, Dockstader's, Wilmington, Del, 

cnls kindly mention Variety. 



JEROME & SCHWART Z 

ILLUSTRATED SONGS. 

"COME BACK TO OLD 
MANHATTAN, DEARIE" 

A Novel Ballad, Something Different from 
Anything Elae in Slides. 



" MY IRISH BOSIE " 
"Any Old Time at All" 

The Big Hit of "The Rich Mr. Hoggenhelmar" 
AND THE NEW SENSATIONAL IRISH HIT 

"MlSSKlU-ARNEY" 

Beautiful Slidea by DaWitt 0. Wheeler. 
All Songa Published by 

FRANCIS, DAY ft HUNTER 

PUBLISHERS 
15 W. 30th ST., NEW YORK CITY 




WEEK JANUARY 6. 

When not otherwise indioated, "L. 0." after 

ahow indioatea it it "laying off." 

American, Theatre Royal, Montreal. 

Avenue Girls, Met. O. H., Duluth. 

Bachelor Club, Gayety, Toronto. 

Behman Show, Standard, Cincinnati. 

Blue Ribbons, 6-8, Bijou, Reading; 9-11, Gayety. 

Scranton. 
Bon Tons, L. O.. 13, Majestic, Kansas City. 
Boston Belles, Waldman'a. Newark. 
Bohemians, London, N. Y. 
Bowery Burlesques. Gayety, Philadelphia. 
Brigadiers, Folly, Chicago. 
Broadway Gaiety Girls. Howard. Boston. 
Bryant's, Harry, Lyceum. Boston. 
Casino Girls, Empire, Toledo. 
Century Girls, 6-8, Lyceum, Troy; 0-11, Gayety. 

Albany. 
Champagne Girls, Bowery, New York. 
Cherry Blossoms, Columbia. Boston. 
City Sports, Star, Brooklyn. 
Colonial Belles, Empire, Chicago. 
Cracker Jacks, Gayety, Washington. 
Dainty Duchess, 6-8, Gllmore, Springfield; 9 11. 

Bijou, Beading. 
Dreamlands, 6 8, Gayety, Albany; 9-11, Lyceum. 

Troy. 
Empire Show, Trocadero, Philadelphia. 
Fay Foster, Sbubert. Newark. 
Girl from Happyland. Palace, Boston. 
Golden Crook. Garden, Buffalo. 
High Jinks. Bon Ton. Jersey City. 
High School Girls. 6-8, Grand, Chester, Pa.: 

1)11. L. O.; 13-ir», Gayety, Albany; 16-1S. 

Lyceum, Troy. 
Ideals, Bijou, Philadelphia. 
Imperials. Academy, Pittsburg. 
Irwiu'a Big Show, Gayety. Pittsburg. 
Jersey Lilies. Gayety, St. I/ouls. 
Jolly Gra>s Widows, Eighth Avenue, New York. 
Jolly Girls. Dewey, New York. 
Kentucky Belles, 6-8, Dee Moines; 9-11, St. Joe. 
Knickerbocker*, Gayety, Detroit. 

Lady Birds, Gotham, New York. 

Lid Lifters, Casino, Philadelphia. 

Majesties. Gayety, Baltimore. 

Mardl Gras Beauties, Murray Hill, New York. 

Masqucradcrs, Euson's, Chicago. 

Merry Maidens, G-S, Star, Scranton; 9-11, Jacobs'. 

I'aterson. 
Merry Milkers. Buckingham. Ixnilsvllle. 
Miss New York, Jr., Monumental, Baltimore. 
Morning Glories. Gayety, Milwaukee. 
Nightingales, Century, Kansas City. 
Night Owls, Gayety, Birmingham. 
Orientals, Colonial, Cleveland. 
Parisian Relies, Lyceum, Washington. 
Parisian Widows, IIS, Gayety, Scranton; 9-11. 

Rijou, Heading. 
Pat Whites Gaiety Girls. Star, Milwaukee. 
Reeves 1 Beauty Show. Gayety, Columbus. 
Bellly & Woods, Star. Toronto, 
Rentz Santlcy, Green w all, New Orleans. 
RlaltO Rounders, Standard, St. Louis. 
Rice & Barton, Olympic, Brooklyn. 
Rolllckera, »» 8, Jacoba', Patereon; 911. Star. 

Scranton. 
Hose Hill, Majestic, Kansas City. 
Rose Sydell. Gaiety, Brooklyn. 
Runaway Clrls, 6-8, Empire. Albany; 9-11, FTm- 

plre. Ilolvoke. 
Sam Oeven'-. Star, St. Paul. 
Scribner's Big Show. IVocadero, Chicago, 
star show Glrla, <> s, iudlanapolls; nil, Terre 

Haute. 
Strollers, Rvansvllle. 
Thorougtittrcds, Dewey, Minneapolis. 
Tiger I.ilies. Imperial, Providence. 
Toreadors. Avenue, Detroit. 
Trans At la nt i«s. Westminster, Providence. 
Trocadero*, Umpire, Cleveland. 
'joth Century Maids. Lafayette, Buffalo. 
Vanity Fair, lir.th Str-.t Music Hall, New York. 
Washington Society <;it)s, »; S, Terre Haute; «J 11. 

Indiana polls. 
Watson's Burlesquers, Park, Brooklyn. 
World Beaters, Corinthian, Rochester, 
Yankee Doodle <;••!*, People's, Cincinnati. 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



T 
H 

E 




NIGHTINGALES 



Big Hit 
Everywhere 

MINNIE MARX, Mgr. 



WILFRED CLARKE 



Presenting Hit Sketches 
'NO MORE TROUBLE" and "WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEX1 
Address, care Lambs' Club, New York City. 



>» 




K 



A 

T 
E 




N 



Presenting "HIS DAY OFF." IN VAUDEVILLE. TIME ALL FILLED. 

HARRY JACKSON. General Stage Director for JULES MURRY. 

Address United Booking: Office or Room 1, New York Theatre Building, N. Y. City. 



Freeman 



Bros. 



FRED KARNOS Comedians 

Original London Comedy Company. 
Manager, ALF. REEVES. 

KLAW & ERLANGER CIRCUITS. Representative, WM. MORRIS. 

"A NIGHT IN AN ENGLISH MUSIC HALL" (with«Billie Reeves, the orig- 
inal "drunk"), "A Night in the Slums of London," etc., etc., in repertoire. 

All productions copyrighted. Pirates, keep off. Attorneys, House, Grossman 
and Vorhaus, who have already confirmed all our legal rights. 



\ 



A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL. 



Those refined medley singers and dancers who do different styles of dancing. Now on the Sullivan 
& Considine Circuit. Coming East soon. Open for Burlesque or Vaudeville for next season. 



Swan 



THE ECCENTRIC RECRUITS, 



AND 



Bambard 



"On Guard'' with W. B. Watson's Army, playing Orogan and the Sheriff In "Krausemeyer's Alley." 
JAN. 6, PARK, BROOKLYN. Agents, WESLEY * PINCU8. 



Go-4th 



AND 



DOYLE 



Week Jan. 6, Majestic. Ft. Worth, Texas. ("All Right") Week Jan. IS, Majestic, Dallas, Texas. 

THE SPEAKER OF TALK 

PHIL MILLS 

In LEW SULLY'S nonsensical narration entitled "ORATORICAL DISTURBANCES" 




COOK 



The 

Juggling 

Kid 



IN HIS OWN ORIGINAL NOVELTY, "JUGGLING IN THE DEPOT." 



Direction JACK LEVY. 



LILLIAN HALE * » 

IN "THE PHANTOM RIVAL," BY SAGER DEAN. 
One of the best laughing sketohei in vaudeville. Big success everywhere. 

JUST KIDS 

RAWSON and CLARE 

FEATURED WITH WEBER & RUSH'S "BON TONS." 



THE FREAK AUTHOR-COMEDIAN. 

Z AM RICH, NOT IN MONEY, BUT 

IDEAS. 



JAS. B. 

RIC 




RIC 



JAS. B. 




THE DUTCH CLOWN WITH 
THE TANGLEFOOT DIALECT. 

VARIETY 



SEYMOUR and NESTOR 



Character Songs and Change*. 



120 W. ll«th St., New York. 



Phone 3470 Mornlngslde 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 





£ Playing Klaw fc Erlanger Circuit 



Open time after April 1« t 



A SMART ACT SMARTLY DRESSED. 



I IN IN E S S etncl RYAN 



KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



and 



THE MUSICAL LAUGH MAKERS 




ADDRES8. CARE VARIETY. 



When answering advertiaemenU kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



23 



SONG BOOKS 



THE IHAS K HARRIS JONGSTER 

{- ABSOLUTELY THE BEST -, 
ALVAY5 CONTAINS THE LATEST HITS 



$10.00 PER THOUSAND* 

With Company's Name, $11.00 per ihous'd 
Immediate Delivery 



Chas K Harris 

31 WVsl 31" 51 New York 
///«• lirttst Bjiltd Mouw in rtic Horld > 



JOS. W. COHENS 

UNREDEEMED 

Fine white DIAMONDS 25 per cent, lower than 
market value. Exchangeable at full price paid 
and RETURNABLE ANY TIKE, lest 6 per cent. 

Diamond Broker 

62 7 PENH ST., READING, PA. 






of every description, beat 

make. Large illustrated oat 

No. 24, 15c. Illustrated oat. 
No. 25 FREE. 

BAILEY A TRIPP CO., 

P. O. Box 460, 
CAMBRIDGEPORT, MASS. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Unless otherwise noted, the following 
reports are for the current week. 



"Variety's" Credential Cards to Corre- 
spondents for 1908 are now out, and only 
those for the coming year should be recog- 
nized. 

No person without one is authorized 
to represent "Variety." 



GHIGAGO 



By FRANK WIESBERG. 

VARIETY'S Chicago Office. 
Chicago Opera House Block. 

(Phone M« In 43SO). 

MAJESTIC (Lymtn R. Glover, mgr. for Kohl 
A Castle. Monday rehearsal 9).— Richard Golden, 
supported l.v three players, presented for the 
first time here a dramatic sketch by Clay M. 
Greene. "A Case of Divorce." It tells a terse. 
Interesting story, highly dramatic and splendidly 
acted. O'Rrlon Havel and Effle Lawrence In 
"Ticks and Clicks" were liked Immensely. Willy 
Zimmerman gave his artistic Impersonations of 
musical conductors, achieving success. Jnllns 
Tannen delivered the same routine of stories heard 
last season In his perfect manner. Edward Clark 
and his Winning Widows have a good enter- 
tainment. Lucy and Lucler returned with the 
same material, but the vehicle is Improved other- 
wise. Rerry and Rorry created amusement. Paul 
Rarnes introduced his tramp specialty, with some 
bright talk, while Lea Aubln Loonef sang French 
songs, making changes in attire. Casey and 
Craney offered a singing and talking act. which 
was liked, and cycling Zanoras showed trick 
cycling. Mason and Rart closed with their clover 
bar feats. 

AUDITORIUM (Klaw & Erlanger. mgrs.: Mil- 
ward Adams, director. Sunday rehearsal 10:30. 
Colonial Theatre).— Shifting followed after the 
second nnmt>er. This was probably due to the 
non-arrival of two acts on Sunday. They are 
Mile. Mane D'Eve and Julian Rose. The Wal- 
thour Troupe, five In number, did well with their 
expert cycle feats and eccentric comedy. More 
striking tricks so dexterously accomplished have 
seldom boon seen here. Lily Flexmore makes her 
debut. She is billed as "La Zephyr," and scored 
tremendously with wonderful flexible dancing. It 
is an absolute novelty. Chas. R. Kltts and Rhoda 
Wlndrutn In a military comedy. "The Cuckoo." 
furnished solid entertainment. The vehicle would 
be more valuable if some of the long speeches 
were curtailed and portions of the incidents modi- 
fied. Edith Helena retained another week, scor- 
ing the same bit. One of the emphatic hits was 
May Relfort. tlrst time in Chicago. Miss Relfort 
was attired In a beautiful gown and was cor- 
dially received on her entrance. "The Storv of a 
Woman Hater." "False Liza Leech." and' "The 
Rake's Progress." were the songs rendered In a 
Hear, pleasing voice. R. Q, Knowles returned 
aftep nn absence of several weeks, with his songs 
and talk, duplicating his previous success. Cln 
Overall!, who figured In the Important inaugural 
bill. Is also listed as a prominent acquisition. 
Eight Ynlllans, R|sh>y feats and acrobatics, sur- 
passed any other act of their kind seen here this 
season. 
SID. J. EfSnX'R (Sid. J. Euson. mgr.).— Al- 



though there is nothing particularly enhancing or 
original In "The Wrong Widow," prepared by 
James Cooper and Snltz Moore for "The Morning 
Glories." the third show of Weber A Rush to 
visit us this season, the fragments have been 
selected with evident care and so scattered as to 
give the action the desired results. The material 
has little reference to the title or plot, which 
discloses Itself conveniently and is Intercepted 
at the point of denouement by musical numbers 
and "business." There are two "widows," One 
Is gay femininity, full of frivolity and dash, 
while the other is more sedate and dignified. The 
contrast In appearance was too marked for much 
mistaken Identity in the plot. No one seemed 
to care what became of the "story" so long as 
the comedians furnished unsnhslding fun. A min- 
strel first part occupied about ten minutes. Sev- 
eral very familiar jokes were heard. The "Trol- 
ley Car" song used last season was repeated, 
with the same satisfactory results. The bur- 
lesque Is without a name. It is reminiscent of a 
piece employed by the "Parisian Widows" last 
season. The setting should have been a seashore 
instead of interior. The "skating" number was 
revived, also "Milo" with stunning Oriental cos- 
tumes. The "Cherry Tree" song would have been 
more effective with electric bulbs, especially when 
the stage Is darkened. One plump blonde made 
herself conspicuous In strenuous movements, which 
earned for the Oriental number several encores. 
Weber & Rush have been more liberal in the 
costume display: the changes being frequent and 
attractive in design and arrangement. Moore is 
a Jovial German with a tendency to dispel woeful 
moments, which he does In a felicitous manner. 
In "A Self-made Man" he shows decided Im- 
provement over a year ago. when the dramatic 
vehicle was given at the Trocadero. Ed. Gold- 
smith, as the son, is too timid, but will prob- 
ably do better when he Is acquainted with the 
part. Helolse Horton should drop the Irish dia- 
lect. It Is not perfect and unnecessary. Clara 
Raymond did well. The act made a very deep 
Impression. James Cooper Is unctuous. That he 
Is a good comedian there can be no question. 
Ills olio act with Lucia Cooper was liked. Miss 
Raymond Is a prepossessing blonde, and was evi- 
dent In catchy numbers, while Miss Cooper made 
herself prominent In an agreeable part. Hill, 
Cherry and Hill showed a series of Intricate feats 
on bicycles with comedy that brought applause. 
Smith and Rrown danced energetically. They 
should eliminate one song and show their fancy 
dancing, which won on its merits. 

EMPIRE (William Singer, mgr.).— Pat White 
and his "Gaiety Girls" are at the Empire for the 
first time. "Casey at the Rat." and "The Down 
and Out Drug Store" are the vehicles nsed. The 
former is replete with fast action and hilarity, 
and the latter contains a little more "slap-stick" 
and rough-house than Is usually found in bur- 
lesque this season. "The Doctor's Shop" has been 
utilized and served In ludicrous style. A better, 
more animated and willing bunch of choristers 
has not been seen this season. There Is dash, 
snap and exactness In their gyrations. The girls 
carry the burden well. They dress becomingly, 
but their singing has a monotone effect. The 
light effects were handled admirably and the 
"cuckoo" song arrangement Is novel. Pat White 
Is one of the best low Dish comedians seen this 
season. While his style borders on the familiar 
uncouth tad in make-up and conception, there is 
aptness and wisdom In the manner In which he 
handles the material. He Is a conscientious com- 
edian, always formulating sometlting amusing to 
divert his auditors. Zelma Summers Is a spright- 
ly young woman and sings quite charmingly. Her 
specialty In the olio won for her much aplause. 
Anna Grant, an attractive blonde, was one of 
the soubrettes. sharing distinction with Miss Sum- 
mers. Grace Addison Rarrett distinguished her- 
self In a matronly part, although she appeared 
as young as her supposed daughters. The mimic 
"ball game" created laughter, also the absurd 
"barber shop." The only respite for noise and 
confusion occurs during the olio. The "Three 
Terrors" appear In dances. No reason Is ascribed 
for the name. Their behavior In a series of 
dances does not Indicate that the "terror" is 
properly applied. Watson and Rert In "A Busy 
Business Man." extracted some time-worn Jokes 
together with some bright and up-to-date remarks, 
and Jennings and Webb sang songs. Miss Webb 
doe* the singing. The Malvern Troupe, composed 
of three men. one woman and a mite of a young- 
ster, apparently six years old, proved the feature. 
Their shoulder leaps and somersaulting showed 
agility and strength. It is a good act. The 
show all around affords excellent entertainment. 

FOLLY (John A. Fennessy. mgr.).— "The Wash- 
ington Society Girls." 

OLYMPIC (Abe Jacobs, mgr. for Kohl A Cas- 
tle. Monday rehearsal 0). — The Sunny South: 
Snyder and Buckley; Grace Hazard: Kelly and 
Vlolette; Ed win Stevens and Company: Paul 
Rarnes; Montrose Troupe: Jeanette Adler ami 
Company; the (Jeromes; Peerless Quartet: Tops 
and Topsv; Uatto Rrothers. 

HAYMARKET (Wm. Newklrk. mgr. for Kohl 
& Castle. Monday rehearsal 0). — Robkers 

Aroles; Ktlenne; Glrardot and Company: Cliff 
Gordon: O'llana San and Company; Elizabeth 
Murray: Conn. Downey and Wlllard; Edna 
Campbell and Company; Glen Rnrt; Welch and 
Earl: Fred Latere; Imperial Four. 

SCIIIN'PLFR'S (L. Sehindler. mgr.V— The 
Three Frnests; Knox and Alvln; Great Caesar and 
Company: Peterson Rrothers; Dorothy Vaughn; 
Sharp and Swift. 

NORTH AVENUE (Paul Slttner. mgr.).— 
Sparks and Sparks; Forrest Family; The Roonoys; 
T. Roy Rarnes and Ressie Crawford: Demlng and 
Rrogan: Roberts Four; LeRov Rland; Mabel 
Fllis. 

TEDDY (Geo. Powell. mgr.). — Vabtre and 
Clark; Marvellous Mells; Great Taelus; Pete 
Loose; James Rrown May and Company; Mae 
Jackson. 

IOI.A (A. W. Roth, mgr.).— Hart Trio; Taylor 
and Crawford: Wellington Rrothers: Rankes ami 
Kingman; Jennie Goode; Welsh and Welsh. 

NATIONAL (C. R. Svenlng. mgr.). — Tetauwarl 
Japanese Troupe: Wiley Ferris and Company: 
Tito Marts; Dancing Ashwell*; Ruth Rurkett: 
Kollln* and Kllflon. 

IMPERIAL (P. J. Schafor, nigr.V— George an! 



Pauline KIdd; Minnie Hess; Sedor Grant: Real 
Comedy Four; Harrv Haley; Lillian Burnell. 

NEW CRYSTAL (Fred Schaefer. mgr.).— Rrad- 
ley, Miller and Freeman; Roy Lee Wells; Court- 
ney and Jeannette. 

GARY (Gary. Ind.).— Walker apd Burrell; 
Thomas and White; Le Conde and Le Clear; 
Bertha Phillipl; Lena Young. 

LYRIC (Chicago Heights).— Mildred LeRoy; 
Moore and Vaughan; Mack Sisters; Sam Morris. 

NOTES. — Junie McCree, who underwent an op- 
eration as a result of ptomaine poisoning, is 
rapidly recovering. His part In "The Girl Ques- 
tion" is now beng played by Joe Whitehead. — 
Rrothers DeVan are on the Sulllvan-Consldlne 
Circuit In the Northwest, playing return engage- 
ments in Seattle and Vancouver. They will re- 
main in that territory until May. — John Grieves, 
manager of "The Merry Makers," was confined to 
his room with the grippe last week. — Daniel's 
Scenic Studio in the Chicago Opera House Block 
has been newly fitted up and enlarged. This con- 
cern has furnished the scenery for a number of 
vaudeville theatres which recently opened in the 
Middle West. — Chas. Crolins, stage manager of 
the Auditorium, was presented with a handsome 
silver mounted fountain pen by Geo. W. Lederer. 
— Sidney Zuckerman, formerly artist for the Shu- 
bert attractions, will probably become staff car- 
toonist on one of the dally newspapers here. — 
(Mark's dogs and ponies will play around Illinois 
and vicinity lu the near future. — Garnel and 
Rohorty are In the city arranging their time. — 
Edgar Foreman and Company, having finished 
their engagements in the South, will play the 
circuits In the middle states during the winter. — 
Track. Gladden and Bessie Babb are booked In 
the Middle West until June. — Dixie Electric The- 
atre Gomppny Columbus, Gn .. .Ineorjtorated, with, 
capital of $10,000. will operate moving picture 
theatres. Incorporators are Z. A. Brooks, R. I. 
Zachrias, E. J. Brooks. — A theatre seating l.noo 
will be erected at St. Louis by the Bourland 
Investment Company of that city. The building 
will be two stories high. — Selhlnl and Grovlnl are 
negotiating for Western booking. They are at 
present in the East. — Whelan and Searles are 
playing in Iowa and Wisconsin. — Mitchell and 
Browning In "His Last Chance" are filling dates 
in Illinois. — Sisters Reardsley are coming this 
way to play one of the circuits for the first 
time this month. They are now in New York. — 
Rose and Ellis closed with the "Yankee Doodle 
Girls" and will go In vaudeville for the balance 
of the season. — Work on the new vaudeville the- 
atre which is being orect<Ml at Galveston. Tex., 
for Hoffman & Rrand. will l>e rushed to comple- 
tion so as to open during the spring. — Riley and 
Fleming open In the Middle West at>out Feb. 1,— 
Gaiety Comedy Four are coming eastward from 
the Coast, where they have played for some 
time.— Woo] ley and Piers Trio will play dates 
at the conclusion of their engagement " at the 
Rink, Cincinnati. -Sanson and Dellla are looking 
for an opening In the West. — Andrews and 
Fields are playing In West Virginia and Ohio. — 
Don and Mae Gordon Company has been reduced 
to three people. One man and two women now 
comprise the act.— While playing In Chicago last 
week the members of the "Merry Makers." un- 
der the management of John Grieves, formed a 
unique club known as "The Tessle Tent Club," 
for the purpose of developing Irrational Instincts 
among Its loyalists. Theodore Metz, musical 
director, lias been appointed the "Rig Chief." 
Other partisans are Sam R. Adams. H. P. Kelly. 
Win. Hinges. Gladys S. John, Mamie Elbart. Wm. 
Manssey. Michael O'Rourke. They are known In 
the dressing room as "Papooses." — Alvo and 
Copeland are In the city booking future time In 
the Middle West.— Cushlng. Merrill and Davis 
are playing in Iowa— Tony Castellane and 
brother left for New York this week, their first 
Invasion of the East In three years. 



SAPS PRAINGISGO 

By W. ALFRED WILSON. 

VARIETY'S San Francisco Office, 
1115 Van Ness Ave. (Room 112). 

ORPHEUM (Martin Reck. gen. mgr.).— Week 
22: This was the first week of this season's 
road show and there was a diversity of opinion 
n« to its comparison with last year's traveling 
combination. It certainly did not" rank with sev- 
eral of the ordinary bills offered during the past 
session. The aggregation possessed the advantage 
of being made up of faces entirely new to us, 
and all received their pro rata ' of approval! 
"Marse Covington." a playlet from the pen of 
George Ade. was rather disappointing considering 
its source, as there was a general expectation of 
something less serious in theme from the slang 
fabllst. Kelly and Kent were hard workers and 
their energetic eccentric comedy efforts brought 
them a hearty response. The Tom Jack Trio had 
a novelty musical act that proved taking. Keno 
and D'Arvllle offered an acrobatic singing and 
'lancing turn that won them favorable mention. 
Goran, the ventriloquist, had an original method 
of submitting his material, though better In his 
line have shown here. La Gardenia, a Spanish 
dancer, was well received. Gallagher and Rarrett, 
with their breezy "Rattle of Too Soon." was 
added to the road show, and went strong. 

NATIONAL (Sid Grauman. mgr.). -Week 23: 
The Five Bellatxer Sisters were the star attrac- 
tion of the holiday week In a novelty aerial net 
replete with unique apparatus, the strong-arm 
work of one of the girls being a sensational fea- 
ture. The Lavalls was another silent number 
well up In the front rank. Sam Goldman. He- 
brew comedian, scored heavily In the comedy sec- 
tion. A line of eccentric dancing brought a strong 
demand for more. Herbert BreJton and Helen 
Downing had a pleasing sketch appropriately en- 
titled "One Christmas Eve." Their offering con- 
tained plenty of action and some clever dialogue. 
George Smedley offered a well chosen selection of 
mush nl numbers On stringed Instruments. The 
American Duo In a comedy playlet, "The Rell 
Roy." had the opening position. Mr. and Mrs. 
Geo. silvers. In a novelty scenic singing act added 
to the v.irlctv of the program. 

EMPIRE • Ilnl Cnrtls. mgr.). -Week 2.7: The 
Colby Family were featured. Their musical |»or- 




First-Class Film 
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199 THIRD AVE., NEW YORK 

AGENTS FOR 

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tlon has been seen here before, though there baa 
apparently been some changes made In the comedy 
action. Donat Redlnl and his acrobatic dogs were 
a well liked feature of the program. Eddie Van, 
comedy cartoonist, completed the olio. Jas. P. 
Loo Comedy Players loomed up to good advantage 
with their stock production. "The Wrong Doc- 
tor." ZInn's Dancing Girls, headed by Francis 
V. Grey, offered a series of ballet numl>ers, clos- 
ing with a cleverly arranged transformation scenic 
effect. 

WIGWAM (Sam Harris, mgr.). — Week 23: 
The Mil was a well diversified combination with- 
out a single conflict ion. The V. S. Singing Four 
were Incandeeeented, though Judged by the audi- 
ence's verdict the stellar place should have been 
held by either George Alexander or Thomas and 
Payne. Alexander made a pronounced bit with 
his monologue, and the colored team. Thomas and 
Payne, were by far the best duo of their kind 
seen here In many a day. The man's closing 
dance on roller skates was the one best of the 
program. Phllbrooks and Reynolds placed them- 
selves In good standing with a breezv bit of 
nonsense under the heading "Miss Stonog." James 
Dervln, the ventriloquist, was on the bill with 
nn act closely following the one shown by him 
last season. Dervin's imitations still have the 
heaviest swing. Jacobs and Sardel, with a line 
of familiar comedy acrohntlcs. opened the show. 
Fred Lancaster, the baritone, returned and was 
warmly greeted. The Lulgl Plcarre Troupe, a 
high-grade acrobatic act, closed the show. 

SIXTEENTH STREET (Sullivan ft Considlno. dl- 
rectors; Al On ken, res. mgr. ).— Week 2.1: The 
bill was made up of R good selection of S. A C. 
acta. Howard and De Leon opened proceedings 
with a standard routine of cquillbrlstlo feats. 
The Columbia Four, with a mixture of song and 
comedy, passed with favor. Will Davis, singing 
and talking specialty, made a good Impression, 
as did Billy King, a colored comedian. The Sully 
Family were In closing position. Their "Roys 
Will Re Roys" wns the only sketch on the pro- 
gram, and was rewarded with the limit of ap- 
proval. Belle Howard sang the Illustrated ballad. 

VICTORY (I. Coleman Levey, mgr.t. — Week 2.1: 
The 1,111 was above the standard, with Al Jolson 
In the place of prominence. Jolson led all the 
way with his monologue specialty and easily 
won first honors. The Three Macs, l n Scottish 
songs and dances, were a warmly appreciated 
number. The Klngsley Brothers, a song and 
dance team, were of the old school so familiar 
ten years or so ago. Their conversational ante- 
dating that time was merltless, but a pair of 
well matched voices held the place for them. 
The Norwoods offered :i comedy bar act that 
registered fair. The Seymour Twins. In a good 
routine of Roman ring work, were In number one 
position. Parrel Vinton made another try at 
vaudeville, and again fell sadly short through 
the lack of a proper vehicle. Vinton has evi- 
dently gone back to ye oldc English comedy for 
his material; at leapt the broadness of some of 
the lines of "A Summer's Day" would suggest as 
much. Two In particular are bolder than even 
the most radical of burlesque* would venture, 
and though perhaps well suited to the moral at- 
mosphere of the days of James the Second, are 
hardly palatable In these times of Theodore. Lem 
Confer sang the Illustrated ballad. 

NOTES.- The Mission Theatre will return to 
Vaudeville the first of the year, playing the Sulli- 
van & Considlno acts. This will leave the Wig- 
wam f Western States) sandwiched between S. A 
C. Sixteenth street house on one side and the 
Mission on the other. Warm times ami heavy 
priced hills are looked for In this neighborhood 
as 11 result of this competition. — Mike Rollly of 
Sacramento dropped Into town last week and 
gave emphatic denial to the rumor that he was 
dead or even a dead on". — -May Yohe Is playing 
The Novelty. Vallejo. Cnl.. this week.— Jas. Fran- 
cis Pooh v and his Dancing Girls left for th* 
Northwest 20 to plav the Panfages' time for the 
Western States. — Mrs. Tom Thumb opened at the 
Wigwam week 30. The Three Kuhns were also 
on the hill. -Hugh Emmett left for the Northwest 



11 



to play six 

.it tcnlturv. 



weeks f->r Sullivan & Consbllne in 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



24 



VARIETY 



REPBB»CNT/\TIVD ABTI«T» 



REPRCSBNTrtTIVB ARTISTS 





Address WESLEY and PINCU8 







MAXIM No. 40 

There are two people you can't convince — a 
fool and an Ignorant man. 

A great liar is always a great talker. 

Many people are penny honest and pound thief. 

Don't be afraid to ask for what you want — 
you might get It. 

BOOKED— WILTON, AGENT. 



The Great Caicedo 



KINO OF THE WIEE. 



BESSIE WYNN 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 
Direction of MB. E. F. ALBEE. 



ABNEB 



HARRY 



Addreas per rout* or H. Y. CLIPPER. 



Dcvcldc & Zekta 

Artistic 6ciuilihri$t$ 



En Route. Season 1907-1, "THE LADY BIBD8.' 



ALI 



AMD 



En Route T. W. Miner's "HIGH JINKS. 



PEISER 

ECCENTRIC COMEDY ACROBATS. 



WEEK JAN. 6, BON TON, 7EB8EY CITY. 



RUBE KITTIE 

Welch-Francis 



BOOKED SOLID. 



Assisted by COYLE, BEATBICE and DYER. 



Direction JACK LEVY. 



WHAT THEY ALL SAY: A GREAT ACT. 



vtaax -LAX.X ajuu DAX! A QS£AI ACT. 

AL RAYNOR i CO. Castellane 

^^ ™ ™ ™ ■■ ■■ ^ ^S^ ™ ™ ^^F ^^ THE MOST SENSATIONAL TRICK CYC 



Introducing Their Wonderful Acrobatic Bull Dogs. 



Direction ALF T. WILTON. 



AND 



Bro. 



I MOST SENSATIONAL TBICK CYCLISTS IN VAUDEVILLE. 

Address Care VARIETY. 



ELLA 



Claus and Radcliffe 



CLAUDE 



A Lady and a Gentleman Able to Entertain Their Own. 
P. S. — It is not a Broadway show now. "Guess why!" 



Consequently, JAN. 6, OLYMPIC; JAN. 13, HAYM ARRET, IN CHICAGO. 

PERSUADER, ED HAY MAN. GENTLEMAN ALSO. 



James R. Waters 



'THE SINGER OF THE GHETTO.' 



MANCHESTER'S "VANITY FAIR" COMPANY 



Jan. 6, 125th St. Music Hall, N. Y. 



SPECIAL FEATURE, THE MAN WITH THE TWO HEADS. 

Potter d Hartwell 



NEXT WEEK, MINER'S BOWERY. 



NELLIE WALLACE 

The Inimitable, Eccentric Comedienne 

Re-opened December 30, Colonial Theatre 



THE TOWN TOPIC TICKLE TALKERS. 




A BEAUTIFUL SINGER OF NEWEST SONGS 

GRACE 

WILSON 

Tremendous success as "Lady Bettie" in J. P. Goring-' s 
Big Song Show, "THE SHOW GIRL," Season '07-'08. 



BILLY HART 



Principal comedian and producer of all the material in 

MANCHESTER'S "GAY MASQUERAD1 

a, show that is being so well talked about all along- the line. 



•• 



BARRY and WOLFORD 

TICKLING AT JOHNSTOWN THIS WEEK. WEEK JAN. 6, CHASE'S, WASHINGTON 
THOSE SMART AGENTS, REICH & PLUNKETT. ""' 




THAT DAINTY ATHLETE 



Little Belle Gordon 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



ANTONIA 



VAN GOFRE «■ CORTRELY 



EMMA 



•FOUR 
ENCORES 
AND 
SIXTEEN 
CURTAIN 



Novelty Balancing and Posturing. 



Address, care VARIETY, San Francisco. 



»» 



riil la. North Am. 



44 



^^^ THE GREATEST SINGING ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 

THE SONG BIRDS 



** 



Music VICTOR HERBERT 



With WILLIAM BURRESS 

Management WILLIAM BURRESS— K.-P. Cirouit. 
When answering advertisements kindht mention Vartf.tv. 



Book GEO. V. HOBART 



or 

THIRTY 
ARTISTS 



VARIETY 



25 



BOSTON 



By EENE8T L. WAITT. 

VARIETY Office, 278A Treraont St. 

Holiday business at all the bouses has been 
exceptionally good. The Tremont sang Its swan 
song this week, "Advanced Vaudeville" retiring 
gracefully from the field, leaving B. F. Keith 
again supreme here, with the eKith aud Orpheum 
theatres. 

TREMONT (J. B. Schoeffel, mgr.).— It was a 
sort of "Old Home Week" here this week, Hetty 
King returning with her Impersonations, and Ida 
Fuller and the Cottrell -Powell Troupe remaining 
another week. Josephine Cohen In her new sketch. 
"The Girl of "The Times.' " and Fred Niblo, are 
the real headllners, being new to this house. Both 
acts made remarkably good. Froslnl, a genius 
on the accordion, got well merited encores. A 
fine bicycle act is that of Hill and Sllvlauy, and 
Raw-son aud June, with spears and boomerangs, 
were interesting. 

ORPHEUM (S. M. Mowry, mgr.).— Lily Lena, 
headlined this week, succumbed to Boston's east 
wind on Monday and did not go into the bill. She 
will hold over next week. Arthur Whltelaw, Cel- 
tic comedian, was moved down the bill after 
Monday, making good. He has some new laugh 
getters that are good. Lea Jardys, very good. 
Frederick Brothers and Miss Burns have a com- 
edy musical- turn that takes with the people out 
front. Konorah, a rapid calculator, surprises 
everybody. Gaston and Green have a pretty turn, 
with bits of musical comedy that are very en- 
tertaining. Staley's Transformation was billed 
as "First time in Boston." but It has played here 
frequently. It is still mightily interesting. John- 
nie Hyarac and Leila Mclntyre bring "Two Hun- 
dred Wives." which Is followed by some character 
changes. Mine. Etolle's Society Circus Horses 
and Vinelll's boxing stallions close the bill. 

KEITH'S (H. D. Dupee, mgr.).— The 25th du- 
nlvereary of this house comes next week and 
special preparations are being made for It. Mr. 
B. F. Keith is here, but under the weather, hav- 
ing a touch of the grippe. The bill this week Is 
strong, well balanced and Interesting. Eva Tan- 
guay heads it. Little Tip, the dwarf elephant, 
is also in the bill. Tip and Eva made a big hit 
on Tuesday afternoon when they went in an auto- 
mobile through the streets, to the Stock Exchange, 
the Common, etc., selling copies of the Boston 
"American" for charity. R. G. Larsen planned 
the escapade. The Sandwlnas, man and woman, 
have one of the greatest acrobatic acts ever 
shown here. The woman is understander, and she 
does feats no woman has ever done here. The 
closing stunt Is startling. She holds the man 
aloft on her single hand and gets a curtain call 
for it. George Ade's newest sketch, "The Mayor 
and the Manicure," is well played, well staged 
and well written. Eugene Jepson Is Ideal in the 
character aud has good support, and Mrs. Gene 
Hughes In "Suppressing the Press," go well. The 
Dillon Brothers have a good, quiet act, in which 
parodies figure, and they please. The Max Tour- 
blllon troupe of cyclists; Quinlan and Mack, "The 
Traveling Dentist"; Daly's "Country Choir"— with 
half of them sick with a cold — but which gets 
the audience to clapping very heartily; Blllle 
Montgomery and Florence Moore In a fine musi- 
cal act; the Pelots. jugglers; the Nohrens, 
trapezlsts; Crouch and Richards, banjolsts, and 
Decry and Francis, In a skit, complete the bill. 

HOWARD (Jay Hunt, mgr.).— The "Tiger 
Lilies" bloomed here this week to good business. 
George P. Murphy heads the company, doing his 
German act. John Marion and Grace Lillian; 
Carrie Ezler and Josle Webb are in the olio, also 
Jack Irwin and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ellsworth. 
The Howard's own show is unusually good, com- 
prising the Pekin Zouaves; Selblnl and Grovlni on 
the eyelet; I*e Malre and Le Maire, Hebrew 
hawkers; the Sliaws in gymnastic feats; Lola Big- 
ger anil Anna Meek, singers; Rudd Brothers, 
English coster comedians; the McLain Sisters, 
local girls and very popular here; Billy Chase 
and Bert Howe. 

LYCEUM (Geo. II. Baehellor. mgr.).— Charlie 
Barton, with Rice & Barton's "Big Gaiety" Com- 
pany, camped here Monday. The show is good, 
the costumes bright and clean, and the girls 
know how to sing. Tossie Mooney is still with 
the bunch. Bert Baker; Glynn, Miller and Hunt, 
musical trio; McKee and Van, In song and dance; 
Pierce and Malzee, costume changers; Mildred 
Gllmore, with new songs; Annie Dunn Mullen, 
Tessle Burns and the French dancers, are all in 
the olio bill. 

PALACE (Chas. II. Waldron. mgr.).— Weber & 
Rush's "Dainty Duchesses" opened to good luisl- 
ness Monday. George W. Scanlan Is In high 
favor here, with Helena May as feature in the big 
auto sensation. Scanlan and the Eight Confec- 
tionery Girls; Frencellns and Company, in heavy 
weight Juggling; Morris and Kramer, dancers; 
and Keller and Ilawley, comedians, complete the 
show's olio. in the Palace's own bill are Hel- 
ston and Hood, in a comedy sketch; Dynes and 
Dynes, club jugglers; Alden Irving, magician; the 
Todesei Keating Trio on the bicycle; Le Rex. 
aerial act. 

COLUMBIA (II. N. Farren, mgr.).— Carew and 
Hayes, in "The Mad Stampede," are features of 
the Miners' Burlesquers' bill this week. They 
get a great hand, for their act Is strong and well 
done. The show Is fair as a whole. Charlie 
Mackle, Andy Gardner and Billy Spencer are the 
leading comedians. The Three Musical Stewarts 
ar g'K>d; Joe Barton and his brother have the con- 
ventional line of bicycle stunts, aud the Bohemian 
Trio -Misses Revere, Law (on and York, lively 
and good looking— are also In the olio. 

AUSTIN & STONE'S MUSEUM (Stone & Shaw. 
props.); — The Royal Cingalese hold over at this 
house, drawing good business. In the curio ball 
are Ronnette on the trapeze; Jay Paige, clay 
modeller; John Mandy, with the Iron skull. In 
the stage shows are Violete Dale, Wygard and 
Wygard. Marslon and Company. Needham and 
Wood, Norma Phara. Beverly and Kramer, Clara- 
bel Curtln, and Tom Meadows' Comedy Company. 
Business good-. 

NOTE. — George Evans closed at the Tremont 
Friday night last, after the evening performance, 
having been notified to Jump to Kansas City, 
opening there Sunday night. — Carl D. IiOthrop of 
Keith's, and Al Sheehan of the Tremont, were 



Respectfully inscribed to _ 

"THE GIRL WITH THE HOOP" 

as we of the Middle- west see her. 
Winsome, pretty, with a personal grace, 



ALINEIMHOOPS 

sets them all the pace. 
Pirouette and pose with hoop in air 
Always pleases our people with her stunt so fair. 
Safely she juggles with grace and true 
'Tis a pleasure to watch her; she's a winner, too. 



FILMS FOR RENT=riLMS TOR SALE 

ALL THE LATEST SUBJECTS CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
OUR SBR1/IGE GUARANTBBS SUCCESS 

Write, phone or Call. 

manhattan Film Rental Co. 

Phone 5508— Oram. 116 E. 23d STREET, NEW YORK. HART & DAVIS, Mgrs. 



After featuring our 14 ft. leap in all the tirst-class houses in America for the past 
three years and all acrobats were gentlemen enough to keep off, I strolled in one of 
the 14th Street Theatres this week and saw two acrobats doing the exact same trick 
we originated. We will be at Keeney's, Brooklyn, February 24th, and we invite these 
acrobats to steal the new one that we will present. 

-ABD ALLAH BROS.- 3 

MYERS & KELLER, Agents 




Variety's Chicago Office 



IS IN THE 



Chicago Opera House Block 

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"S T A GELA NO 



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Gives a bright commentary on Drama. Vaudeville. Music, Circus, etc. TO ARTISTS, AGENTS, PUB- 
LISHERS: An advertisement In "STACKLAND" brings you directly in touch with nil the Managers 
and member* of the profession in the Commonwealth and New Zealand. Hates, $l.. r >0 per Inch single 
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Advance notices of sailings and opening dates should be posted to the Editor. When an artist has 
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guests of the Friars at their meeting In the 
Hotel Langbara Friday night. It was decided 
there that the organization shall work, through 
Lawyer Thomas J. Harry, to abolish the law here 
by which any person claiming that another owes 
him money can attach the debtor's body. 



PHILADELPHIA 

By GEORGE M. YOUNG. 

KEITHS (II. T. Jordan. mgT.).- It Ifl Just 
about wenty years since May Irwin made her 
last appearance In vaudeville in this city, as a 
member of the old Howard Athenaeum Company. 
She made her reappearance this week at the 
head of a vaudeville bill which was a tltting 
Quale for a most successful year an.i a Blowing 
welcome to the New Year theatrically. May Ir- 
win Is much the same jovial person In mannerisms 
she was on her last vaudeville appearance here. 
She docs not depend strictly Upon coon songs, 
but sang two, one Of which was her famous 
"Bully" song, and she added the "Hooks and 
Eyes" recitation which is an old trade mark. 
Many new tricks by performing seals were show n 
by Captain Winston's troupe which was seen for 



the fust time here. The animals perform familiar 
balancing and Juggling tricks and these are re- 
peated by one seal resting on the hack of a 
pony which gallops around the stage. This gives 
the act a great finish. Oracle Em met t and Com 
pany repeated the sketch, "Mrs. Murphy's Second 
Husband," to solid applause. fjeo Carrillo went 
through nicely. The Marno Trio, a European 
acrobatic net, was also new here and made a 
strong Impression. Much of the work Is from »i 
springboard, and rotnedy Is worked through the 
a«t by the unusually high leaping of the top- 
mounters. The get leaves the stnge badly, com 
lug bock for a repetition after a splendid exit. 
There w.is an abundance of singing and dancing 
to lighten up the hill. George Whiting and the 
Melii'ttc Twins In a new specialty proved one of 
thel best liked of all the nets. .\ clever arrange* 
tiient of cross tire talk and singing keeps the 
number moving at a rapid clip and the trio work 
It right up to the finish with some catchy BOIlgs. 
Ruby Raymond and Chester and Jones form an- 
other neal trio of dancers MNs Raymond give-* 
evidence of ability as n loose dancer and should 
try If. A third dancing team Is Wood and Law 
son. Here the woman Is at fault, dressing poor- 
ly. She adds some f;iir steps, hut the man I- a 
corking dance r niid scores with his fast work. 
Cbarbs F. Setnon pleased as usual without show- 



ing any change from his former offering. The 
comical spectacle caused by the disparity in size 
is the chief comedy bid In the Marco Twins act. 
The Toozooln Arabs held down the closing post- 
tion In their usual whirlwind stvie. The trained 
pony "Don," shown by Claude* Frederick, per 
formed tricks which pleased the youngsters. War- 
ren Keane did some good palming, the balance of 
his act being not above the ordinary. Lillian 
Maynard filled In with songs, and Prince and Vir- 
ginia were mixed in behind the pictures with a 
German singing sjioclalty. 

CASINO (Kllas St Koenlg, nigra.).— Fred Ir- 
win's "Majesties" was the New Year week's 
attraction and furnished good entertainment for 
big crowds all week. Some few changes have 
been made since || visited this city last. Cook 
and Madison have been added, doing a specialty 
which replaces that formerly offered by Stanley 
and Fay. The latter pair, with Rogers and 
Walker, form a quartet which is also new The 
same quick action and good singing of the com- 
pany Is a feature and the show made a hit here 

TROCADERO (Fred Wilson, mgr.).— The "Fay 
Foster" Company entertained at the Trocadero 

C.AYF/TY (0. L. Walters. mgr.).— Hyde's Com- 
edians and the "Blue Ribbon Girls" furnished the 
bill here. 

RI.IOTT (Lewis H. Baker, mgr.).— A needless bid 
Tor laughs through the use of the roughest sort 

?L£ OI H* < « ,nk<s ,,,p •*■■ off I be show given by 
The Jolly Girls" company this week. The two 
act farce "A Wise Guy." in which Kdmond Hayes 
is featured. Is being used for its tenth successful 
season, according to the program announcement. 
With the exception of the Interpolation of new 
numbers at Intervals the show Is little changed 
from last season, but It Is a f„r better show. The 
ability of Hayes to win laughs through legitimate 
efforts Is so apparent It Is difficult to understand 
why he should resort to some of the raw met bod • 
he uses In this show. Hayes Is a good ^median 
and from his first entrance twists |»„ fclM out of 
the audience with every line am] action. The 
character of "Spike Ilenncssy" Is of the roughest 
class of comedy parts, yet at times, when ke.»t 
within the limits of decency as it was when "A 
V\ise Guy was played In the popular priced 
houses, It Is genuinely funny and free of offcnslve- 
ness. Robert Archer, who essavs the role of 
Bozo Spike's pal. has probably not accepted the 
idea that comely can be gained without resorting 
to unclean methods, for he makes his appearance 
in tin? first act In the dirtiest kind of a make-up 
and the a lualons to him made by Hayes adds to 
the offensiveness. Archer also goes through the 
motion of sopping up beer from the floor ami plas- 
ters the foam on his face, later allowing Marie 
Jansen. one of the chorus girls, to drink from the 
can aud then spit the beer In his face. There Is 
something lively going on all the time. Again 
Hayes Indulges in some risky work with Joe 
Russell In the guise of a servant, which could 
well be dropped. The girls are capable of good 
work, and they have not very much to do in the 
show. Nearly all the numbers are handled well. 
The Newell Sisters could Improve, their voices 
being weak. Harrlctte Belmont, who seems to 
have a pet note which she stars while occupying 
her place In the Hue, Injects plenty of action Into 
her work; and Marie Jansen scored with her num- 
ber singing the last chorus in German. Mav 
Sheldon lead! the soldier number In place of Edna 
Mathews and figures In numerous recalls through 
Hayes using the slapstick on the gf-rls as they 
march around the stag... The girls pay more at- 
tention to dodging Hayes and his paddle than to 
too music, but the audience didn't care Haves 
leads two songs and Harry Francis one. a quar- 
tet of acrobats do some unusuallv fast ground 
tumbling in the first act. Three of them are far 
above the average, the smallest of the bunch, who 
Is dressed as a girl, throwing rows of flips and 
twisters in lightning like manner. This specialty 
was a big hit. Stella Gllmore assumes the role of 
an actress In search of Lord Get the Cola's money 
aud does better work with it than any of the 
women appearing since Emily Lytton, the original 
- who was Hayes* partner when the team played 
r*"*L erl "f '■ .? travesty. James J. Colli,,*, * „* 
•Mike Idler. Is an acceptable "straight" for 
Hayes, but reads bis lines too mechanically and 
In a sing-song manner. If Is doubtful if my show 
this season has kept the house am Used froiii start 
to finish With better effect than Haves ami the 
"Jolly Girls." but the raw material mentioned Is 
a mark of demerit. 

NOTES.— There was a midnight performance at 
all four of the burlesque houses Tuesday night 
good business resulting, ciark. Bergman and 
Ma honey were "laying off" here this week, lead- 
ing Friday for Colli mbUH, where they p| M y next 
week. Frank Carlefon Is reported to' I*, mending 
nicely and expects to have recovered caftugh In 
a short time to rejoin the "Twentieth Century 
Maids." |[e bus I n 111 here since the show 

played this city. Edward Hlxlev. principal com- 
edian of the "Ronton Relies," was forced »o lay 

off almost all of last week, owing to Illness. 
while the .-how was playing the Casino! 
Lowell B. I new. a local hov who has 
'" «" playing Keith time w n h a monologue 
and Imitations. will Join Will M. Creasy, 
to play [.arts In his sketches William Jennings* 
who was manager of the Rljoii la-t season. |s 
manager of "The Wis,. Guy" Company, and re- 
ports n i,ig business since Ihe opening of the wen- 
son I'vchn Walker, one of the principal- in the 
"Majesties," will (pi It the show in two or three 
weeks. II.-,. |tu hand v\ill continue with the show 
The I'hifadHphla mil-posting Company operated 
le. Nixon \ Zimmerman has hough! up the wn 
Ham I'etin Rill posting Compnn.i which ivn oper- 
• '•''! by W. i; Wegefartli and William \ail 
Tie latter has |*>cn appointed manager of |h/' 
I'filace, the old Lyceum Theatre, which i- now 
a • levip \ audi s ill<- house. 



DUBUQUE. IA. 

LI. lor (.fake Rosenthal, mgr.). Seymour and 
Utfpro, musical, athletic and dancing sketch, hit 
of I > ; ' ! : _ M 1 1 • • T'»"ia. descriptive Illustrated Iwen 
ty minute lecture .mi the Great Southwest, 

ft I; Weils and Sells, acrobatic comedy, clever; 

\! TIcTnoy, vocalist, good: Ijvuinrd Kane, the 
dancing \d"i.i«. very good; Major |.a \... mono 
Iog|-t r ;1 ir LYRIt . Moving pictures; fair 

Justness. VERA V. HAAS. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



26 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 






J 


.. 


nMH 



THE FAMOUS 

JACKSON 
FAMILY 

WORLD'S MOST MAR- 
VELOUS CYCLISTS. 



WILDER 



Marshall 
P. 



256 W. 97th St., Hew York. 
Phone 2188 Riverside. 




HERBERT LLOYD 

And Hit Principal Assistant 

LILLIAN LILYAN 

In Front of the "RAADHUS" (City Hall), 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 



It isn't the name that makes the act — 
It's the act that makes the name. 




THE KING OF IRELAND, 

JAMES B. DONOVAN 

AND 

RENA ARNOLD 

QUEEN OF VAUDEVILLE. 

DOING WELL, THANK YOU. 

ALF T. WILTON. Agent- 




FRED ZOBEDIE 

World's Renowned Gymnast. 
Booked Solid Until June 1st, IflOW 

LaNoleBros. 

Comedy Gymnastic Novelty 



REICH A PLUNKETT. Agents. 



WILBUR DOBBS 

Comedian— Miner's •• Americans " 




Chris 
Richards 



JOHN C. 



stric Corned lav i 

JAN. 6, COLUMBIA, 
CINCINNATI. 

MARINELLI, AGENT. 
SALLY 





Rice -Cohen 

Presenting "A Bachelor Wife." 
WEEK JAN. 6, ORPHEUM. SAN FRANCISCO. 



J 



SOME ACROBATS. 

Who Said "Hail to the Kins"! 
In Vaudeville. 

THE MYSTERIOUS CONJURER 

"SILENT" MORA 

And His Company of Trained Chickens. 
At Present Feature Graham© Stock Company. 

ROWLAND 

The Great Tramp Juggler 

dick McAllister 

ORIGINAL 

SECOND SEASON, Gus Hill's "Around the 
Clock" Company. 

America's Original "That Bad Boy (Late of 
Fred Karno's), "Night in an English Musical 
Hall." 

Permanent Address, care DISBECKER, 
06 IRVING PLACE, NEW YORK CITY. 

Clifton Crawford 



Direction JOE HART. 



Melville and Morgan 

TWO DANCING GIRLS, with "Avenue Girls." 

George Connors 

"STRAIGHT MAN" 
With "Avenue Girts"— "The Hallway Tenor." 



RICE & PREVOST 



"Bumpty Bumps 



If 



GRACE 



Ritterand Foster 

ACROSS THE POND. 

Address care BOMER A WARNER, 

1 Tottenham Court Road, London, Eng. 

ALT T. WILTON, American Agent. 

Grace Orma 



SIX FEET IN "ONE. 
DIRECTION OF 



•► 



JENIE JACOBS 



BENJ. CHAPIN 


A ^sM s^V 


LINCOLN 


■vrm I 

^1 ^v 


In His Own 

Original 

One-Act 

Play 


^1 V ^La m 

' s^l • ^H ' 

■ i 


"At 
The 
White 
House" 



BalnoandShaw 

BURLESQUE ECCENTRICS. 

N. Y. Hippodrome, indef. 

JANE GILBERT 

With MAY TULLY IN "Stop, Look and Listen" 
JAN. 6, COOK'S, ROCHESTER. 



Why not have a cartoon of yourself or act for lobby, or a diagram of your tricks ? 

I'LL DRAW THEM FOR YOU 







ORIGINAL 



If you are, this Is the best protection 



Address care VARIETY 






IVAen answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 




VARIETY 



27 



PRESS AND PUBLIC are unanimous in declaring the instantaneous success of 

YORKE Sc ADAMS'"PLAYING THE PONIES" 



AT THE NEW CIRCLE 
THEATRE, NEW YORK 



All of the lyrics are by 



EDWARD MADDEN 



and are exceedingly clever. 



AARON HOFFMAN 



All the music is by 



6 BIG C 
SONG HITS D 



ALL THE MUSIC PUBLISHED BY 



THEODORE MORSE 

whose tuneful melodies have caught on instantly. 

wrote the book, and it's a hummer. A thousand laughs in two hours' fun. The busi- 
ness, by FRANK SMITHSON, is perfection. The entire production under the able man- 
agement of B. E. Forrester. 

"I'D RATHER BE A LOBSTER THAN A WISE BUY" ''MOON BEAMS" 

"WIND YOURSELF AROUND ME, DEARIE" "THE FAMILY TREE" 

"A COSY LITTLE C0TTA6E BY THE SEA" "CUPID'S WEDDING BELLS" 



ci 



H AVI LAND, 



II 125 WEST 37th ST., 

E W YORK 



and is restricted for this production. 



Carleton among others. MAJESTIC (Frank 

Rich, mgr.). — Week 21: Mr. and Mrs. Blessing, 
eni< rtalnlng; Sherman and Fuller, amusing; 
Barnes and West, very good, with moving pictures 
and 111. songs. F. W. CAMPBELL. 



ERIE. PA. 

FAMILY (James Flamant, mgr.). — First three 
days: The Two Pecks, good; Reed and his Acro- 
batic Dogs, very good; Wm. Rowe, blackface 
comedian, good; Wm. O. Green, songs. This 
week the Family changed Its policy, giving two 
shows a week. New shows start with the Mon- 
day matinee and Thursday matinee. MAJES- 
TIC (J. L. Gllson, res. mgr.). — Jan. 1 and 2: 
"Mrs. Temple's Telegram"; Jan. 4: "Isle of 
Spice." PARK OPERA HOUSE (John L. Gll- 
son, mgr.). — Week of Dec. 30: Murray-Mackey 

Stock Compaiy. NOTES.— The Gaiety, which 

was to open here last Monday, was not able to 
open, not being finished. The new theatre will 
not open for three weeks. It will play vaude- 
ville. BRUCE GRONNETT. 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 

SHEEDY'S (Chas. E. Cook, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10). — The headliner of this week's bill, 
"The Galnsboro Girl," excellent; Elton, Polo and 
Aldo, aerial casting artists, good; Mitchell and 
Cain, "The Frenchman aud the Other Fellow," 
applauded; The Three Nightingales, vocalists and 
dancers, good; Ilealey and Vance, "The Heathen 
Idol," pleasing; Sammy Watson's Farmyard, 
English novelty, very good; The Saraols Troupe, 
whirlwind acrobats and pyramid builders, good. 

PLEASANT STREET (Jas. Mason, mgr.).— 

Rutter and Lamar, tramp sketch, good; John 
Mack, blackface comedian, very good; Ellen 
Denno, songs and dances, fair; Mason Doran Trio, 
excellent. E. F. RAFFERTY. 



FORT SMITH, ARK. 

LYRIC (Winfrey B. Russell, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 12:03.)— The Cummlngs Trio, refined sing- 
ing act, headed good bill and made a tremendous 
hit; Prof. Schafer, barnyard circus, fair; Wills 
and Barron, comedy act, scored; Grace Dodd, 
singing, won applause; Mljuno Troupe of Five 
Japs also scored heavily; the bill as a whole was 

the best the Lyric has presented. Edlsonla, 

Bijou and Olympic moving pictures shows did 
good holiday business. RED. 



FORT WORTH, TEXAS. 

MAJESTIC (T. W. Mullaly, mgr.).— Week 23: 
Edgar Berger, acrobatic, one of the best on this 
week's bill; George W. Stewart. "The Man Who 
Made the Mississippi Famous." fair; MacDowell 
and Virginia Drew Trescott, playlette, "The 
Final Lesson," good; Arthur Huston and Com- 
pany, comedy Jugglers, hit of the bill; Herbert 
Burt Lennou, comedy, fair; the Five Columbians, 
"A Bit of Dresden China," good; F. Blount and 
II. Calhoun, comedy dancing and singing, both 
are Ft. Worth boys, and were special for Christ- 
mas afternoon nud night performance, were one 

of the best on the bill this week. THE LYRIC 

(Geo. W. Barnhart. mgr.). — Hoyt and McDonald, 
comedy playlet, "The Interview," good; Sytz 
and Sytz, comedy acrobatics, good.; Andy Rankin, 
eccentric musical comedian, very good; C. E. 

Able, 111. songs. NOTES.— The Lyric on 

Christmas gave two afternoon performances and 
three night performances. — The financial condi- 
tion In the South does not affect the vaudeville 
business here. F. II. BARNES. 



GALESBURG, ILL. 

GAIETY (J. II. Holmes, mgr.).— Lutz Brothers, 
great; Early and Lute, singing and talking, went 
big; Geo. Mundwellder, ill. songs, excellent; La 
Auto Girl, clever; Clark and Temple, "The Bell- 
ow and the Maid," good; The Musical Smiths. 

pleased. NOTE.— The Bijou Theatre closed 

Dec. 28. F. E. R. 



HARTFORD, CONK. 

POLl'l (Harry Bailey, mgr.).— Wm. Court- 
leigb and Company, headllners, "Peaches," one 
ef the best acts ever seen here; Harper, Desmond 
and Hillard, fun makers; Harry Deaves and Com- 
pany, excellent act: Banks and Newton, poor 
"lingers, good as dancers; James Harrlgan, tramp 
juggler, pleased; Caron and Herbert, acrobats, are 
of high order; The Musical Cralgs, good musl- 

rlana. SCENIC (II. C. Young, mgr.).— I.eRoy 

and Applet on, acrobats, good; Morton and Blink, 
"The Dancing Kids," show some novel steps; Joe 
Hurt, monologlst, brief in act, but good while 
"<>n"; Jennie Glrard continues to sing and pleases 
big audiences. M. W. MORROW. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

MARY ANDERSON (Max Frtedburg, mgr.).— 
The Four Bards inspired with their remarkable 
acrobatics; Dave Lewis was cordially received; 
Vasco, the "Mad Musician," pleased; The Gaud- 
sraldts, clever; Alexander and Bertie took well 
In their ladder act; Fred Sosman, character singer, 
bit; Hanvaar and Lee, juggling, won merited 

applause. HOPKINS* (Wm. Relchman, mgr.). 

— The Six Normans made a fine showing in intri- 
cate juggling; Guyer and Crlspl, very clever 
dancing act; Emlle Subers, comedian, well re- 
ceived; Ferero's Musical Dog, clever; Four Ar- 
n uiics gave one of the prettiest acrobatic turns 
seen here in a long time; Dorothy Kenton, banjo- 

Ist, good; Gil Brown, fair. BUCKINGHAM 

(John Whallen, mgr.).— "Yankee Doodle Girls" 
present a bright show with a couple of amusing 
burlettas and a good vaudeville olio. 

ARTHUR WITTELSHOFER. 



LOWELL, MA8S. 

HATHAWAY (John I. Shannon, mgr.).— Le 
Bunn Grand Opera Trio, good; Fred Russell and 
Lillian Held, "The Dancer and tbe Lady Mag- 
netic," pleased; Mr. and Mrs. Howard Truesdale 
and Company, comedians, "Two Men and a 
Bottle," good; Mile. Chester and Statue Dog, a 
hit; John and Mae Burk in "How I atrlck Went 
to War," good; Keno, Walsh and Melrose 
bats, good; Gardner and Golden, blackface, 

NOTE.— Francis Berg, of "Clark's Six 

nlng Widows," is spending the holidays at 



acro- 
good. 
Win- 
home 



in Lowell. 



JOHN J. DAWSON. 



MAHANOY CITY, 

(E. F. McAtee. 



PA. 



FAMILY (E. F. McAtee. res. mgr.).— Duffy. 
Sawtelle and Duffy, "Naughty Knott, Jr., good; 
Larode and Blake, comedy acrobats, fair; The 
Kalmos, character change dancers, very good; 
Zimmer. Juggler, excellent; Olive and Frank, 
Equilibrists, pleased. J. O. ASHTON. 



MALDEN, MASS. 

AUDITORIUM (Samuel L. Tuck, mgr.).— Maxl- 
I1HI8 the Great, sensation; Golden Gate Quintet, 
colored singers and dancers, liberally applauded; 
Oscar Loralne, protean violinist, a great favorite; 
Todd Judge and Boy, acrobatic, good; Fred P. 
Russell, minstrel monologlst, fairly well re- 
ceived: Al II. Weston and Irene Young, in "The 
Gadding Gosslpers," well received; Little Johnnie 
Magulre, the boy tenor, scored a hit In his Ill- 
songs. NOTE. — Maximal was booked for Tues- 
day noon to be run over In front of the theatre 
by the largest automobile In the city, but was 
unable to perform the stunt as the police could 
not control the great crowd that gathered. 

T. C. KENNEY. 



MARION, IND. 
CRYSTAL (Amnions & DuIkiIs, props. Re- 
hearsal 10.). — Week 23: The Illrschhorns, Alpine 
entertainers, big hit; the Murdos and their acro- 
batic dogs, very clever; Frank and Sadie Harrl- 
gan, comedy sketch team, dancing very good, but 

talk old; Irene White Amnions, ill. songs. 

GRAND (Sam Pickering, mgr. Rehearsal 10). — 
Ida Miaco, contortionist, exceedingly clever; 
Bowman Brothers, "The Blue Grass Boys." sec- 
ond appearance, very pleasing; Grace Ormond, 
comedienne, fair; Baker and Gormeley, acrobats; 
Jake Montross, ill. songs, pleasing. — INDIANA 
(Sam Pickering, mgr. Rehearsal 10:30). — An all- 
star vaudeville bill was featured all week as 
follows: "The Singing Four," a hit; Delphlno 
and Delmora, musical artists, good; La Tosea, 
juggler comlque; Rose and Ellis, barrel Jumpers, 
clever; Morrisey and Rich, singing and talking, 
fair; Cluxton, Richmond and Company, sketch 
team, good; Ruby Taylor, ill. songs, a newcomer 
who possesses a very fair soprano voice. 

L. 0. WETZEL. 



MARION, 0. 

FAMILY (H. S. Vail. mgr. Monday rehearsal 
10). — Three Ross Sisters, singers ami dancers, a 
very well received act, up to date In every re- 
spect; Laura Buckley, mimic, good In Imitations, 
a clever monologlst; Howell ami Webster, comedy 
and singing act. above average: T>evltt and Fall*. 

singing. Juggling, etc.. entertaining. NOTE. — 

The artists of last week's bill at Family Theatre, 
Three Alronas, Deverne and Van, Marry La kola 
and wife, and Zanfretta and Mansfield, 
Impromptu Christmas tree party on 
eve. J. 



had an 
Christmas 
BAUMGARTEN. 



Goodal and Craig, song and dance artists, ex- 
cellent, dressing of act was fine; Len Spencer, 
monologue and vocalist, good; Adams, hone solo, 
is O. K.. 26-29: Headed by the Great Ellisea, 
mind readers, big sensation; Zaneta, tbe frogman 

and contortionist, very good. NOTES. — The 

Bijou was one act shy the last half of the week. 
Tbe act failed to show up at Waterloo. — This 
season tbe Bijou changes acts with the Electric, 
Waterloo. Little Barbour books the houses. — 
The Elite, a moving picture theatre, gave away 
on Christmas Eve a live turkey, and as another 
feature little girls sang for prizes. 

KARL J. INGLEDUE. 



MILFORD, MASS. 

LYCEUM FAMILY (S. B. Stlfter, mgr.).— Nina 
Searles' "Red Raven Extravaganza Company" la 
making good here this week with the following 
olio: Ethel Williams, good; Jas. E. Dalley, good; 
Toledo, hit; Tina Davis, clever; Jos. J. Smith. 

fine. SCENIC (C. L. Litchfield, mgr.).— Moving 

pictures and ill songs. REYNOLDS' PENNY 

VAUDEVILLE (M. J. Reynolds, mgr.).— Moving 

pictures and songs. NOTES. — Kate Sanford 

(Mrs. Wiley), of the team of Sanford and Wiley, 
is sick at her home here. 

CHAS. B. LACKEY. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

ORPHEUM (O. E. Raymond, mgr.).— Charlene 
and Charlene, juggling and xylophone, striking; 
Geo. Austin Moore, good coon and character 
singer; Adolf Zlnk, midget, impersonations, novel, 
effective; Sellgman and Bramwell, excellent 
straight comedy; Violet Dale, charming; Six 
Musical Cultys. all good; Kronemann Brothers, 
better acrobats than comedians. LEWIS. 



MOBILE, ALA. 

LYRIC (O. Neubrik, mgr. Rehearsal Monday 
10).— Week Dec. 23: Adele Palmer and Dennis 
Mullen. "The Ice Man," very good; Webb and 
Connelly, music and singing, excellent; Eugenie 
Barker, good voice; Ernie and Honegger, one- 
legged acrobats, great; Harry Holman In new 
songs, immense. NAN. 



MONESSEN, PA. 

STAR (Wm. McShafTrey, mgr.).— Gage and 
Bay; Lynn and Williams; Princess Cblnqullla; 
Geo. Clark; Jim Dalton, and satisfactory show. 
AVENUE (A. Goldberg, mgr.).— Motion pic- 
tures. L. W. MEYERS. 



MAR8HALLT0WN, IOWA. 

BIJOU DREAM (T. Nelson Downs, mgr. Sun- 
day rehearsal 5. Thursday rehearsal 3).— 22 2.': 



NEWARK, N. J. 

PROCTOR'S (It. C. Stewart, mgr. Monday 
rehearsal 9). — Holiday crowds are filling this 
house. Ned Way-burn's pretentious production, 
"The Star Bout." with Taylor Granville In 
leading role, woke up tbe audience; Ed. Reynard, 
ventriloquist, proved a useful number; Kita- 
inura's Japs, with their elaborate stage setting, 
won hearty applause; Crane Brothers, "The Mud- 
town Minstrels," also won favor; Carletta, con- 
tortionist, clever; The Six American Dancers per- 
formed nil kinds of fancy dancing in a graceful 
manner; Joe Deming had them all the time; 

Howe and Scott, good. EMPIRE (Western 

Wheel. Harry Hyams, mgr.). — The Jolly Gra-s 
Widows have as good a burlesque show as has 
been seen at this house. The burletta, "A Scotch 
Highball," with a clever company of comedians, 
soubrettei and choristers, made up a good en- 
tertainment, with specialties by George Hick- 
man. Kstelle X. Wills, Henry and Francis, Falke 
and Coe, The Three Musketeers, Lillian Boyd, 
Nellie Francis and The Three Deltons, sensational 
Comedy acrobats. All work hard and make good. 
— WALDMANN'S (Eastern Wheel. Ix>e Ot- 
tclengul. mgr.). — Manchester's Vanity Fair Com- 
pany are here with a big company, putting on a 
great show, with Mr. and Mrs. Bob FltSSimmons 
as the strengthened. The olio Is looked after 
by Belle Wilton, songs; Morgan and Chester, 
German comedians, laughable sketch; James R. 
Waters, tbe "Singer from the Ghetto"; Wcl-di 
and Mail land, grotesque combines, who created 
laughs; The Wang Doodle Four; Dawson an! 
Alvarez, songs and talks; Hennlngs, Lewis and 
Ilennings, "The Automobile Agent," a very go4wl 

comedy skit. ARCADE (L. O. Mumford. mgr.). 

— Sliepard's motion pictures, 111. songs and re- 
fined vaudeville. with extra attractions on 
Wednesday and Friday nights, seem to please 
here. — NOTES.— With the "Nlcolet" and "Hip- 
podrome" now open and doing business, Newark 
has about fifteen motion picture show-shops In 
operation and they all seem to be doing a rush- 
ing business. JOE O'BRYAN. 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
ORPHEUM (Martin Beck. gen. mgr. Monday 
rehearsal 1).— May Ward and "Dre*den Doll«," 
Four Parros; Shean and Warren. "Quo Vadis 
Upside Down"; Violet Black and Company, "A 
West Point Regulation"; Three Yoscarys. Mr. 

and Mrs. Fred Voelker and Herbert Brooks 

GREENWALL (H. Greenwall. mgr.).— Two record 
breaking audiences laughed good naturedly at the 
burlesques offered by the "Bon Tons." Featured 
with the organization are Guy Rawson and Fran- 
ces Clare. Mr. Raw-son's various methods of ex- 
tracting humor seemed to find favor. Miss Clare 
Is magnetic, vivacious and painstaking in her 
endeavors. Her dressing has set a high mark 
for other soubrettes. Harry Woods in a "Yiddish" 
character Is convincingly funny, and shows 
marked improvement since last season. The cos- 
tumes worn by the chorus are very pretty. Sev- 
eral musical numbers should lie replaced, especially 
a semi-classical selection inserted In the first part, 
which received naught but Jeers from the Sunday 
night audience. Woods and Greene open the olio, 
in what is commonly called a sidewalk conver- 
sation act. The pair might freshen the dialogue. 
"Just Kids," presented by Rawson and Clare, 
could be elaborated into an excellent vaudeville 
offering. Its possibilities are apparent. 

O. M. SAMUEL. 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

HATHAWAY'S (T. B. Baylies, mgr.).— Julie 
Ring. In a neat little comedy sketch, "In the 
Wrong Room." heads the bill. The sketch Is 
bright and pleasing and Is going well here. Ollle 
Young and Three Brothers, great; J. W. Wlnton, 
English ventriloquist, making ah emphatic hit; 
Chas. Kenna. "The Street Faker." Is easily the 
bit of the bill; Wm. Baylies, a brother of Man- 
ager Baylies, shows complete mastery over the 
'cello and Is a musician of no mean ability; Ilia 
Grammon, sweet singer. Is winning favors; Lttl'i 
Dogs show unusual animal intelligence. 

NEMO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

POLLS (S. Z. Poll, prop.; F. J. Wlndlsch. res. 
mgr. Monday rehearsal 1»»-.- The Now'Ioh, the 
star feature of the week, was an exceptional offer- 
ing and generously received; "What Will Happen 
Next," by Wilfred Clarke and a strong support- 
ing company, decidedly amusing; Knight brothers 
and Sawtelle received merited applause; Callahan 
and St. George, "The Old Neighborhood." full of 
humor and Interspersed with acceptable musical 
numbers; Lee Tong Foo, Chinese baritone, good; 
Green Broam, comedy baseball Jugglers, and Geo, 
W. Copper and Wm. Robinson, colored singers and 
dancers, ulvi on the bill, were good. NOTE. 

Saturday night last, at the Oneco Hotel, Elsie 
Faye and Joe Miller, of Bissett and Miller, were 
married. The ceremony was performed Just before 
the Saturday night performance, and artists as 
slating In last week's bill were the attendants 
and witnesses. E. J. TODD. 

PITTSTON, PA. 

FAMILY (Harry Scott, res. mgr.). — Campbell 
and Brady, elub jugglers, very clever; Will. II. 
Burke, trick harmouiclst. good; Lewis and Hun. 
"All Along the Swanee," hit of bill; Ward and 
Weber, dancers, pleasing; James A. Welch and 
Company, Flannigan's Flirtations, good. 

DAVE HEIMAN. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

GRAND (.lames 11. Lrricksoii. mgr.l. Week 
89; Harry Crandall and Company, "Fun In a 
Grocery*" excellent; llerxog's High School Horses, 
very clever, Sa Van and Hill, comedy acrobat . 
very good; Flora RroWuIng, vo< allst, pleased; 

Joe Thompson. ill. SOUgS, Well received 

PANTAGE'S (John a. Johnson, mgr.).— Week 2'\\ 
Prof. Shedman's Educated Dog* head, plea ed im 
mensely; The Four Franks, "A Mixed Affair" 
excellent; West and Benton stag and dance well; 
Ivanhoe, extemporaneous poet, very good; The 
Saivadas. Japanese Jugglers, very (lexer: Fred 
Baior, ill. BOOgs, well received. W. K. B 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

KEITH'S (Chas. l/ovenberg, mgr.). i'!>> Irwin 
and Company in "Mrs. Pcckhnur's < arouse . 
Alex Hurley in ••Cost.,- III.-; Leua Manlier ., ! 
her horse; Wilbur Hill and Wllletto Wbitnker, 
dingers; Max ¥«»rk and Fox Terriers; si 
Ktrne*; Jupiter Brother-; Meredith Sisters 
IMPERIAL (John P. Hill, mgr.).— "Tbe CI 
Blossoms' Company have a ins I bin ■ :• . ti"- 



28 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE VENTRILOQUIST WITH A PRODUCTION 



Ed. F. 



REYNARD 

And His Famous Mechanical Figures. 
WEEK JAN. 6, PROCTOR'S, ALBANY. 

MAY TULLY I GO. 

"IN STOP, LOOK AND LISTEN." 

Most talked of act in Vaudeville. 
Booked solid with the United Booking Offices. 

Elinore Sisters 

in new act in ONE, season of 1907-8, entitled 
"THE ACTRESS AND THE MAID" 

Copyright Class D, XXC. No. 9801. 

Direction of GEO. HOMAN8. 

"THE MAN WITH THE FUNNY 8LEOE." 
CHAS. J. 

BURKHARDT 

GEO. MOZART 



Address VAUDEVILLE CLUB, LONDON, ENO. 




Marno Trio 



European Comedy Acrobats. 
KLAW it ERLANGER CIRCUIT. 



\A/ I L B U R 




ACK 



AND COMPANY 

KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



JUNO SALMO 

KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



THE If ARROW FILLER.* 

The Italian and His Sweetheart 

T HE PIOTTIS 

CHARACTER SONGSTERS. 

18 Mins. in One. 
Address care VARIETY. 






Going it alone once more and always making 
good. What do you think of that! 

WORK i OWER 

Season of 1906-1907. with ORPHEUM ROAD 
SHOW. Season 1907-1908, KEITH * PROC- 
TOR'S. 

Representative, ALBERT SUTHERLAND, 
St. James Building. 

BEN R. COOK 

A comedian who oan sing and talk and help to 
make a good show. 

2nd season with Williams' "Imperials." 



Do you know met 
If not get acquainted with me and my act. 



THE ONLY 



Bert Page 

"The Comedy Acrobatio Kid." 



Always working. 



Address VARIETY. 



GEO. W. EVERS 



"PORK CHOP8" 

Permanent Address, 
White Rats, 1553 Bway., N. Y. City. 



FINN-FORD 

NOVELTY ECCENTRIC DANCERS. 
Watch 'em on the Sullivan-Conaidlne Circuit. 



he 




(fallbacks 



A Knockout in the East. 
Booked solid till Feb. 3, 1908. Address all agent*. 

"Veil, I got anudder von." 

LEO ST. ELMO 

"The Musical German." 
14 Minutes in "ONE." 

WIGCHN'sTpARM 

Apply to THE CHADWICK TRIO. 

JAMES F. HAYES 

Character and Straight — Miner's "Americans." 



RBPRB6BINTATIVB ARTISTS 



GartelleBros. 

8KATORIALI8M 
HOMERS MASON 

AND 

MARQUERITE KEELER 




GAVIN, PLATT 

and PEACHES 



Presenting "THE STOLEN KID. 



»» 





THE FAMOUS 

HEIM CHILDREN 

The only act that geta their audience on tbe 
Impulse of tbe moment. Booked solid till July, 
1909. Management CHRIS 0. BROWN, N. Y. 

5 Ernesto Sisters 3 

Europe's Greatest Wire Artists. 
KLAW & ERLANGER CIRCUIT. 
Direction HENRY MEYERHOFF. 

We carry special scenery and electrical effects. 




MART E. 



PRESENTING 



"A COUNTRY BOYS LUCK" 

A rural oomedy playlet with original ideas and 
novel situations. 

ALF. T. WILTON, Agent. 

PRINCESS CHINQUILLA 

and NEWELL 



BILLIE REEVES 

ORIGINAL DRUNK. 

Fred Kamo Co., "A Night in English Musio Hall." 
TIME ALL FILLED. 




Ein /bend in Einem Amerikanischen Tingle-Tangle 
Now Playin? Xlaw ft Erlanger for 80 Weeks. 



Russell \ Held 

The Dancer and THE LADY MAGNETIC. 

ALF T. WILTON. Agent. 

JAN. 6, SHEEDY'S, FALL RIVER. 




ECCENTRIC MUSICAL ENTERTAINERS. 

OPEN for Eastern Wheel BURLESQUE or 
FARCE COMEDY. A. W. Stanley plays respon- 
sible parts. Mayme Scanlon, one of the BEST 
DIALECT CHARACTER COMEDIENNES on the 
stage. 

Address, care VARIETY, Chicago. 





"MOTORING." 
Usual Success, Alhambra, This Week. 



JENIE JACOBS, Sole Representative. 



NELLE 








GERMAN DIALECT COMEDIAN. 

"Avenue Girls," Presenting "Tom, Dick and 
Harry," Season 1907-08. 

"A Corker in Cork" 

GEORGE ATKINSON 



And "The Six 
English Rockers 



»♦ 



GOING WE8T AFTER PLAYING THE WILLIAMS CIRCUIT. DEC. 30, ORPHEUM, BROOKLYN. JAN. 6, ALHAMBRA, NEW YORK. 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



29 



LOUIS WESLYN 

Author of "TWO MEN AND A BOTTLE." the 
farcical hit of Howard TrueHdell and Company. 
Writer of aketcbea and songs for Nick Long and 
Idaleue Cotton, Carter aud Waters, Ilallen and 
fuller, WUIa Holt Wakefield, Lillian Apel, Hearn 
and Duncan, Lillian Ashley, Innea and Kyan. 
and many otberi. 

LOUIS WC8LYN 

SKETCHES AND SONGS, 

Headquarters, Grand Optra Houss, Indianapolis. 

MATT WOODWARD 

Producer; Play, Lyric and Sketch Wrlfer. Pro- 
ducer and co-author of "BUST IZZT," "ROYAL 
CHEF," "JOLLY BARON," Ac. 

I make a specialty of exclusive GET-BACK 
SONGS or PARODIES, giving brilliant flnlab to 
an act. 

As for SKETCHES, my only "Budget" la my 
brain, and that Is boiling over with original 
ideas. Great Parody: "Shove Me and the Qlrl Is 
Mine," $1.00. 

Studio. 215 W. 40th St., N. Y. City. 

CHARLES HORWITZ 

Sketches from the pen of Horwlta are the beat 
In vaudeville. Author of such hits aa "College 
Days," "Mrs. Murphy's Second Husband," "The 
Last of the Troupe," "The Marriage Fee," "Jack- 
aon'a Honeymoon," "For Sale, Wiggins* Farm," 
and over one hundred successful aketcbea, mon> 
logues, Ac. ' 

CHARLES HORWITZ, 

102-104 W. 88th St, N. T. Oity. 
Care of Mark-Stern Building. 



I. MILLER. Manufacturer 

ol Theatrical 
Boots and Shoea 
CLOG 
and 
BALLET 
SHOES a spe- 
cialty. All work 
made at abort 
notice. 

203 W. 23d St.. New York. Tel. 100 Chelaea. 
Mention VARIETY. 



MATTHEW GOLDMAN 

SKETCH WRITER. 

Up-to-date, writer with up-to-date ideas. Char- 
acter, Jewish, Slang, Protean, Italian acta, etc 
Author: "The Marriage Fee," "For the Love 
of Mammy," "The Call of the Blood," "Stage 
Struck." "Behind the Footlights." 

High grade vaudeville acts a specialty. 
109 WEST 111TH ST., N, Y. CITY. 



"A CORKER IN CORK.' 



good; May Blossom, soubrette, fair; I. Duvalle, 
German comedy, very good but somewhat rough, 
aud moving pictures and 111. song. Business for 
this bouse Is Improving. JAY E. JOHNSON. 





GEORGE 
ATKINSON 

TIME ALL FILLED. 



l future being the strong olio. The opening piece, 
"Booster's Millions," shows good comedy with a 
little overdose of horse -play. Lizale Perrv opened 
the olio and went well; Markey and Morgen, come- 
dians, appreciated; Jerge. Aleene and Hamilton 
have the neatest linglng and dancing act ever 
se.n here; Goff Phillips, comedian, very good. 
The closing burlesque, "Three Old Cronies," 
gives good opportunity to the well trained and 
good looking chorus to render their songs with 
good effect. The pictures of the Hums-Molr fight 
were Dot allowed to he shown. New police rules 
- — SCENIC TEMPLE.— Mayo and Howe open the 
olio in h good sketch; Hilly Pryor. banjolst. good; 
iru Kesaner, sluger. s. m. SAMUELS. 



READING, PA. 

ORPHEUM (C. Floyd Hopkins, mgr.).— Foster's 
Dog, 'Wise Mike." very intelligent; Deltorelll 
and Gliaasndo, pleased; Hrown and Nevarro, ex- 
cellent; Harry Yokes and Margaret Daly Vokes. 
assisted by Maud Dunn. "Watch the Barrel." 
good; Stewart Sisters, good dancing and rope 
•kipping and pretty stage picture; Rlalto Corned v 
Quartet, Mattering reception; Martinetti and Syl- 
vester, plenty of laughs. BIJOU (Updegraff A 

Brownell, nigra.).— Half week: Boston Belles 
Big Company, pleasing. Second half: The Bowerv 
Hurlesquers. FAMILY Hels & Appell. mgrs.).— 
vaudeville and moving pictures. Cotton's Donkeys 
bein>; featured. GEO. RITER. 



I). 



SaLT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
ORIMIKI'M <\V. L. Jennings, res. mgr.).— Week 
A gala bill to large houses all week 



with the I* Scala Sextet as headline™. TMt 
aggregation proved to be a strong drawing card 
»nd their sinning alone was worth the price of 
■dmlssioo. The Two Vivians did some remarkable 
shooting. Kva Madge, "The Military Maid," in 
quick character changes, did her work with pre- 
cision and has a splendid act. When It comes 
to imitations on the violin. Gelger of Gelger and 
>\ alters is superior and his partner is pleasing; 
<-eorge Wilson has originality In his blackface 
monolog and takes well; "Silvers," In bis original 
pantomime of the "Hall Game" made a decided 
hit, his partner, Charles Slegrlst. doing a double 
somersault from the ground, was recalled manv 

times. BON TON (J. H. Young, mgr.).— Week 

Dec. 2.'l: Louis Fens, tenor, good; Dale and Car- 
reg, skit and songs, good; Geo. H. Saunders' 
troupe »f Does, good; Chester Morris, toe dancer. 



SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 

RITCHE'S TENT (Ernst Rltche, mgr.).— Dra- 
matic and vaudeville. Good company and business 

continues big. NEW COLONIAL (Matt Cannon, 

mgr.). — Moving pictures and 111. songs. "The 
Two Orphans" with the all-star cast proved a 
winning card and drew out big crowds. EDI- 
SON IO (Loper Bros., mgrs.). — The Passion Play 
and Ben Hur caught on big and proved a big 

money getter. NOTE. — The Lyric Alrdome 

Theatre closed. It opens the summer season in 
April. CAL COHEN. 



SANDUSKY, OHIO. 

MAJESTIC (Joe Howard, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10).— Half week, Dec 26: The Kings- 
burya, musical comedy act, repeated their suc- 
cess of the former half of the week, being head- 
lined; O'Hara and Watson, Irish comedy, good; 
Wurnell Brothers, acrobats, excellent; Eddie 
Dwyer, Monologue, very good; Little Anna Kings- 
bury, daughter of George and Anna Kingsbury, 
captured first prize from a big bunch of amateura 
Friday night. Half week Dec. 29: Forbes, wire 
walker and Juggler. Is headliner; The Gordons, 
dramatic sketch, good; Corrigan and Hayes, black- 
face singers and dancers, an excellent act; Whal- 

ley and Wballey, musical act, very good: 

NOTE.— Manager Howard, of the Majestic, re- 
ceived a handsome pair of ebony military brushes 
from Gub gun of the Sun Vaudeville Agency, aa 
a Christmas present. DOC. 

SCRANT0N, PA. 
POLl'S (J. H. Docking, mgr.).— Mabel Mc- 
Klnley, headline, good; McMahon's Watermelon 
Girls and Minstrel Misses, usual hit; Morris and 
Morris, the laughing hit In "Fun on a Broom- 
stick"; Kleln-Ott Brothers and Nicholson, musical, 
very good; Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Crane, pleased; 
Hal. Merrlt, comedy cartoonist, good; Agnes 
Mahr. the American Tommy Atkins, went well. 

NOTE. — The Family Theatre, which opened 

Dec. 28, did not prove n paying venture and 
closed the following Saturday. D. F. McCoy 
was the promoter. II. S. HOLLAND. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

PANTAGES (Alex. Pantages, prop, and mgr.). 
— Week 23: American Newsltoys Quartet (Faulk- 
ner Brothers, Leonard and Holden). singers, 
dancers and comedians, great feature; .Lorlmer 
Johnstone and Company, farcical playlet, "After 
the Ball"; the Vaugbners, colored singers and 
dancers; Original Two Georgls, comedy acrobats; 
the Totltos, comedy ladder act; El well. ill. 

songs. COLISEUM (Sullivan & Consldlne, 

props.). — Week 23: Hesse aud Marlette, whirl- 
wind dancers; Devoy and Evans, hand balancers; 
Eddie Roesch, balladlst; Ned Nye, comedian; Nel- 
son and MUIedge. In "Glass Put In." STAR 

(Sullivan & Consldlne, props.). — Week 23: Famous 
Eddy Family, acrobats; Hammond and Forrester, 
sketch artists; Abdalah Kader and his three 
wives, novelty painters; Glenroy and Russel, 
comedy sketch; Mme. Marakoff, Parisian song 

bird. FAMILY (Edw. Lang, prop.).— Colored 

show, "Nashville Students. 

MILTON G. WALKER. 



SHAMOKIN, PA. 

FAMILY (W. D. Nellds. mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10). — The Four BraedonR. singers and 
dancers, good; Joseph Callahan and Company, 
Character artist, very good; The Ilallbacks. sing- 
ing, fair: Lewis McCord and Company, comedy 
sketch, pleased. MILLER. 

SIOUX CITY, IA. 

ORPHEUM (David Beebler, mgr.). — Ernesto 
Sisters, queens of the wire, very good; I.es 
Amatis, novelty piano artists, pleased; James and 
Sadie Leonard and Richard Anderson, "When 
Caesar C's Her," a hit; Sullivan and Pastpielenu 
|o "A Newsboy's Appeal," a real touch of the 
Bowery: Melatil Trio. Italian street musicians, 

good; Christie Duo, dancing, clever. NOTE. — 

The FStnily Theatre has abandoned vaudeville and 
Is nt present occupied by a stock company play- 
ing to popular prices. U. E. M. 



mgr.).— 

and the 

acrobatic 

dancers; 



SPOKANE, WASH. 

WASHINGTON (Geo. E. Blakeslee, 

Horton and Latriska, "The Messenger 
Human Doll"; Melnntte-Lanole Ino, 
wire; Bowen Brothers, singers and 
James E. McDuff, mimic; Minnie Middleton Quar- 
tet: Nello and Mine. Nello, juggling: Pete Duns- 
worth, ill. son^s; pictures. Good bill and at- 
tendance. PANTAGE'S (E. Clarke Walker, 

mgr.). — Hall ami Colborn, "The Swede and the 
Happy Gal"; Azards. acrobats; Dancing Davey; 
Buckeye Quartet; Leo White, ill. songs; Cal 
Stewart and Company, "Uncle Josh on the 
Bowery." j. j. HUGHES. 



SYRACUSE. N. Y. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (Grand Amusement 

Co., mgrs. Monday rehearsal 10:30). — Marseilles, 
good; Armstrong and Clark, pleased; Avon Com- 
edy Four, well received; Foy and Clark, fair; 
.lames J. Morton, went big; The Romanv Opera 
Company, hit of the bill; Paul Conchas, good. 

SAM F HE EM AN. 



TERRE HAUTE, IND, 

LYRIC Mack Hoofticr. gen. mgr.) .— Ellett 

Brothers, comedy bar artists, ordinary; Singing 

Four, great; Rockwny and Conway, comedy sketch. 

very good; Daly, "The Madman."' comedy Juggling 

and acrobatic, very good. VARIETIES (Jack 

Hoofflcr, gen. mgr.).— Hose and Ellis, barrel Jump- 
ing act, great; Morrlaej and Rich, comedy talk- 
ing and singing duo, great: Dave and Percle 
Martin, comedy skit, good; Emory Govt, equill- 

Irlst. very good. COLISEUM (J. H. Rarnes, 

mgr.).- Sunday, Doe. 20: "The Merry Makers"; 
also New Year's matinee and night. Jan. 5: 

"Washington Society Girls." NICKELDOM. 

ELECTRIC THEATRE and DREAMLAND having 
large attendance. ROSS GARVER. 



TOLEDO. 
THE ARCADE (Chester Sergent, mgr. Sunday 
rehearsals 10). — The bill this week Is only fair 
but Is amply redeemed by Jos. Hart's magnetic 
racing drama, "The Futurity Winner." This la 
the hit of the bill. The Three Renards. billed 
as Continental Novelty Gymnasts, open the bill 
and were well received. Carl W. Molter sang 
ill. songs-, Schooley and De Angelo did an ordinary 
musical act; M. A. Hunt and Company made good 
In "Rustic Courtship"; L. M. Coppens also worked 
hard; Sal vail Is a really clever card manipulator 
and his act goes well; The Makarenkas, Russian 
gypsies, are good singers. One of the best acta 
on the bill la Anderson and Gomes, colored enter- 
tainers. THE EMPIRE (Abe Shapiro, mgr.).— 

Week of 30: "The Trocadero Burlesquers" to 
good business. The show is clean and has an at- 
tractive chorus. The olio is well ud to the 

standard. THE LYCEUM (Ed Kelsey, mgr.).— 

This week Williams and Walker in "Bandanna 
Land" to big bouses. SYDNEY WIRE. 

TROY. 

PROCTOR'S (O. A. Graves, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsals 10).— Thomas J. Ryan-Rlchfleld and 
Company, "Mag Haggerty's Reception," headliner 
and proved a very pleasing number; The Big City 
Four, excellent; Myrtle C. Byrne and Company, 
sharpshooters, very good; Kramer and Belleclalr, 
physical culture, won approval: The McCarvers. 
colored entertainers, pleased. The rest of the bill 
includes the Wilson Brothers, German comedians, 

aud eLon Rogee, a good Imitator. LYCEUM 

(R. H. Keller, mgr.).— The "Lady Birda" held 
forth the first half of the week to very good 
attendance. For the last half we have Miner's 
"American." Amateur night every Wednesday. 

J. J. M. 



WHEELING, W. VA. 

WONDERLAND (H. W. Rogers, mgr.).— The 
feature act, Cora YoungbloQd Carson and her sex- 
tet, is an exceptionally strong musical number; 
The Great Kelter, bounding high wire act, good; 
Parraalee and Mack, song and dance, well re- 
ceived; John and Ida Kelly, a bit. BIJOU 

(Geo. Shaffer, mgr.). — Billy Moore, comedian, 
good; Gladstone Sisters, singing and dancing, act 
well and have good voices; Raymond and Hess, 
comedy sketch; De Vatre Trio, club Juggling. 
Others: De Verne and Van; Lois; Tegge and 
Daniels; The Wood wards; Freeman's Trained 
Coats; Wormser Tots; Musical Coles; Merrill 
Kenny. C. M. H. 



Y0NKER8, N. Y. 

ORPHEUM (Louis J. Fosse, res. mgr.).— Week 
30: Big bill and business. Stunning Grenadiers, 
solid success; May Duryea and Charles Deland, 
"The Impostor," carried off second honors; Clif- 
ford and Burke, blackface comedians, scored heav- 
ily; Ingraham ami Campbell, planologue, a hit; 
Lester and Miller. "The Little Emigrant." show to 
advantage; The Devoo Trio, got a good reception; 
Wise and Milton, colored entertainers, good. 

B. N. KARFUNKLE. 



LETTERS 



Acuua, J. M.; Allison, Mrs.; Arden, 'Edwin. 



Barnold, Charles: Buree, Jim; Berguln, Nellie; 
Bohme, W. A.; Bnniiln, Hose; Burke, ('has. ; 
Balrd and Dunn (Chicago otllce); Barry, W. II. 
(Chicago office) ; Bedlnl. Geltan; Backman, Marie; 
Baron, C. (Chicago office! ; Hrown. Mrs.; Billing' 
ton. E. ('.; Hording, S. ; Blair, Eugene, and Com- 
pany; Bluke's Animal Circus; Bernard, Nat. 



Coleman. Al. (Chicago office); Cavaln, Joftlah; 
Conklin, Joslab; Calhoun, William; Carleton and 
Terre (Chicago office); Claftln, Jimle; Cleinenso, 
Bob (Chicago office); Collins. M. D.J Crane. Law- 
rence; Charllne and Char line; Curtis. W. D. (2). 

D 

Darnell, Edith; Denby, Walter; Dumas. Flor- 
ence; Demtng, Arthur; Donnelly, Henry V.; Dutch, 
Mr. 

E 

Evans, Charles; Elliott and West (Chicago 
office). 

F 

Fox. Mort; Fay, Eltle; Ford. John; Fay. 
Elfie (Chicago office); Fullaui, Tom; Farren, 
George (U). 

O 

Gardener and Revere (Chicago office); Gaudy, 
Louise: (Jill.ert. John D.; Olllingwater, Claude; 
Gallando; Gibbons, Thomas (Chicago office); 
Grant, Bert and Bertha; Griffin, F. B.; Geer, 
J. H.: Guardot, Etlume and Company; Gardener, 
Gladys; Garrison, Jules. 

H 

Herbert, Will; Hunting. Tony; Hammond. 
Charles; Hughes, Gene; Henry, William; Hale and 
Francis; Hill, Hamilton; Hale, George G. (Chi- 
cago office). 



Jordan and Harvev 



Kara. Mr.: Kelly, John W, : King. Gussle; 
Kent. Dorothy; Kokln, Mignonette. 



Will Rossite r's (ORHER 

CHICAGO. SATURDAY, JAN. 4. 



JUST OUT! 

Push-Cart 

PUBLISHED EVERY NOW AM' THEN FOR 

80NOS AND SINGERS. 

THI8 WILL INTEREST YOU. 

SEND FOR FREE COPY. 

WILL R0S8ITER. 
168 Lake Street, Chicago, HI. 






WASHINGTON, D. 0. 

NEW LYCEUM (Eugene Kernan, mgr.).— -"Mlsa 
New York, Jr.," a clever burlesque company, la 
here this week and presents a good spectacular 
musical comedy In two acts, "The Navigators," 
which met with the approval of the audience. 

GAYETY (W. S. Clark, mgr.).— Fred Irwin's 

"Big Show" Is the offering this week. The bur- 
lesques are "The Great White Way" and "The 
Actor's Clnb." which are above the average bur- 
lesque. Harry Campbell Is the chief comedian, 
lie is aided by Frank Lynch. Frank Young, Murry 
Livingston, Joe Brady and Wm. Kenny and Billy 
Walsh, who deserve mention for their good work. 



Jack Burnett 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE, CHICAGO, 
The "ACTWRIGHT," Still 

WRITES 

REAL SKETCHES. 

Any of my 150 "clients" will tell you 
I write absolutely 

NOTHING BUT HITS 
M. STRASSMAN, 

Attorney, 858 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



NOTICE 



DAN. O'BRIEN, 

The Leaper, 

HAS FURNI8HED ROOMS, 

Bath, Steam Heat. 

260 W. 88TH ST., NEW YORK. 



^^^ THK ATBICAL 

Scenery 

Vaudeville and Production, Largest Soenlo Concern la *» 
«^u r Di0 8 YcHI0A&. aUkO "* ** O*™ ^^ 



YIP! YIP! YIP! 
GOING WEST, WHOf 




AND 



Shelly 



Eccentrio Singing and Dancing Act. 
Guide, LOUIS PINCUS. 

First Scout, FRAN K B0HM. 

\A/ I GS 

TOUPFES. Paints. Powders. Stamp for Dries lint 
G. SCHINDHELM. 118 W. 26th St.. New York 



Lmkey. J„s.; L e Monts, The; Lnwler, Charley 
and Daughters; Lacey, Hurry, and Company; Law- 
reuce and Harrington. 

M 
Madden, Mary (Chicago office): Vanton George 
McAvoy, Dick am) Alice; IfcCart, William; 
.Marks, Al.; Mcars, Grace; Moore. Frank II ■ 
Moore. Rhodes; Mills. Beecliei II.; Morrison! 
Altrea; Mead, W ill; Miirala. Toklo; Moll Robt ' 
Myers, George: McWafers and Tyson; McDonald! 
Mike; Marion H nd Deane; Mandell, Klehard- Mc- 
Cord. Louis; afcClalr, Cbaa. 

N 

Npblea, Milton and Dolly, 



Otulta, Mile. 

P 
I'ringle, Aubrey; Palmer, Austin. 

Q 

Q'ligley, Helen. 

R 
Rose, Mr. (Spencer, Kelly' and Roae); k,> s < 
Budd (Chicago office); Robinson, W A- Rice 
James It. (2)J Ray, Elizabeth. 

S 
St. Onge, Fred; Sailer. Irving; Bar 11, Tony • 
Shavrie. John; Rlmonds, Teddy; Smith. Charles 
V ; Starr, Mabel (Chicago office) j Stephens Hal • 
Stevens, .lames F ; Sutton, Harry; Sterling 
Kvelyn: Stanley. Gertrude; Sbeck, B.; Bargeanti 
R ; Sellgtnan, Minnie, 

T 
Tobin Slstefa, The 12); Toledo, One: Tulsa- 
Tisnn and Brown; Thomas Win. H ; Thatcher 
Kva; Tenley, Elmer. 

w 

Wilson. Hurry K. ; Wroth. E<1. ; Williams 
Ratella (2) , Wallace, Fianklyn; White. Lou 
Whltaker. Raymond; Ward. May; Weaver Jack 

Y 

Voting. Ollle. 



When an.sucring advcrtisvmfnts kindly mention VARIETY, 



30 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



WEEK JAN. 6, TROCADERO, PHIL A. 

HCUCI. & rENNCSSY'S 



44 



EMPIRE SHOW 



DIRECTION W. H. HISS. 



• • 



EMMA WESTON 

CONTRALTO. THAT'S ALL 



THE TWO EXTREMES 
ED. JEANETTE 

JOHNSTSNaodBUCKLET 

"Why, Ker-Boit-ny" 

AL ZIMMERMAN 

Character and Singing Comedian 



IBS DOT 801" 



GEORGE KLEIN 

STILL WITH THE BIO SHOW 



Xfc* Sensational Acrobatic Comedians. 

lOUMUuilQIL-fiLU 

The Peer of Comio Acrobats 



IMHQF and CORINME 

"IN A STRANG! HOTEL 



LEW H. SPOOLER 



MUSICAL DIRECTOR 



AND 





WORLD FAMED 



Dunedin Troupe 

Marvellous, Artistic- and Acrobatic Cyclists. 



§8 

o W 

o 

« 










Challenge the World to Find Their Equal. 
Jas. E. Donegan, Mgr. Address care Clipper. 



MR. 
Ml 

MRS 



GENE lift 



IN "SUPPRESSING THE PRESS." 
BOOKED SOLID. 



PHIL 



NETTIE 



PETERS 

JAN. 6, BENNETT'S, LONDON, CAN. 
THIS TIME IT'S ME. 

True Rice 

An Acrobat. 
JUST NOW, BUMPING WITH 
"8 BELLS." 

Address. WHITE RAT8. 46TH 
ST. and B'WAT, NEW YORE. 



HARRY EARLE 



VETA 




Presenting "A DAUGHTER OF THE GODS." 
In Preparation, "The Chaperon" (4 People). 



WEEK JAN. (,, BUCKINGHAM. LOUISVILLE 

THE MERRY MAKERS" 

JOHN GRIEVES, Manager. 

SAM J. ADAMS 

"THE LONO BOY." 

La Belle Marie and 
M. J. O'Rourke 

Singing, Dancing and Novelty Wire Act. 



WM. MAUSSEY 

THE SCOTCH CHARACTER COMEDIAN. 



GLADYS 



TILLIE 



St, John and Cohen 

THE RUFFY FLUFFY GIRLS. 



H. P. KELLY 



•THE MEDIUM BOY.' 



W. A. WOLF 

THE MPNSTREL BASSO. 



GEO. A. STREET 

Supported by Mrs. Geo. A. Street and Com- 
pany, in his elaborate scenic creation por- 
traying* historic events in the careen of the 
world's great military commanders. 



SUTTON 



AND 



SUTTON 



The Rube and the 
Living Pumpkin 

En Route with the 

High School Girls 

JAN. 6, L. 0.; 18-15, GAYETY, ALBANY; 
16-18, LYCEUM, TROY. 



"lie 5 




(FRANK MAJOR A 00.) 

Addrees, FRANK MAJ OR, 

COMEDY CLUB, V. Y. CITY. 



Le BRUM £* 

Strongest Singing- Act la Vaudeville. 

Magnificently Costumed. 

Management ALBERT SUTHERLAND. 



Lillian Tyce 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT. 
The Really Funny Monologist. 

JAMES J. MORTON 

Still on the Theatrloal Platform. 

KELLY no KENT 

ORPHEUM ROAD SHOW. 



PATWHIIErOAIETYOIRLS 
5'Malvern Troupe-5 

WHIRLWIND ACROBATS 

Zelma Summors 

The Girl from the Golden West. 



WM. 



MABEL 



JenningsandWebb 

Not Ahead But Neck and Neck With the Best 



Tommy O'Noill 

IN SONGS AND DANCES 



FourTerrors 

In Binging and Acrobatic Dancing 



Grace Addison 
Barrett 



CONTRALTO 



CHAS. B. 



AL. 



Watson and Bert 

"A Busy Business Man" 



WITH 



PAT WHITE 



Netta Vesta 



SINGING COMEDIAN 

Keith Circuit 
Address oare VARIETY 




Seattle "Times," Nov. 26.— 
"Good fun and clever work 
characterize Bush and Elliott's 
acrobatic turn, which is high 
class and very skillful. Good 
acrobatic work on the vaude- 
ville stage is becoming a mat- 
ter of course, and the marvelous 
Is becoming the rule, but this 
act belongs In the Coliseum's 
own catepory of 'tvxira good.' " 

ALF T. WILTON, Agent. 




MR. AND MRS. 



TRUESDELL 

Time all filled. 

Address, care VAUDEVILLE COMEDY CLUB, 
147 W. 45th St., N. Y. City. 

A Cure for the Blues 



Laurie 




ENGLISH COMEDIENNE. 



FELIX REICH, 

Manager. 



LOUIS WESLEY, 

Agent 



Time All Filled 

A Good Singer of Good Songi. 

JOSIE AINSLEY 

Direction of JAMES J. MORTON. 

Bob Van Osten 

THE, MAN WITH THE DUCK NOSE, 



Pete Curley 

PRINCIPAL COMEDIAN, 
The Behman Show. 

Management, Jack 8inger, 
Season 1907-08. 



cc 



I 




ITT* 



99 



Ryan-Richfield Co 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 
DIRECTION MAG HAGGERTY'S FATHER. 




EDWIN STEVENS 

in 

"A Night Out." "Julius Caesar Up To Date," 
"An Evening with Dickens" "An American Raffles" 

Assisted by MISS TINA MARSHALL. 
Time all filled till June 7, 1908. 

STUART BARNES 

Direction GEO. HOMANS. 



'THE PLAYERS.' 



MR. 
and 
MRS. 



John T. Powers 

VAUDEVILLE "TIT-BITS." 

Agent, ALF T. WILTON. 



MARION 



VICTORIA 





Direction AL SUTHERLAND. 





1 Vacant January 18th 
(through Mouldy, Mass., 

*»ing rimed. Will Perny 

Williams write in. 

GRIFF 



L'INCOMPUSHABLE. 



Of whom the Lynn "News" says: "Very good, 
notwithstanding that he is direct from London." 

HATHAWAY'S, NEW BEDFORD. 

ROBINSON 

PARQUETTE 
TRIO 

AL MAYER, Agt. 



K. ft P. CIRCUIT. 



GEORGE 



EDDIE 



Lyons i Parkes 

In a Unique Musioal, Binging and Dancing Act. 

Add. aU Com. to AARON KE88LFR, 

Hammerstein's Viotorla Theatre. New York. 



When answering advertisementi kindly mention Variety. 



MISS ST. GEORGE 
HUSSEY and CO. 

Assisted by O. F. LORRAINE. 

A Startling Comedy Success in Vaudeville. 

Address WESLEY ft PLNCU8, Agents. 



VARIETY 



31 



■ ' ■' 



VAUDEVILLE THEATRE MANAGERS 



ATTENTION 



Do Not Allow Anyone to Maks Ton Believe That There n a Scarcity of 

Good, High-Class Acts 
in the Vaudeville Field 



' 



■» 



I Here an Abundance of the Boot Material OB My Books, to usual, and 

Can Book Any Number of Theatres on 24 Hours 9 Notice 

ALL House* Rteeivt Equal Traatmamt in My Office. 

WILLIAM MORRIS 

Chicago Office*. 167 Daarborn St. 1440 Broad war. M«H 



BARBOUR— He Books the Acts 

For Veuderille, Tain and Parka. Managers, aaad for lista. Areata, aaad open time. 
A4draaa X. L. Barbour, 119 La Salle St., Chicago. 

e 

traTelin* to Europe should take advantage of the exoeptioaelly lew 
imteo now prevailing aad in effect until Marok Slat, 1908. Call or 
write for full particulars. 

TAU1IG, 104 C«*Bt 14th Stre>e>t. 

NEW YORK CITT 



PERFORMERS 



TeL tOee Stayre. 



HATTER OF RECORD— 



KLAW & ER L ANGER S Mvanced 



Vaudeville 



THEATRES ARE THE MOST PR0SPER00S IH AMERICA 



FOUR AUDITORIUM 



RECORD 
MAKING 
TRIUMPHS 



CHICAGO, has entertained 
more people than all the 
other vaudeville houses in that city combined. 

NPULf YflRK THEATRE - P^y^ to the larf- 
llCffl lUniA est vaudeville business ever re- 
corded in the metropolis. 

F fi R R F^T PHILADELPHIA - Closing in a blase 



of Philadelphia. 



of glory. The vaudeville educator 



TRFIUIfiNT BOST0N - Another great success. 



they never knew. 



Taught Bostonians the vaudeville 



Sid J. Em's 

V. Clark aad Kinxie Bts., JHXOAGO. 
46 Seconds from Clark Bt. Bridfe* 

SID J. EU80N, Leaooa aad Manager. 

Playing in burlesque attractions of the Colum- 
bia Amusement Company. Matisse every day* 
Amateur night Friday. 



FOLLY 

State Street near Congress 
CHICAGO 

EMPIRE CIRCUIT CO., LESSEE. 

John A. Fennessy, Manager. 

The moat popular burlesque theatre in Chicago, 
playinf the attractlona of the Empire Circuit. 
Nothing but the bast. Two ahows every day. 
Amateurs Friday. 



PASTOR'S 

14th St., 8d At. Continupua, 20 A 80 Ota. 

NEXT WEEK, MONDAY, JAN. 6, 1008. 

FITZGIBBON-McCOY TRIO 

JEANNETTE DUPREE 

BILLY BROAD 

MRS. JULES LEVY AND FAMILY 

EMERSON AND BALDWIN 

The Kramers Bernler and Stella 

Arthur Yule and The Gray Sisters 

Company Harcourt and Courtney 

The Two Pecks Vltagraph 

HATHAWAY AMD 8IEOEL 



HAMMERSTEINS 



VICTORIA 



AMERICA'S MOST 
FAMOUS VARIETY 
THEATRE. 

Open the Year Around 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

•P HUH CLAM VAUDBVILLB THEATRES 
M. MSTYBRFELD. JR., Pre*. 

.MARTIN BECK, General Manatee 
FRANK VINOBNT, N. Y. R*presentatl»e. 
All Applications for Time Most be Addressed to 
C. E. BRAY. Booking Manager. 
Majeatlc Theatre lildg.. Chicago. 111. 

VAUDEVILLE HEADLINED 
-GOOD STANDARD ACTS 

If you have an open week yea want to SU at 
short notice, write toW. L DOCK ST AD ER, 

Garrick Theatre, Wllaaiagte». BeL 
Can close Saturday night and make any city 
of Chicago to open Monday Bight. 



Percy G. 




CIRCUIT 



COLONIAL 
ORPHEUM 

ALHAMBRA 



flaw York 
Brooklyn 
Harlem 
Rsstss 
NOVELTY Williamsburg 
60THAM Esst New York 

Addre« all PERSONAL letter* to 
PERCY Q. WILLIAMS. ST. JAMBS 
BUILDINO. 2eTH ST. AND BROAD. 
WAV, NEW YORK CITY 



Th.atrlcl BxchUg.! 
M LA SAIXX ST., OKIOAOO. 



A SEAL OOICEDT ACT. 



BELLE BELMONT 

ALWAYS WORK/MO 

Regards to Horn and Fat ~ Ha! Hoi Curses 

When •n*u*tihp *di*rt&mm*nts kindlp mention Variety. 



Boprsasatiag first class managers ef 
Weeten vaaaeviUe theatres, vaadeville 
liners, novelties, big aota. Bond VOW o] 
Address W. F. BXVDEBAON, 
and Manager. 
U TRICK, Aast. , 
F. Q. DOYLE, RepreaentatiTe. 



OZART 

VaudeTille Circuit. 

10— Theatres— 10 

FEATURE ACT! ALWAYS WANTED. 

All communications to Edward Mosart, Mala Offloe, 
Family Theatre, Lancaster. Pa* 




New E mpire 

Madison Street Neer Heleted 
CHICAGO 

WILLIAM SINGER, MANAGER. 
Handsomest burlesque bouse la ISslsllS. 
lag Empire Cirouit attraotieas exolasieely. 
■hows ehaaged every Sunday. 



NEW STAR 



FRANK R. TBOTTMAN. 

" Handsomest and safest burlesoae theatre S* 

America. Playing Empire Circuit Shews. Msttsse 

Brery Day. 

Visit the saw Rathskeller Downstairs. 

The beat la the West. 



I Want Performers 



To know that X build 

Parodies, etc., ef quality. 

CHARLES E^ WELCH 

Per Address: 

COOK'S OPERA HOUSE, 



ROCHESTER, K. Y. 



BEST PLACES TO STOP AT. 



When playing TORONTO, CAM., atop at the 

ALEXANDRA ROYAL 

188.190 SIMCOE ST. 

Catering exoluaivaly to the prof eagles. Special 
rates. Two-minute walk from all theatres. 

MEDEA HOTEL 

JOHNSTOWN, FA. 

Half block from Majestio aad Cambria Theatres. 
Rooms with or without bath. Bates moderate. 
"Ths Houaa Reoommonda itself." European Plea. 

7. P. KNUFF, Prop. 



*^ ARTISTS, NOTICE 

Hotel Faurot 

SCRANTON. PA. 

3 Minutes from The* Ires 
Americas) Plan It a toe Madera** 

Ce PAISLEY, 244 AdasBS St. 

Rational Rotel 

CHICAGO 

Cor. Van Bursa St. aad Wabash Ave. 
Half block from Auditorium Theatre. la Tioinltjr 
of all theatres. Weekly rates 

D. A. DOOLEY, Prop. 



Return to Vaudeville 

Sisters La Tour 

California's Favorite Comediennes 



UNDER PERSONAL DIRECTION 



REICH & PLUNKETT, vaudeville agents 



UN BWAT.. V. T. o. 



fc 










THE ORIGINAL JAIL BREAKER 



> 



H 



as 



' 







escaped from 438 JAILS, which is 40 

than all others combined 



Happy New Year 



• it 



MORE 




All 



* 



Management of BEN. J. GREENE 



This week Keith & Proctor's 58th St., N. Y. 






EUGENE CLINE 



EUGENE 
EUGENE 



. 



EUGENE 

EUGENE 
EUGENE 

EUGENE 






EUGENE 



Stores Located as Fellows: 

CLINE, 59 Dearborn St.. Chicago. III. 

CLINE. Third and Nicollet Aves./ Minne- 
apolis. Minn. 

CLINE. 268 S. State St.. Salt Lake City. 
Utah 

CLINE. 6th and Olive Sts., St. Louis. Mo. 

CLINE, 1021-23 Grand Avenue. Kansas 
City. Mo. 

CLINE. 7 1 7 Superior Ave.. N. E.. Cleve- 
land. Ohio 

CLINE. 221 S. Broad St.. Atlanta. Ga. 



Majestic Circuit 

INTERSTATE AMUSEMENT CO. (PROPRIETORS). 

E. F. CARRUTHER8, General Manager. 

PLAYING MODERN VAUDEVILLE IN THE 



MAJESTIC THEATRE. 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. 

Opens Monday*. Daily Matin***. 
Popular Price*. 

MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

DALLAS, Tnu 

Open, Sunday*. Daily 
Popular Pri 



MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

HOUSTON, Texas 

Dally Ma ti n—. Opens Sundays. 
Popular Prices. 

LYRIC THEATRE, 

MOBILE, Ala. 

Open* Mondays. Daily Matin*—, 
Popular Pri om. 



MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. 

Open* Mondays. Daily Matin*—. 
Popular Pries*. 

MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

FT. WORTH, Toss* 

Open* Mondays. Daily 
Popular Prices. 

MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

SAN ANTONIO, T< 

Opens Sundays. Daily Matin***. 
Popular Pri*—, 

MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

WACO, Ttaao 

Playing- Traveling 

Popular Prions. 



OUR BOOKING DEPARTMENT IS 
ETC.. FOR ALL THEATRES AMD 0OCA8I0M8 



TO FURNI8H BANDS, VAUDEVILLE ACTS, 
IN THE SOUTH ON SHORT NOTICE. 



ADDRESS at.i , MAIL TO 

E. F. CARRUTHERS, UJESTil TlEim nil , CHICA80, ILL. 



Phil Olt, Nettie Nelson 

and At Stedman 

with th* "Sam Devere" show in " DR. NEARLY, 

A DOCTOR." 



When Mrawrm, mdvrnl l mmintt kindly mention TlHBT. 



Thirty-Six Pages 



TEN CENTS 







vol. ix., no. :; 5. 



JANUARY 11, 1908. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 




Mntttrtd as seoond-class matter Dicemher 2°., 1905, at the pot* office at Weu> York, N. Y., under the act of Congress of March 3, 187U. 



• 



VARIETY 









• i 









NEW YORK THEATRE 

AMERICAN DEBUT OF DEMURE AND DAINTY 



MONDAY NEXT! 



*^LLCY WESTON k* 



"BE GOOD" 






. 



(ENGLISH COMEDIENNE) 

singing "TWO FLATS REQUIRED'* 



"As You Walk Down the Strand' ' 



F. D. & H. 

(the Firm that Delivers the Hits) 



PUBLISHERS: 



FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 

NEW YORK: 15 WEST 30th STREET 



AIN'T I RIGHT, BOYS? 



FRANK FOGERTY 



THE DUBLIN 
MINSTREL 






Who Originated that now famous saying for stage use 
"Ain't I Right, Boys? You Can Bet Your Life I Am" 

Keep off, and leave my own matter alone 






DECISION READS: 




. 



Performance is of a nature, UNIQUE, not to be 
DUPLICATED and of Unrivalled Excellence 




is therefore ordered for the plaintiff with costs" 

Management of BEN J. GREENE 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 






Thirty-Six Pages 



TEN CENTS 




VOL. IX., NO. 5. 



JANUARY 11, 1908. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



ONLY ONE WEEK MORE 
OF "ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE" 

The Remaining Two Houses on the Klaw & Erlanger 
Vaudeville Circuit End Their Careers Next Week. 



When the New York Theatre closes its 
doors to vaudeville the night of Jan. 19, 
pending a week's preparation of the house 
for the appearance of "The Soul Kiss" on 
Jan. 27, Klaw & Erlanger will have wholly 
retired from the vaudeville entertaining 
field, the other remaining theatre on their 
circuit, the Auditorium, Chicago, ending its 
variety reign next Saturday. 

With the passing of the vaudeville 
"acts" from New York comes the passing 
of "Advanced Vaudeville," the theatrical 
sensation of 1907. 

It is about eleven months since Klaw 
& Krlanger cast the vaudeville bomb-shell, 
and announced a circuit over night. Since 
that time "Advanced Vaudeville" has come 
and gone. Two hundred and forty sep- 
arate acts have played in Klaw & Erlanger 
houses, and in the past two months one 
hundred and ninety of these have been 
turned over to the United Booking Offices 
for future time to be allotted under the 
Klaw & Erlanger contracts in conform- 
ity with the terms of the agreement en- 
tered into when K. & E. agreed to leave 
the vaudeville business. 

Klaw & Erlanger gave out during the 
early days of their vaudeville pilgrimage 
they would have a circuit of from twenty- 
five to fifty theatres. During last sum- 
mer a couple of htuiscs were open, but 
the actual commencement of the "Ad- 
vanced Vaudeville" circuit occurred on 
Aug. 20 when the New York Theatre gave 
its first weeklv bill under the new regime. 

In all K. & E. had sixteen houses located 
in fourteen different cities. Of the houses 
seven were acquired in the merger of the 
K. & E.-Shubert interests, and there were 
not at any one time over fourteen K. & E. 
vaudeville theatres in operation. 

Shortly following the inauguration, the 
Shubert, Brooklyn, was abandoned, and 
this was later followed by the Dusquene, 
Pittsburg. 

"Advanced Vaudeville" had its ups and 



downs for the first month, particularly 
"downs" during the early part of Septem- 
ber, when it was unusually warm, and its 
failure was predicted often by the opposi- 
tion managers. 

Mistakes of management and of policy 
were made at the outset, and the Eastern 
vaudeville managers opposed to Klaw & 
Erlanger pooh-poohed the idea of "oppo- 
sition"; said there was no such thing, with 
other kindred remarks, leading the lay- 
man to believe almost that the Klaw & 
Erlanger circuit had not opened. 

On Oct. 13, the Auditorium, Chicago, 
commenced a vaudeville season, and with 
the installation of a big bill at that play- 
house came the second wind to "Advanced 
Vaudeville." A liberal policy which had 
not prevailed up to that time was set in 
motion. Crowded houses became the rule 
in the larger cities of the K. & E. string, 
all led by the Chicago theatre. 

The opposing side still laughed when the 
subject of "opposition" was broached, but 
within three weeks after the Auditorium 
opened negotiations were practically closed 
for Klaw & Erlanger to give up vaudeville 
by Feb. 3, this year, upon the United Book- 
ing Offices agreeing to take over all un- 
fulfilled contracts, besides paying Klaw & 
Erlanger an amount estimated at from 
$250,000 to $1,500,000; generally believed 
to be the latter amount. 

There is a positive certainty that Klaw 
& Erlanger received a cash bonus to re- 
tire from vaudeville, and at a time (Nov. 
7) when Klaw & Erlanger through failure 
to secure sufficient houses to play the acts 
booked, were in intimate danger of beinj? 
flooded with acts they could not place. 

Had the United Booking managers held 
l>ack the signatures to the settlement 
agreement three weeks longer, Klaw & 
Erlanger would have had from 90 to 100 
acts, with "play or pay" contracts, walk- 
ing the streets. 

(Continued on page 17.) 



ROBINSON HAS BRIGHTON BEACH. 

The Brighton Beach Music Hall next 
summer will be conducted by David L. 
Robinson, manager of the Colonial. Mr. 
Robinson secured the seaside music hall 
this week under a long term lease. 

Vaudeville will be given, the style of 
entertainment which has prevailed at the 
Beach for some years past under the di- 
rection of William T. G rover. 

The opening for '08 will occur about the 
middle of June. Acts will be booked by 
Mr. Robinson through the United Offices. 



IMPERSONATING GEO. BERNARD 
SHAW. 

During the engagement of Charles Leon- 
and Fletcher at the Colonial week of 
Feb. 3, Mr. Fletcher will give an imper- 
sonation of George Bernard Shaw, the 
famous Irish writer. 

The subject matter of the Shaw char- 
acter will be taken by the impersonator 
from an interview he had with Shaw while 
in London. It will be the first time that 
Mr. Shaw has been reproduced over here. 
His name is widely known, but his fea- 
tures are shrouded in visionary mists of a 
sinister mien to the readers of his works. 
Some have gone so far as to conjure up 
a disappointed man, leaning upon his arm 
over the edge of a table, with his face 
hidden from view, after perusing one of 
Mr. Shaw's volumes. 



NEW POLICY AT TWENTY-THIRD 
STREET. 

The new policy of "pictures" at Keith - 
Proctor's Twenty -third Street Theatre 
went into efTect on Tuesday last, when a 
show running thirty-five minutes was 
given. 

This was repeated about twenty times 
during the day. A fair attendance was in 
the house at all shows, and has kept up. 
The audience is one not generally found 
watching "pictures," but whether this 
clientele, likely a relic of the previous 
vaudeville, will continue is a question. 

Four reels of moving pictures are 
shown, with one illustrated song, and no 
vaudeville numbers, Neither flairs nor 
black drapery adorned the front of the 
historic Twenty -third Street Theatre at 
its degeneration. 



MORRIS STILL MUM. 

"Nothing for publication" was again 
the answer given by William Morris to a 
Vakikty representative when pressed this 
week for any information regarding his 
proposed new vaudeville circuit. 

Mr. Morris said his affairs were pro- 
gressing satisfactorily, but still remained 
in a state compelling reticence. 

No positive information as to Mr. Mor- 
ris' operations comes to the surface, al- 
though it is rumored he has had long 
talks with architects, and that there are 
in his office leases for out-of-town the- 
atres. 

It is pretty directly said also that a 
few specially selected artists have been 
approached by Mr. Morris for their ser- 
vices for next season, and contracts of- 
fered, but whether any have been closed 
or not is unknown. 

1 

A rumor that Mr. Morris met commit- 
tees from the White Rats and Comedy 
Club, when next season was discussed, 
was denied by both Mr. Morris and R. C. 
Mudge, president of the White Rats. 



ETHEL LEVEY WITH BERNARD. 

Ethel Levey will retire for the present 
from vaudeville. She will go with Sam 
Bernard in his new piece which will be 
placed in rehearsal next week. 

Cissy Loftus was to have had a part 
in the same production, but sudden 
illness made it necessary for her to re- 
tire from the cast. Miss Levey takes her 
place. The vaudeville singer was to have 
played the Alhambra week of Jan. 20, 
completing the Percy G. Williams chain, 
but instead will be busy rehearsing. 

She has cancelled contracts for twentv- 
two weeks in vaudeville. 



ALICE LLOYD IN AUTO ACCIDENT. 

A cable from London on Thursday told 
of nn automobile accident in which Alice 
Lloyd, the popular Kuglish music hall 
artiste, \\a< severely v\\\ about the fore- 
head. 

The message *nul Miss Lloyd was pro- 
gressing favorably, and it i- not thought 
from the t"iie of the cable any serious 

ic^ults are feared. 



VARIETY 






WHAT ARE THE BEST STEPS 
FOR ARTISTS' PROTECTION ? 



Under this heading, from week to week, 
will be printed the views and opinions of 
artists, written to Variety for publication 
and coming within the scope of the ques- 
tion. 

Communications should not exceed 400 
words and must be signed, but the name 
of the writer will not be printed if sup- 
pression is requested. 

The past year in vaudeville has brought 
several pertinent questions affecting his 
future welfare direct to the door of the 
vaudeville artist. He now has a practical 
exhibition of a condition before simply 
surmised or hinted at, but not regarded 
as likely by the majority. 

Artists all over the country, and the 
world as far as that goes, are discussing 
how they can protect themselves for the 
future. 

Variety has always maintained that the 
solution was a complete organization, with 
the foundation a solid feeling of brother- 
hood among the artists. While this yet 
remains true, many artists have given the 
subject of protection to themselves con- 
siderable intelligent thought. Many may 
have laid out good ideas whereby the artist 
would be in a position to at least hold up 
an independent footing, regardless of the 
manager or a monopoly. 

It is for this purpose that Variety will 
set apart two columns each week for 
artists to express their views and opinions. 
It is not desired that any artist will in de- 
tail divulge any scheme he has in mind. 
It is not the intention of Variety to fur- 
nish information to the manager of the re- 
sources or the possibilities of the artists 
combined, but the subject matter may be 
generally discussed and a skeleton or the 
suggestion of a plan given. 

The several ideas when pieced together 
may develop a tangible means of escape 
from the worst possible condition which 
might confront the vaudeville artist. 

It is not intended that the purpose of 
this space shall be taken up in argument, 
nor that one artist shall point out the de- 
fects in another's plan, nor is it desired 
that any artist shall debate any proposition 
which Variety may raise, but each writer 
shall briefly and to the point express what 
he deems are the immediate needs of the 
vaudeville artist, the best way in which to 
obtain that end, and the protection which 
should be erected for the future welfare. 

That there is need for some concerted 
action of the vaudeville artist no one can 
dispute. Opposition or no, the artist must 
needs look after himself. He is as capable 
as the manager, who always combines with 
his fellow manager to obtain power. The 
very fact of that union, and the steadfast, 
piercing, deliberate movement for a vaude- 
ville monopoly by the leading managers of 
this country, which has been growing and 
going onward for the past six years, sweep- 
ing everything before it with or without a 
money payment (whenever required) ought 
to now convince the vaudeville artist that 
he must do something more than merely 
think if the manager is to respect him in 
business dealings. 

The artist is the first power always un- 
der certain conditions. He can be the first 
power always, whether there is opposition 



in vaudeville or no. If an artist has only 
self-interest ; if a contract for forty weeks, 
more or less, will cause him to forget his 
future ; if the feeling of "It is no use ; you 
can't go against the manager," takes pos- 
session of him, there is not much hope for 
a protective body of artists. 

The manager needs the artist. Just how 
badly he is afraid to admit even to him- 
self. And just how badly he needs the 
artist is in evidence to-day around New 
York City, with no opposition, with no en- 
tanglements, and with no artist refusing an 
engagement. The manager can not place 
a bill together satisfactory to himself be- 
cause he can not make the selections he 
wants. To-day there is no better argument 
than the vaudeville shows of New York 
City. 12 the manager can not make the 
selections he requires to put his show to- 
gether, he can not draw business. Let the 
manager tell you otherwise and believe it if 
you will. 

Vaudeville to-day is in a peculiar posi- 
tion. There is no manager gloating over 
the prospects. This has been a year of 
big shows, big acts, and it is having an 
effect. Managers must give a show, and it 
can't be played by amateurs. 

There are many ways to place the artist 
in a firm position ; there are many ways to 
improve that position, but there is only one 
way to ipake a start ; that is by the artists 
getting together under a plan or scheme 
which will weld them closer; place them 
where they will be a power by themselves 
and able to use it. 

Strict confidence is pledged by Variety 
to all correspondents desiring their names 
withheld. Variety suggests that the small 
act as well as the large express its opin- 
ions. It can do no harm, and it can and 
should do a world of good. 



MABEL HITE SOON. 
Mabel Hite opens Jan. 20 with a new 
sketch by Vincent Bryan. She will play 
the United time, but her opening stand 
has not yet been disclosed. Miss Hite 
will work alone, using for her support 
only a mechanical dummy in a burlesque 
upon the "Merry Widow" waltz craze. 



PAULINE HALL ON SMALL CIRCUITS. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

Pauline Hall, who headed the bill at the 
Majestic last season, and played all the 
large houses in this territory not long ago, 
will probably come West early in March 
to fill a few weeks' engagement at the 
better class provincial vaudeville theatres 
in Illinois and Iowa. 

This is said to be Miss Hall's first vaude- 
ville engagement in the smaller cities of 
the Middle West. 



FINAL BILL AT NEW YORK. 

The last bill of the New York Theatre's 
vaudeville season is as follows: George 
Evans (on the initial program week Au- 
gust 20th), Lucy Weston, Maidie Scott, 
The Yuilians, Collins and Hart, Three 
Danie Sisters, Marstro and Oretto, Lily 
Fl.'xmore and Whit CunlifTe. The show 
opens Monday. 



MORTON'S TIME CANCELLED— AL- 
MOST. 

Contracts for all his remaining time on 
the United circuits were cancelled Mon- 
day because James J. Morton, the monol- 
ogist, president of the Vaudeville Comedy 
Club, had refused to play a Sunday night 

performance in Syracuse, N. Y. Mr. Mor- 
ton received notification on Monday that 
his time had been withdrawn. He imme- 
diately presented himself at the New 
York offices of Klaw & Erlanger and in- 
formed that firm that no engagement had 
been assigned to him for the current 
week. 

He is playing under a Klaw & Er- 
langer agreement turned over to the 
United Offices in accordance with the 
compromise terms. Mr. Morton entered 
a demand with the "Advanced Vaude- 
ville" promoters that he be placed by 
Thursday, the implied meaning being that 
he would resort to legal proceedings if 
his demand were not complied with. 

On Wednesday Marc Klaw and E. F. 
Albee were in conference, and on Thurs- 
day Mr. Morton received notice that he 
would be expected to play the Fifty- 
eighth Street Theatre next week, his 
other time being reinstated. 

Mr. Morton was instructed, together 
with a number of other acts, to play last 
Sunday at the Grand Opera House 
(Keith's), Syracuse. Before the Monday 
matinee Mr. Morton notified the hous>» 
manager in the up-State town that he 
would not be able to play the show, and 
if his presence were required he would 
prefer to lay off. 

The local manager informed Morton it 
was not certain whether a Sunday show 
would be given, and to take his place on 
the bill, having the matter settled mean- 
while. 

The attention of the United Office was 
called direct to his objection to that par- 
ticular Sunday by Mr. Morton, but no 
reply was received. A show at the Grand 
Opera House was given last Sunday at 
which the monologist did not appear. 

Reaching New York he was informed his 
routing for Baltimore for this week was 
included. Nat Haines was sent to Balti- 
more to replace Mr. Morton on the bill. 

The contract issued to Mr. Morton by 
Klaw & Erlanger has still about twenty- 
five weeks to run, an additional ten weeks 
beyond the first named length of time 
having been added. 

The agreement provides that the act 
shall play on Sundays when lawfully per- 
mitted. Sunday shows in Syracuse have 
had a precarious record, and the legality 
of them in that city has not been affirma- 
tively decided. The Supreme Court de- 
cision rendered by Judge O'Gorman in the 
Hammerstein license case plainly said no 
performances of any character in this 
state on Sunday were legal. 

It would devolve upon any defendant 
Mr. Morton might have brought into a 
law suit, if the matter had not been 
otherwise settled, to prove that the Sun- 
day performance given last week at Syra- 
cuse was legal. 



HARRISBURG OPENS FEB. 3. 

The new Wilmer & Vincent vaudeville 
theatre at Harrisburg, Pa., was expected 
to have opened last Monday, but the open- 
ing has been postponed to Feb. .7 next, ac- 
cording to acts notified. 



MORRIS' TENDER DECLINED. 

To perfect the foundation for the law- 
suit he anticipates with Klaw A Erlanger, 
William Morris on Tuesday called at the 
offices of the "Syndicate," and tendered 
Marc Klaw of the firm, $2,750 in bills, 
rent for the Franklin Square, Worcester, 
and the Nelson, Springfield, Mass., com- 
mencing Jan. 14. 

As reported in Variety last week, Mr. 
Morris has secured an injunction restrain- 
ing Klaw & Erlanger or the United States 
Amusement Company from attempting to 
take possession of either theatre, by legal 
means or otherwise, before the final ad- 
judication of the proceedings of the re- 
straining order. It will probably bring 
the whole matter before the court. 

This was to forestall a possible occu- 
pancy of the Massachusetts houses by 
physical force, either by the lessors from 
which Mr. Morris leased the premises, or 
other parties. 

Provided vaudeville is not taken out of 
both theatres by Feb. 3, S. Z. Poli will 
withdraw $15,000 posted by him as his 
share of the bonus paid by the United 
managers to Klaw & Erlanger for that 
firm to leave vaudeville. Mr. Poli has a 
vaudeville house in each of the cities. 

Mr. Klaw declined the money proffered 
by Mr. Morris, and wanted to know why 
Morris would not leave as requested. Mr. 
Morris replied he had not accepted the 
theatres, considered a poor investment at 
the time, for the purpose of vacating them 
at the pleasure of anyone, and intended 
playing vaudeville while his lease con- 
tinued. The agreement under which Mor- 
ris holds possession of the houses is said 
to be for over ten years. 

Klaw & Erlanger claim Morris has de- 
faulted in the conditions imposed by not 
booking acts in the houses under contract 
to the "Advanced Vaudeville" promoters. 
In answer to this, Mr. Morris says he is 
ready at all times to prove no condition 
or covenant agreed to by him has been 
violated. 

The rent for the premises has been set- 
tled for up to Jan. 13. The injunction 
obtained has been served upon the U. S'. 
Amusement Company's representative in 
Massachusetts, and a bitter legal fight is 
expected after that date, especially as 
the tender of the rent was not accepted. 

The "lease" Morris is supposed to hold 
from Klaw & Erlanger is said to be a let- 
ter written to him by the firm advising 
he could operate the theatres, and is not 
the stereotyped legal form of a printed 
lease. 

Springfield, Jan. 9. 

P. J. Casey, representing Klaw & Er- 
langer, was in town last Wednesday. Jt 
is believed his call was due to the contro- 
versy over the Nelson and Franklin 
Square, Worcester, between William Mor- 
ris and K. & E. 

Mr. Casey is a native of Springfield, 
well known and popular. He is said to 
have been instrumental in securing the 
Franklin Square for K. & E. for vaude- 
ville when their circuit opened last fall, 
and Casey is thought to know more about 
the present situation than any one else. 
What he did while here did not become 
public. 



Hetty King and heF husband, Ernest 
Luck, will return to England in about :i 
month. 



VARIETY 



A Variety Paper for Variety People. 

Published trerj Saturday by 

THE VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
1402 Broadway, New York City. 

Telephone I 4022 L 38tb St. 
1 4023 J 



SIME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 22, 
1905, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., 
under the act of Conarcss of March 3, 1879. 

~CHICA^d^EFICE~ 

Chicago Opera House Block 

(Phone, Main 4380). 

FRANK WIE8BERO, Representative. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 

1115 Van Ness Ave. (Room 112). 

W. ALFRED WILSON, Representative. 



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Copyright, 1907. by Variety Publishing Co. 



Vol. IX. 



JANUARY ||. 



No. 5. 



Hallen and Hayes play the Empire, Lon 
don, for six weeks next season. 



Joe Welch will play his sketch "At El- 
lis Island" next week at the Orpheum. 



Bernard and Coleman open at the Or- 
pheum, Reading, next week. 



Leonard and Ward oj>en on the Sulliva.:- 
Considine Circuit commencing January 
13th. 



Max L. Burkhardt is in vaudeville with 
a single act, made tip of comedy songs and 
some patter. 

Max Brooks and Sadie Yedder will 
"break in" a new act at the Howard, Bos- 
ton, next week. 



Max Witt is at work upon a new net 
for Edwin Brandt and four people en- 
titled "Get The Hook." 



Commencing with the week of January 
20. Laveen and Cross will be known as 
Lateen, Cross and Company. 

The United Offices has three "jnil break 
era" on its route sheets at prevent: ll«»u- 
dini, Brindamour and Hardcen. 



Joe Morris will be starred in a two-act 
musical comedy which Charles Horwitz is 
now writing for the Mittenthal Brothers. 



The Stuart Comic Opera Company 
opened at the Teck, Buffalo, this week, re- 
placing "Advanced Vaudeville" at that 
house. 



Ed Cray and Milt Wood have been 
booked to play in London next July 
through the New York branch of Somers 
& Warner. 



A new vaudeville theatre was opened in 
Geneva, New York, this week. No infor- 
mation as to its connection was obtainable 
in this city, 



Harry Taylor, the stage manager at 
Pastor's, has been ill and absent from his 
post this week. Louis Schwartz officiated 
in his stead. 



"The Rollickers" did $4,500 at the 
Dewey last week. This is well above the 
average for that house for the last sev- 
eral months. 



Queen and Ross have left Miner's "High 
Jinks" and are with the "Fay Foster" 
show on the same wheel. Paul Wolff 
booked them. 



Tony Castellane and Brother, the cy- 
clists, are in New York, and will short'y 
open. It is three years since ihe act ap- 
peared in the East. 



Barth Brothers and Walton returned to 
work this week after laying off five weeks 
owing to the illness of Bert Walton, who 
suffered from, blood poison. 



Arthur Prince and Ida Rene ("K. & E. 
acts") will again appear over here around 
the middle of February, and will be 
routed from their first week by, the 
Tinted. 



M. S. Bentham is offering for vaudeville 
Carlyle Moore, formerly stage director for 
David Belasco and later a member of Hen- 
rietta Crosman's Company in "Sweet Kitty 
Bellaire." 



The opening date for Hannnerstein's 
Roof Garden next summer has been set 
for dune 1. Horace Gold in, the illusion- 
ist, has been engaged for the first four 
weeks as the attraction. 

• 

Sam Sidman, the German comedian, was 
married at Stockton, Calif., on December 
.'{(ith to [mogene Carlson, of that city. 
Mr. Sidman has been on the Pacific Coast 
for some months. 

Ida May Chad wick, the youngster of 
the Chad wick Trio, is working out a single 
act in which she will appear. Jack Levy 
has agreed to obtain the opening for Miss 
Chadwick, when she gives the word. 



Pearl Roberts, of the lour Roberts, 
playing in 'The Dollmakcr's Dilemma." 
was injured in a street cat accident in 
Chicago. The week's engagement had to 
be cancelled. She is now recovered. 



Grace La Rue will sail for Berlin on 
March 13 to open at the Wintergarten 
there, Mi<s La Rue will close with "The 



Follies of 1907" a couple of weeks pre- 
vious to that date. M. S. Bentham is her 
agent. 



Frederic Melville returned this week on 
the "Oceanic." Mr. Melville opens at the 
Orpheum, Boston, Jan. 20, with "Moto- 
girl." Under his management also will 
shortly come to New York a foreign 
"Diablo" player. 



Arthur O. May, monologist and dancer, 
will enter into partnership with Charles 
Stutzman in the spring and produce a 
new comedy act under the firm name of 
Stutzman and May. The title will be 
"The Soap Peddler." 



Kara, the juggler, opened at Hopkins', 
Louisville, this week for the beginning of" 
his tour over the Western time. On Sun- 
day Willie Steinerd, his assistant, broke 
his arm and a substitute had to be r-e- 
cured at short notice. 



Tim McMahon did not produce his new 
act at 23d Street last week. Instead he 
"tried out" a "pumpkin" number for the 
finish of the "Pullman Porter Maids," and 
will defer the presentation of the whole 
act until a future date. 



Liane D'Eve closes her Klaw & Erlanger 
time at the Auditorium, Chicago, this 
week. On her way to New York she will 
stop off at Cleveland to play the Hippo- 
drome for a week commencing Monday. 
Then the French girl will return home. 



Five hundred persons attended the re- 
ception held in the Harlem Casino last 
Sunday to celebrate the engagement o't 
Dora Lazarus to Harry Cooper, of the 
Empire City Quartet. Nearly one thou- 
sand telegrams of congratulation were re- 
ceived. 

Charles M. Howell, for the last two 
years manager of the Woolworth Roof 
Garden, at Lancaster, Pa., has been nomi- 
nated for mavor of Lancaster on the 
Democratic ticket. Mr. Howell is the 
voungest man ever named for the office. 
He is managing editor of the Lancaster 
'Intelligencer." 



Spissel Brothers and Mack close their 
American time June 22 and sail immedi- 
ately to open in Brussels July 5. They 
will play eight weeks at the Palace, Lon- 
don, and then return to the continent, play- 
ing without a break until April 20, KM)!), 
when they return to America. M. S. Ben- 
tham secured the time. 



AJ Stinson. of Stinson and Merton, who 
was taken ill at Louisville early in No- 
vember, has sufficiently recovered to be 
removed to his brother's home at 1015 
S. Alabama Avenue, Indianapolis. Mr. 
Stinson was stricken with acute gastritis 
ami articular rheumatism. He expects to 
be out in a short while. 



The Unique on East 14th Street, occupy- 
ing the site where formerly stood the Al- 
hainbra Music Hall, is a "picture show" 
place, but its interior will surprise any- 
one who visits there. The ground floor 
plan and seats, both commodious, excel 
manv vaudeville theatres, in and out of 
New York City. The admission is ten 
cents. 



Bert Levy, the cartoonist, has composed 
a new waltz named "Artist Dreams." It 
is whistled by Mr. Levy while presenting 
his novel rapid sketching in vaudeville. 



Jules Delmar won the automobile 
raffled off in the United Booking Offices 
last week. Mr. Delmar occupied the ma- 
chine Sunday, speeding down Broadway, 
with a regular chauffeur in front, as 
though he had been brought up in one. 
The chances on the auto, said to be worth 
$3,000, were one dollar each. About 250 
chances were sold. 



Over at Hyde & Behman's Olympic 
Theatre the other day the employees of 
the theatres advanced upon Nick Norton, 
the manager, in a threatening manner. 
Mr. Norton braced himself for an attack, 
when W. R. Burgess, of the staff, pre- 
sented "Nick," whom everybody likes, with 
a sparkling diamond scarf pin, and added 
a gold headed cane for protection if some- 
one tried to "frisk" him of the sparkler. 



For the first time since his successful 
trip through the West in "The Fifth Com- 
mandment" Julius Steger play* New 
York next week, appearing at I he Colonial, 
where he shares the headline honors with 
Vesta Victoria. Mr. Steger's company re- 
mains intact excepting for the temporary 
absence through illness of William H. Pas- 
coe from the cast. Howard Kyle, late star 
of "The Evangelist," will enact Mr. Pas- 
coe's role until he returns. Mr. Steger 
continues to sing "Castles in the Air" as 
a feature of his own playlet, the actor- 
author having written "The Fifth Com- 
mandment." 



During the week Hugo Morris had oc- 
casion to call on the 'phone a prominent 
lawyer of the city, chairman of an enter- 
tainment-committee for which Mr. Morris 
was arranging a large and expensive vaude- 
ville bill. Calling off the names of his 
selection, the lawyer halted him at "Geo. 
Evans" and "Julian Rose." He said he 
knew of them both for years and wanted 
somebody new. Mr. Morris assured the 
attorney both artists would give complete 
satisfaction, but he still insisted they were 
not "new." "Well," philosophically re- 
marked Mr. Hugo over the telephone, "You 
have been a lawyer a good many years to 
my knowledge, but I have never heard any- 
one say that you were better twenty years 
ago than you are now. Were you?" 



Charles Leonard Fletcher, at the 58th 
Street theatre this week presenting "An 
Evening With Mansfield," told the other 
day of when, on his tour of the world, he 
played golf in Scotland, and of a sad but 
funny incident of the game. In Scotland 
the different links are governed by what 
are known as "local rules." An obtuse 
Englishman while playing one day un- 
wittingly struck his "caddie" on the tem- 
ple with the ball. In falling the boy cov- 
ered up the sphere, and upon being ex- 
amined was pronounced dead by a by- 
stander. The Englisbman continually 
called upon someone to find his ball, even 
while the examination was going on. Ex- 
asperated, some one at last said to him, 
"You've killed the boy." "But where is 
the ball?" persisted the golfer. "Under 
the boy," he was told. "Is that so?" said 
the Englishman. "What is the lo™l nils 
here?" 



VARIETY 



— f 

ADELINE GENEE HERE. 

Adeline Genee, the famous ballet dancer 
of London, is at the Hotel Knickerbocker, 
where she arrived on Wednesday from the 
"Oceanic." 

The dancer is to appear in "The Soul 
Kiss" when that piece plays the New 
York, opening at Philadelphia Jan. 20 for 
the week prior to her New York debut. 

With Miss Genee came nine coryphees 
from the Empire, London, where the 
dancer has reigned for the past ten 
years, without interruption. In "The 
Soul Kiss" she will give four dances, 
opening with "Ballabile, w an ensemble 
ballet, and for her second number will 
appear in skirts, wearing high-heeled 
shoes. This will be followed by her dance 
known as "Little Michus," and Miss Genee 
will conclude with her famous "Hunting 
Dance" in which she is costumed in a full 
riding habit. 

While on her way over, the premiere 
ballerino celebrated her 26th birthday. 
This happened on Jan. 6, and Miss Genee 
makes no secret of her age. She has 
impressed all meeting her since arriving 
as a very pleasant and charming young 
woman. 

The career of Genee is unusual and in- 
teresting. Contrary to popular belief, she 
is not an Englishwoman, but a native of 
Denmark. England claims her because 
she has been the idol of that people and 
of London's play-going clientele since 
she was a girl in her teens. Ten years 
ago last November, a slip of a girl, then 
just turned fifteen, was put in the 
matronly care of Mme. Katti Lanner, 
the veteran maker of ballets at the 
Empire, London. "Another new first 
dancer" was the way tradition says Genee 
was introduced. Sne was engaged for six 
weeks; then she was to retire in favor of 
some other who would twinkle and pirou- 
ette into the good graces of the gracious 
Britons. 

Six weeks! Less than two months ago 
she celebrated her tenth anniversary at 
the Empire, the home and traditional 
store house of English ballet. This is her 
first visit to America. 



CHEAP CIRCUIT FORMED IN THE 

SOUTH. 

Cliicago, Jan. 9. 

The new circuit of cheap vaudeville the- 
atres which has been planned and pro- 
moted in the South by a number of 
prominent business men headed by P. R. 
Whitney of Montgomery, Ala., and Sam 
Du Vries, the Chicago booking agent, as 
mentioned in Variety a few weeks ago, 
promises to utilize the undeveloped 
amusement field in that territory and be- 
come a permanent fixture. 

The circuit became an association at a 
meeting held in Birmingham last week 
under the name of the Southern Advanced 
Vaudeville Association, with the following 
officers: F. W. Bandy, manager Superba, 
Savannah, president; G. A. Vucovich, 
Star, Pensacola, vice-president; P. R. 
Whiting, Theato, Montgomery, secretary 
and treasurer. 

The theatres already linked to the chain 
are the Theatorium, Memphis; Crystal, 
Nashville; Crystal, Knoxville; Alamo, 
Birmingham; Theatre Palais, Meridian; 
Casino, Mobile; Wonderland, Columbus; 
Lyric, Macon; Superba, Augusta; Super- 
ba, Savannah; Star, Pensacola; Theato, 
Montgomery, and a new one in Vicksburg, 
Miss., owned by Mr. De Bardolaben, 
owner of Wonderland, Columbus, making 
altogether fourteen houses ready to oper- 
ate. 

Several other theatres in New Orleans 
and Chattanooga and intermediate towns 
are expected to join as soon as the de- 
tails are arranged. A clause in the char- 
ter granted under the laws of the State of 
Alabama provides that each member shall 
deposit with the treasurer the sum of 
$100, which is to constitute a fund held 
by the Association for the protection of 
the acts and guarantee payment for their 
services irrespective of whatever business 
conditions prevail at any of the houses. 

It is the intention of the Association to 
play two or three acts a week in each 
house, and if conditions are favorable, the 
number will be increased accordingly. 

Mr. Du Vries, who will personally book 
the acts for the new circuit, has other 
houses in connection with the Interna- 
tional Theatrical Company in the South 
and West. It is believed he will arrange 
the route so that acts will jump from 
Wheeling, W. Va., the International Cir- 
cuit's Southern terminal, to the nearest 
point occupied, by the "Southern Advanced 
Vaudeville Association." 

The organizers of the new cheap vaude- 
ville circuit confidently believe th.it with 
conservative business methods their 10- 
cent houses will ultimately evolve as one 
of the largest and most profitable enter- 
prises of its kind in the South. 



TIMBERG TO BE REAL STAR. 

Gus Edwards is making ready an elabor- 
ation of his "School Boys and Girls" vaude- 
ville sketch for a three act rural children's 
drama, which is to tour the Stair & Ilav- 
lin circuit next season. Herman Timberg, 
who played the Hebrew in the original 
sketch, will be featured in the forthcoming 
production. It is understood that George 
H. Nicolai, general manager for Stair & 
Havlin, will be financially interested in the 
venture. 



MARTIN BECK IS HOME. 

With a short visit only to recall 
his last trip to the old country Martin 
Beck reached New York again late last 
week. 

Mr. Beck said he had done nothing of 
importance for publication while abroad, 
and spent the greater part of his time 
with his family. 

He visited Paris and Berlin. In the 
latter city and all over Germany, said 
Mr. Beck, the managers were inaugurat- 
ing a new system of booking— for them 
— which it was expected would immensely 
improve their bills. 

Instead of booking acts for a month at 
a time, as formerly prevailed, there would 
be engagements made now for one, two, 
three and four weeks, giving a change of 
program more often. 



"Phroso," who dropped out of sight for 
some time, has reappeared at the Apollo, 
Halle, Germany, with a new act. 



ROSSITER IN NEW OFFICES. 

Cliicago, Jan. 9. 
Will Rossiter has secured the Remick 
professional suite in the Grand Opera 
House building, lately vacated by the lat- 
ter firm. Lack of sufficient space com- 
pelled the Rossiter folks to seek larger 
quarters, and they now will have one of 
the finest professional places in the 
country. 



MANAGERS LOOKING FOR SITES. 

Providence, Jan. 9. 

It is said that S. Z. Poli has been here, 
looking for a site upon which to build a 
theatre, but whether for vaudeville or the 
legitimate is not known. 

The Keith theatre in this city, owned 
by E. F. Albee, plays vaudeville, booked 
by the United Booking Offices, where Mr. 
Poli also secures his consignment of 
vaudeville numbers for his various the- 
atres. 

The reports from New York regarding 
the controversy between K. & E. and 
William Morris, and the story in Variety 
of the $15,000 bonus Mr. Poli had posted 
to relieve himself of opposition in Spring- 
field and Worcester, where Morris is 
operating the houses in opposition to him, 
has caused speculation whether Mr. Poli 
has become dissatisfied with the United 
Offices at finding he is the only one of 
the managers left over from the "settle- 
ment" with a fight still on his hands. 

Andrew S. Hathaway, with houses in 
New Bedford, Lowell and Brockton, is 
also reported to have visited this town in 
company with an architect. 



PHILADELPHIA WANTS MORRIS. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 0. 

The advertisement of William Morris 
seeking a theatre, or site, appeared in one 
of the local newspapers this week and 
caused considerable speculation as to his 
chances of entering the local vaudeville 
field. 

While there appears to be no way open 
to Morris' invasion at present, it would 
not be surprising to hear of his having 
gained a foothold. At least one local 
manager is ready to talk business with 
Morris and give him a share in the house, 
while a wealthy contractor of this city, 
who owns an excellent site in the very 
heart of the city, is said to have ex- 
pressed a willingness to furnish the site 
and to take an interest in a theatre to 
be erected. 

It is known that Morris is anxious to 
secure a house in this city if possible, as 
it is believed that with the right class 
of entertainment vaudeville can be made 
to pay in opposition to Keith's big Chest- 
nut Street house, which has the first-class 
vaudeville field to itself at present. 



VAUDEVILLE AGAIN IN SAGINAW. 

Saginaw, Mich., Jan. 9. 

A new vaudeville theatre will open here 
in the early part of February. The West- 
ern Vaudeville Managers' Association will 
own and control the house which will be 
on the Bijou Circuit. W. A. Rusco has 
been engaged to look after the new the- 
atre. The seating capacity will be 1,000 
with a stage 24 by 40>/o feet. It will be 
located at 407-4 11Vi» Genesee Avenue. 

A new electric theatre will soon open 
directly opposite the new vaudeville house. 
It will be owned by the E. M. Smith Com- 
pany, which controls a chain of five and 
ten-cent houses. One is already located 
here. 



"BERT" HOLCOMB PASSES AWAY. 

Herbert Holcomb, formerly of the 
vaudeville act of Holcomb, Curtis and 
Webb, died Friday of last week of pneu- 
monia. He had been sick only a short 
time, and his death came as a great sur- 
prise to his professional friends. 

Mr. Holcomb had recently joined Sue 
Smith, and the pair were playing in a 
new singing and comedy act called "The 
Flower Girl." The vehicle has been ar- 
ranged a short time, and had been shown 
only at a few Sunday shows. 

The artist passed away at his home in 
Elm wood, L. I. 

The deceased was a composer of popu- 
lar music. But a few davs before stricken 
with the illness which proved fatal, Mr. 
Holcombc wrote and placed with Charles 
K. Harris his last song, called "Paddle, 
Paddle Your Own Canoe." 



WALTER VINCENT IN HOSPITAL. 

Walter Vincent, of Wilmer & Vincent, 
was taken to Dr. Bull's sanitarium, 33 
West 33d street, last Sunday, suffering 
from a serious attack of inflammatory 
rheumatism. Early in the week he was 
reported as better. 



LILY LENA ILL. 

Boston, Jan. 9. 

Lily Lena was obliged to retire from the 
bill at the Orpheum after the Monday 
performances, going to New York to be 
treated for an illness which attacked her 
while here, preventing Miss Lena from ap- 
pearing at the same house the previous 
week. 

The Englishwoman made a brave effort 
on Monday and struggled through the two 
shows, but it was too much for her. 



"ROLLICKERS" FOR A RUN. 

Arrangement! are now being perfected 
for the return of M. M. Thiese's "The 
Rollickers" to the Dewey at the conclu- 
sion of the season for a run of at least 
four weeks. 



WHIT CUNLIFFE. 

W)hit Cunliffe, a picture of whom is on 
the front page this week, is known in 
England as "The Man in Brown." He 
changes his costume for each song, always 
keeping to the same color. 

So much attention do his clothes attract 
that more than once Mr. CunlifTe has re- 
ceived letters saying: "Dear Sir: — We liko 
your songs very much; who made your 
trousers?" 

He is rather proud of the fact that his 
head is the same shape and size as King 
Edward VII. One night his servant placed 
his top hat on the seat of the brougham 
and Whit sat on it. The result was dis- 
aster! They 'phoned down to the hatter's 
for another hat, but as is usual on such 
occasions, they were out of his size. "All 
we have is one of the King's hats," was 
the reply. And Whit sang that nighT 
under the protection of the King's hat. 
History does not relate if His Majesty had 
the hat after or not. 

Speaking of New York, Mr. Cunliffe says 
that the welcome they give to strangers 
is a good thing to hear. They welcome 
you and then sit tight and you do the 
rest — if you can. 

He is the author of most of his songs, 
and sometimes the composer also. There 
is one thing he feels a little hurt over, 
and that is that his own great English 
song hit "Hello" has been heard on this 
side already. It was THE song of the 
year on the other side, and he was en- 
gaged to come here on the strength of 
that alone. 



VARIETY 



PHONOGRAPH MEN THREATEN 
OPPOSITION. 

The New York music publishing houses 
(hat arc working in conjunction with the 
composers for the passage of a ne»v copy- 
right bill in Washington may find them- 
selves a new competitor if the proposed 
Congressional enactment goes through. 

One of the main features of the new 
bill is the prevention of all talking ma- 
chine concerns from making records of 
copyrighted melodies without the consent 
of the owners of the publication rights. 
Such vested rights in popular melodies 
would command fabulous monies from the 
talking machine firms, but these corpora- 
tions, fearing such possible legislation, 
have met in conclave and determined that 
in the event of adverse congressional 
enactment they will form a gigantic cor- 
poration, embarking in the music publish- 
ing business. 

They figure that they could afford to 
pay composers larger royalties than the 
ordinary publisher, even if the publishing 
house was conducted at a large loss, as 
they would then be relieved of the heavy 
penalties that the present publishers 
might impose on the melodies which they 
control. The scheme would be to sell 
sheet music so cheap as to drive their 
competitors to cry quits. 

Several large music publishers were in 
Washington this week looking after the 
interests of the copyright law. 



WALDO RESIGNS. 

F. S. Waldo, general manager for the 
William Morris Amusement Company in 
New England, has tendered his resigna- 
tion from that post, to take effect to- 
night. 

Mr. Waldo has directed the two Morris 
houses in Springfield and Worcester, "Mass., 
making his headquarters in New York and 
taking weekly trips to the towns. In his 
letter of resignation no reason for his 
action is given. 

At the same time Charles II. Davis will 
retire from the management of the Nelson 
Theatre, Springfield, being replaced by 
James Matthews, formerly assistant man- 
ager of the Worcester theatre. Walter M. 
Pepper will have charge of the Franklin 
Square in that town. 

Mr. Davis was placed in Springfield by 
P. J. Casey, and it is believed that place 
will be made for him in New York. 

Mr. Waldo is negotiating with W. S. 
Cleveland to take out a company reviving 
the Cleveland Minstrels, an organization 
formerly well known in the West but which 
has not been out for five years. 

For the present the William Morris 
Company will not have a New England 
general manager, the business of the con- 
cern being handled by its two house man- 
agers. 



AMERICAN MAY OPEN IN SPRING. 

St. Louis, Jan. 9. 

The American Theatre, now building, 
may not open until spring. It is said a 
lease has been given to Tate & Middleton, 
who manage the Columbia. The latter 
may continue vaudeville if the building 
is not sold, but the firm intends to play 
variety shows at the American. 

Nothing is known here of how the con- 
tract held by William Morris, New York, 
to book the American figures. 



"COMMISSIONS" MAY BE NO MORE. 

If a statement made this week by a 
big manager connected with the United 
Booking Offices may be relied upon, that 
agency will no longer charge commission, 
commencing with next season, if the plan 
he is working upon to do away with the 
booking fee is found acceptable to the 
United directors. 

The manager would say not a word 
about what his idea was in this connection 
beyond admitting he was working on a 
plan which he hoped to bring to a suc- 
cessful conclusion. 

The accomplishment of this is not 
thought possible, in the face of past per- 
formances of the managers who derive a 
profit through the fee received from both 
artists and managers booking through the 
United. The W r estern Vaudeville Associa- 
tion, the Chicago branch of the United, 
would be equally affected by that radical 
move. 

A scheme to do away with the commis- 
sion might be put through without bene- 
fiting the artist by having a deduction of 
salary on a long time contract made in 
accordance with what the commission 
would have been weekly, having the con- 
tract read for a net amount. 

As an illustration, a manager might 
suggest to an artist to do away with the 
five per cent, by figuring a salary of $400 
as $.180 weekly, or on a contract of 10 
weeks, ask the artist to agree upon a 
round figure of possibly $:i7.">, which would 
be even less. 

Another object in waiving the commis- 
sion could be to influence the artist in 
favor of the United as f gainst any possi- 
ble opposition which seemed in prospect 
or might arise. 

It has been positively stated by a New 
York attorney that no manager who is 
acting as an agent by receiving a commis- 
sion on salary paid by him, or who is di- 
rectly connected with a booking agency 
through which an act for his 'theatre or 
theatres is booked can legally retain the 
amount of the commission if the artist 
should sue to recover. The lawyer said 
that it is acknowledged law a person can 
not be a principal and agent at the same 
time. 

A VARIETY representative was told the 
other day bv a man who claimed to have 
heard I». F. Keith make the statement that 
Mr. Keith remonstrated some time ago at 
a meeting of managers against charging 
the artist commission through their own 
booking office. 

"I don't believe in agreeing to pay an 
artist a certain salary on Saturday night, 
and then have a string attached to it so 
he does not receive the full amount," Mr. 
Keith is reported to have said at that 
meeting. He is also reported to have fur- 
ther stated that while he did not believe 
in the commission, he seemed to be the 
only one of the managers who did not, and 
WOllld bow to the will of the majority. 



PICTURE DECISION IN ABEYANCE. 

The decision as to the legality of dis- 
playing moving pictures in a vaudeville 
theatre had not been passed upon by the 
Supreme Court of this county up to Thurs- 
day. 

The question was brought before Judge 
Davis by Maurice Goodman, attorney for 
the United Booking Offices, who secured 
an injunction restraining the authorities 
from interfering with "The Passion Play" 
as presented at the Fifth Avenue Theatre 
the first Sunday the house remained 
opened under the city ordinance passed by 
the Board of Aldermen. 

An adjourned hearing was had when the 
motion for a permanent injunction first 
came up, but was argued before the court 
last week. Mr. Goodman submitted a 
brief of over forty typewritten pages. De- 
cision was reserved. 

Restraining orders against the police 
protected all the local Keith-Proctor thea- 
tres last Sunday, and the moving pictures 
closed the bill in each of them. 

There are several cases of a similar na- 
ture pending before the same court, 
brought by the moving picture men, and a 
decision will probably be handed down on 
all at one time. The Corporation Counsel 
is resting his opposition to the injunction 
on Section 2G5 of the Penal Code which 
incorporates "all shows" in a statute re- 
lating to sporting exhibitions only. A 
police magistrate has decided this wording 
did not include theatrical entertainments. 

To-morrow (Sunday) in some of the 
theatres a little wider range of acts will 
be attempted in an endeavor to have the 
latitude of the Sunday ordinance widened. 
The experiences of the past few Sunday 
shows have repeatedly proven disappoint- 
ing to the managers, in the shows and the 
attendance as well. 

The public seems to instinctively recog- 
nize an entertaining bill at sight, and has 
shied at most of the shows provided for 
their Sunday delectation thus far. 



PASTOR'S SUMMER VACATION. 

Tony Pa.stor's Theatre, for rhe first t\\\o 
in fourteen years, -will close during the 
coming summer for the purpose of repairs. 

June and duly will likely be the months 
selected by Mr. Pastor for the occasion of 
the overhauling, no bookings having been 
entered for that period at the 14th Street 
house. 



FIFTH AVENUE AGAIN VAUDEVILLE. 

The Fifth Avenue Theatre opened Mon- 
day as the representative vaudeville the- 
atre of the Keith -Proctor interests. The 
initial offering was a big bill, estimated to 
have cost in the neighborhood of $4,400. 
R. E. Irwin, who was a partner in the 
[rwin-Luescher vaudeville venture in Balti- 
more some months ago, is house manager. 

The whole stage crew of the dismantled 
Twenty-third Street Theatre was moved 
over to take up the backstage work, under 
the direction of Stage Manager Frank 
Katts. 

In the press notices for the house it is 
hinted that the Fifth Avenue will be made 
the starting point on the circuit of all big 
attractions. Mrs. Lani/trv, Cissy Loft us 
•mil a number of oth<T stars are prom- 
ised for the future. 

The Keith people will use the house a- 
the medium for introducing their importa- 
tions by the Broadway route. Mr. Irwin 
has introduced several new feature-, one 
of which is a special room fitted up for 
the convenience of newspaper men. This 
adjoins the business office of the theatre. 

Stoddard and Wilson, who have a com- 
edy musical act called 'The Rat Catcher," 
will play their first Eastern engagement 
week Jan. 20 at Pastor's, bobked by Alt' 
T. Wilton. 



WILL AVERAGE FARES. 

Many complaints have been spreau 
alxmt by artists holding Klaw & Erlanger 
contracts that excess transportation, as 
provided for in their contract*, has not 
been received at the United houses, where 
~"K. & E. acts" have played. 

The United managers have told artists 
this point would be eventually adjusted, 
but no money has been forthcoming, 
either fiom the United or Klaw & Er- 
langer. 

At the K. & E. offices this week it was 
said the question of fares would be final- 
ly settled when the acts had concluded the 
time called for in the K. & E. contracts. 
Some of the contracts called for an "aver- 
age fare," held to mean the average 
amount of transportation for each jump 
during the season. The agreement reads 
that all fares in excess of Jp5 each east 
of Chicago shall be paid hy K. & F.. while 
all fares west of that city shall be borne 
entirely by the managers. 

The K. & E. representative said the 
United intended averaging the fares when 
that style of contract specified the con- 
dition, basing the computation on the 
"jumps," charging off .$5 for a local leap 
as against the excess for long travel. 

By playing a "K. & E. act" for a few 
weeks around New York, a considerable 
credit would be thus obtained against the 
charge for transportation the act might 
finally hold under its contract. 

No act has been heard of which had any 
doubt as to the validity of the transpor- 
tation clause. It is considered binding. 



PICTURES AT ELIZABETH. 

A change of policy struck Proctor's 
Theatre, Elizabeth, this week. Moving 
pictures, illustrated songs and five or six 
vaudeville ads, headed by Ameta, make 
up the bill for which an admission of 10- 
20*30 is charged. 

It is the second of the Proctor houses 
to adopt the "picture" style of entertain- 
ment, this week, the 2.'Jd Street Theatre 
commencing its cheap career last Tues- 
day, following the reopening of the Fifth 
Avenue for vaudeville on Monday. 

The Proctor Theatre was opened at the 
beginning of the season with straight 
vaudeville shows, booked by the United 
Offices. There was some fear that the 
other Proctor theatre; iu Newark would 
have an effect upon the smaller city, but 
Elizabeth just seemed not to take to 
vaudeville as proffered to it at Proctor's. 

Weber it Push first alighted upon the 
New Jer«ey town for a vaudeville site, but 
relinquished their claims at Mr. Proctor's 
request. 



LONG TRIP WITHOUT FARES. 

Commencing soon, the Right Yuili- 
an.H, foreign acrobats, commence a tour of 
the Orpheum Circuit, which .vill extend 
to the Pacific Co. ist . 

The foreign act is one of the K. & E. 
contracts turned over to the United Olli- 
ccs for routing, and the Vuilians have 
been assigned to the West. 

Other aits have or will play the West- 
ern time, but their contracts are not minus 
a "fare" clause, something the Yuilians' 
failed to contain. Iu a troupe of eight 
people this transportation is apt to run 
into a solid amount before the act sails 
for homo. 



8 



VARIETY 



ARTI STS' FO RUM 

Confine your letters to 150 words and write on one elde of paper only. 
Anonymous communications will not be printed. Name of writer must be signed and will 
be held In strict confidence. If desired. 



Dublin, Ireland, Dec. 18. 
Editor Variety : 

In your issue of 7th in an article head- 
ed "Burlesque Comedian Serious" appears 
the name Will H. Fox with "The Lady 
Birds." 

Will you kindly state that there has 
only been one Will H. Fox on the stage 
ever since (must I tell?), well, before this 
Fox you mention was born. Having a 
reputation as an artist, author and com- 
poser, and as I may return home again 
next September, your article may lead 
people to believe that I was the Fox 
mentioned. 

In justice to me— the original— this 
Fox you speak of might change his middle 
initial, substitute some other letter than 
the letter "H" and no one will appreciate 
the same more than Will II. Fox. 



Chicago, Jan. 1. 
Editor Variety: 

I am writing to let you know what I 
experienced playing at the Globe Theatre, 
Racine, Wis., as a warning to artists. The 
others on the bill with me were the Four 
Shannons, Cremono Brothers, May Mel- 
ville and Harry Hahn. In the first place 
they had me billed under the name of 
Chas. Altman. I was booked there the 
last half of the week Dec. 23— a split 
week. I did my blackface singing and 
talking act the first show, Thursday mati- 
nee. I was singing "Common Sense." The 
manager said that that was not lively 
enough, and asked me if I could sing 
something else, so I told him I would sing 
"Walked in and Turned Around Again." 
He said that would be all right. "Com- 
mon Sense" is about two months old and 
the other about two years. 

He then told me there was a blackface 
act at the Bijou, and asked me if I could 
change my act any, and I told him I 
could work straight. He said that would 
be fine. I did the two evening perform- 
ances. I went good in the afternoon 
blackface, also good at two evening 
shows, straight. Now, there are three 
managers. The house has been open a 
week and a half and three acts have been 
cancelled in that time. 

Before the "managers" got enough 
money together to open up a show shop 
they were employed as follows: The real 
manager was a painter and a local char- 
acter; the home manager, dancing teacher, 
and the third manager a carpenter— a 
very capable combination to judge an act. 
After the evening show I went around to 
the front of the house, to the house man- 
ager, and asked him how he liked it. He 
said "Fine; I thought you would go bet- 
ter straight than blackface. The town 
has been done to death with blackface." 

I said, "Everything O. K. for the rest 
of the week, straight?" and he replied, 

"Certainly." 

The next afternoon I was cancelled, 
the notice being in the name of Charles 
Altman. I refused to accept my money, 
and said, "Either pay me or play me." 
They refused. I went to the city attor- 
ney, Mr. Burgess, and he made them pay 
me in full. City Attorney Burgess told 
me I had a good case. 



The rest of the bill, also the people 
from other theatres, were glad to learn 
that I won out, and told me it would be U 
good thing to let other artist^ know the 
kind of a proposition they were up against 
when they played the Globe, Racine, Wis. 

Norman 0. Kendall. 



Wilmington, Del., Jan. 8. 

Editor Variety: 

While playing the Gotham, Brooklyn,/ 
week Dec. 30th, one of our trunks was ei- 
ther lost or stolen from the transfer 
wagon between twelve Saturday night and 
six Sunday morning, between the Gotham 
and Pennsylvania R. R. 25rd St. Station, 
New York. 

The name on the trunk is in big white 
letters "Ziska & King, Theatre," and is 
valued at $250. Any one seeing the trunk 
kindly notify us or Variety, and we shall 
appreciate it very much. 

Ziska and King. 



Springfield, Mass., Jan. 6. 
Editor Variety: 

I have noticed a great many of your 
correspondents when they note "The 
Country Choir" use my title. I think 
something ought to be done about it. 
They are a steal from my act, and I don't 
care to have them derive any benefit from 
me. Glover Ware, 

"The Village Choir/' 



Williamsport, Pa., Jan. 5. 
Editor Variety: 

In order to show the readers of 
Variety how narrow-minded some people 
arc, we would like to say that in the 
"write-up" from the Family, Shamokin, 
Pa., it was stated that we, The Hallbacks, 
were simply fair. (It is not our fault we 
are colored.) Well, we must say that if 
the writer, Miller, ever says his prayers 
he will certainly have to pray for that 
one. For we were the hit of the entire 
show, taking from three to four encores 
each time during the week that we ap- 
peared. Besides we played to the record- 
breaking week in the history of the house. 
(Ask Manager W. D. Neilds.) 

The Hallbacks. 



Toledo, Jan. 5, 1908. 
Editor Variety: 

Was to play week of Jan. G in Louis- 
ville. J. Murdock, Majestic, Chicago, 
wired me at Indianapolis to go instead to 
Arcade, Toledo. T arrived Sunday morn- 
ing; met the manager and he informed 
me I was playing Dayton for $25 less. 

I never got the contract for Dayton. It 
is run by Hurtig & Seamon. They sent 
me with my company to Bijou, Richmond. 
We jumped from New York at an enor- 
mous salary (?). Upon arriving in Rich- 
mond the manager, Jake Wells, told us we 
were not booked. He told us to go by 
boat to New York. He paid half the fare. 
I'd like to see them pay half fare to any- 
body. Fred Ray. 



RAILROAD BOYCOTTED. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

All the Empire Circuit attractions 
(Western Burlesque Wheel) playing 
Terre Haute from Chicago have been of- 
ficially notified to travel on the Illinois 
Centrul Railroad instead of the T. E. and 
I., as formerly. 

No reason for the change accompanied 
tint instructions. 



NEW BURLESQUE FOR "HIGH ROLL- 
ERS." 

John W. Jess has signed for next sea- 
son with H. S. Woodhull's "High Rollers." 

.Mr. Jes# will put on a new burlesque 
for the show entitled "The House of 1,000 
Scandals." 

u i 

GUARANTEE FOR "LAY OFF" TIME. 

Harry Mart ell's "High School Girls" are 
playing the Grand Opera House, Chester, 
Pa., owned by Thomas Hargreaves, the 
last three days of this week. Next week 
Jacobs, Butler & Lowry's "Merry Maid- 
ens" will take the stand instead of "lay- 
ing off," following three days at Scran- 
ton. Both shows play under a guaran- 
tee. 



WILKES-BARRE READY FEB. 15. 

The New Luzerne Theatre, Wilkcs- 
Barre, Pa., being built to house the shows 
of the Empire Circuit (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) is now under its roof, and it i* 
positively stated that it will be ready 
for opening by Feb. 15. 



NEW BURLESQUE HOUSE, JAN. 26. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

The opening date of the new Hyde & 
Beh man's burlesque house has !>een placed 
forward to January 2G instead of 19th, 
due to unavoidable delay. 

Rice & Barton's "Rose Hill Folly" Com- 
pany will be the first attraction at "The 
Star and Garter," as the house has been 
named. 



MUST SUBMIT LITHOGRAPHS. 

Washington, Jan. 9. 

An ukase has been issued that here- 
after all show liU»o{.^pi)s nnjqt 
mitted to the Commissioner of the Dis- 
trict for approval before being posted iu 
windows or on billboards. 

Last week several sheets were pulled 
down in different parts of the city on the 
ground they were immoral. 



Rosimi, a former foreign vaudeville 
agent, now manager of a theatre in Lyons, 
France, recently won $40,000 in a lottery. 



ABE LEAVITT ILL. 

New Orleans, Jan. 9. 
Abe Leavitt, proprietor and manager of 
the Rentz-Santley Burlesquers, was at- 
tacked with acute indigestion while his 
organization was playing Cincinnati. Mr. 
Leavitt's condition becoming serious, he 
was removed to French Lick Springs. Late 
this week the manager was reported as 
steadily improving. 

WESTERN CIRCUIT TO BUILD. 

St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 10. 
The Indiana Amusement Compary, 
which operates a string of houses in Ohio 
and Indiana, has secured a 99 -year lease 
of the property at the southwest corner ot 
Broadway and Market street, for a new 
theatre, costing about $40,000. 



DES MOINES HOUSE FOR BUR- 
LESQUE. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

M. J. Karger, late manager Empire, Des 
Moines, and Bert Boldman, are planning 
to build a new theatre in that city to cost 
$125,000. A plot of ground on Walnut 
Street has been purchased. The Empire 
was recently offered for sale. 

The new house will in all probability 
be given over to burlesque shows when 
it is completed, probably making a stand 
in the Western Burlesque Wheel. Ne- 
gotiations to this end are now in prog- 
ress. 

— - ■ ■■ ■ ■ ■■■■» 

TO REPLACE GARDEN THEATRE. 

Following tne policy of replacing old 
theatres with modern houses the Columbia 
Amusement Company has already decided 
that when the lease on their Buffalo house, 
the Garden, runs out in a little less than 
two years from now, they will rebuild. 

The same plan is in prospect in several 
other towns of the circuit. 



REPLACING AFTERPIECE. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 
"College Boys," Frank Finney's bur- 
lesque, will replace "Dooley's Drug Store," 
the vehicle used by the "Trocaderos" this 
season. 



H0MANS' THEATRE OUT. 

Geo. Unmans' Bit* Vernon Theatre is no 
longer among the vaudeville bookings. The 
house closed for variety last Saturday 
night. This week Walter Rosenberg has 
a stock company in the theatre. 

Mt. Vernon has proven a poor town for 
vaudeville promoters. Henry Myers, who 
managed the Doric, Yonkers, once upon a 
time tried the role of "magnate" by tak- 
ing over a theatre in the suburban vil- 
lage, making of it a three-night stand, but 
nothing seems to succeed in Mt. Vernon 
excepting the landlords, and Mr. Myers 
retired after a short sojourn. 

Mr. Myers was fond of remarking that 
"a town which could not make good with 
only a trolley-car jump was no good," and 
Mt. Vernon agreed with him. 



WELL! WELL!! WELL!!! 

Special notice to dancers, bicyclists and 
acrobats: a new stage has been installed 
at Hammerstcin's Victoria Theatre. 
Many have complained as to the "rocky" 
state of the stage. Some went so far as 
to say they would donate a new stage. 

It was rebuilt, however, without any 
outside financial assistance or contribu- 
tions. 

The trustworthy stage manager, Mike 
Simons, who threw out his chest in com- 
pany of several artists and agents made 
the following statement: "We'll show 
them a few tricks around here. We put in 
a new stage, a new garden set, a new par- 
lor set and a front curtain; I guess that's 
going some." (Contributed.) 



Marie Dressier is reported ill in London 
with bronchitis. 



NEW CLUB ORDER. 

The United Booking Offices h?s notified 
outside agents booking there that all club 
work must be done through its offices. 
Whenever they get an order to furnish 
talent for a private entertainment, agents 
must bring it to the St. James building 
and commission divided. 






VARIETY 



TEMPLE TELLS THINGS. 

Detroit, Jan. 9. 

This week is the anniversary of the 
Temple Theatre under the management of 
J. H. Moore. It is booked in conjunction 
with Cook's Opera House, Rochester. 

Following New Year's, large advertise- 
ments appeared in the local papers, head- 
ed "Temple Theatre Anniversary," and 
without being signed, went on to recount 
the late vaudeville battle, detailing the 
strength of the United Booking Offices 
and its affiliated Western branch, the 
Western Vaudeville Association. 

The advertisement termed B. F. Keith 
"the father of modern vaudeville," and 
said the two booking agencies were weld- 
ed together in a manner no power on earth 
could disrupt during a ten years' agree- 
ment. 

The advertisement also said "during 
the brief period the opposition (Klaw & 
Erlanger) to these amalgamated interests 
held sway in a few cities in the East and 
West, the backers of the enterprise lost, 
it is estimated, $1,700,000. And then they 
retired from the field." 

The Temple states that the cause of 
the opposition retiring was its inability to 
secure big vaudeville acts, "as the greater 
vaudeville combination (United) had 
blanket contracts with every big vaude- 
ville act in the world, and only the 
cheaper talent, which could not secure 
blanket contracts with the United Book- 
ing Offices and the Western Managers' As- 
sociation, booked with the opposition." 

The advertisement caused some talk 
about the city, as it was uncalled for 
under the circumstances, and in view of 
the inaccurate statements contained, 
there is a presumption the Temple man- 
agement placed the "ad" in a possible ef- 
fort to scare off any capital contemplat- 
ing investing with William Morris, of New 
York. Morris has had his advertisement 
soliciting a theatre in the Detroit papers. 

There have also been rumors here that 
a Hippodrome would be erected modeled 
after the one lately opened in Cleveland, 
and that the same financial interests 
would back the enterprise, to be booked 
by Mr. Morris. Any amusement venture 
of a variety nature in Detroit would be 
opposition to the Temple, which n"ls hid 
a monopoly in this field for years in what 
is considered the best show town in the 
United States. 



READY FOR PASTOR'S BALL. 

All the preparations have been made for 
the big ball to be given on Jan. 28 at 
Tammany Hall by the employees of Tony 
Fastor's Theatre. 

Ted Marks will be the floor director, and 
other final arrangements indicate the af- 
fair is expected to be the largest and most 
popular in the history < f the event, now 
established as an annual institution down- 
town for some years. 



CLANCY WEDS. 

James Clancy, manager of Jacques 
Theatre, Waterbury, Conn., will not be at 
his post next week. He has been granted 
a vacation for a week by S. Z. Poli. 

During his absence from duty Mr. 
Clancy will travel to Rochester, N. Y., 
there to take unto himself a helpmate in 
the person of a Rochester girl, the daugh- 
ter of a wealthy local contractor. After 
the honeymoon the pair will return to 
Waterbury. 



AUDITORIUM IN A WEEK. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

The last of Klaw & Erlanger vaudeville 
in the massive Auditorium will be seen on 
January 18, when the "Advanced Vaude- 
ville" season there closes. Josephine 
Cohan and Company and Fred Niblo will 
hold over, probably becoming the features 
of the closing show. 

Chicago will watch the departure of 
variety performances from the Auditorium 
with much regret. There is an undeniable 
disappointment in the city over the fail- 
ure to continue the entertainment, the 
best Chicago ever had in this line. 

The Auditorium attendance has kept up 
to the present moment. The advent of the 
Auditorium, drawing people from all sec- 
tions of the city to its somewhat isolated 
location for a vaudeville theatre, has 
changed the complexion of the best theatre 
of Kohl & Castle's trio of vaudeville es- 
tablishments. The attendance at the Ma- 
jestic has lost the "class" formerly ob- 
taining there, but this will now be re- 
gained no doubt. 

A monologist recently at the Majestic 
who attempted to joke about "Advanced 
Vaudeville" leaving Chicago found his 
sally sailing through a dead silence. He 
did not repeat the joke. 

The San Carlo Opera Company follows 
vaudeville at the Auditorium, the best, the 
biggest and the finest theatre ever offering 
a straight variety entertainment in this 
country. It has the vaudeville record of 
having held more people in its brief vari- 
ety existence than any other theatre in a 
similar period. 

The Chicago vaudeville public refuses 
to bid the Auditorium "Good-bye"; it 
says instead "Auf Wiedersehen" (until we 
meet again). 



LEONHARDT AT UNITED OFFICES. 

The United Booking Offices is now the 
business place where Harry I«eonhardt, 
former manager of the 23d Street Theatre, 
may be found. With the change in policy 
of the house, Mr. Leonhardt gave up his 
managerial position, retiring to the main 
booking office. 
_Bef« r e leaving, the house staff presented 
i^gohardt ul " l ^^flfc^ r "m 



SUNDAY AGITATION IN DENVER. 

Denver, Jan. 9. 

It is reported about town that the late- 
ly formed Managers' Association has suc- 
cessfully combatted the movement of the 
authorities to close all theatres on Sun- 
days. 

A movement against Sunday openings 
was strongly agitated for a short while, 
but seems to have abated, for the present 
at least. Judge Wallace declared his in- 
tention of forfeiting all bonds filed by 
artists under indictment in his court for 
Sunday violation, but was prevented by 
a restraining order. 



LOOKING FOR "CONTINUOUS" ACTS. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

The owners of a circuit of 10-eent the- 
atres in the South held a meeting at Bir- 
mingham on Dec. 31 for the purpose of 
forming an association to facilitate the 
routing of acts. 

One of the chief objects of the organisa- 
tion is to secure better acts, playing from 
five to ten shows a day. 



VAUDEVILLE QUITS AT SHUBERT. 

Kansas City, Jan. 9. 

Vaudeville winds up its season at the 
Sam S. Shubert Saturday night. The Or- 
pheum Circuit, through M. Lehman, local 
manager of the Orphcum Theatre, took 
possession of the Shubert last Sunday. 

Next week Bertha Kalich plays an en- 
gagement under a former Shubert con- 
tract, and the following week * a stock 
company now being organized by Martin 
Beck will be installed in the theatre. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

All the theatres at one time held by 
the American Theatre Company under 
lease from Klaw & Erlanger have been 
turned over to the managers of the West- 
ern Vaudeville Association, according to 
the terms of the agreement made between 
the parties. 

It is understood the Garrick, St. Louis, 
and Mary Anderson, Louisville, will dis- 
contiriue"vaudevfiie after this week; but 
that the Snubert, Milwaukee, will likely 
continue for the present, there existing 
no vaudeville opposition in that city. 



SHUBERT, MILWAUKEE, STOPS. 

Milwaukee, Jan. 9. 
Frank Winters, manager of the Crystal, 
has the Shubert for this week. It is one 
of the Cella -Western Vaudeville Associa- 
tion houses which figured in the late deal, 
and will close this Saturday. 



MORE ACTS TO ROUTE. 

According to the present outlook there 
will be several "K. & E. acts" idle next 
week. Owing to the closing of the four 
Western theatres as far as the K. & E. 
offices further bookings are concerned, 
names of thirty-five acts were sent down 
to the United Offices last Saturday for 
routing, commencing Jan. 13. 

The United gave answer it could not 
take care of them at the notice given, but 
would be in a position to do so the week 
following. By that time (Jan. 20) there 
will be fifty more from the same source 
on the United's hands, caused by the clos- 
ing of the New York (New York) and 
Auditorium (Chicago), and the additional 
forr>".TKjU<*. to reach here l>v* ffrftff* 

It seems improbable that the United 
will be in a position to care for the en- 
tire number immediately, and much argu- 
ment is expected to ensue. This will raise 
the total number of "Klaw & Erlanger 
acts" turned over to the United Offices to 
nearly 100. There are a few others to 
be added from time to time as they appear. 



START THREE-A-DAY CIRCUIT. 

Reading, Ohio, Jan. 9. 
The Dreamland Theatre was opened 
here (Jth by Horn & Deitrich, giving three 
shows daily. The opening bill consists 
of Martha Clans, in songs; Rudolph Ack- 
erland, violin soloist; Swain and Powers, 
German comedians; Harry White, black- 
face act, and Prof. Howard, the handcuff 
king. C. A. McGav has been appointed 
manager. Gus Sun is booking the house. 
Messrs. Horn and Deitrich announce that 
they will shortly open three or four other 
vaudeville houses in this vicinity. 



WILLIAMS HAS IMPERIAL. 

The Imperial Theatre in Brooklyn has 
passed into the possession of Percy G. 
Williams, as lessee, and it is said stock 
will be installed in the house by Mr. Wil- 
liams. Report says the Spooner Stock 
Company will take the first try. 

The Imperial is also known as "the old 
Montauk," and Mr. Williams is financially 
interested as a stockholder in the company 
controlling it. At one time it was a 
Western Burlesque Wheel spoke, but was 
vacated just before it was wholly moved 
to its present location. 

The house has been on the market, and 
William Morris was negotiating for it as 
one of his forthcoming circuit of vaude- 
ville theatres. A difference of $5,000 
yearly stood in the way of the transaction 
being completed by way of lease. While 
the difference was in process of discussion, 
Mr. Williams leased the premises himself, 
removing possible opposition to his own 
-v-a-aviv,ville-titrairer in tira-bame fuoUtjrr — ~ 



SOME JUMPING. 

When it comes to speaking of "jumps," 
cognizance should be taken of Kitts and 
Windrum, the English act playing at the 
New York for the first time in the city 
this week. 

The English people came to this coun- 
try with a Klaw & Erlanger contract 
tucked away, all prepared to open at the 
New York. They landed here a few weeks 
ago— on a Thursday. Instructions were 
given to open the following week at 
Louisville. 

Kitts and Windrum travelled to Louis- 
ville, and by degrees reached Chicago, 
where they played last week. From there 
they "jumped" to the New York, and 
were "shifted" to the United Offices for 
routing, commencing January 13. 

Early in the week the act was informed 
it was expected to play Atlanta, Ga., com- 
mencing next Monday. 

An unfortunate phase of the "jump- 
ing" tribulations of the act is that the 
K. & E. contract given it contained no 
clause to furnish transportation of any 
kind or amount. Four people are in the 
company, and all railroad fares must be 

Rather than accept the long jumps 
which are being put upon them, Kitts 
and Windrum may return home. 



BOOKINGS FOR WESTERN STATES. 

Among the acts lately booked for en- 
gagements over the Western States 
Vaudeville Association time by Louis Pin- 
cus, the Eastern representative, are Ow- 
h-y Randall, who opens Jan. 13 at the 
Empire, 'Frisco; Colby and May also at 
the same place on the same date, and the 
following acts as well, all commencing 
at the Empire likewise: Maximus, "strong 
man," Jan. 20; Miles and Rickards, Jan. 
27; Blanche Sloan, Feb. 17; Willy Zim- 
merman (return engagement), March 23. 



Imro Fox is around New York, and 
ready to battle with vaudeville on this 
side once again. Mr. Fox has been abroad 
for some time. 



John Wiggin is authority for the state- 
ment that Christmas >^*k in Rochester, 
with a $1,000 bill, the Cook Opera House 
broke all records. He says further that 
Manager W. B. McCallum must have 
given anaesthetics to the local lire depart- 
ment, otherwise he can't figure out how 
all the money was crowded into the house. 



10 



VARIETY 



SUMMER PARKS 



GIRGUS NEWS 



The State fairs dates have been allotted 
for 1908 by the Committee oil Fair Pates, 
of which N. R. Gentry is chairman and W. 
II. Mellor secretary. The first State fair 
of the season will be held at Des Moines, 
la., week of Aug. 24 and the list as made 
up is as follows : 

Week Aug. 24. 

Iowa — Des Moines. 

Week Aug. 31. 

Minnesota — Minneapolis. 
Nebraska — Lincoln. 

Week Sept. 7. 

Ohio — Columbus. 
Wisconsin — Milwaukee. 
Michigan — Huron. 
South Dakota — Pierre. 
Iowa — Sioux City. 
~{ Interstate" Live * Stock Fair, j 

Week Sept. 14. 

New York — Syracuse. 
Kansas — Hutchinson. 
Indiana — Minneapolis. 

Week Sept. 21. 

Missouri — St. Joe. 
(Interstate Live Stock and Horse Show.) 
Tennessee — Nash v il le. 

Week Sept. 28. 

Illinois — Springfield. 
Washington — Spokane. 
Tennessee — Memphis. 

(Tri-State.) 

Week Oct 5. 
Missouri — Sedalia. 
•Montana — Helena. 

Week Oct. 12. 
American Royal — Kansas City. 



The circus which will be given at the 
Hippodrome, Jacksonville, Fla., next 
month under the management of Fred M. 
Barnes, the Chicago agent, has already 
been programmed. The show commences 
Feb. 5 and continues for two weeks. Prices 
range up to $1. Mr. Barnes will person- 
ally superintend. Eleven displays have 
been provided for the two rings and one 
stage. The Hippodrome Military Band 
has made up a list of twenty-five selections 
to be played during the performances. All 
the acts are well known, either here or 
abroad, and Mr. Barnes has secured some 
foreign numbers for a first American ap- 
pearance. 



Dare Devil Schreyer is working out a 
scheme to give a country fair individually 
for one day each week during the coming 
season. Mr. Schreyer's plan is to lease 
the fair grounds in a town for a day, and 
surround his sensational high dive with 
trotting races and other amusements 
usually found in the woods when a big 
event conies off. The show will be billed 
like a circus around the immediate vicin- 
ity, and Schreyer expects his advent into 
a town to be declared a local holiday. 



Walter Kelly of New York has had 
copyrighted a complete spectacle, book, 
musical score and effects, designed for 
summer park use. It is a dramatization 
of a Biblical incident, and is said to in- 
volve big chorus and ballet ensembles. Ne- 
gotiations are pending for its production 
the coming summer. 



The Heras Family of acrobats have 
been given contract^ for ten weeks next 
summer by the Morris office to play in 
Western parks booked by that agency. 



The Buffalo Bill Wild West cleared! 
$400,000 net profit the past season. 



There 'seems to be a belief the newly 
founded National Park Managers' Asso- 
ciation will form a booking connection 
with the United Offices, from which it 
will secure vaudeville acts for the parks 
booking through it. Its offices are given 
in the St. James Building, but where 
located in the premises cannot be discov- 
ered. 



A park man, always current with the 
future park season outlook, said this week 
he was in fear the present business de- 
pression would extend over the summer, 
and until the Presidential election, at 
least. "This will make another poor park 
season to come/' said he. "Last summer 
was quite bad enough. If we are to have 
another, I don't see what the outcome will 
be. It will place any number of really de- 
sirable summer amusement resorts on the 
market. There are notes still outstanding 
of indebtedness incurred last season, and 
these notes must be carried over until the 
summer for possible payment then. It 
has placed the summer park situation in 
a bad way. For my part, I believe it a 
wise policy for park men to carefully 
think over their opening and final dates 
for 1908. The openings should not be a 
day earlier than possibly consistent with 
eipectations for profitable business, and 
the last day be figured as closely. It will 
mean a loss to me and many others who 
have attractions to farm out if the man- 
agers do this, but I think it will be the 
wisest course in the end. The prospects 
are not so favorable that chances may be 
taken. If this tightness of business con- 
ditions continues, the park manager must 
gauge accordingly, for it will affect him 
the most when the hot weather arrives." 



The Tampa Exposition opens Feb. 5 
at Tampa, Fla., for 18 days. The Flying 
Fishers, Cliffe Berzac's Comedy Circus 
and Dewar's Dogs have been booked as 
part of a $10,000 vaudeville and circus 
show. 



Victor D. Levitt, managing director of 
Happyland Park, at South Beach, Staten 
Island, last season, has associated himself 
with the National Park Amusement Asso- 
ciation as traveling representative. 



Summons have been served upon the 
management of Luna Park, Buffalo, and 
Alpha Park, Albany, by the New York 
Vaudeville Company, in an effort to force 
the collection of alleged unpaid commis- 
sions upon acts booked in those places 
last summer. An action by the same con- 
cern was pending against the Diamond 
Novelty Company, of Syracuse, N. Y., 
which is interested in a Troy summer 
resort, but was discontinued by their set- 
tlement in full. 



The Amusement Park Association, tht 
recently formed organization of summer 
park managers, has opened New York of- 
fices in the St. James Building, New York. 



The Barnum-Bailey Circus, under the 
management of the Ringling Brothers, 
opens at the Madison Square Garden on 
March 18 for a stay of five weeks. Fol- 
lowing the "Big Show," Buffalo Bill's will 
occupy the same place for two or three 
weeks, each commencing its season's tour 
after the Garden engagement. 



Frank O'Donnell, with the Forepaugh- 
Sells Circus the past season, will be con- 
tracting agent with the Barnum-Bailey 
show the coming summer. 



Ernest Cook will have charge of the 
Buffalo Bill show this season, it Is said, 
instead of Fred Hutchinson, who, it was 
generally thought, would be retained as 
manager of the Wild West The Hutchin- 
son Brothers (Fred and Charlie), together 
with Louis E. Cooke, are planning a cir- 
cus of their own for 1909, according to re- 
port. 



Walter L. Main, proprietor of "The 
Great Fashion Plate Shows," seems to 
have disposed of his future, as far as next 
summer is concerned. According to an 
authentic statement this week he has 
thrown his fortunes in with Frank A. 
Robbins, and the coming season will 
travel with the latter's organization. 
Much of the Main parade parapher- 
nalia and the Power elephants will be 
added to the Robbins outfit, and Main 
himself will be manager of the privileges 
wi^h the show. This will possibly make 
some difference in the territory to be 
played by the Robbins circus. Last sum- 
mer "The Fashion Plate Shows" played 
just ahead of the Robbins outfit for a 
month or more, and this had its effect 
upon business. With the two shows to- 
gether, the small Eastern towns will be 
free from opposition. There was some 
talk of Robbins attempting to develop a 
new territory, but under the merger 
scheme, this plan will in all probability be 
given up. Another story had it that Main 
was trying to buy the Robbins show. 



Albert R. Rogers, who conducts a sum- 
mer circus entertainment in Atlantic City, 
will open an indoor event of the same 
sort in the Mechanics' Building, Boston, 
March SO to April 25, this spring. In the 
show, as now made up, will be included 
the Flying Banvards, Powers' Elephants 
and possibly Winchermann's Bears. 



J. C. Miller, of Bliss, Oklahoma, arrived 
in New York Monday, and spent several 
days planning a road tour next summer 
of Miller Brothers' "101 Ranch." Mr. 
Miller says it, is proposed to play Eastern 
territory, and the tour will cover a period 
of six months of one-day stands. Inter- 
ested with Miller Brothers in the project 
are some influential New York amusement 
.-J>e°Pje J?L.«Werience_and. executive. J&fl - 
ity, which will be an important factor in 
making the enterprise a success. No pains 
or expense, added Mr. Miller, is to be 
spared to send away from Oklahoma next 
spring a Wild West outfit that will be 
second to none in size and equipment, and 
as Pawnee Bill's Wild West is pretty 
certain not to take the road this year, 
"101 Ranch" will enjoy the distinction of 
being the only rival of the Buffalo Bill 
combination. Eddie Arlington, Pawnee 
Bill's general manager last year, will 
pilot the Miller organization. 



The Robinson Greater Shows are being 
extensively refitted in winter quarters at 
Terrace Park, Ohio. The parade equip- 
ment is being entirely regilded, the work 
already having progressed well toward 
completion. Everything is reported to be 
in fine shape at winter quarters. "Gov." 
Robinson did not send his stock "up coun- 
try" for wintering this year, as has been 
his custom, but kept it in winter quar- 
ters. 



John T. Shannon, general privilege man- 
ager of the Norris & Rowe Circus, of Ven- 
ice, Cal., is in New York making arrange- 
ments for sending circus acts to the Hip- 
podrome, San Francisco, which Norris & 
Rowe are expected to open to-day. It 
seems as though the circus firm will be 
compelled to make some arrangements 
with one of the Western circuits to take 
acts playing Western territory, the jump 
from New York to the Pacific Coast being 
a long one even in view of the fact that a 
four weeks' engagement will be offered 
there. 



The advance force for the Barnum- 
Bailey show for the coming season, its 
first under Ringling Brothers' manage- 
ment, has been announced in part. Harry 
B. Graham will be Car No. 1 manager; 
J. F. Benzinger, Car No. 2, and John F. 
Harper, Car. No. 3. W. C. St. Clair has 
been designated as special Barnum & 
Bailey agent. Press Agent Coxey, former- 
ly of the Barnum-Bailey forces, has been 
retained. Most of the others named above 
were with the Forepaugh-Sells Circus. The 
Ringling Show advance remains practical- 
ly unchanged. 



W. C. Thompson will handle the press 
work of the "101 Ranch" this coming sea- 
son. Mr. Thompson acted in the same 
capacity for Pawnee Bill's show last year. 



There was a gathering of the big circus 
managers in New York this week. John 
Ringling, of the Ringling Brothers, arrived 
ten days ago from England, and until 
Tuesday afternoon held forth daily at the 
Barnum & Bailey offices in East 22d 
Street He was visited there by a Lum- 
ber of booking agents, but no statement 
was given out as to what business had 
been transacted. Otto Ringling came into 
the city from Bridgeport, Conn., where he 
is in charge of the Barnum & Bailey win- 
ter quarters, and was present at most of 
the conferences. On the same steamer 
which brought Mr. Ringling home traveled 
Charles Cory, general agent of the Hagen- 
beck-Wallace Shows. Mr. Cory remained 
from Friday until Tuesday afternoon at 
the Hotel Astor and likewise transacted 
business for his principals. Mr. Ringling 
returned to his home in Chicago. Mr. 
Cory left no word as to his destination 
when he left his hotel. 



John Fagin, railroad contractor for the 
Hagenbeck-Wallace shows is in the city 
this week. His mission is unknown. 






VARIETY 



11 




London, Dec. 28. 
The Christmas boom and Christmas 
rush are well on; crowded trains are com- 
ing and going; all the palaces of amuse- 
ment and sporting resorts are jammed. 
Christmas itself is a rather reJigtous day 
here, no shows running arvl a lost day's 
wage resulting, except with such man- 
agers as tender the sum for a sort of 
Christmas present. All the old shows and 
many new onevs get their starting signal 
the day after Christmas — "Boxing Day." 
In American childhood the name suggest- 
ed a day consecrated to "fistiana," but 
the "boxing" is of Christmas gratuities 
and leavings of the feast to be sent serv- 
ants and humbler folk on the day after 
Christmas. "Boxing Day" found twenty- 
two pantomimes- (c f u-H -*, ,ving (&-lx less 
than London had two years ago), while 
five circuses (not as big as Ringling's) 
were on at different places. At the Crys- • 
tal Palace George O. Starr recalls Barnum 
days when gazing at the stirring sights of 
Gilleno's Continental Circus, with the fa- 
mous Whimsical Walker as head clown. 
Manager Starr is also gratifying his Bar- 
num tastes by accumulating a menagerie 
in the North Tower of the great glass 
palace, and here you can see in fiercest 
form the lion, tiger, hyena, wonderoo, willi- 
pus wallipus and ring-tailed giasticutis. 



song "Mademoiselle," with many divert- 
ing sallies, keeping the audience in a roar. 
Extra good hits were made by Harrison 
Brockbank's song, "A Stoup of English 
Ale," and Agnes Fraser's patriotic ballad, 
"Hats Off to the King." The five hours 
panto had a gorgeous finish "At the Home 
of Good Luck." The next matinee per- 
formance saw a "cut" which brought the 
show well within the customary three and 
one-half hours. All in all this year's 
Drury panto is a success and will run 
many months. 



At the Islington World's Fair, Royal 
Agricultural Hall, we have Hanneford's 
Canadian Circus, and those famous old 
names Ella Zuila and Lulu are up, figur- 
ing in a high-wire item. The Sisters 
Leamy, on a revolving trapeze gemmed 
with lights, are the aerial feature here. 
At Olympia Beketow's Russian Circus in- 
troduces a woman doing a headlong dive 
of 120 feet, and here we see Bud Snyder's 
somersaulting motor car. Surrounding it 
is "Mammoth Fun City," a sort of mid- 
winter Coney Island, with its cake-walk- 
ing machines, roundabouts, aerial flights 
and every conceivable variation of the 
merriment of motion, all of which great- 
ly pleases the stolid Britisher. 



The pantomime at the Drury Lane this 
years is a rather incongruous mix-up 
called "The Babes in the Wood," and 
blending that subject with "Robin Hood" 
and "The Old Woman Who Lived in a 
Shoe." There are many amusing scenes 
and stage pictures, the variety element 
coming most to the fore in the second 
part. The scene where the robins cover 
the babes with leaves is prettily spec- 
tacular, and introduces a medley of 
people made up as "many birds of 
many kinds," also insects with glistening 
wings, including some bees that might 
have stepped from Parker's "Honeyland" 
at the Hippodrome. Later "A Spirit of 
Discord" takes one to "The Land of 
Nightmares," with a brief glimpse of fear- 
some forms. A procession of giants is a 
short effective interlude, though it's part- 
ly a procession of dwarfs, starting with 
the veriest pigmy and winding up with a 
gentleman 20 feet high. Walter Pass- 
more and Marie George worked very hard 
and effectively as the "Babes," keeping 
the fun alive. Harry Fragson has not been 
given too many chances by the author, 
but scores when he gets an opening, his 



The De Frece Circuit is now booking for 
the Empire, Swindon and the opera 
houses at Jersey and Guernsey, Channel 
Islands. It has closed the Margate Hip- 
podrome tu reopen when sea beach 
weather is more inviting. — Attempts by 
the Holborn Empire and the Tivoli to re- 
strain "Happy" Fanny Fields from ap- 
pearing at the nearby Adelphi failed to 
land, as an antecedent contract with Ar- 
thur Roberts was claimed, which had first 
call and could not be broken with im- 
punity. Roberts is a big man in panto- 
mime, with several thousand people on his 
payroll, and the late legal tilt between him 
and George Robey will be remembered. — 
Last Saturday a big crowd saw off Little 
Tich at Waterloo, as he left for nine 
weeks in South Africa. His salary is ad- 
vertised as £500 per week.— Barrasford's 
new Hippodrome in Cambridge street, 
Sheffield, opened for a holiday month last 
Monday, after which it is understood it 
will close for final touches, making its 
regular opening later. Its seating ca- 
pacity is 2,800. 



A letter just in from Franco Piper, the 
famous banjo manipulator, makes a justi- 
fied "kick" against managers who arc 
penny wise and pound foolish, losing the 
value of many skilled acts by norheating 
their halls so the artists can do them- 
selves justice. It is amazing, but even as 
far north as Glasgow you will find big 
places kept like barns, and artists stand- 
ing around shivering in the cold. A bit- 
ter 'cold spell is now on, and yet many 
London halls of the secondary grade are 
entirely without heat, while the situation 
is complicated by a custom of holding the 
stage doors wide open for arriving stars, 
and the greater the star the longer the 
doors are held open by the tip-hunting 
menials, the stage people shivering in the 
icy draught and catching galloping con- 
sumption and other ailments that swell 
the V. A. F. death roll. On a visit to a 
certain well known hall a juggler was 
seen trying to warm his apparatus over 
a gas jet so he could make a bluff ut 
working with it, while a horizontal bar 
expert was complaining of inability to 
hold on icy bars. In a dressing room art- 
ists were stripping down to nature's gar- 
ments in Arctic cold, but a cheery fire was 
found going on a visit to the manager'? 
office. It '8 an extra cold day when the 
managers get left. 



McCREE OUT OF PLAY. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 

Junie McCree will not rejoin "The Girl 
Question" at the La Salle. He was obliged 
to leave the show for a few days a couple 
of weeks ago through illness. When re- 
covered some differences came up, and Mr. 
McCree will remain out. 

He will probably sue the management 
for the remaining twenty unplayed weeks' 
salary under his contract, which calls for 
forty weeks at $400 weekly. Mr. McCree 
played the leading part in the piece, and 
was featured. 



COOLEY'S NEW JOB. 

Hollis E. Cooley, who recently retired 
from the general management of the 
Henry W. Savage attractions, will not be- 
come the manager of the Columbia 
Amusement Company, as reported recent- 
ly. The offer was tendered him, but while 
the two parties were getting together on 
the salary question, the newly organized 
National Managers' Association required a 
secretary, and Mr. Cooley was selected for 
the post. He is the only salaried member 
of the association. 

The managers met again yesterday at 
the Hotel Astor. At its last meeting the 
body elected the following officers, Henry 
Savage, president; Charles Blaney, vice- 
president; Hollis E. Cooley, secretary, and 
Sam S. Scribner,' treasurer. The board of 
directors is made up of Marc Klaw, Wil- 
liam A. Brady, Gus Hill, Charles Yale, Al. 
H. Woods, George Tyler, Henry B. Harris 
and Harry Martell. 



COOPER-VICTORIA SUIT DECIDED. 

On Thursday in the City Court before 
a judge and jur£ closed the trial of the 
action brought by Bert Cooper against 
Vesta Victoria to recover $1,250. Mr. 
Cooper alleged that he was entitled to 
the commission of 5 per cent, on Miss Vic- 
toria's weekly salary of $2,500 for ten 
weeks of her engagement with K. & E. 
The verdict was a judgment in full in his 
favor ($1,250). The court took under ad- 
visement a motion to set the judgment 
aside. 

Commencing Monday Miss Victoria 
will play the Colonial for two weeks, the 
first of the seventeen still remaining 
under her Klaw & Erlanger contract, 
which has been taken over by the United 
Offices. 



4 

Work is being rapidly pushed forward 
for the rebuilding of the vaudeville house 
in Altoona. It is now expected that the 
reopening will occur before the close of 
the present season. 



VAUDEVILLE LEAVES SALEM. 

Salem, Mass., Jan. 9. 

Julius Calm's Salem Theatre has given 
up its vaudeville shows, replacing them 
with moving pictures, reducing the prices 
of admission to five and ten cents. 

An announcement was made by the 
management that as Salem did not seem 
to care for high class vaudeville, moving 
pictures would be presented until the pub- 
lic expressed a desire for vaudeville again. 

Shows running from $1,500 to $1,1)00 
weekly had been booked and played in 
the theatre, while the gross weekly re- 
ceipts seldom exceeded $1,000. 

With the change of policy, and pictures 
as the attraction, at a weekly cost of not 
over $100, the receipts have been around 
$1,400 each week since they were in- 
stalled. Four shows daily are given. 



NO CHANGE AT SHEEDY'S, BROCK- 
TON. 

Brockton, Mass., Jan. 9. 

It would not cause any surprise if M. R. 
Sheedy changed the vaudeville entertain- 
ment now being presented in his theatre 
here to a cheaper form, including pictures, 
with four or five shows a day. 

Straight vaudeville now holds the 
boards. Louis Pincus, of New York, con- 
tinues to book the theatre, as he has 
done since it opened, while Mr. Sheedy 
is securing his attractions for Fall River 
from the United Booking Offices as of 
yore. 

The large booking agency has appar- 
ently taken no action on Sheedy 's ignor- 
ing its decision in favor of Andrew S. 
Hathaway as holding the priority for 
vaudeville in Brockton. 

The situation here will probably clear 
next week, when Sheedy is expected to 
make a definite move of some nature. 



MYERS & KELLER DISSOLVE. 

The vaudeville agency firm of Myere & 
Keller dissolved partnership this week, E. 
S. Keller retaining the offices in the Shu- 
bert Building, 39th Street and Broadway. 
B. A. Myers has located at his former ad- 
dress, 31 West 31st Street. 

The parting was amicably arranged, and 
both partners will continue in the book- 
ing business. 

"Myers & Keller" was formed on Janu- 
ary 1, 1900, when E. S. Keller, who had 
previously been connected with the Wil- 
liam Morris office, joined Mr. Myers, an 
independent agent. During the life of the 
firm it has booked a great many acts upon 
all the vaudeville circuits, here and abroad. 



KEITH'S ANNIVERSARY. 

Boston, Jan. 9. 

It is "Anniversary Week" at Keith's 
Theatre. Wednesday, January 8th, was the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of Mr. Keith's 
start as a manager. 

Half-page advertisements in the Boston 
papers state that this week's program is 
a special one, and is "thoroughly repre- 
sentative of the vaudeville of to-day." 

The bill is composed of Clayton White 
and Marie Stuart, Walter C. Kelly, Bessie 
Wynn, Romany Opera Company, Bert 
Levy, Heras Family, Lasky Quintet, Caron 
and Herbert, Clarence Sisters, Cooper and 
Robinson, Dudley and Cheslyn, Ed Estus, 
Frederick, La Nolo Brothers and moving 
pictures. 

Of the above numbers the Romany 
Opera Company and Heras Family are 
"K. & E. acts," having been shunted over 
to Mr. Keith's booking office by Klaw & 
Erlanger. 

Last Saturday, as is the usual Keith cus- 
tom in Boston, all the house employees 
were called together, and those upon the 
''roll of honor" had their salary increased 
one dollar weekly. Few escaped the 
"roll." 

■ 

MORRIS ADVERTISEMENT APPEARS 
. IN NEWARK. 

Newark, N. J., Jan. 9. 
William Morris' advertisement for the- 
atres appeared in the local newspapers 
for the first time this week. The text is 
somewhat changed in that Mr. Morris 
seeks to interest local capital with him m 
building a theatre especially with vaude- 
ville in view. 



12 



VARIETY 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 



Initial Presentation, First Appearance or 
Reappearance in New York City. 



[ NEW AGTS OP THE WEEK ) 



Lucy Weston, New York. 

Maidie Scott, New York. 

Three Danie Sisters, New York. 

Marstro and Oretto, New York. 

Lily Flexmore, New York. 

Clarence Wilbur and Company, 125th 
Street. 

Chas. H. Burke, Pat Touhey and Com- 
pany, Pastor's. 

Leo St. Elmo, Pastor's. 

Laura Morris and Company, Pastor's. 



Flo Irwin and Company (4). 
"Mrs. Peckham's Carouse" (Comedy). 
i k MinsT; * TTTree"( Special i>et ) . 
Fifth Avenue. 

For ten minutes at the tail end of "Mrs. 
Peckham's Carouse" Flo Irwin puts over a 
bit of exquisite comedy in the faithful de- 
lineation of a dignified, middle-aged ma- 
tron afflicted with a "t/ying souse." It is 
comparable in its excruciating humor with 
nothing but the companion-piece of acting 
of May Irwin's in "Mrs. Black is Back." 
The opening of the Flo Irwin sketch is a 
bit slow and talky. It takes the cast 
quite a little time to establish their char- 
acters and plot preliminaries, but from the 
moment Miss Irwin raises her eyes in an 
unsteady drunken stare until the curtain 
falls there is no breathing space between 
laughs. The . situation is entirely un- 
looked for as to the action, and it was a 

mistake which gave the skit a name that 
would arouse the auditor's suspicions, and 
thus take the edge off the surprise. The 
scene is the law office of Horace Peckham 
(Koland Carter), a comfortable, middle- 
aged attorney, inclined to occasional com- 
munion with the whiskey bottle in the ab- 
sence of his wife (Mrs. Peckham), a re- 
former with a self-appointed mission to 
destroy the demon rum. She comes to 
her husband's office while he is indulging 
with a convivial friend (John Maurice). 
She suspects the convivial friend of being 
drunk and telephones her suspicions to his 
wife. The latter comes to Peckham's of- 
fice forthwith and, Peckham having ab- 
sented himself for a moment, finds the 
convivial friend and Mrs. Peckham to- 
gether with the offending bottle between 
them. Mrs. P. has, in fact, just been de- 
livering a temperance lecture, but the wife, 
being a jealous person, accuses her of 
holding clandestine meetings with the con- 
vivial friend. Mrs. P. promptly faints, 
and by _w^ay of reviving her the convivial 
friend pours unlimited quantities of raw 
whiskey down her throat. Hence the 
"souse." The contrast between the 
straight-laced, puritanical reformer and 
her tipsy reincarnation is the very essence 
of comedy. Miss Irwin handles the work 
with sure-footed skill and makes of the 
George Ade sketch a veritable comic 
classic. Without that one touch of com- 
edy the sketch would have fallen a bit 
flat, but that alone is worth waiting 
through the preliminary dialogue to see. 
The supporting company is excellent. 

Rush. 



Kitts and Windrum. 
"The Cuckoo" (Comedy). 
17 Mins.; Four (Interior). 
New York. 

Chas. S. Kitts, Rhoda Windrum and a 
company of two compose an English act 
playing a comedy sketch named "The 
Cuckoo." It was first presented in the 
West, where it is reported to have 
achieved a success, something that can not 
be looked for in the East. In England— 
and presumably in the Western cities here 
— the brand of humor offered by the for- 
eign folks may be liked, but there is noth- 
ing connected with the piece to com- 
mend it to New Yorkers or those who 
7olkwr this city'aTaatt iii"vau(ieviiie. The 
sketch is of an English army officer, and 
the scene opens in his quarters, very well 
set at the New York. Mr. Kitts is the of- 
ficer, and he has had a flirtation with a 
widow (Miss Windrum) while engaged to 
another young woman (Miss Gibbons). 
The widow is a brunette; his fiancee is 
blonde, but this does not enter into the 
question except to distinguish th ! women 
who are not listed on the program. The 
widow calls at the officer's rooms, and 
while there his intended is announced. 
What possible fun there is in the piece is 
supposed to be extracted from the widow 
secreting herself first in a cuckoo clock, 
then a chest, and finally under the table, 
where she comments or causes a commo- 
tion, which the officer covers up in his 
desire to prevent hislTffianced discovering 
her presence. The sort of fun which 
might be expected under these conditions 
ensues. Neither the comedy nor the theme 
is in any way new or novel. Mr. Kitts 
makes a very good army officer with the 
English trait of indistinct enunciation and 
the latest London fad of wearing a green 
polka dot handkerchief tucked in his 
sleeve. Miss Windrum is lively and 
a pretty woman and widow, without dress- 
ing the part to attract the feminine no- 
tice. Miss Gibbons is somewhat pale as 
the fiancee, and there is a young man, an 
attendant, who does not figure. A very 
big gamble is taken when a foreign sketch 
is booked for America. One may be 
funny at home, but there is always the 
additional risk of the story having grown 
familiar through long usage in various 
guises over here, as is the case with "The 
Cuckoo." Sime. 



The Kramers. 

Songs and Dances. 

14 Mins.; Four (Interior). 

Pastor's. 

Annie and Maud Kramer are the act. 
One is a large woman, while the other is 
a young girl who wears an eccentric com- 
edy costume and holds up the offering 
with "mugging" and dancing. She is 
bright looking, and could probably be de- 
veloped. There is nothing new shown, a 
"piano-dance" by the young woman even 
following the music played by Clara Mor- 
ton when the latter does the same. Th» 
eccentricity of the character taken by the 
girl, however (called "Flop-Jack Sal, de 
Kid from de West") caught J he Pastoi- 
ites hard, and the act was one of the hits 
of the show. Sime. 



Hitachiyama. 

Wrestling. 

10 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Hammerstein's. 

Japanese or "Sumo" wrestling, the an- 
nouncer explains is not to be confounded 
with the much talked of "Jiu Jitsu," as 
the former differs widely from the sport 
as it is practiced in this country. The 
contestants battle in a fourteen foot circle, 
a fall consisting of throwing a contestant 
out of the ring or from his feet. Hitachi- 
yama is billed as champion of all the Jap- 
anese and after reading the rules which 
govern the game and looking him over, it 
is easy to believe. The man weighs 
about three Tiundred pounds, but is 'quick 
on his feet and seemingly as strong as a 
bull. A short introduction for Hitachi- 
yama and his troupe of wrestlers is fol- 
lowed by a brief ceremony in native cos- 
tume that is rather interesting. Three 
bouts are wrestled by the members of th6 
troupes before the champion is called into 
action. The bouts are interesting, the 
second one being made rather exciting. 
The two men go at each other like a couple 
of wild cats. After the preliminaries 
Hitachiyama does some wrestling, throw- 
ing his opponents one after the other in 
rapid succession. A few training tricks 
are shown at the finish, with the "Big 
Boy" throwing the rest of the members of 
the troupe around like so many medicine 
balls. A Japanese referee affords a quan- 
tity of amusement through his announce- 
ments made in his native tongue. The act 
closed the show at Hammerstein's and 
was interesting enough to keep the large 
audience in their seats, although it was 
very late when the Japs went on. 

Dash. 



Tennis Trio. 

Juggling. 

17 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). 

Fifty-eighth Street. 

Although the Tennis Trio are originally 
from the West, they have been playing in 
the East for some time, this being the 
second week in New York. The act makes 
a good impression from the start through 
the use of a pretty Japanese garden set 
and the neat dressing. The two young 
women wear dainty knee length frocks, 
very attractive, while the man carries a 

white flannel outing suit nicely. A simpler 
style of hair dress might be practiced 
by the girls. The juggling consists most- 
ly of clubs, although there is some good 
work shown with tennis rackets and balls. 
The club juggling is uniformly good. The 
feminine end of the trio handles the 
clubs much better than is usual with 
women. The smaller girl also does some 
first rate work with the baton. The man 
attempted some juggling of plates, not up 
to the other work. The spinning of a 
dollar on top of a Japanese fan was 
heartily applauded. The act employs a 
soft light throughout, a departure for an 
act of this character. The Tennis Trio af- 
ford entertaining diversion, without ques- 
tion, and are a unique combination. 

Dash. 



Arthur Yule and Company (x). 

"Willie's Visit" (Comedy). 

16 Mins.; Open in Two; Close in One. 

Pastor's. 

Arthur Yule, who of late played alone 
in songs and imitations, has arranged a 
nice little act with the assistance of an 
unnamed pretty young girl. They are at 
Pastor's this week. Mr. Yule may have 
intended to impersonate a boy. Although 
his facial make-up is peculiarly odd, and 
well adapted to the role of a grotesque 
"kid," the clothes worn dispel a youthful 
illusion. The contrast is offered by the 
girl's dressing, which is childish to an ex- 
treme in the length of her skirt. Some 
conversation and songs take well, and 
Yule retains ^iis imitations of musical in- 
struments, including his own unapproach- 
able "musical glasses." The young woman 
should be instruct -J how to handle her 
voice in order to omit the raspy high 
notes7~andr~very "*iittTe~TuitXo"if "oTigiic. ""W 
finish her off into an excellent soubrette. 
The present piece is much better than 
Yule's single act, and his offering is now 
capable of being worked up into a most 
enjoyable number. Sime. 



Six Samois. 

Acrobatics. 

8 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Union Square. 

There are seven men in the act, al- 
though the billing reads but six. They do 
the regular routine shown by other Ara- 
bian troupes. The pyramid building is of 
the usual sort, although not as well 
worked. Too much time is spent in this 
portion. The ground tumbling is of the 
rapid fire order, and very well done. 
Where the larger troupes of Arabs have 
not been seen the act should do nicely. 

Dash. 



Billy Broad. 
Singing Monologue. 
15 Mins.; One. 
Pastor's. 

Billy Broad, in blackface, calling him- 
self "The Wandering Minstrel," has some 
new songs and talk at Pastor's this week. 
Mr. Broad also dances. It ends his first 
line of patter, dwelling upon the members 
of a "rep" company. It is much better 
than that used for an encore. A song 
at each end of Mr. Broad's fifteen minutes 
opened and closed his act nicely, and the 
audience thought very well of him. 

Sime. 



The Two Pecks. 

"The Policeman and the Baby." 

13 Mins.; One. 

Pastor's. 

The Two Pecks (not Pucks) are open- 
ing the show at Pastor's. Maggie Peck 
dresses as a servant girl, and attempts 
"kid" singing, while Otto Peck is a 
"Dutch" policeman. There is a baby car- 
riage employed for some dialogue, but if 
anything is to be made of the act at all, 
the woman might better occupy a regula- 
tion baby carriage, being wheeled on the 
stage by the "cop," and carry on a con- 
versation from that position. From the 
singing, the pair could do better with il- 
lustrated songs than with "straight" num- 
bers. Sime, 

(Continued on page 17.) 



VARIETY 



13 



BOOKING SOUTH FROM CHICAGO. 

Chicago, Jan. 9. 
Weber & Rush have arranged to place 
the booking of their Orpheum Theatre in 
Atlanta with the Western Vaudeville As- 
sociation here. This change from the 
United Booking Offices in New York was 
brought about by the heavy expense en- 
tailed in paying fares of artists from New 
York, the rate being $23 for one way. It 
is believed that Wilmer & Vincent will 
make a similar arrangement for their 
Norfolk house, and the other Southern 
houses of the joint vaudeville firm may 
also book from here. 



MUST TAKE GOOD. AND BAD. 

The rule at the United Booking Offices 
now in regard to the "K. & E. acts" 
seems to be that where a low-priced 
established success of Klaw & Erlanger's 
is accepted by a manager for a week or 
more, he~ mustTat the same time take over 
another act from the same source, which 
may cost more, but with a lesser name 
in the successful list. 

This is for the purpose of evening up 
matters, according to a manager. Grace 
Hazard is said to be the prize subject for 
the "average" game. At her weekly fig- 
ure Miss Hazard is the biggest bargain 
who entered the United Offices from "Ad- 
vanced Vaudeville," and figuring upon her 
actual value as a member of a bill there 
is a large margin left over what she re- 
ceives for another act to be routed along 
with her. 



QUARTERS FOR ANIMAL ACTS. 

Joe Vion just can't seem to keep his 
hands off actors' money. Not content 
with drawing down weekly percentages 
from his vaudeville artists he has decided 
to turn his huge building on Jerome Ave- 
nue, heretofore occupied as a garage, into 
a home and training quarters for animal 
acts. 

When Vion retired from the agency 
business, some seven or eight years ago, 
he drifted into real estate and, naturally 
enough, looked to his former associates 
for patronage. This being an off season 
in the agency line at present, he is once 
again seeking for new fields to conquer. 
Already two acts have yielded to his per- 
suasive eloquence, and several more are 
elated for capture. 



COMPANY FOR WORLD'S TOUR. 

A trip around the world for a vaudeville 
company is being arranged by Mark A. 
Luescher. There will be a list of all star 
acts. Dazie, the dancer; Josephine Cohan, 
Fred Niblo, Henry Lee and a famous mu- 
sician will compose the company. A pan- 
tomimic number will close the show in 
which Dazie will appear. 

C. Fred Ackerman will be the advance 
representative. The party will sail from 
San Francisco and visit Australia, New 
Zealand, India, Japan, China, Philippines, 
Russia, South Africa, Constantinople, 
Italy, France, Germany and England be- 
fore returning. 



TRYING TO STOP PICTURES. 

Washington, Jan. 9. 

The church element of the city has been 
active against moving picture shows on 
Sundavs, and seems to have the District 
Commissioners on its side. 

A petitica has been presented to Con- 
gress to stop Sunday shows advertised as 
"Sacred Concerts." The moving picture 
houses have gone along unmolested for a 
long time with Sunday performances, that 
being the best day in the week for the 
box office. 



MAY CHANGE MANAGERS. 

* 

Hamilton, Can., Jan. 9. 

Charles Mussett, assistant manager of 
the Colonial, New York, may become the 
manager of Bennett's, Hamilton, it is 
said, James F. Driscoll, the present man- 
ager of the Bennett house here being pro- 
moted to a more important post on the 
circuit. 

Percy G. Williams brought Mr. Mussett 
over to this country from England, where 
he had capably handled managerial du- 
ties of vastly more importance than now 
assigned to him in the New York theatre. 



HUGO MORRIS AFTER HOUSE. 

John G. Jermon's theatre, the Bon Ton, 
Philadelphia, may come into the posses- 
sion of Hugo Morris. Mr. Morris was ne- 
gotiating with Mr. Jermon the early part 
of the week for the theatre, which is on 
the market. 

Vaudeville of a cheap variety is now 
being played there. If Mr. Hugo secures 
it he will improve the grade of perform- 
ances; also the cost of the weekly bills. 
The admission will probably raise to 10- 
20-30 in that event. 



THE WIFE. 
By J. C. Nugent. 

Don't forget your wife, Mister Actor, 

When you happen to make your hit. 
Don't forget your true benefactor 

In the days when you were not "it." 
Though your name is now in big letters 

And your're greeted with applause and cheers, 
Don't forget the pal who helped you win it all; 

The comrade of your struggling years. 

Don't forget your wife. Mister Feature, 

Don't mind if the critics say 
That a prettier and younger creature 

Would land you upon Broadway. 
She was there when the game was harder; 

She was there when the way looked blue. 
You can't be so strong if you can't take her along; 

The girl who gave her youth to you. 

Don't forget your wife, Mister Wonder, 
When your money gets over "Three"; 
Don't tear the team name asunder 
And sav "Me" instead of "We." 

if 

When you split, your good luck goes with her 
And there's not in this bier, broad land 

Nor all the earth, success and gold that's worth 
The soft touch of the "old girl's" hand! 



MARDI GRAS BEAUTIES. 

Someone is entitled to a great deal of 
credit for "The Mardi Gras Beauties." 
It is a new organization on the Eastern 
Burlesque Wheel, and has been on the road 
about five weeks. 

W. S. Campbell and Al Reeves own the 
show ; Jack Sydell is the manager. Mr. 
Sydell has contrived, although starting 
when everyone else had taken their pick, 
to place a company together, well bal- 
anced and who put up excellent entertain- 
ment, without anything "unclean" and that 
includes, - besides suggestiveness, "slap- 
stick" or "rough house" comedy. "The 
Mardi Gras Beauties," under the circum- 
stances, become a mark of distinct merit 
for the owners, the manager and the 
Wheel. 

Mr. Sydell ought to divulge the secret of 
how he obtained the good-looking chorus 
carried, about nineteen or twenty girls, 
young, and nearly all pretty, without any 
"heavies." It is the best looking lot of 
choristers seen in burlesque this season, 
and they make a much better appearance 
on the stage than many a Broadway gath- 
ering. 

Particularly in the opening do they look 
well in grey costumes while Dorothy Stone 
is singing "Just For a Day," a sweet 
melody, nicely rendered by Miss Stone, who 
has an exceptional, although not strong, 
soprano for burlesque. Miss Stone looks 
well also, almost picturesque towards the 
end of the play, but she makes up poorly. 
The piece in use is "Tom and Jerry," a 
former Ward and Vokes vehicle, divided 
into two acts, with Harry M. Stewart 
featured on the billboards and in the cast. 
Mr. Stewart is a Hebrew comedian, and 
about the only customary "character," the 
usual Irishman and "Dutchman" being 
agreeably missing. 

Lee Allen shares with Mr. Stewart 
among the comedians, and Joe Conway, be- 
sides "Tuff Mug," are cast for comedy 
roles also. "Tuff Mug" on Wednesday 
evening was cither Hallman or Collins, of 
that team, who joined the show but a day 
or so before, and worked under that handi- 
cap. 

There is some sort of a story to the 
"Tom and Jerry," but it was lost in a 
maze of comedy incidents, mostly inter- 
polated it seemed. Mr. Stewart was con- 
cerned in all. and into the first act he 
brought his former "bit," the "coat and 
button" business. 

Here and there throughout there is some 
familiar comedy, but it is handled sharply, 
and with deviation from the general man- 
ner. During the second act, the superior 
of the two, some new funny business is in- 
troduced. It comes quickly and often. A 
spontaneous laugh arose when Allen with 
a tape measured Stewart around the tem- 
ple, and called out "32, waist," going along 
with some other similar burlesque meas- 
urement*. 

Another, an electrocution chair, was 
good for laughs, and this should be given 
more attention, making of it a genuine 
travesty. A "temperance lecture" by 
Cassie Bernard, with the top of Stewart's 
head as a table for her gavel (slnp-stick) 
to fall on, caught on quickly, but it can not 
be termed "slap-stick comedy" from the 
manner in which it was played, and 
through the woman behind the stick. 

The first act did not move quickly 
enough, but the setting for the last act, a 
jail corridor with a hotel office ground 
plan, was better adapted to the funniments. 



Mr. Allen seems to be naturally comical 
in a smooth way, and imprv^sed the 
stranger as the show progressed, whMe Mr. 
Stewart was much liked by the auuience. 
He did a "specialty" at one point of the 
action, singing two parodies, and previous- 
ly another was given by him, but there was 
no good reason for Mr. Stewart to hand 
out "In the Land of Bohemia." The ballad 
didn't fit his make-up and should be turned 
over to whoever sang "Dreams," another 
very good song. 

Some of the numbers as listed were left 
out, and others might be changed for more 
catchy selections, but the songs as sung are 
not of the hammered popular sort, already 
done to death, and sounded much better for 
that reason. 

The "extern, song" by Messrs. Stewart 
and Allen and the Misses Bernard and 
Webb might as well go by the board. It 
is a poor way to obtain a laugh at the 
best, and the thing has been squeezed dry 
years back. Stewart, Allen and Miss Webb 
also are concerned in a "Rube" number, 
when dressed in ulsters, they bounce up 
and down. This made the strong finish of 
a vaudeville act at one time, the name not 
being readily recalled at the moment, and 
it proved an encore getter for the trio as 
well. 

The Misses May and Mars from the 
ranks each have an opportunity to lead 
numbers, the first named presenting a neat 
appearance in tights, which predominate 
in the second act, culminating when all the 
girls enter in regulation "cooch" costume 
at the finish, the second best change, but do 
not "cooch," although their sedateness in 
the garb might be attributed to directions 
as several appear to know how, displaying 
their knowledge by unconscious movements. 
Miss Bernard was suffering from a 
severa cold and unable to do justice to 
her songs, but added a neat little dance, 
with some toe walking. She is the prin- 
cipal woman. Madeline Webb has a some- 
what eccentric role, with a number or so, 
passing through with both, while Miss 
Stone's forte is singing and looking well, 
both easy tasks for her. 

The olio is short, opening with the 
White City Quartet, of good voice, without 
selections, which arouse great enthusiasm, 
excepting a tricky concerted song for the 
finale. Another of the same calibre, "Hi 
Lee ; Hi Lo," ought to be dropped, and one 
or two of the current successes placed in 
the act. Inza and Lorella are on the bill, 
and Hallman and Collins for their talk and 
songs in "one" open with a "hand me** 
song, going into conversation which takes, 
but breaks badly at the close. The act has 
not corrected this fault, which has existed 
for some time. 

"The Perfect Man," C. E. Relyea, gives 
what could easily be made over into an in- 
teresting physical culture lecture. This 
Mr. Relyea does in part, although he is too 
technical in his explanations at times. Few 
in front probably "got" the "diaphragm" 
Mr. Relyea passed over in his descriptive 
matter, but for the gentle folk present the 
entire net is spoiled by Mr. Uelyea's un- 
sightly displacement of his abdomen. It 
should be labeled "for men only," and left 
out altogether. The only thing it does is to 
impart the secret of some "cooch" dancers' 
muscular movements. 

"The Mardi Gras Beauties" is a good 
show, and will work into a better one. By 
the expiration of another month or so the 
show ought to stand comparison with any 
out. Simc. 



14 



VARIETY 



LONESOME TOWN. 

After the first of the two acts in "Lone- 
some Town," playing at the Studebaker, 
Chicago, an asbestos curtain, thick and 
heavy, was lowered. To the uninitiated 
stranger in the dull, dirty city of the West 
it seemed for all the world as though the 
theatre management intended to protect 
Kolb and Dill and the rest of the cast in 
the piece from the well-earned rage of the 
audience, but it developed that a local or- 
dinance compels the dropping of the fire 
guard when nothing is going on upon the 
stage. 

If that is a fire or building regulation, 
the asbestos curtain might as well obstruct 
the whole of "Lonesome Town" from view. 
There is little more than nothing on view 
during the entire performance. The show 
may close at the Studebaker to-night, 
either for its Chicago run or forever. 
There was a report to that effect a week 
• *o. 

Kolb and Dill are the sponsors for 
"Lonesome Town," for all information the 
program gives to the contrary. It is gen- 
erally supposed to be a Dillingham pro- 
duction, but the written description of the 
piece mentions Kolb and Dill only in the 
directorate. 

"Lonesome Town" is called "A Comedy 
with Music," the book written by Judson 
C. Brusie and the music by J. A. Raynes. 
The locale is a California town named 
"Watts." Some years ago before the old- 
est inhabitant anywhere peacefully passed 
away two men were wont to stroll on the 
stage and one, when asked where he lived, 
answered "Watt street." The other would 
inquire "What street?" and the first again 
reply "Watt street." This was prolonged 
into a wordy argument, and it must have 
been excruciatingly comical because hun- 
dreds did the same thing until it became 
so well known and monotonous ushers had 
to wake the audience up. The practice 
gradually died out — in the East. 

Some years ago before Weber and Fields 
made New York believe they were funny 
Mr. Fields had a playful habit of kicking 
Mr. Weber in the stomach — or where his 
stomach would have been had not Weber 
inserted a pillow. With every kick came 
a roar, and if Mr. Weber was being pro- 
pelled a sufficiently long distance back- 
wards before falling it brought a couple of 
roars. It was known as "knockabout," an 
obsolete form of amusement, adopted by 
many in the days of lpng ago and now 
left only to the entertainment at the cus- 
tomary "concert" after a circus perform- 
1 ance. 

Kolb and Dill have revived these amus- 
ing diversions in "Lonesome Town." It is 
curious the great amount of humor they, 
in the garb of two German tramps, to- 
gether with Ben T. Dillon as a third hobo, 
think is secured from the play on the 
word "Watts" in attempting to inform 
each other it is the town of Watts. 

Besides this passe dialogue and obsolete 
"knockabout," "Lonesome Town" has a 
slight touch of the "seltzer bottle" during 
the second act, and the only thing missing 
from the old-time burlesque shows is the 
"slapstick" with the chorus girls. In the 
lines of the piece crop up once "by golly" 
and "cheese an' crackers," while it sounded 
like old times again to hear Mr. Dillon 
remark to a woman he asked for a kiss 
when she said, "I don't know you," "Well, 
1 don't know you either, so I am taking as 
many chances as you are." 



There are plenty of other reminiscent 
lines, some of more recent date and now in 
use by others. Particularly is remembered 
one of the alleged funny men saying "be 
cheated" for "be seated." 

Along the Pacific coast Kolb and Dill 
are proclaimed the funniest of comedians. 
They have had a great vogue there and 
one reviewer who should know his S'an 
Francisco vowed since arriving in New 
York that Kolb and Dill are the two fun- 
niest "Dutchmen" he ever saw. How many 
"Dutchmen" he ever saw is not on record. 

"Lonesome Town" is the story of a stray 
village in the West, "staked off" by an ad- 
venturer, who left the hamlet and was 
not heard from for twenty years. Upon 
the commencement of the first act several 
people, including the three tramps and a 
pseudo widow of Watts, the first owner of 
the town, connive separately to lay claim 
to it by false deeds. 

The "widow" with flirty wiles induces 
the men to abandon their pretended claims, 
but she at the finale is balked by a will 
being discovered which hands the locality 
over to an orphan resident, whose mother 
cared for Watts during an illness. 

There are several interpolated musical 
numbers; in fact, nearly all seem to be. 
"Gee, but This is a Lonesome Town," with 
a dance by the three tramps, was liked as 
though new, and the finale of the first act, 
n march song, "Your Father was a Sol- 
dier," with the choristers attired in red, 
white and blue dresses, received enough 
applause for "The Spirit of '76" to be 
pushed forward as an encore. It was this 
trite "patriotic" stuff, employed by any 
number of burlesque shows this season, 
which caused the suspicion the principals 
were being protected by the asbestos cur- 
tain. 

Several of the programmed musical 
numbers were not sung, but "The Art of 
Making Love" brought forth Sager Midgley 
and Gertie Carlisle in their former vaude- 
ville act. Both have "kid" parts, Midgley 
in his usual country bumpkin make-up. 
The roles are not important beyond their 
"specialty" possibilities, and the variety 
names of "Sammy" and "Sarah" have been 
replaced by "Eazy" and "Hazy." 

The "widow" is Maude Lambert. Miss 
Lambert is absent until the second act, 
where she sings a couple of selections, the 
first in the natural order of the events, 
while the second is introduced more rudely. 
Miss Lambert tells Robert G. Pitkin, one 
of the schemers by name of "Wise," that 
she will be gone for an hour, making 
preparations to exit. Mr. Pitkin leaves 
the stage, but Miss Lambert halts near the 
wings, deliberates a moment with her back 
to the audience, turns around, walks down 
to the footlights and sings "Just Some 
One," the best song of all. 

The dances have been staged by the 
principals. The good-looking girls of 
"Lonesome Town" in "I'm Running After 
Nancy" are seated on a fence, and led by a 
mixed quartet on the stage, did very well, 
but it was rather the suggestive position of 
the young women which secured the en- 
cores. 

Besides Mr. Pitkin in the "straight" 
parts there are Wilmer Bentley, Edna 
Dorman and Irma Croft cast in minor 
roles, escaping without especial notice. 
George Wright, Sr., gives some distinction 
to a constable, but "Lonesome Town" is 
never for an instant better than a poor 
burlesque show. Sime. 



TONY, THE BOOTBLACK. 

There's something soothing and satisfy- 
ing about the way Al H. Woods serves 
his melodramas. His villains know their 
own minds. They're really, truly, sure- 
enough villains, black hearted through and 
through. Certain enlightened dramatists 
hold to the ridiculous theory that the 
stage villain may have a redeeming grace 
to relieve his general worthlessness, but 
this disturbs the ease of one's enjoyment. 
How much better it is to watch Mr. 
Woods' simon pure article. You can sit 
comfortably and hate him luxuriously 
without having your sympathies dis- 
tracted. 

The same is true of the Woods hero. 
His unqualified nobility calls for no men- 
tal effort at analysis, and the purity of 
his motives goes without saying. 

But these conventional characters are a 
side issue in "Tony, the Bootblack." The 
main event is the presence of Genaro and 
Bailey, erstwhile the effervescent vaude- 
ville pair of singers and dancers, and now 
stars of a production. 

They fit surprisingly well into their new 
environment. Dave Genaro brings to the 
role of the melodramatic hero an utterly 
unexpected flash of humor and a smooth- 
ness of stage bearing in character work 
that few who knew him as a, polite 
tailor-made singing and dancing comedian 
would have given him credit. 

He does more than merely satisfy the 
melodramatic conventions in reading 
bumptious lines and manipulating a re- 
volver; he gives to the part of the Ital- 
ian bootblack some real life and plausi- 
bility. Of course, the piece makes no 
pretention to being anything more than 
a dramatized dime novel, as all these 
things are. There is little about the con- 
struction of the play that is novel. Its 
aim is to deliver a thrill a minute, and 
the author was not at all particular in the 
selection of ways and means. 

"To Hades with finesse — keep 'em in- 
terested" expresses the length and breadth 
of the Woods method. In pursuance of 
this simple system when the action lags, 
virtue in the person of the persecuted 
heroine (Marion Ruckert) is dragged 
shrieking into a position of danger, and 
with the same speed restored to safety 
by Tony and his "pal," Daisy Lane, "the 
girl Detective" (Ray Bailey). 

Miss Bailey is a revelation to legitimate 
managers of what a leading woman, 
trained to the vaudeville standards of 
stage dressing and deportment, can do in 
melodrama. 

There is nothing of the listlessness that 
one too frequently finds in actresses in 
this class of plays. Miss Bailey is the 
same energetic, graceful figure she was in 
vaudeville. She is busy every minute 
while on the stage. She accepts nothing 
for granted and makes her every action 
tell. And as for dressing, Miss Bailey 
tears off glittering change after glittering 
change in a wondrous series that sets a 
pace few women in melodrama would care 
to have to follow. Last week at the 
Metropolis she was suffering from a cold 
that almost robbed her of her voice, but 
left her skill as a dancer unimpaired, al- 
though she cut out her singing numbers. 

Toward the end of the final act the 
pair gave their vaudeville specialty al- 
most without change, and in the act pre- 
ceding did a first rate bit in an adapta- 
tion of "The Merry Widow" waltz. The 



vaudeville specialty was easily the hit of 
the show. 

Mr. Woods has given the piece an elabo- 
rate mounting, with three scene changes 
in each of three acts, but the cast might 
have been better selected. This is an un- 
usual observation to make of Mr. Woods' 
methods. William Robert Daly stands 
out as an excellent "heavy," with a good 
voice and very little pose. He goes direct- 
ly to his point and handles his part satis- 
factorily. As much cannot be said for 
Charles Pickens. He is artificial in near- 
ly everything he does, but passes well 
enough, thanks to his good appearance. 
He would have made a better Robert Mor- 
ton than did Chauncey Causland, who 
never looked the part for a moment, either 
in action, Carriage or dress. Campbell 
Stratton was an exceedingly stagey as- 
sistant hero in the part of Dick Winter, 
a New York reporter, who never seemed 
to have anything to 5o except blunder 
into' 8c rapes with the "Black Hand" gang. 
Confidentially I think he had an easy 
job in the advertising department of his 
newspaper, because he had so much time 
to loaf about and foolishly stand with his 
back to mysterious looking windows so 
that the "blackhanders" could conveniently 
lean out and "slug" him into unconscious- 
ness. Twice he put the villain out with a 
right hook to the point of the jaw, but 
the rest of the time he looked and acted 
like a melancholy spring poet. 

Marion Ruckert was very pale and frail 
in appearance and work and Dorothy Rog- 
ers, an adventuress, moved about with 
clockwork mechanicism. 

A chorus of eight girls appeared only 
twice. They are probably more in evi- 
dence as a rule, several of their numbers 
being out owing to Miss Bailey's fore- 
going her singing. The girls work splen- 
didly and are gorgeously dressed, making 
three changes as pretty and neat as any 
musical comedy ballet you care to men- 
tion. 

The plot is conventional, but the piece 
has been lavishly staged, and the skill of 
its leading principals carries it through 
triumphantly. Rush. 



OVER TWO HOURS FOR ESCAPE. 

Pawtucket, R. I., Jan. 9. 
It required two hours and thirty-three 
minutes for Brindamour, "the jail break- 
er," to escape from a cell in the local po- 
lice station last Monday. Brindamour is 
playing at Keith's this week. 

The cell Brindamour got out of is a 
specially built one, and is said to have 
been passed up by other "jail breakers" 
who have played this town. None of the 
officials thought Brindamour could ac- 
complish the feat. 

The papers gave a column to the affair, 
mentioning that Brindamour had escaped 
from Sing Sing in seven and one-half 
minutes. 



POPULAR IN NEW YORK. 

The Karno Comedy Company plays at 
the Alhambra next week, its forty-fifth 
engagement in New York City since arriv- 
ing here in October, 1905. 

During that time "A Night in an Eng- 
lish Music Hall" and the other panto- 
mimes which are played by the Karno 
Company under the direction of Alf 
Reeves have been given eleven return en- 
gagements at Hammerstein's. 






VARIETY 



15 



FIFTH AVENUE. 

A really imposing array of vaudeville 
talent is offered to start the Fifth Avenue 
off on its return bid for patronage in the 
variety class of entertainment. The show 
runs off nicely with a good scattering of 
acts in "one" to give the stage mechanism 
smoothness and a decided preponderance 
of comedy numbers. Indeed, there is lit- 
tle else but comedy in the show. Lina 
Marrder's circus act was the only excep- 
tion in the early part. Outside of this 
and "Our Boys in Blue," to close, the whole 
bill was framed up for laughing purposes 
only. 

In spite of murderous weather Wednes- 
day night the house was fairly well filled, 
there being perhaps one seat out of fifteen 
vacant in the orchestra. The audience re- 
ceived the performance warmly. 

"The Song Birds" was the headliner. 
The half-hour travesty went extremely 
well in a late position, the house demand- 
ing encores and bows beyond count. There 
has been no change in personnel or ma- 
terial. 

Fields and Ward were well to the fore 
as a laughing hit. Al Fields makes an ex- 
ceedingly effective eccentric comedian. The 
pair have their old well constructed line of 
conversation, punctured with the serai-ex- 
(empore observations of Fields. The rou- 
tine moves rapidly and there is nothing 
like a dead minute in the act. 

Bobby North has a cleverly thought out 
routine of consecutive topical comment 
delivered in a faithful Hebrew dialect. His 
matter is of up-to-date interest and 
North's quiet methods adapt themselves to 
the material admirably. He has a singing 
voice of really exceptional quality for a 
single dialect comedian, and this made his 
parodies entertaining. A medley of oper- 
atic compositions worked into a continu- 
ous parody is a unique idea and furnished 
him with a capital finish. The number 
was very well liked. 

Bradlee Martin and Company opened 
the show with "Jessie, Jack and Jessie." 
The farcial sketch has undergone no 
change, Mr. Martin holding to his crudely 
drawn caricature of an old man. Jessie 
Courtney is a pretty, graceful young per- 
son, but is led into some rough clowning 
by the general "roughhouse" of the pro- 
ceedings. John Bowers is a manly look- 
ing figure in an uncongenial role. 

Work and Ower have devised an exceed- 
ingly swift and skillful acrobatic act, put- 
ting more real comedy knockabout into an 
act in "one" than a whole lot of artists in 
the same field manage to pack into a full 
stage setting. Placed No. 2, they kept the 
audience laughing continually, and scored 
one of the solid hits. 

Lina Marrder uses much the same 
routine of highschool work she displayed 
at the Hippodrome earlier this season. The 
confines of an ordinary stage cramp her 
large light effects, but skillful manage- 
ment did wonders for it at the Fifth 
Avenue. There is none of the speed that 
makes such an important factor in a 
vaudeville specialty of this sort, but the 
spectacular trimmings of the number put 
it through in good shape. 

"Our Boys in Blue" made a splendid 
closing number in a "great" show and Flo 
Irwin and Company (New Acts) showed 
"Mrs. Peckham's Carouse" for the first 
time in New York. 



, 



NEW YORK. 

Even with a wide variety spread over 
the program, and Vesta Victoria heading 
the bill, the show at the New York this 
week does not play well, nor give any- 
thing like satisfaction. Other than Miss 
Victoria, there are three foreign acts. One, 
Kitts and Windrum (New Acts), was 
probably depended upon for a large part 
of the comedy of the performance. It did 
not materialize, and this had a somewhat 
deadening effect upon the first half, which 
also included Jordan and Harvey in then- 
Hebrew conversation and parodies. The 
parodies had decidedly the first choice. 

Appearing very early in the evening, 
there was small chance for the talk to 
bring results. , 

Miss Victoria sang only one song new 
to New York on Monday evening, "Mary, 
Queen of Scots," and it is among the best 
in her repertoire. The old favorites were 
gone through, and she was the hit of the 
bill, as might be expected. 

Another single act from England is 
Whit Cunliffe, in his second week at this 
house. Mr. Cunliffe sang "Oh, the Steam- 
er," "Poor Old Father," "Four Ages of 
Man," and "I Double U, I Double L." 
There is no choice among the numbers. 
"Poor Old Father" has a catch at the end 
bringing a roar of laughter, and "Oh, the 
Steamer," simply opened the act. Mr. 
Cunliffe's vantage points are a very clean 
cut presentable appearance, excellent sing- 
ing voice, and several quick changes, all 
in brown. That he is a huge favorite in 
his own country forcibly strikes the 
listener, and Mr. Cunliffe is one to grow 
on you here. He becomes especially popu- 
lar at once with the women, and among 
the many foreign acts brought over here 
this season may be classed well up. But 
Mr. Cunliffe should try out all his songs, 
finally selecting those the best liked, not 
clinging to those he deems the best nor 
those England favors the most. 

The first part was closed with Ida 
Fuller in her exquisite colored lights and 
lire dances, while Mile. Emmy's Pets, one 
of the best acts of its kind in vaudeville, 
opened after the intermission to a con- 
siderable degree of success in a house 
markedlv "cold." 

The acrobatics were supplied by La 
Troupe Carmen, who also offered wire 
walking by a woman with abnormally de- 
veloped lower limbs and an expert per- 
former on the wire. The act played with 
a circus during the summer. It is neatly 
dressed, looks well, but has quite a way 
to go yet before reaching the program 
description: "Greatest Wire Act in the 
World." 

The opening number is Rawson and 
June with their unique "boomerang 
throwing," a practice which Mr. Rawson 
first introduced on the American stage. 
He is expert at it, and made, as he always 
does, a distinct hit for the position placed 
in. 8ime. 



Leonard and Warner have been booked 
on the Sullivan-Considine Circuit. 



Upon New Year's Eve the several man- 
agers of the different companies of B. A. 
Rolfe's attractions received word that 
they were each to take out their respec- 
tive companies, and have them wine and 
dine the old year out in a fitting manner. 
On New Year's day B. A. Rolfe was pleas- 
antly surprised by the presentation of a 
gold-headed cane by the members of "The 
14 Black Hussars," under the leadership 
of Henderson Smith. 



HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

A long, well selected program with 
Hitachiyama (New Acts), the Japanese 
wrestler as the novelty attraction, is of- 
fered at Hammerstein's this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Drew's sketch 
"Billy's Tombstones," is new to the house 
and its success was quite as pronounced 
as it has been elsewhere. The sketch for 
vaudeville reaches about as near perfection 
as is possible. The work of Mr. Drew as 
the toothless ex-football hero, and Mrs. 
Drew, as the sympathetic though some- 
what irritating sister, is capital. A 
capable supporting company of five is also 
employed. ^ 

Truly Shattuck is paying vaudeville one 
of her spasmodic visits. Miss Shattuck is 
singing three songs, featuring a high note 
in the first two, not good enough to re- 
ceive all the attention given it, but it 
really doesn't matter, the singer looking 
well enough to hold the stage fifteen min- 
utes without singing at all. "I'd Like to 
Be a Friend of Yours," with a "plant" in 
a box was w r ell worked up and earned 
numerous recalls. 

Genaro's Venetian Band is seen to much 
better advantage than when shown during 
the summer on the roof. The theatre per- 
mits of the using of a very pretty Vene- 
tian set. Mr. Genaro makes a dashing in- 
pearauce in white trousers, and nicely fit- 
ting military blouse. The leader descends 
to a bit of horse play during the proceed- 
ings that is hardly dignified and should be 
dropped. The band closed the first half 
and was extremely well received, holding 
the curtain back for three or tour minutes. 

It was after 5 o'clock when R. G. 
Knowles appeared, but the comedian had 
little difficulty in getting his audience in- 
terested and keeping them so. Mr. 
Knowles has a bright crisp line of new 
talk and his easy swift delivery is most 
pleasing. Several telling "locals" were 
worked in. 

Sleed's Pantomime Company did rather 
well in an early position. Similar work 
has been shown at various times but never 
in as advanced a form. There is too much 
similarity in the work shown, and the act 
becomes a trifle tiresome towards the 
finish. The water spout, shown by a 
Japanese troupe for some time over here, 
was well done and caused considerable 
merriment. The act makes first rate en- 
tertainment for the children. 

The Kinsons opened after the intermis- 
sion, and did remarkably well. Mr. Kin- 
son's imitations of various musical instru- 
ments were received with much warmth. 

Felix and Caire on Tuesday afternoon 
were without question the hit of the pro- 
gram. The act remains the same as when 
last seen, and there is still much room 
for improvement. The burlesque on "The 
Merrv Widow" waltz at the finish was 

■ 

the signal for much laughter. 

Johnson and Wells opened the show 
with their familiar singing and dancing 
specialty. They are still using several 
songs long since forgotten around here. 

Doth. 



The suit of the New York Vaudeville 
Contracting Company against the Ernesto 
Sisters, for liquidated damages, was up for 
argument recently, but postponed. Hear- 
ings in the contempt proceedings insti- 
tuted by the same concern against Arthur 
P.londell, Hans Meyerhoff, Felich Reich 
and others, has been postponed until the 
same date. 



COLONIAL. 

In point of interest perhaps Mr. Hy- 
mack, the European novelty artist, is the 
most prominent figure of this week's bill, 
by reason of his newness to New York. 
This is his second week in this country, 
having opened at the Orpheum, Brooklyn, 
last week. 

Hymack's specialty is completely mysti- 
fying. The talk and incidentals with 
which he has surrounded the principal 
feat are rather dull and uninteresting, 
but the main event captures and holds in- 
terest firmly. This is the trick of slip- 
ping the hands into differently colored 
.gloves so swiftly that the coverings seem 
to spring into place of their own volition. 
Hymack merely puts his hand under his 
coat tails as if reaching for a handker- 
chief and, presto, it is neatly gloved. 
Neckties are changed with the same celer- 
ity and for a finish Hymack changes his 
coat in view of the audience, without an v 
one discovering how the trick is done. It 
left the Colonial audience in an audible 
buzz of comment and speculation. 

Kartelli opened in . his wire-walking 
turn, one of the best single acts of the 
sort that has been shown over here. He 
works every minute of his stage occu- 
pancy. His feats follow each other in a 
breathless succession, and the stage is 
never idle. 

Donald and Carson followed in their 
well arranged singing and dancing comedy 
skit. Donald makes a first rate Scotch- 
man and Miss Carson is a neat looking 
assistant with a good deal of ability as a 
dancer. Their singing both in the solos 
and duets is altogether enjoyable. 

Binns, Binns and Binns appear after 
their European trip with their musical 
absurdity unchanged. If they do use the 
seltzer bottle they at least give it a new 
twist that makes it amusing, and their 
comedy material is a succession of solid 
laughs. They do well to pack most of 
their clowning into the early part of the 
act. When they finally get down to their 
straight musical work it comes as a wel- 
come change, not because the fun making 
has become tiresome, but rather on the 
merits of the music itself. 

Joe Welch has wisely dropped his paro- 
dies. There was nothing the matter with 
them as parodies go, but Welch is one of 
the few comic Hebrew delineators whose 
pure character work stands out and with 
whom a descent to parodies seems in- 
artistic. 

Ryan and Richfield played "Mag Hag- 
gerty's Father," their newer sketch of the 
same series having been shown at this 
house rather often. Otto Brothers opened 
the intermission. The freak voice of the 
slim member holds the act up in spite of 
a rather light quality of talk and a touch 
of old-fashioned methods in makeup and 
delivery. 

Ethel Levey was the headliner. She has 
given up her pianologue, at least for this 
week, and works altogether in "one." She 
makes an altogether charming figure in 
an odd frock that is chic and smart de- 
spite its seeming simplicity and Quaker- 
like gray, and carries her songs off grace- 
fully. 

Abide Capitaine closed in a capital 
trapeze act, full of motion and animation. 
Miss Capitaine is a decidedly shapely 
young person with searcely"~a suggestion 
of unfeminine muscular development, but 
she nevertheless perforins really 
able feats of strength. 



16 



VARIETY 



THE JOLLY GIRLS. 

Edmond Hayes in his familiar tramp 
character of "The Wise Guy" is the fea- 
ture. Indeed, he is more than that — he 
is the whole show. Outside of him there 
is not a comedian in the organization, and 
the only woman principal is buried under 
a straight part that gives her almost no 
opportunity to display her ability. 

Hayes makes an exceedingly dirty 
tramp, both as to his stage makeup and 
in his methods. At the Dewey this week 
he is responsible for some of the most re- 
volting business a burlesque comedian has 
ever employed. The audiences laugh at 
him, but he could make himself quite as , 
amusing without resorting to such ex- 
tremes of bad taste. 

Robert Archer, who plays opposite to 
Hayes for fifteen minutes or so at the 
opening, is an even worse offender than 
the. principal comedian. The bit of busi- 
ness of spreading beer foam which has 
been spilled on the floor over his face was 
a sickly performance, and several other 
things were in the same class. 

Hayes is undeniably funny in his tramp 
stuff, unlike any other comedian playing 
that character. His slang is kept up to 
date, and he delivers it with quiet unction 
that is immensely effective. 

James J. Collins, the "straight" man, 
does nicely with the familiar sort of con- 
ventional part, and John Russell fails 
signally to get anything even vaguely re- 
sembling comedy out of a servant girl 
disguise. Harry Francis seemed too young 
to be intrusted with a speaking part, and 
Archie Goulet made an active bell boy, 
the speed of his entrances and exits being 
the funniest thing he did. 

The whole show is Hayes. He makes 
laughs, and when he is off stage all is 
sorrow and desolation, except when the 
chorus cavorts. The chorus is quite the 
most miscellaneous bunch that has come 
to Fourteenth street in a long time. They 
work hard enough, but about half are too 
plump for an engaging appearance in 
tights. They have only one costume 
change in the first act of the piece, and 
show three suits in the second, rather a 
slender costume equipment for an up-to- 
date burlesque production. The singing, 
even for burlesque, is poor. One voice 
hidden away in the fourteeen just couldn't 
keep to the key and the rest followed the 
music but indifferently. Harriette Bel- 
mont led one number ' and displayed a 
fairly agreeable voice and Harry Francis 
sang "Lindy Lee," but the number that 
went best was "Won't You Be My 
Honey?" sung by Marie Jansen, who was 
taken out of the chorus for the moment 
and permitted to wear long skirts. It was 
this same Miss Jansen, wearing tights, 
who was chased about the stage by 
Hayes, armed with a slapstick, and smit- 
ten from time to time with a resounding 
whack. Miss Jansen is a large young 
person, and one may easily imagine that 
the performance was funny. The house 
screamed at it, but its delicacy is open 
to question. 

There is no olio. The only specialty in 
the show is the acrobatic act of "Four 
Wise Guy International Entertainers," a 
rough "knockabout" turn, which was rung 
in for the finale of the first act. Two of 
the four men dress rather unconvincingly 
as women, but they turn off a routine of 
really remarkable mat work, doing twist- 
ers and straight somersaults with whirl- 
wind speed. _ ^?^f^* 



UNION SQUARE. 

Jesse L. Lasky's "Stunning Grenadiers" 
are topping the bill at the Union Square 
this week. There are only six military 
maids in the offering at present, and the 
act is suffering accordingly. In the mat- 
ter of costumes and scenery there has 
been no question of expense, the girls 
wearing three beautiful costumes that are 
nicely brought out by the pretty stage 
settings. Maude Corbett, a dainty little 
soubrette, who looks very like Vesta Vic- 
toria, and gives the best imitation, un- 
announced, of the English comedienne that 
has been seen, fills in the waits and adds 
needed life to the second number. The act 
has been well thought out, and ha* beeu 
given a first rate comic opera atmosphere, 
but it needs more than six girls to carry 
it properly. 

Spissel Brothers and Mack, in the clos- 
ing position, scored stronglv with their 
good clean ground tumbling and knock- 
about comedy. The act has but recently 
returned from an extended trip on the 
other side. The specialty remains about 
the same, in the main. There have been 
several new and screamingly funny comedy 
effects introduced, however, and that gives 
it a new appearance. 

Armstrong and Clark, the song writers, 
scored principally through the comedian's 
rendition of an old "coon" number. The 
straight man and the orchestra leader 
should hold a little pow-wow. There is a 
difference of about six keys between the 
two that should be settled up if only for 
the audience's sake. If the pair haven't 
written a good song lately it would be 
advisable to sacrifice one of their old ones 
and use someone's else to benefit the act. 

Sprightly Mignonette Kokin also had a 
little trouble with the orchestra, and, of 
course, the picture machine had to get out 
of order at the same time, but with it all 
the audience liked the little lady im- 
mensely and said so. Miss Kokin's danc- 
ing will carry her anywhere she wishes to 

go- 
James Harrigan ran through his familiar 
offering and then let loose a twelve -min- 
ute monologue which took in about every- 
thing that was ever told about marriage. 
It was evidently all new to one woman. 
She got a laughing start and finally had 
to be lead out of the house. 

Galletti certainly has the right idea with 
his monkey show. He makes no effort 
to put the animals through a routine of 
tricks, but simply lets them cut loose, and 
their antics are all that is necessary. 

Mabel Meeker showed a pleasing con- 
tortion specialty. Miss Meeker makes a 
pretty appearance and is a graceful 
dancer, but the song at the opening 
should be dropped. The dance alone would 
suffice. The contortion work is quickly 
and neatly done, and variety is added 
through some good ground tumbling. 

Leon Rogee imitated several musical in- 
struments, finishing with a flute imita- 
tion, very similar to the bird imitations 
of Carles Howison, who was in the early 
portion of the program. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allison caught a good per- 
centage of laughs through Mrs. Allison's 
excellent character bit, and the Trillers 
opened with their rag picture specialty. 

Slater and Williams, when they got 
down to dancing, did very well. The com- 
edian has a few new eccentric steps well 
worth while, and the Six Samois are under 
New Acts. Dash. 



PASTOR'S. 

There is nothing exciting about the Pas- 
tor show this week. A few new acts and 
some established favorites are on the bill. 
In a couple of instances, repetition of pre- 
ceding numbers which have similiar bits 
of business or dialogue, as in the case of 
Jeanette Dupre and Billy Broad, causes 
some suffering. 

Each speaks lightly of their singing 
ability, Miss Dupre coming second, but 
there is only a slight allusion to it by her 
while Broad dilates upon the subject to 
some extent. 

Two of the latest songs, one on "The 
Merry Widow," and another about "Mari- 
utch," both travestying the originals, and 
the "Widow" verse covering many popu- 
lar selections just now, are used by Miss 
Dupre to excellent effect, together with 
some dialogue employed for a short mono- 
-Jogue ... 

Miss Dupre has an easy bearing upon 
the stage, looks well particularly in a 
handsome gown at the opening, and makes 
two changes of costume. About the only 
fault with her act at present is the un- 
avoidable short waits while dressing for 
the changes. The opening may be a trifle 
long. At least it seemed so, as the cos- 
tumes afterwards worn came as a sur- 
prise. 

The music of Mrs. Jules Levy and Fam- 
ily, consisting of Mrs. Levy's son and 
daughter, was a large applause getter. 
The boy is rounding out into a high class 
cornetist for his age, and the three make 
a wholesome stage picture. Mrs. Levy 
should guard her son against playing too 
loudly while she is singing, and also have 
him carefully scan his evening clothes be- 
fore each performance. 

Bernier and Stella are playing a return 
date, with the same dressy singing and 
dancing turn shown here the last time. 
Mr. Bernier wears a natty brown suit, but 
spoils the effect with a poorly selected 
light colored waistcoat, and a brown neck- 
tie. Miss Stella makes a change of wear- 
ing apparel, looking well in both gowns, 
but goes in for just a litle too much exu- 
berance in her final efforts, and also sings 
with poor judgment, forcing her voice to 
a pitch rendering it unpleasant. She han- 
dles "Just Help Yourself" much better 
than "Sweet Marie Snow," the latter sung 
by both for the dancing exit. 

The act passes easily at Pastor's. It 
could go through on looks alone. 

George and Libby Dupree call their act 
a "German comedy sketch," which it is. 
Mr. Dupree is a "Dutchman" who dances 
like the stage Germans of years back, and 
they did not lack appreciation in an early 
position. 

The Fitzgibbon-McCoy Trio headline 
this week; Hathaway and Siegel are the 
extra attraction, programmed to play 
"The Theatrical Costumer," that having 
the sound of a new sketch for them. 
Emerson and Baldwin, big favorites on 
14tli street, are also on the bill, as are 
Ralph and Lillie Carlisle, who closed the 
show in a rope spinning number. 

Billy Broad, The Kramers, Arthur Yule 
and Company, The Two Pecks and Webb 
and Norton are under New Acts. Sime. 



NOTES. 



Lane, OTkmnell and Boyne are now 
known as the Lane Trio. 



Ed. and May Woodward, "The Sun- 
burned Rubes," have in prospect the in- 
troduction of a new sketch to be called "A 
Tangled Tale of Misfits." The act Is in 



William La Tell, of the acrobatic La 
Tell Brothers, was married Jan. 2 at 
Lebanon, Pa., to Helen Reutter, of Will- 
iamsport. Mrs. La Tell is a non-profes- 
sional. 



Clara Alto, formerly of Alto and Jen- 
nings, is seriously ill at the home of her 
sister, Mrs. V. E. Whitner, 145 West 90th 
Street, New York. 



Ned Nelsqn is recovering from an at- 
tack of typhoid fever, which confined him 
for the past two months to the Kittaning 
(Pa.) General Hospital. When well 
enough to travel, Mr. Nelson will return 
to nis 'home' in Philadelphia. 



Madge Marshall has replaced Clara Ray- 
mond with "The Gay Morning Glories." 



Geo. Evans plays United time commenc- 
ing January 20 for the remainder of his 
K. & E. contract. There are eleven unex- 
pired weeks for Mr. Evans to play. 



"The County Choir" did not play at 
the Colonial this week, due to illness of 
one of the company. The Otto Brothers 
occupy their place on the program. 



Jewell's Manikins played at the New 
York last Sunday. The act consists of a 
miniature stage, with manikins worked 
by strings from above. Miniature cur- 
tains are dropped, and the same sort of 
stage settings in the interior of the stage 
upon a stage shown, but there is no pro- 
vision in the "Sunday Closing Law" for 
this particular form of entertainment, 
and Klaw & Erlanger's attorneys advised 
the act could be given. 



Flavia Arcaro, formerly a member of 
"The Four American Beauties," a vaude- 
ville singing act, and later a member of 
Savage's "Beggar Student" Company, has 
a new vaudeville offering in prospect. 



Louis Pincus, the agent for the Western 
States Vaudeville Association, furnishes a 
denial that he was responsible for the 
"club" entertainment given at a Masonic 
lodge last week, where the program as- 
given was not played. Mr. Pincus states 
he does not book clubs, and furnished the 
acts for the affair as a special favor to 
the chairman of the committee. Pincus 
says he knew nothing of the program nor 
its contents. 



The gross receipts at the Twenty-third 
Street Theatre for Christmas week are 
said to have been $3,800, and the cost of 
the bill to have footed up $8,900. 

Wheeler Earle and Vera Curtis will show 
a new act at Pastor's week of Jan. 27. 



Trainor and Dale have been booked 
through Walter Plimmer for the "Rentz- 
Santley" Company (Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel) for next season. 



"one." 



May De Sousa, an American girl, wan 
the hit of the opening bill at the Moulin> 
Rouge, Paris. 



\ 



VARIETY 



17 



THE GIRL QUESTION. 

You are never quite sure while seeing 
"The Girl Question" at the La Salle The- 
atre, Chicago (where it has been running 
for over six months), why that particular 
name was applied. 

The piece belongs in the "musical melo- 
drama" class, without the "thrills." Per- 
haps more accurately it could be listed as 
in the "Geo. M. Cohan school" of melo- 
dramatic comedy with music. 

Will R. Hough and Frank R. Adams, 
who wrote "The Girl Question," have taken 
some desperate chances oh the finales of 
the three acts, bring each to a quiet close, 
especially the last act, when only two of 
the principals are on the stage. The "hur- 
rah" style of finishing is missed and it 
causes the audience to look backward over 
the remainder of the production for other 
defects instead of having one's head filleJ 
with a melodious air as the final curtain 
descend*. 

The music, written by Joe E. Howard, 
is catchy. Mr. Howard has the knack of 
turning out music striking the popular 
fancy, and in "The Girl Question" the 
composer pleases whenever one of his com- 
positions is sung. 

This occurs often and commences with 
"Waltz with Me Till I'm Dreamy," a 
number on the style of "The Merry Widow 
Waltz," sung by Frances Demarest. Miss 
Demarest is a stunning looking girl, with a 
rather pleasing soprano, but she is seeking 
to make of herself a composite picture 
while on the stage of Lillian Russell, Va- 
leska Suratt and Anna Held. It would be 
far more becoming for Miss Demarest to 
be simply herself, without affectation, for 
she is no mimic, a fact prominently 
brought out while Miss Demarest sings 
"The Imitation Craze" in the third act, 
when she deliberately attempts to "do" 
Anna Held. 

This number, the hit of the show in 
point of applause through "The Eddy Foy 
Girls," gives also another single imitator 
to the stage. It is Lee Kohlmar as David 
Warfield in "The Music Master." 

The one huge spot in Mr. Kohl mar's 
impersonation is that it is not of David 
Warfield really must be Mr. Kohlmar 

giving an nitation of how Mr. Kohlmar 
thinks Mr. Warfield should have played 
"The Music Master." Coming after Mr. 
Kohlmar's excellent work as a soft-hearted 
young German, it nearly marred the un- 
usually good impression he had created. 

The wonder of Chicago theatricals is 
where the chorus girls out there come 
from. With very few exceptions all the 
females of the rank and file are pretty and 
full of ginger. Take the "ponies" in "The 
Girl Question." If a Broadway production 
possessed them Broadway would rave over 
the girls — Broadway would rave any- 
way over the "Eddie Foy" number. It is 
a travesty on the many imitations of the 
comedian. About ten "ponies," all made 
up for Foy, prove what an easy subject he 
is. The first girl to en f .er gives an imper- 
sonation as good as the best, while the last 
girl on the line, by a silly expression and 
a lazily drooping pose, brings encores with- 
out end with her quiet comedy. At first 
the audience gives little attention to this 
comedienne, but finally insists repeatedly 
upon having her go through the perform- 
ance again. 

Another very catchy number is "The Old 
Buck and Wing," sung by Joe Whitehead, 
with the chorus behind him prettily at- 
tired. Something similar was in "The 



Ham Tree" and another "novelty" of the 
production called "The Phantom Chimes," 
electric bells in many different places 
through the auditorium, seems to be an 
elaboration of an effect in one of the 
Weber shows a few seasons back. The 
bells are played from keyboards on a type- 
writing stand, but the house is not dark- 
ened sufficiently and the bells, having a 
bright nickel surface instead of being in 
harmony with the color scheme of the 
theatre, attract attention and speculation 
before the number is reached, it losing a 
great deal of the effect. "I Like to Hear 
You Call Me Honey," sung by Phrynette 
Ogden, and "There's No Place Like Home," 
by Leonora Kerwin, are tuneful and 
scored. 

Several chorus men with three show 
girls back up the "broilers." The show 
girls are fair looking, but one, when in 
tights, dare not turn her back to the house 
for the best of reasons. The costuming is 
in good taste and there are many changes. 
Ned Wayburn staged the dances. They 
bespeak Wayburn all over. He has given 
the show nothing new or unique in this 
department. 

"The Girl Question" opens in a restau- 
rant and the other two scenes are located 
in the same place, with the stage slightly 
transformed each time. Junie McCree, 
who originated the principal role, that of 
a slangy head waiter, evidently written to 
fit him, was out of the cast through ill- 
ness when the show was seen.* Mr. White- 
head substituted for Mr. McCree at a few 
hours' notice and gave a first-class per- 
formance under the circumstances. 

Of the other male principals Tell Taylor, 
a manly looking college boy, William 
Robinson as a colored cook and Arthur 
Sanders in the role of a millionaire all did 
well. 

Miss Kerwin heads the list of women, 
playing the cashier of the restaurant, 
while Georgia Drew Mendum becomes the 
principal female through her character of 
a waitress. Miss Mendum makes the part 
just a trifle too coarse in looks, but secures 
all the points possible from the lines 
through her vocal and facial expression. 

The dialogue of the piece is bright and 
witty. There is nothing stale in the talk. 
For the major part it consists of short, 
crisp replies, all having snap, but there 
is so much of this it tends to tire before 
long. 

The plot itself serves well enough for 
the purpose. The La Salle is a compact 
theatre, with a capacity of about 800. The 
present company fills the stage, "getting 
to" the audience easily, and the liveliness 
of the show gives it a swing which carries 
it to success, but it seems that "The Girl 
Question" would require a larger and bet- 
ter company to hold a permanent engage- 
ment in a regulation sized house in the 
metropolis. Sime. 



In February Richard Pitrot, the foreign 
agent, will go to Europe to remain for an 
indefinite time. While away he will en- 
gage acts for the Western States Vaude- 
ville Association through Louis Pincus, as 
well as for other amusement enterprises 
over here. 



The new Imperial Theatre, on HGth 
Street, near Lenox Avenue, is about rea4y 
for opening. It will be conducted as a 
moving picture and illustrated song es- 
tablishment, under the management of 
Sam Tauber. 



ONLY ONE MORE WEEK OF AD- 
VANCED VAUDEVILLE. 

(Continued from page 3.) 

The immense business done by the Audi- 
torium paralyzed the Western managers 
associated with the United Otlices, and 
they demanded a settlement be made at 
once. It was reported at the time some 
of the Eastern managers preferred to 
make a stand against any agreement being 
made with K. & E., but the will of the 
West prevailed. 

Previous to this an offer had been made 
Klaw & Erlanger of $3,000,000 to leave 
vaudeville. This had been declined, and 
a much higher figure set by the "Ad- 
vanced Vaudeville" promoters. 

Bookings at home and abroad had been 
entered into which would have supplied 
sufficient bills for twenty-five vaudeville 
theatres, the number first proposed by K. 
& E., but which did not materialize. The 
deficiency of houses left a surplus of acts, 
and the failure of Klaw & Erlanger to se- 
cure the requisite theatres to place their 
acts led to a general belief that "Advanced 
Vaudeville" had been a speculative invest- 
ment for the United States Amusement 
Company, the incorporated company or- 
ganized to conduct the K. & E. circuit. 

This company had as stockholders, other 
than Klaw & Erlanger, the Shuberts, Felix 
Isman, William A. Brady, J. J. Rhinock, 
Geo. W. Cox and several theatrical man- 
agers in close affiliation with the Klaw & 
Erlanger legitimate theatrical interests. 

One report had it that the members of 
the company pressed A. L. Erlanger, who 
actively operated the vaudeville business, 
to reach a settlement, and that this pres- 
sure was a large factor in the deal which 
left vaudeville without an opposition. 

William Morris acted as the exclusive 
booking agent for Klaw & Erlanger, but 
he did not exclusively select the acts. A 
great many were brought from the other 
side. Some of the poorest vaudeville acts 
ever appearing on an American stage, con- 
sidering the salary paid, were among the 
number. 

A few of the American acts engaged did 
not meet with the favor of the public an- 
ticipated, and it became a difficult matter 
at one stage of the progress to place a 
bill together not including any of the 
"deadwood." This had a deterrent effect 
upon the shows. 

The entry of Klaw & Erlanger sent the 
salary of the vaudeville artist to a high 
point, where, for the most part, it will re- 
main if another opposition occurs, but it 
is not believed that a higher figure will be 
ever reached, and the closing of "Advanced 
Vaudevill " will shut the door to the un- 
heard of figures received by foreign 
artists. 

There has been a great deal of dissatis- 
faction expressed by artists engaged by 
Klaw & Erlanger, mostly caused by the 
routing. That caused long railroad trips 
between the week stands, bringing with 
them many other inconveniences and an- 
noyances. 

The placing of the unexpired contracts 
with the United Offices is expected to bring 
about more complaints, and there are any 
number < f artists at present with griev- 
ances to be adjusted. 

Klaw & Erlanger will hear of vaudeville 
unquestionably until the end of the season 
when all differences will be settled, but 
in the settlement made, it is understood, 
they relieved themselves from all further 



financial liability under the contracts, that 
having been assumed by the United Book- 
ing Offices. 

The failure of Klaw & Erlanger to con- 
tinue their vaudeville circuit will work a 
hardship upon any further opposition in 
vaudeville to be erected. What the artist 
considers the mistakes of the "Advanced 
Vaudeville" will be avoided in the future. 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK. 
(Continued from page 12.) 



Walter Webb and May Norton. 
"The New Man and the Maid." 
13 Mins.; Three (Interior). 
Pastor's. 

Both Walter Webb and May Norton, 
who are appearing together at Pastor's 
for the first time, have been members of 
other acts. As a team they do quite well 
this week. Mr. Webb is an Irishman, and 
the quoted description of. themselves gives 
the characters. Sime. 



Moving Pictures. 

"Carl Hagenbeck's Menagerie at Ham- 
burg." 
10 Mins. 
New York. 

The moving picture at the New York 
this week is an evidence of enterprise on 
the part of someone. It is of Carl Hagen- 
beck's menagerie of wild animals at Ham- 
burg, Germany. The camera takes in the 
entire animal farm. It seems more like 
witnessing the interior of a zoological gar- 
den. Nothing startling, sensational nor 
exciting is shown on the sheet, but the 
different views of the animals, from leap- 
ing does to an elephant pushing up trunks 
of trees, are very interesting. The series 
is a departure from the irrational lot of 
melodramatic matter foisted upon the 
public in lieu of legitimate subjects of late. 

Sime. 



OUT OP TOWN 



Radcliffe and Belmont. 
Rifle Shots. 
15 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Majestic, Sandusky, 0. 

Both men are dressed in evening clothes 
and make a very neat appearance. They 
call themselves "The Wizards of the Win- 
chester," and do some really difficult shots. 
The number had a very cordial reception 
from the Monday evening audience. 

Doc. 



Claus and Radcliffe. 
Songs and Dances. 
14 Mins.; One. 
Haymarket, Chicago. 

The pair have entirely changed their 
comedy talking act to singing and eccen- 
tric dancing. Radcliffe appears in neat 
Hebrew makeup and does some excellent 
eccentric dancing, besides delivering five 
well-written parodies. Miss Claus dis- 
played a pretty gown and nimbleness in 
wooden shoe dancing. The act in its pres- 
ent shape is a vast improvement over the 
former. It is more brisk. For the diffi- 
cult place occupied, it received an un- 
usually good reception. Frank Wicxberg. 



Alexander Fischer, brother of Clifford 
C, is still in the city with a scheme up 
his sleeve not allowed to even peep out. 



18 



VARIETY 



VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK JAN. 13 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED. 

(The routes here given, hearing no dates, are from JAN. 12 to JAN. 19, inclusive, de- 
pendent upon the opening and closing days of engagements in different parts of the country. 
When an address follows the name the act is "laying off" for the week and may be written 
or telegraphed to accordingly. All addresses are furnished VARIETY by artists and may be 
relied upon as accurate. Addresses care managers or agents will not be printed.) 

"B. R." in the list indicates the route of the burlesque company named, with which the 
artist or act is with and may be found under "BURLESQUE ROUTES." 



♦ — ♦ 



♦ -» » 



J 



Abel. Geo. A Co., Vaudeville, Pittsburg. 

Abbott- Andrew Co., 207 W. 38, N. Y. 

Adair Art, Lyric, Alton, 111. 

Adams, E. Kirke, A Co.. P. O. Box 21, Guyan- 

dotte, W. Va. 
Adams Broe., Imperials, B. R. 
Auams Ac urew, 2bi w . 43, N. Y. 
Adams A Kirk. Lady Birds, B. R. 
Addison A Livingston, Palmetto Beach, Tampa. 
Adler, Harry, Park, Alameda, Cal., lndef. 
Adler, Flo, Orpbeum, Salt Lake. 
Abeam, Charles, Golden Crook, B. R. 
Ahem A Baxter, Bachelor Club. 
Aberns, The, 290 Colorado, Chicago. 
Albanl, 1416 Broadway, New York. 
Aldo A Vannerson, 331 Roebllng, Brooklyn. 
All A Pelser, High Jinks, B. R. 
Alpine Troupe, Majestic. Birmingham. 
Allen, Eta, Ideals. B. R. 
Allen, Joaie, 306 W. 112, N. Y. 
Allen A Kenna, Crystal. Logausport, Ind. 
Allen, Searl & Violet, Poll's, Waterbury. 
Alllster, Harry, 11 Rue Geoffrey Marie, Parla. 
Alpha Trio, O. O. H., Pittsburg. 
Alpine Trio. 207 B. 14. N. Y. 
Alrona Zoeller Trio, Automatic, Alliance, 0. 
Alvarettas. Three, Trocadero, B. R. 
Alvora. Golden Crook, B. It. 
American Dancers Six, Colonial, N. Y. 
American Newsboys yuartette, Pantage's, 

Spokane. 
American Newsboys' Trio, Wisconsin Hotel, Marl- 

aette. Wis. 
Americus Comedy Four, Auditorium, Lynn. 
Ampere, Electrical, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 
Anderson, Carl, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 
Apdale's Animals, Bennett's, Montreal. 
Appleby, E. J., Marlon, Marlon, Ind. 
Apollo Orch., Century Club, Elkhart, Ind. 
Apollos, The, 63 8th Ave., N. Y. 
Anderson, Richard, Orpbeum, Kansas City. 
Arberg & Wagner, Princess, Cambridge, 0. 
Ardelli, Sharon, Pa. 

Archer. LaDella A Davey, Jolly Girls, B. R. 
Ardo A Eddo, 317 Hoyt Ave., Astoria, L. I. 
Arlington Four, Orpbeum, Oakland. 
Arlaonas, The, 148 W. 68, N. Y. 
Armluta A Burke. O. II.. Mt. Carmel, 111. 
Arnold, Lucia, Boston Belles, B. R. 
Arnot A Gunn, 215 6th Ave., N. Y. 
Astrellas, The, Maryland, Baltimore. 
Atkinson, Geo., Star, Monessen, Pa. 
Auberts, Les, 14 Frobel Str. III., Hamburg, Gar. 
Auburns. Three. Majestic, Pittsburg. 
Auers, The, Lyric. Ft. Smith, Ark. 
Austin, Claude, 86 No. Clark, Chicago. 
Austins, Great. Rockvllle, Conn. 
Austins. Tossing. Metropole. Manchester, Eng. 
Avery A Pearl, 653 Wash. Boul., Chicago. 



Baader La Velle Troupe, 383 Christiana, Chicago. 

Baker, Nat C, 32 Division, N. Y. 

Balno A Shaw, Hippodrome, N. Y., lndef. 

Banks, Chas., Boston Belles, B. R. 

Barton, Joe. Bohemians, B. R. 

Barrett. Grace, Pat White's Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Barrett A Belle. Century Girls, B. R. 

Barrett. Charles, High Jinks. B. R. 

Barry, Katie. 541 W. 158, N. Y. 

Barry, Mr. A Mrs. Jimmle, Hopkins', Louisville. 

Barry A Wolford, Colonial, Norfolk. 

Barto, Eddie, Rolllckers. B. R. 

Bartlett, Al, Hunt's Hotel, Chicago. 

Bates A Neville. 46 Gregory, New Haven. 

Beard, Billy, 1401 Drayton, Savannah. 

Beattles, Juggling, 137 Park. PaterWb. 

Beauvals, Arthur, A Co., 123 W. 26, N. Y. 

Beardsley Sisters, Auditorium, Lynn. 

Bedell Bros., Poughkeepsle. N. Y. 

Bedinl, Donat, A Dogs, 229 W. 88. N. Y. 

Beecher A Maye. 23 Atlantic, Bridgeport. 

Belford Bros., 223 First, Jersey City. 

Belford, Allan G., Washington, N. J. 

Belmont, Harriette, Jolly Girls, B. R. 

Belclalre Bros., Columbia. St. Louis. 

Bell Boy Trio. Hathaway's, New Bedford. 

Boll, Frank, 1553 Broadway. N. Y. 

Bell, Norma. Trane-Atlantlca. B. R. 

Belmont A Brennan, Imperials, B. R. 

Bennett, Laura, 14 Linden, Jersey City. 

Bensona, Musical, Genl. Del., Chicago. 

Bentlay, Harry, Imperials, B. R. 

Benton, Maggie. 136 Taylor, Springfield, 0. 

Berkes, The, 409 W. 80. N. Y. 

Bernard, Caeele, Rose Sydell, B. B. 

Beraler A Stella, 22 Howard. Providence. 

Berzac's Circus, Orpheum. Minneapolis. 

Berry A Berry, Great Valley, N. Y. 

Big Poor, High School Girls, B. B. 

Big City Quartet, Cropsy A Bay 25. Bensonharat. 

Bijou Comedy Trio. Wataon'a Burlesquers, B. R. 

Blmm, Bomm A Brrr, Orpheum, St. Paul. 

"Ingham. Kittle. Majestic. Pittsburg. 

r. Ingham, Majestic, Pittsburg. 



Blnney A Chapman, Garden, Memphis, lndef. 
lilrch. John, 133 W. 45th, N. Y. 
Bishop, Frances, Century Girls, B. B. 
Bisaett A Miller, Treat, Trenton. 
Blxley, Edgar, Boston Belles. B. R. 
Blanchard Bros., Trent, Trenton. 
Blanchard. Elenor, Mrs. Leslie Carter Co. 
Block, John J., Harry Bryant'a, B. R. 

ttiue Cadet*, ol Hanover, iioaiuu. ' . " """ 

Blush, T. E., 3241 Haywood, Denver. 

Blanchet Broa. A Randolph, Hanlon Superba Co. 

Bobker, Henry. 63 Forsyth, N. Y. 

Bobannan A Corey, Century Girla, B. R. 

Bolses. Five. 44 Curtis. Grand Rapids. 

Borrella, Arthur, Star, Washington, Pa. 

Bottamley Troupe. Clrco Bell, Mexico. 

Bouldon A Qulnn. Orpheus Hall. Halifax. N. S. 

Bowers, Walters A Crooker, Bennett's, Montreal. 

Bowery Comedy Quartet, 821 Charles, W. Ha» 

boken. 
Bowen Bros.. Grand, Victoria, B. C. 
Bowman Bros., 326 W. 43, N. Y. 
Boyce. Lillian. Jolly Girls, B. R. 
Boyce, Jack, Trocaderos, B. R. 
Boyd A Veola. 119 B. 14. New York. 
Bragg, John 1)., Toreadors, B. R. 
Bradua A Derrick, G. O. H., Syracuse. 
Bradys, The, 721 Copeland, Pittsburg. 
Brady A Mahoney, Irwin's Big Show, B. B. 
Brlnn, L. B., 23 Hay market. London, Eng. 
Breunan A Downing, Falrbope, Ala. 
Brennen A Rlggs. Century Girls, B. R. 
Brantford, Tom. Park Hotel, Port Chester, N. X. 
Broadway Quartette, 1553 Bway., N. Y. 
Broadway Trio, Wine, Woman A Song, B. R. 
Brobt Trio, Lyric. E. Liverpool. O. 
Brown Bros. & Kealey, Family. Butte. 
Browning, Flora, S. A C, San Francisco. 
Brooks A Vedder. 210 E. 17. N. Y. 
Brooks & Jeanette, Grand, Fargo, N. D. 
Brooks A Clark, 2464 Patton. Philadelphia. 
Brooks, Jeanne, Parisian Widows, B. R. 
Brown A Bartoletti. City Sports, B. R. 
Brown A Wilmot, 71 Glen, Maiden. 
Brown A Wright, 344 W. 45. N. Y. 
Browning, Mr. A Mrs., 126 W. 83. N. Y. 
Browning A Le Van, 895 Cauldwell, N. Y. 
Bruce, AL, Toreadors, B. R. 
Bruces, The, 1525 State, Chicago. 
Bryant, May, Boston Belles. B. R. 
Bryant A Savllle. Bijou. Jackson, Mich. 
Burke, Minnie, Boston Belles, B. R. 
Burton A Brooks, Fair Haven, N. J. 



BUCRNER 

SENSATIONAL CYCLIST. 

Touring Europe. 
Address Central Hotel, Berlin, Germany. 
Associated with AL. SUTHERLAND. Vaude- 
ville Booking, St. James Building. 



Buckley, Wm. C. Union St., Knoxvllle. 
Buckleys, Musical, 297 Ave. B. N. Y. 
Buckeye Trio, 646 E. Center, Marion, 0. 
Burdette. Madeline. 212 W. 44, N. Y. 
Buckeye State Four, 2364 E. 57, Cleveland. 
Burgees, Harvey J., 637 Trenton. Pittsburg. 
Burke, John A Mae. Empire. Pittsfield, Mass. 
Burke A Urllne, 119 E. 14, N. Y. 
Burke, Wm. H., 84 Barston. Providence. 
Burnham A White. Gaiety. Galesburg, HI. 
Burns, Morris, A Co., 54 Hermen, Jersey City. 
Burtinos. The. 1370 Richards, Milwaukee. 
Burton A Burton, 309 W. 55, N. Y. 
Burton, Matt, 1185 Valencia, San Francisco. 
Burton A Shea. Ill 7th Ave., N. Y. 
Burton A Vass, 25 Haskln, Providence. 
Burrows Travers Co.. 116 B. 25th, N. Y. 
Busch Family, Excelsior Springs, Mo., lndef. 
Bush A Elliott. Acme, Sacramento. 
Bussler, Walter H., Orphla, Madison, Wis., lndef. 
Bulla A Raymond, Wash. Society Girls, B. It. 
Butler A Lamar, 2319 S. Bouvler. Phila. 
Butley A Lamar, 2319 8. Bouvler, Philadelphia. 
Buxton. Chas. C, Crystal, Mcnasba, Wis., lndef . 
Byers A nerman, Poll's, Springfield. 
Byron A Langdon. Keeney's. Broklyn. 
Byrona* Musical Five, 5138 Indiana, Chicago. 



Carbrey Bros., 1347 E. Oxford, Phils. 
Carberry A Stanton, Maine, Peoria, 111. 
Carrillo, Leo, Nyack, N. Y. 
Carr, Jessie. Toreadors, B. R. 
Carlln A Otto, Orpheum, Denver. 
Carol Sisters. Lyric. Little Rock. 
Carroll A Cooke, Hotel York, N. Y. 
Carroll, Joe, 231 Liberty, Peterson. 
Carroll, Great, Fay Foster, B. K. 
Casad A De Verne, 812 Valley. Dayton. 
Carson A Wlllard, 2210 No. Lambert, Pblla. 
Carson Bros., 168 Bergen, Brooklyn. 
Carter, Taylor A Co., 444 W. 137. N. Y. 
Carter A Taylor, 250 W. 43, N. Y. 
Carter A Waters, 158 Greenfield, Buffalo. 
Cartwell A Harris, 1031 McDonougb. Baltimore. 
Carver A Murray. 229 W. 38, N. Y. 
Carvar A Pollard, 1022 W . 6th. Davenport, la. 
Casper, Will A Mabel, Pastor's, N. Y. 
Crswell, Maude, Gibbons Tour. 
Castauos, The. 104 W. 61, N. Y. 
Chadwick Trio, 229 W. 38, N. Y. 
Cbauieroys, The, 60 Manhattan ave.. N. Y. 
Chandler, Anna, City Sports. B. R. 
Cbantrell A Shuyler, 219 Prospect, Brooklyn. 
Chapln, Benjamin, Lotos Club, N. Y. 
Chester A Jones, Orpheum, Alleutown. 
Christy. Great, Knickerbockers. B. It. 
Christy. Wayne G., 776 8th ave., N. Y. 
Church City Four, Strollers, B. R. 
Clalrmout. 2051 Ryder Ave., N. Y. 
Clarence Sisters, Keith's, Troy. 
Clark A Duncan, Temple, Ft. Wayne. 
Clark, Edward. 1553 Broadway. N. Y. 
Clark, Geo. G., Star, Unlontown, Pa. 
Clark, John F.. 425 Forest, Arlington, N. J. 
Clark, Mul, Bowery, B. R. 

ciark. .&. Tt9*l*^**mt^Jjkmtimtr*j 

Clarke, Harry Corson, Lambs Club. N. Y. 

Clarke. Wilfred, Lambs Club. N. Y. 

Claudius A Scarlet, 60 Chapln. Canandalgua. M. Y. 

Claus, Martha. Orpheum, Urbaua. O. 

Claaa A Badcllff. Trocadero, B. B. 

Clermento. Frank A Etta. 129 W. 27. New York. 

Cleveland, Claude A Marlon, 215 Shurtleff, Chel- 
sea, Mass. 

Clipper Sisters. 466 Blewett, Seattle. 

Clito A Sylvester, 214 No. 8. Philadelphia. 

Clivette. 274 Indiana. Chicago. 

Coate, Charlotte A Sunflower, 1553 Broadway. 

Coccia A Amato, travel; 20, Pantage's, Portland. 

Cogan A Bancroft, 1553 Bway.. N. Y. 

Cohen, Louis W., W. New Brighton, N. Y. 

Colleens, Singing. 104 W. 38, N. Y. 

Collins. Eddie, Oshkosb, Wis., lndef. 

Collins, Nina, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Celllns, James J., Jolly Girls. B. R. 

Collins A Brown, 148 Kosciusko, Brooklyn. 

Cottons, The. Champagne Girls, B. R. 

Connolly A Klein. Empire Show, B. R. 

Comrades, Four. 834 Trinity, N. Y. 

Contlno A Lawrence. 249 So. May, Chicago. 

Cohen. Will II.. Rolllckers, B. R. 

Comerford, Vaughn. Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Conn, Downey A Wlllard, Olympic, Chicago. 

Connelly, Pete, Weast's, B. R. 

Conway, Nick, Empire, Denver. 

Cook, Billy, Toreadors, B. R. 

Cook, Frank, Austin A Stone's, Boston, lndef. 

Cook, Joe, 1439 Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Cooke A Rothert, Majestic, Chicago. 

Cooper A Robinson. Poll's, Hartford. 

Cooper, Harry, High Jinks, B. R. 

Cooper. Harry L.. Fay Foster, B. R. 

Cossar, Mr. and Mrs., 203 W. 121, N. Y. 

Cotton. Lola, Cook's. Rochester. 

Cottons, The. Champagne Girls, Tl. R. 

Couthoui. Jessie, 6532 Harvard Ave., Chicago. 

Courtlelgh. Wm.. Poll's. Springfield. 

"Covington, Marse." Orpheum, Los Angeles. 

Coyne A Tinlin. 1036 Washington. Chicago. 

Craig, RIchy. 335 Third Avenue, New York. 

Crawford A Manning. 258 W. 43, N. Y. 

Crickets, Keith's, Columbus. O. 

Criterion Male Quartette. 156 5tb Ave., N. Y. 

Cronln, Morris, 21 Alfred pi.. London, Eng. 

Cross. Will H.. A Co., Wesson's. Joplln. Mo. 

Crystal, Herman, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

Cummlngs A Merley, Unique, Los Angeles, lndef. 

Cummlngs, Thornton A Co., Majestic, Denver. 

Cunningham, Al., 200 W. 44, N. Y. 

Cunningham, Bob and Daisy, Orpheum, Urbana, 
O. 

Cunningham A Smith, 183 E. 94, N. Y. 

Curtln A Blossom, 01 Newell, Greenpolnt. Bklyn. 

Curtis, Palmer A Co., 2096 Nostrand. Brooklyn. 

Cushman A Le Claire, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Cuttys. Musical. 3034 E. Baltimore, Baltimore. 

Cyril, Herbert, Keith's, Boston. 



I)acre, Louie, Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Dagneau A Bruce, Orientals, B. R. 

Dagwell, Aurie, Hathaway's, New Bedford. 

Daley, James, Parisian Wldowa, B. R. 

D'Alvlnl, Rocky Point. R. I., lndef. 

Dale, Wm.. Crystal, Elkhart. Ind., lndef. 

i)aiy A Devere. 115 E. 115, N. Y. 

Dale. Dotty Dainty, 252 W. 30th. N. Y. 

Dale, Sydney, Guy Bros.' Minstrels. 

Dale, Will, Bucklen Hotel, Elkhart. 

Dalley Bros., 1379 No. Main, Fall River, Masa. 

Darling. Fay. Lady Birds. B. R. 

Darmody, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 

Davenport, Edna, Yankee Doodle Girls. B. B. 

Davis, Edwards, Orpheum, Harrlsburg, Pa. 

Davis, Floyd, Temple, Boulder, Col., lndef. 

Davis, Hal, A Co., Grayling, Mich. 

Davis, II . Air-Dome, Murpbysboro, 111., lndef. 

Davis, Roland, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Davis A Davis. Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 

Dawson A Whitfield, 346 E. 58, N. Y. 

Deaves, Harry, A Co.. Bergen Beacb, Brooklyn. 

De Canio, Chas. A Dog, 8 Union Sq., New York. 

Deery A Francis, 328 W. 30th, N. Y. 

Delavoye A Fritz, Bijou, Lansing, Mich. 

Dell A Miller, Hippodrome, Buffalo, lndef. 

Dell A Fonda, 207 E. 14, N. Y. 

Deltons, Three.. Joljy Grass Wldowa, B. R. 

Delmore, Misses, Proctor's, Elizabeth. 

De Chautal Sisters, Auditorium, Pittsburg. 

De Graff Sisters. Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

De Lisle, Mae, Colonial Belles. B. R. 

Delapbone. 54 Willoughby, Brooklyn. 

De Coe. Harry, travel; 20, Orpheum, Omaha. 

De Haven A Sidney, Poll's, Bridgeport. 

.Dj-jm<jpt<> A-.. HeIU_Er?glewood. N. J« 

De Mont. Robert. Trio, Majestic, Ft. Worth. 

De Veau, Hubert, Majestic, Birmingham. 

DeMora A Graceta, Imperial, B. R. 

De Mutbs, The. 26 Central. Albany. 

De Velde A Zelda. Lady Birds. B. R. 

De Voy A Miller. 209 E. 14, N. Y. 

De Witt. Burns A Torrance. Temple. Detroit. 

De Witt Young A Sister. Family, Butte. 

Deming, Joe, Poll's, Springfield. 

Dervln, Jas. T., 516 So. Flower, Los Angelas. 

Diamond A May, Fischer's, Los Angeles, lndef. 

Diamond, Jas., Kentucky Belles, B. R. 

Dlerick Bros.. Clrco Bell, Mexico City, to Jsn. 4. 

Dixon, Bowers A Dixon, 5626 Carpenter, Chicago. 

Doherty, Lillian, Jan. 1-31, Uauaa, Hamburg, Gar. 

Donald A Carson. Orpheum, Brooklyn. 

Doner. Joe A Nellie. High Jinks. B. R. 

Donnelly A Kotali, Coliseum, Seattle. 

Donnette, Ira, 133 W. 45. N. Y. 

Doherty. Jim. High Jinks. B. R. 

Douglae, Chss. W., Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Dove A Lee, 422 W. 48. N. Y. 

Dowlin. John. Toreadors, B. R. 

Downey, Leslie T., to Feb. 3, Electric, Racine, 

Wia. 
Doyle. Phil., Lady Birds, B. R. 
Doyle, Maj. Jas. D.. 1553 Broadway. N. Y. 
Drn wuc Frisco A Hainbo, Casino, Buenos Aires, 

S. A. 
Dreano, Josh., Revere House, Chicago. 
DuBois, The Great. Orpheum, Palnesville, O. 
Dudley, O. E., Crystal, Ind.. lndef. 
Duffy. Thoe. II., High School Girls, B. B. 
Duncdin Troupe, II. A S.. Dayton, O. 
Dunne. Thoe. P., 128 B. 19, N. Y. 
Dunham, Heslln A Barardl. Jolly Girls, B. B. 
Duncan, A. O., Arcade, Toledo. 
Dunn. James, Majestic. St. Paul. 
Dupree, Bob. Canvas. Provo. Utah, lndef. 
Dupree, George A Llbby, 251 W. 37. N. Y. 
Dupree, Jeanette. Hotel Albany, N. Y. 
Duprez, Fred, Lyric, Hot Springs. 



Fckhoff A Gordon, 240 W. 20th. N. Y. 
Edmonds A Haley. 308 R. 60, Chicago. 
Edmonds A Monle, 308 E. 60. Chicago. 
Edwards, M. A C. E., Hippodrome, Buffalo, lndef. 
Edwards, Jennie, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 
Edwards, Ralph, Parisian Widows, B. R. 
Edwards A Vaughn, Arcade. Washington, Pa. 
Edwin. George, Orpheum. Des Moines. 
Ehrendall Bros.. 1344 Lefllngwell. St. Louis, 
■lser, Carrie, Tiger Lllllea, B. R. 
Elsstlc Trio. Msjestlc. Pittsburg, lndef. 
Eldredge. 50 No. Broadway, Yonkers. N. Y. 
Blen, Gus, Edith Villa, Tburlelgh Ave., Balaam. 

London. 
Elttnsre. Julian. 1014 E. 163. N. Y. 
Blllott A West. 2902 Ellsworth. Pblla. 



USE THIS FORM IF YOU HAVE NO ROUTE CARDS 



Caesar, Frank, A Co., Electric, Waterloo, la. 
Callahan A St. George. Union Square, N. Y. 
Cameron A Flanagan, Proctor's, Albany. 
Camp. Sheppard, Kentucky Bellea, B. R. 
Campbell A Cully, 1633 Bourbon, New Orleans. 
Caldera, A. K., St. Charles Hotel, Chicago. 
Calvin. James, 445 W. 64, Chicago. 
Caprice. Mile., Cook's, Rochester. 
Campbell, W. S., Rose Sydell, B. R. 



Name 








P^rmanrnt Addrr** 


Temporary 


i« 












Week 


Theatre 


City 


State 






































\ 


♦ 



CARDS WILL BE MAILED UPON REQUEST 






VARIETY 



19 



MESSRS. 
E. F. ALBEE and MARTIN BECK 
present MR. JULIUS STEGER, «s- 
slsted by Howard Kyle, Helen Mur 
Wilcox and John Romano (Harpist), 
In bis own muslcal-drainatic playlet 
adapted from tbe German, entitled: 

THE FIFTH COMMANDMENT. 
(Honor Tby Fatber and Thy Mother.) 



Colonial Theatre, week of Jan. 13 

Orpheum, Brooklyn, " •• '« 1*0 

Ham'stein's Victoria, " M •* 27 



Mr. Steger's song, "Castles In the 
Air," composed for him by Paul 
Llncke and published by Jos. W. 
Stern & Co., N. Y. 



Bller, Goldle, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Ellinore Sisters, Shea's, Toronto. 

Elliott, Belalr & Elliott, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 

Ellsworth, 4. Tiger Lilies. B. B. 

Baaery, Maude, 2110 E. Federal, Baltimore. 

Emerald Trio, 443 Central Ave., Brooklyn. 

Emerald, Monnle, 41 Holland rd., Brixton, S. W., 

London, Eng. 
Kmerson St Wright, Kanaas City, Mo., lndef. 
Emniett, Oracle, Kernan's, Baltimore. 
Emperors of Music, Four, 431 W. 24, N. T. 
Empire Comedy Four, Jan. 1-31, Bounacbera, 

Vienna. 
Engleton, Nan & Co., Grand, Madison, Wis. 
Erb * Stanley. Mollue. Hi. 

Ergottl A King, Circus Clnlselll, Warsaw, Russia. 
Esmeralda, 8 Union Sy., N. V. 
Kspe, Dutton & E«pe, Proctor's, Albany. 
Esttrbrooks, Tbe, Miss, N. Y.. Jr., B. R. 
Eatelle & Wills, Jolly Grass Widows. B. B. 
Eugene A Mar, 1740 W. 103, Cblcago. 
Evans St Lloyd, 208 Am. Bauk Bldg., Seattle. 
ETans Trio, 24 BulQncb, Boston. 
Evans, Billy, Colonial Belles. B. It. 
P.vers, Geo. \\\, Family. Slianiokiu, Pa. 
■vsrett, Rutb, Ideals, B. It 
■rerett, Sopbie, St Co., Soutb and Henry, Jamaica, 

L. I. 



Falrcbllds. Mr. & Mrs. Frank. G. O. H., Pitts- 
burg. 

Fslke A Coe, Jolly Grass Widows, B. B. 

Falke, Elinor, Columbia. Cincinnati. 

FantaB. Two. 211 E. 14. N. Y. 

Farb. Dare, 615 W. 6. Cincinnati. 

Farrell, CbHrlle, 332 Main, W. Everett, Mass. 

Farrell, Billy, Moss St Stoil, Eng. 

Favar's, Marguerite, Saratoga Hotel, Cblcago. 

Fay, Ray F., Alamo, Cedar Rapids, la., lndef. 

Fay. Coley & Fay, 1508 Bway, N. Y. 

Faye, Elsie, Trent. Trenton. 

Felix A Barry. Albambra, N. Y. 

Fentelle & Carr, K. & P. 58, N. Y. 

Ferguson, Dare, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. B. 

Ferguson & Du Free, 313 E. 71, N. Y. 

Ferguson, Barney A DUk. 08 W. 53, Bayonne. 

Fern St Mack, Paterson, N. J. 

Fiddler A Sbelton. 2713 Dearborn, Cblcago. 

Field Boys, 148 E. 97, N. Y. 

Fields & Hanson, Lyric, Danville. 111. 

Fields St Wooley, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

Fllson A Errol, 122 So. Austin, Austin Station, 
Cblcago. 

Fink, Henry, 150 Fotomac, Cblcago. 

Fisher, Mr. St Mrs. Perkins, 531 Washington, 
Brookllne, Mass. 

Pinlay & Burke, Box 4103, Onset. Mass. 

Fisher, Bobert, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Fisher A Berg, Bents-Santley, B. B. 

Fltagerald St Qulnn, Trans-Atlantlcs, B. B. 

Flatow St Dunn, 205 E. 14. N. Y. 

Fleming, May Agnes, White'a Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Flemen St Miller. Kentucky Belles, B. B. 

Flora. Mildred. Night Owls. B. B. 

Fletcher, Charles Leonard, K. & P. 5th Ave., 
N. Y. 

Flower, Dick J., Orpheum, Denver. 

Flynn, Jas. A., 1213 Penn. Ave., Washington. 

Fogerty, Frank, Empire, Holtoken. 

Follett, Lonnle, Altmeyer. McKeesport, Pa. 

"Fords, Famous," 391 Gates, Brooklyn. 

Foreman, Edgar, A Co.. Elks' Club, N. T. 

Forrest, Edythe, Innocent Maids, B. R. 

Foster A Dog, Keith's, Newark. 

Fox, Will H.. Palace. Hull. Eng. 

Fax. Mort, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

Fox A Hughes, Empire, Boise, Idaho, lndef. 

Fox, Will, Lady Birds. B. R. 

Francis, Adeline, travel; 20. BIJou, Dubuque, la. 

Frank. George. Lady Birds. B. R. 

Franklin A Green, H. A S., Toledo. O. 

Frans, Cogswell A Frani. 240 W. 21, N. T. 

Francis, Harry, Jolly Girls, B. R. 

Frederic Bros. & Burns, Phoenicia, N. Y. 

Freligh, LlzKle. Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

Frevoll, Frederick, O. O. H.. Warren, O. 

Frey A Allen, Ideals, B. R. 

Fredo A Dare, 207 E. 14, N. Y. 

Frederick, Snyder A Poole. 200 N. Gay, Baltimore. 

French, Henri, Sherman House, Chicago. 

Frey Trio. Chicago Post. Chicago. 

Frosto, Chris, 917 W. 6. Faribault. Minn. 

Fullerton A Derry, Scenic, No. Tonawanda, N. Y. 
• Futurity Winner, Cook'a, Rochester. 



Galando, 82 Sumner, Brooklyn. 

Gaietti's Moukeys, Keith's, Pbila. 

Gallagher St Barrett, Orpheum, San Francisco. 

Galloway, Albert E., Orpheum, Turtle Creek, Pa. 

Garden A Somers, Toreadors, B. R. 

Gardiner Children, 1958 No. 8. Philadelphia. 

Gardner, Eddie, Orpheum, Chilllcothe, O. 

Gurdiuer St Vincent, Empire, Sheffield, Eng. 

Gardiner, Jack, Gotham, Brooklyn. 

Gardner, Andy, Bohemians, B. it. 

Gardner, Arline, 1958 N. 8, Pbila. 

Gartelle Bros., 410 S. Maiu, Gloversvllle, N. Y. 

Gatb. Karl St Erma, 44 Cass, Chicago. 

Gavin. Piatt A Peaches, 4417 3d Ave., N. Y. 

Gaylor St Graff, 244 W. 16, N. Y. 

Gaylor, Bobby, 5108 Princeton, Chicago. 

Gehrue, Mayme, A Co., Orpheum, Boston. 

Gelger & Walters, Orpheum. Oakland. 

Genaro Theol Trio, Jan. 1-31, Appolo, Chemnitz, 
Ger. 

Gennero's Band, Poll's, New Haven. 

Gertrella, Proctor's, Elizabeth. 

Gibson, Fay, Standard, Davenport, la., lndef. 

Gillespie, Ed., Orpheum, Denver. 

Gilbert, Jane. Buffalo. N. Y. 

Gillette Sisters, Grand Family, Fargo, N. D. 

Gllmore, Stella, Jolly Girls. B. R. 

Gilroy, Hayes A Montgomery, Washington, Spo- 
kane. 

Gladstone, Ida, 335 W. 60, N. Y. 

G locker, Cbaa. A Anna, Rentx-Santley, B. B. 

Godfrey St Ueuderson, 208 W. 34. N. Y. 

Goeta, Nat., 1818 Tree. Donora, Pa. 

Golden A Hughes, Bijou. Duluth. 

Goldsmith & Hopoe. Bennett's, Ottawa. 
-CKforta-*" IKiiL, •MfgCfctfei ■LtHiw.- «—- 

Gordon A Cbalor, 144 W. 20, N. Y. 

Gordon A Marx. 236 W. 38, N. Y. 

Gordon, Amy, Bose Sydell, B. B. 

Gordon, Cliff, 3 E. 106. N. Y. 

Gordon, Max, Beeves' Beauty Show, B. B. 

Gorman St West, 52 E. 88, N. Y. 

Goss, John, Star, Manning ton, W. Va. 

Gossans, Bobby, 400 So. Smith, Col., O. 

Gotham Comedy Quartet, City Sports, B. B. 

Graces, Two. Miner's Americans, B. B. 

Grant, Anna, Pat White'a Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Grant, Sydney, 10 W. 63, N. Y. 

Graham, Geo. W., Scenic, Providence, lndef. 

Gray & Graham. 34 Bullett, Roanoke. Va. 

Green, Sam, White's Gaiety Girls, B. It. 

Gregg, Frank, Tiger Lilies, B. B. 

Gregory, Geo. L., A Co., 943 Lorimer, Brooklyn. 

Gregorys. Five, Llebichs. Breslau, Ger. 
Grimes, Tom St Gertie, 1615 No. Front, Phlla. 
Gruet, Jack, Al. Marie Ideals, B. B. 



• 



Hall, Alfred, Bolllckers, B. B. 
Hall, Geo. F., 180 Center, Boston. 
Haley, Harry It.. 236 Ogden, Chicago, 
llalperiu, Nan, Orpheum, Shelby, O. 
Hammond & Forrester, 101 W. 83, N. Y. 
Haney, Edith. St Lee, Jr., 4118 Winona, Denver. 
Hanson A Nelson, 592 10th St., Brooklyn. 
Hanson St Drew, Bijou, Bay City. 
Harris St Randall, Palace Hotel, Chicago. 
Harcourt, Frank, 44 Pleasant, Worcester. 
Hart, Fred, 393 8th Ave., N. Y. 
Hart, J. C, A Co., Tiger Lilies, B. B. 
Hayes St Carew, Bohemians, B. B. 
Hart, Sadie, 1163 Jackson, N. Y. 
Hart, Willie & Edith. 1018 S. 11, Philadelphia. 
Harlaud A Bolllson. 224 W. 14, Kansas City. 
Ilarlowe. Beatrice, High Jinks, B. R. 
Harris, Sam, Vaudeville, Youngstown, O. 
Harrity & Herr, 123 Church. Lancaster, Pa. 
H arson. Julee, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. B. 
Harrington, Hilda, Rose Sydell, B. B. 
Harris, Bobby, Toreadors, B. B. 
Harris, Charley, Harry Bryant's. B. B. 
HarriBon. Minnie. Brigadier. B. R. 
Harvey A. Adams, Tallahasee, Fla. 
.Harvey A De Vora, Rialto Bounders, B. B. 
Harvey. Elsie. 138 E. 14. N. Y. 
Harvey, Harry, 3110 Cottage Grove Are., Chicago. 
Haskell, Loney, Orpheum. Sioux City, la. 
Hawtrey, Win., & Co., Orpheum, St. Paul. 
Hayes St Haley. 147 W. 127, N. Y. 
Hayes, Edmund, Jolly Girls, B. B. 
Haynes, Beatrice, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. R. 
Hayes & Wynn, 539 Bergen. Newark. 
Healy A Vance, 215 W. 106. N. Y. 
II •■am. Tom. Pantomime, Liverpool, Eng. 
Heath, Thomas G.. 8504 Penn., Pittsburg. 
Heclow. Charles & Marie. 452 N. High, Chilll- 
cothe. O. 
Helm Children, Lyric. Mobile. 
Hallbacks, The. 2010 Armour. Chicago. 
Hellman. BenJ., Toreadors, B. It. 
Heath A Emerson, 2<K) Berrlman. Brooklyn. 
Henly A Elliott. 4925 Cypress, Pittsburg. 
Heuman Trio. 155 So. Cbanning. Elgin. III. 
Henry A Francis, Jolly Grass Widows, B. B. 
Henry A Young, Keith's. Phlla. 
Herbert, Mabel, 404 Main, Worborn, Mo. 
Herrmann, Adelaide, Gllsey House, N. Y. 
Herron. Bertie, Burtis O. H.. Auburn, N. Y. 
Hertzman, Julia, Imperials, B. R. 
Hess Sisters, 258 W. 55, N. Y. 
Heuman Trio, People's, Cincinnati. 
Hewlettes, Tbe, Fritz. Portland. Ore., lndef. 
Hlbbert St Warren. Orpheum, Allentown, Pa. 
Hickman Bros. A Co., National, Steubenvllle, O. 
Hickman, George, Grass Widows, B. R. 
Hleetand, Cbas. F.. 2639 Iowa Ave., St. Louis. 
Hill, Cherry A Hill. Gay Morning Glorlee, B. B. 
Hill. Edmons Trio, 202 Neilson, New Brunswick. 
Hilllard, Bobert, Union Bq„ N. Y. 
Hlltons. Marvelous, Fay Foster. B. R. 
Hlllyers, Three. Grand. Reynoldsvllle, Pa. 
Hlnes A Remington, Harrison, N. Y. 
Illrsh. Estelle, G. <>. H.. Grand Rapids. 
Hobelman, Martha, Harry Bryant's, B. It. 
Hoch, Emit, St Co., Auditorium, Lynn, Mass. 
Holdsworths. The. Majestic, Dallas. 
llolman Bros.. Clrco Bell. Mexico City. Mex. 
Holmao, Al A Mamie, Olympic, Kleff, Russia. 
Holmes, Gertrude Bennett, 13 Central, Greendale, 

Mass. 
Holman, Harry, Majestic, Ft. Worth. 
Holt. Air.. MoM-Stoll Tour. England, lndef. 
Horton A La Trlska, Grand, Bellingham, Wash. 



Houston, Fritz, 292 King, London, Oat., Can. 

Howard Bros., 229 W. 38. N. Y. 

Howard A Cameron. 479 No. Clinton, Bocbeater. 

Howard A Esber, Garrick, Burlington, la. 

llowan A Kearney, Orientals. B. R. 

Howard A Howard, Cook's, Rochester. 

Howard A St. Clair, Charing Cross rd., London. 

Howard. Ed, 50 Madison. N. Y. 

Howard, Harry & Mue, 155 So. Ualsted, Chicago. 

Howard, Jos. B., Aleda, 111., ladef. 

Howard, May, 3603 Prairie Ave., Cblcago. 

Howard's Ponies St Dogs, Bloomington, Ind. 

Hoyden & Hogdn, Crystal. Logaus|>ort, Ind. 

lloyle, William, 16 5, Attleboro, Mass. 

lloyt, Frances, A Co., Sherman House, Chicago. 

lluehn, Musical, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Iluegel Bros., 2417 French. Erie. I'a. 

Hughes, Florence, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 

Huested, Sadie. Yankee Doodle Girls, B. R. 

Hurleys. The, 185% So. Orange, Newark. 

Hyde, Wall. M., St Co., 3.~>06 0. Pittsburg. 

Hyde. Mr. A Mrs. Robert, Camp Best, Chemo 

Lake, Clifton, Me., lndef. 
Hyiner A Kent, Hathaway's, Lowell. 



Imbof A Corlnne, Empire, B. R. 

Imperial Musical Four. 148 Dearborn, Chicago. 

Inman, Tbe Great, 312 W. 24, N. Y. 

Irwin, Jack, Tiger Lilies, B. B. 

Italia, 356 Mass. Ave., Boston. 



Jack Lew A Bro., 9249 So. Cblcago, So. Chicago. 

Jackson Family, Moss A Stoll Tour. 

Jackson, "Harry St '"KateTTv. St P. 23d St., N. Y. 

Jacobs St West, Sam Devere, B. B. 

James, Byron, Bijou, Flint, Mich., lndef. 

Jenkins St Clark. Box 205, Appleton, Wis. 

Jennings A Jewell, Knickerbockers, B. B. 

Jennings St Renfrew, 338 Spruce, Chelsea, Mass. 

Jennings, William, White's Gaiety Girls. B. B. 

Jerome. Nat. S., 1287 Washington, N. Y. 

Jess. John W.. Lid Lifters, B. R. 

Johnson. Chester, 333 3d Ave.. N. Y. 

Johnson, Mark, BIJou, Bay City, .Mich. 

Johnson Bros. A Johnson. 515 Brushton, Pittsburg. 

Johnson, Geo., Scribner's Big Show, B. B. 

Johnson, Jess P., 622 So. 4, Camden, N. J. 

Johnsons, Musical, Albambra, London, Eng. 

Jobnston & Buckley. Empire, B. R. 

Jones & Ramondo, Royal. Vlncennes, Ind. 

Jones St Sutton. 102 W. 17, N. Y. 

Jones & Walton, Star, Hannibal, Mo. 

Jorden, Tom, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Joyces, Tbe, Austin A Stone's, Boston. 



Kallnowskl Bros., Trans-Atlantlcs, B. B. 

Kalmo, Cbas. A Ada, May wood, N. J. 

Keegan & Mack, Scenic Temple. B. Boston. 

Kelfe. Zena. 508 W. 135, N. Y. 

Keeley Bros., Orpheum, Reading. 

Keene, Juggling, 1360 Boston Bd., N. Y. 

Kelly, Sam A Ida, Bijou, La Crosse, Wis. 

Kelly, John T., Elmburst, L. I. 

Kelly & Bose, 40 W. 28. N. Y. 

Kelly, M. J., 46 Johnson, Brooklyn. 

Kelly, Walter C, Bennett's, Montreal. 

Kelly & Massey, Family. Plttstoa, Pa. 

Kelso & Lelghton, Pastor's, N. Y. 

Kemp's Tales of tbe Wild. Keith's, Boston. 

Kennedy Bros. St Mac, 32 Second, Dover, N. H. 

Kennedy & Wilkens, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Keno & D'ArvIlle. Orpheum, Los Angeles. 

Keno, Walsh & Melrose, K. & P. Mb Ave., N. Y. 

Kenton, Dorothy, Majestic. Chicago. 

Keogh & Francis. Majestic, Little .Rock. 

Kberns, Arthur II., 5 Wisconsin, Chicago. 

Klein. Ott Bros. St Nicholson, 10 W. 36, Bayonne. 

Kingsbury, Tbe. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

King, Sam. & Nellie. 2374 Pitkin, Brooklyn. 

Kluh-Ners. 343 N. Clark, Chicago. 

Klnsons. The, 21 E. 20, N. Y. 

Klrschhorns. 207 So. 13, Omaha. 

Knight * Seaton. 1806 Morgan. Springfield, 0. 

Knight Bros. St Sawtelle, 1710 Cornelia. Chicago. 

Knowles, Harry, 1533 Broadway, N. Y. 



HYDE & BEHNAN'S 

Amusement Enterprises 



Brooklyn 

44 



44 



44 



44 



44 



44 



Bijou Theatre, 

Folly " 

Hyde & Behman's 

Olympic Theatre 

Star 

Qayety 

Newark •• Newark, N. J. 

Qayety " Pittsburg 

^ & Garter Theatre, Chicago 

We TJse High-Claw, Extra, and Special Fea- 
tures at All Times. Address All Communica- 
tion! to the 

HYDE & BHIMAN AMUSf MINT (0.. 

TEMPLE BAB BUILDING, 
BROOKLYN, M. T. 



Knox, W. II., Elyslan Groye, Tucson, Aria. 

Kooper, Harry J., High Jinks, B. B. 

Koklu, Mignonette, Keith's, I'blla. 

Kokln, Prince, 400 Concord, Chester, Pa. 

Kolfage, Duke, Crystal, Elwood, Ind., lndef. 

Koppe, 215 E. 80, N. Y. 

Kratons, Tbe, Bennett's, Hamilton. 

Kretore, 110 Wash, Altoona. 

Kuhns, Three White, Wigwam, San Francisco. 

Kurtls-Busse, 6 W. 8, Erie, Pa. 

Kyle, Iugram, Allegheny, Pa. 



Ln Centra St La Hue. 532 E. 18. N. Y. 
Le Clair A Weat, BIJou, Wheeling. 
La Dells. Four, Howard, Huntington, W. Va. 
Ladell & Crouch, Orpheum, Minneapolis. 
In Fleur, Joe, Orpheum, Memphis. 
La Nole Bros., 212 I. 14, N. Y. 
La Toska. Phil. G. O. II., Grand Baplds. 
Lakola, Harry, Box 70, Fernando, Cal. 
Laml>ert & Williams. Novelty, Brooklyn. 
Lamb A King. 333 State, Chicago. 
Lamh'a Manikins, 403 Pippin. Portland. Ore. 
Lurkins & Burns. Luna I'k., Mexico City. Mex. 
Latona, Frank & Jen., Empire, Holloway, Lou- 
don. 

Lawler A Daughters. 100 W. 105. N. Y. 

La Maze Bros., Poll's, Bridgeport. 

La Mont's Cockatoos, 254 E. Ontario, Chicago. 

Laredo A Blake, 325 E. 14. N. Y. 

La Marche. Frankle. 430 E. 26, Chicago. 

La Toy Bros., Parisian Widows, B. B. 

La Van A La Valet te, Majestic. Pittsburg, Indtf. 

Larrlvee St Lee, Unique, Carthage, Mo. 

La Veen St Cross, Keith's, Providence. 

La Velle St Grant. 226 B. 14. N. Y. 

Lavette A Doyle. 840 N. 2. Hamilton, O. 

La Vino Cimaron Trio, Union Sq., N. Y. 

I.avlne & Leonard. Empire, Ixmdon. Eng.. lndef. 

Lavlne A Hurd, New Century Maids, B. B. 

Langdons. The, 704 5th Ave., Milwaukee. 

Uauder, Harry, Court. Liverpool. Eng. 

Lawrence, Pete, Al Beeves' Big Show, B. B. 

Lh Gray, Dollie, BIJou, Baclne, Wis., lndef. 

Lawrence. Port, 3 Laurel, Boxbury, Mass. 



Leonard 



AND 



Ward 



BOOKED SOLID. 



In an original act ln one, "THE HEBREW FATHER AND SON." 

Also do a novelty in Italian. 

JOE M. WOOD, Agent. 





RESTAURANT 
CHICAGO 



Mr. Abe Frank, for the past five year* sole 
Manager of the Sherman House and College Inn, 
Chicago, which connection he haa severed, 
announce* his association with Rector's. Clark 
and Monroe Streets. Chicago, as part owner 
and Managing Director. 

Mr. Frank extends to his friends and acquaint- 
ances among the profession a cordial welcome 
to Rector's, assuring them of a continuation of his 
personal solicitude for their comfort and entertainment. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



HART TRIO 

INSTRUMENTALISTS AND VOCALISTS 



Exclusive Management 

MR. ALF. T. WILTON 



Suite 920, St. James Building 
NEW YORK CITY 



The only juggler that went from Pes tor' ■ across the street to the Dewey. 





CHAMPAGNE GIRLS CO. 



JAN. IS, BON TON, JERSEY CITY. 




m HALL i COLBORN a 

"The SWEDE and the HAP PY GIRL" 

Biff success on Western State* Vaudeville Asa' a. Booked solid until 0ltt~ 
IMPERSONATIONS, MIMICRY AND TRICK PIANO PLAYING. 

FIDDLER and SHELTON 

DOING THINGS WHICH COME TO SOME, BUT ALL "NEVER." 
En route, booked by Western Vaudeville Association. Per. Add., 2701 Dearborn St., Chicago, m. 

Going some at the Haymarket, Chicago, this week. 



THE DANCING WONDERS 



BROWN I WRIGHT 



Par. Address. 844 W. 48th St.. V. T. 0. 



Management JACK LEVY. 



HARRY TATE'S G. 

FISHING ^MOTORING 



JN#3\a/ York 



Australia 
Africa 



EIGHTEEN MINUTES OP COMEDY. 



HARRY L. WEBB 



THE MAN WHO TALKS AND SINGS. XSXP YOUR EYE ON THE LAUGH PRC/DUCEK. 
Scoring BIG on the Western Vaudeville Association time and a Ions; routa booked. 



Chas. I. Burkhardt 

"The Man With the Funny Slide" 




Late off Joe Weber's Co. 

Is ready to consider offers for the balance of this season 

Address all communications to L. H. FRANK, care Variety, Chicago Office, Chicago Opera House Block. 



Anna s Effie Conley 



The Dainty Little Comediennes, in BTOBY SONGS. 



Direction of JACK LEVY 




BOOKED SOLID. 



"THE AUSTRALIAN NUGGETS. 




Direction AL MAYER. 



MORGAN and McGARRY 

Introducing Refined Singing, Expert Soft and Wooden Shoe and Aorobatio Dancing. 

Exclusive Agent, ALP T. WILTON. 



WILBUR AMOS 

THE CLEVER COMEDY JUGGLER. 

My act has been highly praised by managers and press in all the cities where I have appeared. 
THE CANDY KID OF THE WEST— Now Enjoying California. 



THE DAINTY SINGER OF DAINTY SONGS. 



MISS 



LILY LENA 



UNITED BOOKING OFFICES TIME. 



OPEN TIME FOR CLUBS 

JANUARY 20th TO MARCH let 

Klein, Ott Bros. & Nicholson 

Addrsn, 16 W. 36th St.. Bayonne, N.J. 



WINSTON'S SEA LIONS 

Introducing the famous sea lion "Jockey." Featured with Barnum A Bailey show, season 1907. 

JAN. 6, ORFHEUM, BEADING, PA. 



PETER 



META 



Donald 



AND 




"The man with the lamp-post and the bonnie Scotch lassie." 
January 18th, Orpheum, Brooklyn; January 20th, Alhambra, New York. 



Correspondents Wanted Wherever There is a Variety Performance. 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



21 






FEATURING 

ROSE & SNYDER'S 

"The Police Won't Let 
Mar.uch-a Danee 
Unless She Move 
da Feet." 

THE FUNNIEST ITALIAN 
SONS OF THEM ALL 



FROM THE WEST TO THE EAST 

JIMMIE LUCAS 

FROM THE EAST TO THE WEST 

WILLIE WESTON 

RIGHT HERE IN ZIECFELD'S 
"THE SOUL KISS" 

LILLIAN SHAW 



PUBLISHED BY 



THE SONG MAKERS 

ROSE & SNYDER 



42 Weal 28lh SI. 



NEW YORK 



WRITERS OF THAT BIB 
MARCH SOMG HIT 

N'T 
WORRY" 



Bit 



If you can't drop down, drop up to 
our Selling Agents, T. B. HARMS, 
1431 Broadway, They will teach 
It to you. 



Cobb's Corner 

SATURDAY, JAN. 11, 1908. 

1 ■ ' — ■ ■ '■ " ' ' w ■ ■ ■ ™ — - i ■ ■■■■■' ' ■ — 

No. 98. A Weekly Word with WILL the 
Wordwrlght. 

(OBB WARDS' 

LATZ8T, NOW BEING SUNG BT 

MAY IRWIN 

" The Peacti TlMt Tastes the Sweetest 
tongs the nicest on tie Tree." 

WILL D. COBB 

Wordwrlght, 
1618 Broadway, NEW YORE. 



Lee Tunc Foo, 1223 2d, E. Oakland. 

Le Clair A Bowen, Arcade, Toledo, lndef. 

Le Clairs, Two, 408 W. 01, N. Y. 

Le Pelletlera, 144 E. Elizabeth, Detroit. 

Leahy, Frank W ., Manhattan, Norfolk, Va., lndef. 

Leeds, Adelaide, Parisian Wldowa, B. B. 

Le Hrun Grand Opera Trio, Orpheum, Reading. 

La Fevre A St. John, Bijou, Superior, Wis. 

Le Malre A Le Maire, 6T3 Lenox, N. Y. 

Leigh, Andrew, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Leigh, Lisle A Co., Proctor's, Troy. 

Leigbtons, Three, Olympic. Chicago. 

Leoui & Leoni, 10 E. Seventh, Cincinnati. 

Leonard, Jamea F., Yankee Doodle Otrls, B. R. 

Leonard, Jos. and Sadie, Orpheum, Kansas City. 

Leonard, Uus, Acme, Sacramento, lndef. 

Leontina. Marie, IT E. 9T, N. Y. 

Leonore A St. Claire, 4948 Baston, St. Louis. 

LeRoy A Woodford, 241T Wylle Are.. Plttaburg. 

Leslie, Bert, A Co., Orpheum, Denver. 

Lester, Will, 281 John R., Detroit. 

Levlno. Dolph A SuBle, Dominion, Winnipeg. 

Levy, Bert, Jan. 20, Maryland, Baltimore. 

Levy, Mrs. Jules, and Family, 102 W. 98, N. Y. 

Lewla A Cbapln, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Lewie A Uarr, 125 W. 16, N. Y. 

Lewis, Phil, 121 W. 110. N. Y. 

Lewis, Oscar, White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Lewla A Thompson, Merry Maidens, B. R. 

Le Witt A Ashmore, 296 No. State, Chicago. 

Llbbey A Trayer, 802 W. 4T, N. Y. 

Llna A Calljui, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Linn, Benn. Half Dime. Jersey City, N. J., lndef. 

Loder, Chas. A., Rose Lawn, Areola, Pa. 

Lois, Orpheum, Limn, O. 

Lomlson. Wllllard, 228 Montgomery, Jersey City. 

Long, John, Family, Erie, Pa., lndef. 

Louise and Dottle, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 

Lovltts, The, 314 Beverly rd., Brooklyn. 

L<>we. Musical, -0 Unique. Minneapolis. 

Lowell A Lowell, Moss A Stoll, Eng., to Nov. 23. 

Lucas, Jltnmle, Keith's, Phila. 

Luekle A Yoast, 389 Sumpter, Brooklyn. 

Luce A Luce, Star, Brooklyn. 

Lucier, Marguerite. Qutncy Adams Sawyer Co. 

Lucy A Lucier, Columbia. St. Louis. 

Lulgl Plcaro Trio, Crystal, Milwaukee. 

Lutz Bros., 213 Grant, Corona, N. Y. 

Lukena, 4, Reading, Pa. 

Lynton, Chris, Empire, Loe Angelea, lndef. 

Lyons, Jr., Champagne Girls, B. R. 



Macarte's Monkeys, Union Sq.. N. Y. 
Macarte Sisters, Proctor's, Troy. 
MacAuley, Mez, G. O. II., Indianapolis. 
Mack, Wilbur. Bennett's, Quebec. 
Macks. Two, Savoy. Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Mack A Dugal, 7509 Dretel, Chicago. 
Mack, James, Wesley, Rose Sydell, B. R. 
Madcaps, Winkler's, K. A P., 126th St., N. Y. 
MacDonaugh. Ethel. 68 W. 107, N. Y. 
Magulre, U.S., North Adams, Mass. 
"Madle," 403 W. 61. N. Y. 
Mahr, Agnes, Grand 0. H., Pittsburg. 



Makarenkoa Duo, 306 E. 5, N. Y. 

Malchow, Geo., Bijou, Oshkosb, Wis., lndef. 

Malvern Troupe, White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Manhasaet Comedy Four, Rose Sydell, B. B. 

Manley A Norrls, 617 Walnut, Hamilton, O. 

Mantells, Marionette. Bijou, Cat Falls, Mont. 

Marablni Lulgl, Ma1»stlc, Streator, 111. 

Marion A Pearl, Majestic, Houston. 

Mario Trio, Clrco Publllones, Mez., Mex. 

Marks, Clarence, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Marlon A Lillian, Tiger Llllles, B. B. 

Marlowe, Piunkett A Co., 27 Gay lord, Dorchester, 
Masa. 

Mar*b, Joe, 3122 Lucas, St. Louis. 

Martin. Dave A Percle, Majestic. EvansvJUe. Ind. 

Martlnettl A Sylvester, 2061 North Carlisle, Phila. 

Martynne, C. B., Orpheum, Leavenworth, lndef. 

Martynne, Great, Rose Sydell, B. R. 

Martin A Crouch, Coeur D'Alene, 8pokane, lndef. 

Marshall A King, Reutz Santley. B. R. 

Martini A Maximilian. Yankee Doodle Girls. B. B. 

Marty, Joe, 1623 Hancock, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Maruna, Nevaro Maruna, Keith's, Boston. 

Mason A Fllburn, Coeur D'Alene, Spokane, lndef. 

Mason A Keeler, Keith's, Cleveland. 

Maaae, Ed A Nettie, Portland, Pa. 

Matbews, Joca, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. R. 

Maxwell A Dudley, 106 W. 96th, N. Y. 

May, Arthur <).. P. O. Box 623, Norman, Okla. 

Mayer, Robert, High Jinks, B. R. 

Mayne. Elizabeth, Harry Bryant's, B. B. 

McCabe, Jack, Century Girls, B. B. 

McCabe A Peters, Ashland Hotel, Kansas City. 

McCale. Larry. Imperials, B. R. 

McCarthy, Myles, Union Hotel, Chicago. 

MeCarvers. The. 218 W. 28. N. Y. 

McCree, Junie, La Salle, Chicago, lndef. 

McCullough, Walter, Acme, Sacramento. 

McCune A Grant, 3 Banton, Pittsburg, Pa. 

McFarland, Frank. 811 W. 142, N. Y. 

McParlond A McDonald, Colonial Belles, B. B. 

McFarland A Murray, Champagne Girls, B. B. 

McGlnnls Bros., 76 Bradford. Springfield, Mass. 

McGrnth A Paige, 58 Wash. Mlddletown, Conn. 

McGregor, Lulu, Grand, Altoons, Pa., lndef. 

McLaughlin, L. Clair, Sberldanvllle, Pa. 

McLeod, Andy, Kentucky Belles, B. R. 

MeMahon's Watermelon Girls, Orpheum, Boston. 

McKlnley, Nell, Jersey Lilies, B. R. 

McWilllams, G. R., travel; 20, Majestic, Chi- 
cago. 

Meaney, Lottie, A Co.. Bijou, Duluth, Minn. 

Melville A Hlgglns, 272 So. 2d. Brooklyn. 

Melvln Bros., Kentucky Belles, B. R. 

Melroy Trio, Elite, Diivenport, la. 

Merrltt, Raymond, Empire. Los Angeles, lndef. 

MIddleton, Gladys. Fischer's, Los Angeles, lndef. 

Mlgnon. Helene. Empire. St. Paul, lndef. 

Mills, Joe, Rollickers, B. R. 

Mills, Wm., 20th Century Maids, B. R. 

Millard, Frank, Lady Birds, R. K. 

Millard Bros., Crackerjacks, B. R. 

Mlllershlp Sisters, Wstson's, B. R. 

Miller. Elisabeth. 1726 W. 31 PL, Cleveland. 

Miller, Grace, Phillips', Richmond, lnd., lndef. 

Mills A Lewis. 114 E. 11, N. Y. 

Millers. Three Musical, Majestic. Madison, Wis. 

Mills A Morris, Clarendon Hotel, N. Y. 

Mitchell A Cain, 611 Sterling PI., Brooklyn. 

Mitchell Sisters, Monarch, Lawton, Okla., lndef. 

Mitchell A Qulnn. 20 Bay 26. Bensonhurst, L. I. 

Mitchells, The. Elmira. N. Y. 

Monroe, George, 1653 Broadway, N. Y. 

Montambo A Hurl Falls, Empire, B. R. 

Montrose, Louise. 450 So. 1st Ave., Mt. Vernon. 

Montague's Cockatoos, Caracas, S. A. 

Montgomery, Geo. P., Lyric. Hot Springs, lndef 

Montgomery A Moore, Orpheum. Rending. 

Montray, 814 Western Ave., Allegheny, Pa. 

Morette Sisters, 1237 Lee. Phllsdelphls. 

Moon, Eddie. Majestic, Dallas. 

Mooney A Holbein. Palace, Bristol, Eng. 

Moore A Dillon, Fay Foster. B. R. 

Moore. Tom. Colonial, N. Y. 

Moorehead, Harry (Dreamland), Norfolk, Va. 

Morgan A Chester, Vanity Fair, B. R. 

Morgan, Lou, Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Morgan A McGarry, Novelty, Denver. 

Morre, Chas., Lady Birds, B. R. 

Morre, Helen J., Night Owls, B. R. 

Morrelle, Marie, Lyric, Beaumont, Tex. 

Morris A Kramer, Dainty Duchess, B. R. 

Morse, Billy, Anheuser's, Aberdeen, Wash., lndef. 

Morse-Ron. Touring South America. 

Morton, James J., 147 W. 45, N. Y. 

Morton. Ed., Rollickers, B. R. 

Muehlners, The. Orpheum, Portsmouth, O. 

Mullen A Correlll, Orpheum, Oakland. 

Mueller A Mueller, G. O. II., Indianapolis. 

Muller, Chum A Muller, 16, Charlotte. Asbvllle. 

Mulllnl Sisters, Washington Society Girls, B. B. 

Munger, Mort M., Frankfort, Ind. 

Murphy, Whitman A Co.. Bell. Oakland. 

Murphy A Andrews, 116 Washington pi.. If. Y. 



Murphy A Magee, Ideals, B. B. 

Murphy A Palmer, 809 8d ave., N. Y. 

Murphy A Willsrd, 60b No. 7th, Philadelphia. 

Msrphy, Geo. P.. Tiger Lilies, B. B. 

Murray, Elizabeth M., G. O. H., Indianapolis. 

Murray Sisters, 239 W. 52, N. Y. 

Murray, Wm. W., 223 E. 14, N. Y. 

Murtha, Lillian, 211 B. 10, N. Y. 

Murray A Williams, Irwin's, Goshen, Ind. 

Musketeers, Three, Jolly Grass Widows, B. B. 



Nagel A Adams, Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 

Narelle, Marie. Chrtatchurch, New Zealand, lndef. 

Natus, Julie, Tiger Lilies, R. R. 

Nawn, Tom, A Co., 420 W. 62, Phila. 

Neff. John. 136 Main. Bridgeport. 

Nellls, Nelll A Chapman. 1662 B. Main, Rochester. 

Nelson Farnum Troupe, 3141 Beverly rd., Brooklyn. 

Nelson, Katherlne, 10 Howland, Roxbury, Mass. 

Nelson A Egbert, 483 Atlantic, Pittsburg. 

Nevada A Eden, Wonderland, St. Mary's, Pa. 

Newell, Jlmmle, Union St., Knoxvllle. 

Newell Sisters, Jolly Girls, B. B. 

Newell A Nlblo, Empire, Woolwich, London. 

Newmsn, Jules, Lady Birds, B. B. 

Niemeyer A Odell, Blue Ribbon Girls, B. B. 

Nichols A Hogan, 1544 Broadway, Brooklyn. 

Nlcolai. Ida, Bohemians, B. R. 

Night On a House Boat, Trent. Trenton. 

Night With the Poets, travel; 20, Majestic 

Chicago. 
Noble. Billy, 20th Century Maids. B. R. 
Noblette A Marshall, Lyric, Lincoln, Neb. 
Nolan, Fred, Boston Belles, B. B. 
Norman's. Juggling Six, 5804 Mansfield, Chicago. 
North. Bobby, 45 W. 116th, N. Y. 
Nosaes, The, 179 W. 47th. N. Y. 
Nugent, Eddie, Trans -Atlanties. B. R. 
Nugent, J. C, The Osks, Canal Dover, f>. 



O'Brien-Havel, 616 52, Brooklyn. 

Odell A Hart, 2063 Strand, Seattle. 

Odell A Klnley. 127 W. 21, N. Y. 

Ogden, Helen, 279 Clybourne, Chicago. 

O'llanna, San. Columbus. O. 

Olivette, 225 Pacific. Brooklyn. 

Omega. Ollle. Parisian Widows, B. R. 

"Onetts," Park Hotel, Port Chester, N. Y. 

Ontbank A Blancbetto, P. O., Boston, Msas. 

O'Nell. Tommie. White's Gslety Girle, B. R. 

Orbasany's Irma, Majestic. Little Rock. 

oilfans, Three, Lyric, Streator, 111. 

Oliver, Clarence, G. O. II., Indianapolis. 

O'Regan, Box 305, Ottawa, Can. 

Orloff. Olga, Toreadors, B. R. 

O'Rouke A Marie, Merry Makers, B. R. 

Otto Bros., Keith's, 6tb Ave., N. V. 



Palmer A Dockman. Lyric, Denlson, Tex. 

Palmer A Saxton, 110 E. 14. N. Y. 

Palfrey A Hoeffler. Jan. 27. Gaiety. Phila. 

Paradise Alley, Bennett's, Hamilton. 

Parisian Grand Opera Co., 636 Lexington, N. Y. 

Parks. Dick. 1268 E. 25, Los Angeles. 

Patton, Grace. Rollickers, B. R. 

Paullnettl A Piquo, 242 Franklin, Phila. 

Pendletons, The, 135 Pittsburg. New Castle. 

Pero A Wilson, 335 Temple, Washington, O. 

Pearl, Kathryn, Rollickers. B. R. 

Pearl. Violet. Rollickers. B. R. 

Pelot, Fred A Annie, 101 Westminster, Atlantic 

City. 
Pepper Twins. Lindsay, Ont.. Can. 
Perkins, David F., A Co., 222 Eastern Promenade, 

Portland, Me. 
Perry A White, Miss N. Y.. Jr., B. R. 
Perry, Frank L., 747 Buchanan, Minneapolis. 
Perry, Clayton, Ideala, B. R. 
Petchlng Bros., Orpheum. Omuha. 
Peters, Phil A Nettle, Bennett's. Ottawa. 
Phllbrooks A Reynolds. 220 E. 78. N. Y. 
Phillips Sisters, Majesties. B. R. 
Plerey A Fulda. 1920 Patterson, Baltimore. 
Pike. Lester, Falrhaven, N. J. 
Plottis, The, Family. Spokane. 
Plum, Anna, Star, Seattle. 
Polrer's Three, Roseland. Roseland, III. 
Pollard, Jeanne, World Beaters, B. R. 
"Polly Pickles' Pets In Petland," Temple, 

Detroit. 
Posner. Allan n., 438 Central Park W„ N. Y. 
Potter A Harris, Trent, Trenton. 
Potter A Hartwell, Champagne Girls. B. R. 
Powers Bros.. 16 Trask. Providence. 
Tower, Coletta A Co , Majestic, Houston. 



The Chas. K. Harris Courier 

Devoted to the interests of Songs and Singers. 

Address all communications to 
CHAS. X. HARRIS. 81 W. 81st St., N. Y. 

(Meyer Cohen, Mgr. ) 



Vol. 9. 



New York, Jan. 11, UH)8. 



No. 6. 



Have you heard Chas. K. Harris' New 
Baby song 

" There's Another Picture 
In My Mamma's Frame" 

Write or call for it at once. Slides 
now ready for this beautiful baby song; 
every slide a hit with any audience. The 
best baby song since "ALWAYS IN THE 
WAY." Slides $5.00 per set. Write At 
once. 



Prampln Trio. 847 W. 40, N. Y. 
Price, Bob. Nationoscope, Montreal. 
Price. John R., A Co., 211 E. 14, New York. 
Prltzkow, Louis, Century Girls, B. R. 
Prosit Trio, 5 E. Msln, Springfield, O. 
Pryors. The, 30 No. Main, Providence. 
Psycho, Mile., Mansfield, ()., lndef. 
Pudgle A Emmett. 464 Blewett, Seattle. 
Pullen. Louella, 194 Jefferson. Trenton. 
Pullman Porter Maids, Keith's, Boston. 



Quaker City Quartet, 403 Macon. Brooklyn. 

Quartette, The, 20 Columbia, Cincinnati. 

Qulgg, Mat-key A Nlckersun, Fenberg Stock Co. 

(Eastern*. 
Quluu A Mitchell, 20 Bay 20. Bensouhurflt. L. I. 



Radford A Valentine, Oxford, London, to Feb. 10. 
Rabin's Monkeys, Gotham, Brooklyn. 
Rain Dears, liaymarket, Chicugo. 
Rainbow Sisters, Amuse I, Draddock, Pa. 
Raleigh A Harrington, 233 Winter, Ilagerstown, 

Md. 
Ralston A Son, Star, Munele, Ind. 
Ramsey Sisters, liaymarket, Chicago. 
Ilastttl A Banks, Flora. Amsterdam, Holland. 
Ranfs, The, bijou, Winnipeg. 
Uankin, Virginia, Orpheum, Shelby, O. 
Rawls A Von Kaufman, Gaiety, So. Chicago. 
Rawson A June, Phoenicia, N. Y. 
Raymond A Harper, 0400 Lexington, Cleveland. 
Raynos', Al., Bull Dogs, 13 Burtls, Auburn, N. Y. 
Rasarfs, The, 4503 No. 20, Phila. 
Ray, Fred, & Co., Majestic, Chicago. 
Raymond, Frederlcka, 16 E. 88th, N. Y. 
Raynor. Val, Trans Atlanties, B. R. 
Reattino A Stevens, 114 E. 11, N. Y. 
Reded A Hadley, World Beaters, B. R. 
Bedford A Winchester, O. O. II., Syracuse. 
Reed Bros., 48 Saxton, Dorchester, Mass. 
Reed A St. John, 454 Manhattan, N. Y. 
Regal Trio. 116 W. Washington pi., N. Y. 
Reid sisters, 53 Broad, Elizabeth. 
Reed A Earl, Sucker's, Loa Angeles. 
Read, Harry L., Washington, Buffalo, lndef. 
Reeves, Al, Reeves' Besuty Show, B. R. 
Remington, Mayme, Orpheum, St. Paul. 
Renards, Three, Temple, Ft. Wayne. 
Rennee Family, 20, Lyric, Lincoln, Neb. 
Reno, Geo. B., A Co., Empire, Coliseum, London. 
RenBbaw, Bert, Majestic, La Salle. 111., lndef. 
Renzetta A Lyman, Trocadero. B. R. 
Rever A Yolr, Champagne Glrla, B. R. 
Reynard, Ed F., Shuhert. Ultra. 
Reynolds, Abe. Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 
Rhodes A Engel, Lincoln Rq.. N. Y. 
Rice. Al. 262 Springfield. Newark. 
Rice & Cohen. Orpbeutn, Oakland. 
Rice. True. >223 s'tate, Milwaukee. 
Rice A Elmer, 848 E. 142d. N. Y. 
Rice A Prevost, Poll's, Scranton. 






When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 






22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Sen RODE 



AND 



L J LIZZIB 

IrllJLVEY 



Under the Direction of MISS JINIE JACOBS. 1402 Brotdway, New YorR 



Curtis, Palmer 

In " MAMA'S DARLING BOY," By AARON HOFFMAN 

Booked solid by our Mascot, Harry Leonhardt. 
Verdict of proM and public, bigger bit than the School Act. 



AND 
CO. 



JAMES 



LUCIA COOPER 



•'CHATTERING CHUMS." 
WEEK JAN. IS, TROCADERO. CHICAGO. "Gee, Blutch made me laugh." 

"Tom" Kelley 



PIANIST AT PASTOR'S THEATRE. 



JENNINGS and JEWELL 



GERMAN COMEDIANS. 



Second Beaton Robie's " Knickerbocker!. ' 



Tanean , Fe I j x s Claxton 

Open for Clubs and Sunday Nights, 
January, February. Week March gth 
and later open. 

Per Add., SSI S. 93d Street. Now York City. 
OPEN FOB SUNDAY NIGHTS AND CLUBS. 

Tel. 6459— 79th St. 




THE ASTRELLAS 

Predentin* Their Original Son* and Dancing Novelty in Vaudeville. Address, car© VARIETY. 

SNITZ MOORE 

In tbo Comedy-Dramatic Playlet "A SELF-MADE MAN." 
One of tbo best offerings of the new year, at acknowledged by press and publio everywhere. 
Address VARIETY, Chicago Office. 




AND WHI 




POSITIVELY THE BEST DANCING ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



This WeeK, Auditorium, Lynn, Mass. 



n 



The sort of Entertainment that Advances Vaudeville." 



chas p 



PRESENTING 
GEORGE 

ARLISS' 
FARCE 



V 
EVANS 



S COM'Y. 



"IT'S 
UP 
TO 
YOU. 
WILLIAM" 



WEEK JAN.. 13, K.-P. FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK. 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 



Two NOVELTIES of MERIT i (in ono sot) Presented by 



JIMO.ZOUt30LJL.AKIS 

CLAY CARTOONIST AND MUSICAL VIRTUOSO 

14 Minutes. (Boron in "ono"; open or oloio.) 




44 



KIETY 



KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CTTY. 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADING OF 

REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



ft 



AT FOLLOWING RATES: 

S4.00 monthly, not 2 Inohos double col., $22.50 monthly, net 

7.00 " 1-2 Inch across page, 1 5.00 " ■ 

7.60 ■ " 1 inch » 25.00 M M 

12.50 " " 2 Inches " 60.00 " " 

I*arrfar Space Pro Rata 
No advertisement under this heading accepted for lets thsn ono month snd no preferred position 
given. Remittance must accompany advertisements forwarded by mail. 
Cash discount for 6 and 12 months. 



1-2 Inoh single col., 

1 Inoh 
1*2 Inoh double col., 

1 Inoh 



Rice A Walters, Boston Belles, B. R. 

Richards, Chris, Keith's, Columbus, O. 

Rich Duo, 164 E. Randolph, Chicago. 

Rich, Jack & Bertha, Acme, Sacramento. 

Richards, The Great, Mozart's, Hagerstown, Md. 

Riley, Frank, Orientals B. R. 

Ronaldos, The, Majestic, Paris, 111. 

Richards A (J rover, Main, Peoria, 111. 

Ring A Williams, 102 Liberty, Baltimore. 

Hitter A Foster, Alhsmbrs, Paris, France. 

Roberts, Four, 140 W. 88, N. Y. 

Roberts, Hsyes A Roberts, Cedar Manor, Ja- 
maica, N. Y. 

Roberts, Slgna, Bijou, Superior, Wis. 

Robert -de Mont Trio, 722 W. 14th PI., Grand 
Rsplds. 

Roblsch A Childress, Majestic, Kalamazoo. 

Robinson A Grsnt. 208 8th eve., N. Y. 

Robinson, Parquette Trio, Colonial, Lawrence, 
Mass. 

Robinson, Tom, Scrlbner's Big Show, B. R. 

Rockaway A Conway, Hsymarket, Chicago. 

Rogers A Mackintosh, Uuique, Sheboygan, Wis. 

Romola, Bob, BIJou, Davenport, In., lndef. 

Rooney A Bent, Gotham. Brooklyn. 

Rooney, Katie, Keith's, Portland. Me. 

Rooney Sisters, 807 N. Patterson Pk. Ave.. Bal- 
timore. 

Roscoe A Sims, Rents-Sent ley, B. B. 

Rose A Ellis, Ysnkee Doodle Girls, B. B. 

Boas A Lewis, Surrey, London, Eng. 

Ross A Vsck, Orpheum, Yonkers. 

Rosso A Simms, Bowery Burlesquers, B. B. 

Ronsek, Jsck, Air Dome, Leavenworth, lndef. 

Kowlsnd, 127 W. 27. N. Y. 

Roysl Musical Fire, 240 8b. fth, Brooklyn. 



Royce Bros., 874 N. Randolph, Chicago. 
Ryno A Emerson, Continental Hotel, Chicago. 
Russell A Held, Auditorium, Lynn. 
Russell, Fred P., 486 W. 130, N. Y. 
Russell, Fred, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 
Russell A Davis. Pastime, Atlanta, lndef. 
Ryan & Richfield, Orpheum, Brooklyn. 
Ryan A White, 504 E. 103. N. Y. 



Settler, Chas., Lady Birds, B. R. 

Sanford A Darlington, 2422 So. Adler, Phlla. 

Salvaggls, 5, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 

Sandow A Lsmpert, Orientals, B. R. 

Schaar Trio, Temple, Ft. Wayne. 

Schack, Nat, Orpheum, Bucyrus, O. 

Schell's, Mine., Clrco Bell, Mexico City, to Jan. 4. 

Schepp, Grover, Rollickers, B. R. 

Schmldllng, Harry H., 287 W. Monroe, Chicago. 

Schuster, Milton, Palace. Boston, lndef. 

Schrock A Rice, Columbus, Chicago. 

Scott, Edousrd, Grand, Reno, Nev., indef. 

Sears, Gladys, Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Seguln, Wood, Eugenie, 2314 Hollywood, Toledo. 

Septette, G. O. II . Indianapolis. 

Seymour Sisters, Howard, Huntington, W. Va. 

Seymour, O. G., A Co., 27, Majestic, Madison, 

Wis. 
Seyons, The, Parisian Belles, B. B. 
Shannons, Four, Grand, Madison, Wis. 
Sharps, Dollie, Family, Pottsrllle, Pa., lndef. 
Sharrocks, The, 821 Main, Lewiston, Ida. 
Rhaws. Aerial. 288 W. 24. N. Y. 
8hean A Warren, 31 Chester, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Shermsn A Fuller, 858 N. 8, Beading, Pa. 



Sherman, De Forest, Co., Sherman Farm, Central 
Pk., L.I. 

Shirhart, Anson, Crystsl, Detroit, lndef. 

Short A Edwards, S7 Mlddagh, Brooklyn. 

Shrodes, Chas. A Alice, Orpheum, Boston. 

Simpson, Cora, Majestic, Dallas. 

Slmms, The Mystic, Box 860, Dobbs Ferry. N. Y. 

Sieger, Lillian, Harry Bryant's, B. B. 

Sldmsn, Sam, Columbia, Oak.and, Cal., lndsf. 

Sldonne A Keilie. 424 E. Chicsgo are., Chicago. 

Silver Stars, 51 Hanover, Boston. 

Simpsons, The Musical, Empire, Oakland. 

Slneay's Dogs A Csts, 101 W. 40. N. Y. 

Slater A Finch, Colonial, Lawrence, Mass. 

Sloan, Grace, Orpheum, Denver. 

Smith A Arado. 325 Converse, E. St. Louis, 111. 

Smith A Convey, Trans Atlantlrs. B. B. 

Smiths, Aerlsl, Broadway, Camden, N. J. 

Smith Bros., 66 Hawthorne, Hartford. 

Smith, Wm. M., Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Smith A Brown, Morning Glories, B. R. 

Smythe, Wm. H., Gsy Morning Glories, B. B. 

Snyder A Buckley, Haymarket, Chicago. 

Sommers A Storke, Ideals, B. B. 

Homers. Zalmar, Pat White's Gaiety Girls. B. R. 

Some Quartet, Merry Msldena, B. R. 

Sonnett, Annette, City Sports. B. R. 

Song Birds. K. A P. 68th St., N. Y. 

Soper, Bert, Star, Altoona, Pa., lndef. 

Spencer, Lloyd, Lyric, Houston, lndef. 

Spillers, Musical Five, Bennett's, London. 

Spoler, Lew H., Empire, B. B. 

Stanford, Billy, Star, New Kensington, Pa. 

Stanley, Mr. A Mrs. W. H., 448 Central, Brook- 
lyn. 



Stanley, Minna. City Sports, B. R. 
Stsnton A Sandberg, 711 Orch, Chicago. 
Stelnert A Thomas, 120 W. 135, N. Y. 
Bteger, Julius, A Co., Colonial, N. Y. 
Sterns, Al.. Dorp, Schenectady. 
Stevens, Leo, Washington Society Girls, B. 
Stevens A Boehm, 825 E. 14, N. Y. 
Stewsrts, Musical, Bohemians, B. R. 
Stewart, Harry, Ross Sydell. B. R. 
Stlckney's Pony A Dogs, Hempstesd, L. I. 
Stlrk A Dan, 28 Hancock, Brockton, Mass. 
St. Elmo, Leo. Pastor's, N. Y. 
St. Onge Bros., 22 Portland, Worcester. 




IN "CAFE DS PARI1." 
Jan. 18 — Keith's, Providenoe. 



Stone, Beth, Majestic. Des Moines. 

Stuart A Keeley, Gaiety, So. Chicago. 

Sturgls, Ida, Imperials. B. B. 

Stutsman A Crawford, Bijou, Superior, Wis. 

Sullivan, W. J., Bijou. Jamestown, N. D., lndef. 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 









23 



BAKRY 



AND 



WOLFOR-D 



THE TOWN TOPIC TICKLE TALKERS. Tickling Furiously at Chase's, Washington, this week. Read what they say about the HIDDEN HEADLINERS: 
WASHINGTON "POST." i WASHINGTON "TIMES." 

"Though not especially large-typed and head-lined, George W. Barry and Maude Wolford seemed "HIDDEN HEADLINERS PLEASE AT CHASE'S THI8 WEEK, 

to strike the particular fancy of last night's audience. They gathered In most of the recalls of the "Although not featured as a headline act on this week's bill at Chase's, George W. Barry ami 

evening. They are good, too, of their sort. They add new verses to hackneyed songs, and have actually Maude Wolford won the lion's share of applause and responded to numerous encores. To their 
succeeded in finding some strictly fresh jokes." travesties on songs of the day were added a line of jokes brought, right up to the minute. 

THOSE SMART AGENTS. REICH <H> PLUNKETT. 



WEEK OF JAN. IS. COLONIAL. NORFOLK, VA. 



BOOKED SOLID. 



Gus 

Edwards 

Says: 

that "SEE-SAW" 

is having great success with CURTIS, 
PALMER AND CO., and lots of other 
big acts. 

Get your voices ready for the ballad 
hit of 1908, 

"I AM WAITING FOR THE SUM- 
MER TIME AND YOU." 

P. S.— "I AM WAITING FOR THE 
SUMMER TIME AND YOU." 

More P. S.— "I AM WAITING FOR 
THE SUMMER TIME AND YOU." 

OCS EDWARDS MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 



Sully & Phelps, 0. II., FlBhklll. N. Y. 
Sullivan A Pusquelena. Cedar Rapids. 
Summers ft Winters, Spellman. C. R. 
Sutcllffe Troupe, Empire, Swansea, Wales. 
Sutton A Sutton. High School Ulrls. B. R. 
Sevengala. Vaudeville, Brockton, Mass. 
Sweet, Eugene, 20 Cherry, Providence. 
Sweeney, John S., 4S2 Turner, Allentown, Pa. 
8wor Bros., 713 W. 63, Chicago. 
8ylows, The. Parisian Belles, B. R. 
Symonds, Jack, Grand, Marlon, Ind. 



Taneans, Elmlra, N. Y. 

Tanean, Fella ft Claxton. 331 E. 93d at., N. Y. 

Talcots, The, Crystal, Elkhart, Ind. 

Taylor, Tell, La Salle, Chicago, lndef. 

Tegge ft Daniel, 2148 No. Robly, Chicago. 

Tempest Trio, 124 Booream, Jersey City. 

Tenors, Four, Pat White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Thomas. David, c|o Moyer, Atlanta. 

Thompson ft Carter, City Sports. B. R. 

Thompson. Harry, 112 Covert, Brooklyn. 

Thorne. Mr. ft Mrs. Harry, Hotel Braddock, N. Y. 

Tlddlewlnks ft Dugan, 503 Hudson, N. Y. 

Tlerney, Belle, 74 N. Main, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Tlnney, Frank II., 812 Moore. Phlla. 

Tivoli Quartette, Orpheum. Kansas City. 

Tomkins, Win., Orpheum, Denver. 

Torcat, Mohawk, Schenectady. 

Toys. Musical, Taunton. Mass. 

Tracers, Belle, Orientals, B. R. 

Trlllers, The. Keith's. Boston. 

Troubadours. Three, Majestic. Birmingham. 

Troyer Lafe, Irwin, Goshen. Ind., lndef. 

Truesdell, Mr. ft Mr*. Howard, Hatha way's, 

Lowell. 
Trocadero Quartet, Dixieland, Jacksonville. Fla. 
Tully, May. Shea's, Buffalo. 
Turner, Bert, Crystal, Frankfort. Ind. 
Tyce. Lillian, 733 Mt. Prospect. Newark. 
Tyroleans, Fourteen, 242 E. North, Chicago. 



Ullrich. Frlte. 2418 N. 16. Phlla. 

Usher, Claude ft Fannie, 38 Henry, Jersey City. 



Valadons, Aerial, 65 Sumner, Central Falls, 

R. I. 
Valdare ft Vamo. Bloomington, Ind. 
Valmore. Mildred. Toreadors. B. R. 
Valveno Bros.. 107 E. 81. N. Y. 
Van Cleve. Denton ft Pete, 236 E. 14, N. Y. 
Van Gofre ft Cotrely, 1628 Sutton. San Francisco. 
Van Lee. James. Yankee Doodle Girls, B. R. 
Vardaman, 270 W. 39. N. Y. 
Vardon, Perry ft Wilbur. Crackerjacks, B. R. 
Variety Quartet, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Veda & Qulntarow, Star, Monessen. Pa. 
Vedmars, The, 749 Amsterdam. N. Y. 
Vermette-Carpottle Trio. 451 Rue Breboeuf, Mon 

treal. 
Verna, Belle, Majestic, Pittsburg. 
Viola ft Bro., 123 Montauk. Brooklyn. 
Voelker, Mr. ft Mrs. Frederick, Keiths. Phlla. 
Van Dell, Harry, Jan. 6-20. Casino, Atlantic City. 

W 

Waddell. Fred ft Mae. Gaiety. Springfield, 111. 
Waggand ft Waggand, Com. Woonsocket, R. I. 
Wahlund, Tekela Trio. 205 W. 22. N. Y. 
Walters, Harry, 1558 Bway, N. Y. 
Watson, Fred. Orpheum. Denver. 
Watson Sisters, Irwin Big Show. B. R. 
Waldorf ft Mende*. Family, Mahony City, Pa. 



Walton, Fred, ft Co., Orpheum. St. Paul. 

Walton. Irving R., Irwin's Majestic, B. R. 

Waller ft Maglll. 102 7th sve.. N. Y. 

Ward, Alice Lillian, Denver, Col. 

Ward, Klare ft Co., Denver, Col. 

Ward Trio, 640 82. Milwaukee. 

Warner, Stanley M., Majestic, St. Paul. 

Warren ft Brockway, Rellly ft Woods, B. R. 

Wangdoodle Four, Vanity Fair, B. R. 

Washer Broa., Oakland, Ky. 

Walsh-Lynch ft Co., Irwin's Big Show, B. R. 

Walsh, George, Toreadors. B. R. 

Washburn, Blanche, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Waterbury Bros, ft Tenney, Novelty, Brooklyn. 

Waters. Harry, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Watson, Jos. K., Rolllckera, B. R. 

Webb ft Connelly, Majestic, Ft. Worth. 

Webb, Harry L., Beatrice, Neb. 

Webb, Joale, Tiger Lilies, B. R. 

Webb, Mabel, Pat White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Weber, Chas. D., Bowery Burleequers, B. R. 

Weber, John, Broadway Gaiety Girls. B. R. 

Welch, Lem, Poll's, New Haven. 

Welch ft Maltland, Vanity Fair, B. R. 

Wells, Pauline. Parisian Widows. B. R. 

Wells. Billy K., Harry Bryant's. B. R. 

Werden ft Taylor, Poll's, Worcester. 

West. John A., 161 W. 66, Chicago. 

West ft Benton. Oak Park, Sacramento, lndef. 

West, Harry, Washington Society Girls, B. R. 

West, Ed.. Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Weston. Emms. Empire, B. R. 

Weston, Sadie. Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Wheeler Children, 2514 No. 25, Phlla. 

Wheeler ft Roeey, 15 So. Clark, Chicago. 

Whalley ft Whalley, Bijou, Lorraine, O. 

Whelan ft Searles, 1520 Glenwood. Phlla. 

White, Dennison ft White, Grand, Sharon, Pa. 

White. Ed. ft Holla, Washington, Spokane. 

White Hawk. 750 Westchester. N. Y. 

White, Pat, Pat White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

White. Tom. Lady Birds, B. R. 

Whitehead. Joe, 408 W. 83. N. Y. 

Whltely. James. Trans-Atlantles, B. R. 

Whiteside, Ethel, Hackney Empire, London. 

Whitman, Frank. Weber's Music Hall, N. Y. 

Wiggans. Joe, Imperials, B. R. 

Wilbur, Caryl, Hippodrome. Poplar. London. 

Wilder. Marshall P.. 256 W. 97. N. Y. 

WMlfred ft Lottie, Bijou. Bay City, Mich. 

Williams, C. W„ 3313 Jamaica, Richmond Hill, 

Williams ft Mayer. 309 W. 55. N. Y. 

Williams, Jud, 20, Dodge's, Keokuk, la. 
Williams, Joe, Jersey Lilies, B. R. 
Williams. Sam. Union Sq.. N. Y. 
Williams ft West, High Jinks, B. R. 
Wills ft Hassan. Majestic. Johnstown. Pa. 
Wilson. Tony, Heloise ft Armoros Sisters, 1 Prima 

rd., Brixton, London. S. E ., Eng. 
Wilson, Alf ft Mabe. 256 W. 37, N. Y. 
Wilson Bros., K. ft P. 5th Ave., N. Y. 
Wilson. Jack, ft Co.. G. O. H., Pittsburg. 
Wilson, Lizzie N., 175 Franklin, Buffalo. 
Wilson. Sam. High Jinks, B. R. 
Wilton, Belle. Vanity Fair, B. R. 
Winoherman. V. F., 201 E. 14. N. Y. 
Winkler & Kress. Park, Johnstown, Pa. 
Wixon & Eaton, Folly, Chicago. 
Wood Bros.. Star. Toronto. 
Wood, Ralph. Lyric, Ft. Smith. Ark., lndef. 
Woodford's Animals. Rose Sydell. B. R. 
Woodford & Marlboro, Shelby. (). 
Wormser Tots, 502 W. 3, Davenport. la. 
Wordette, Estelle, ft Co.. 40 W. 84. N. Y. 
World ft Kingston. Shea's. Toronto. 
Work & Ower. Orpheum, Boston. 
Worthier. MInthorne. 125 Lexington, N. Y. 
Wynn & Lewis, Poll's, Bridgeport. 



Yarkley ft Runnel, Elm Villa, R. F. D. 6, Lan- 
caster. Pa. 
Yalto Duo, 220 W. 38. N. Y. 
Yomamato Bros., Emerald, Adams Co., O. 
Young ft De Vole, 8 Lower 5, Evansvllle. 
Young ft Manning, 2130 Grant, Denver. 
Young. Hsrry C. Lady Birds, B. R. 
Young, Ollie, ft Bros., 58 Chittenden. Columbus, •. 



Zamlooh ft Co., 10«o 62 St., Oakland. Cal. 
Zanoras. Cycling, C. O. II., Chicago. 
Zaras, 4, 104 W. 40, N. Y. 
Zeda. H. L., 211 E. 14. N. Y. 
Zemo. Zemo Troupe, Star, Muncle. Ind. 
Zemla. Parisian Widows, B. R. 
Zeno. Rob. 348 Vf, 1. Portland. Ore. 
Zolas, The. Dominion. Winnipeg. 
Zimmerman. Al.. Empire. B. R. 
ZInn's Famous Dancing Girls, Empire, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Zlska ft King. Orpheum. Harrisbnrg, Pa. 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



WEEK JANARY 18. 

When not otherwise indicated, "L. 0." after 
show indioates it is "laying off." 

Americans. Star, Toronto. 
Avenue (Jlrls, Dewey. Minneapolis. 
Bachelor Club. 13-15. Empire. Albany; 16-18, 
Empire, Ilolyoke. 



Behman Show, Gayety, Birmingham. 

Blue Ribbons, Waldman's, Newark. 

Bon Tons, Majestic, Kansas City. 

Boston Belles. 125th St. Music Hall. N. Y. f 

Bohemians, 13-15, Star, Scranton; 16-18, Jacobs, 
Paterson. 

Bowery Burlesquers. Gayety, Baltimore. 

Brigadiers, Star, Milwaukee. 

Broadway Gaiety Girls, Imperial, Providence. 

Bryant's, Harry, 13-15, Gllmore, Springfield; 16- 
18, Bijou. Reading. 

Casino Girls, Empire, Cleveland. 

Century Girls, Gotham. N. Y. 

Champagne Girls. Bon Ton, Jersey City. 

Cherry Blossoms, Bowery, N. Y. 

City Sports, Gaiety, Brooklyn. 

Colonial Belles, 13-15, Terre Haute; 16-18, In- 
dianapolis. 

Cracker Jacks, Gsyety, Pittsburg. 

Dainty Duchess, Star, Brooklyn. 

Dreamlands, Theatre Royal, Montreal. 

Empire Show. Dewey, N. Y. 

Fay Foster, Eighth Ave., N. Y. 

Girl from Happyland, Olympic, Brooklyn. 

Golden Crook, Corinthian, Rochester. 

High Jinks, Trocadero, Phila. 

High School Girls, 13-15, Gayety, Albany; 16-18, 
Lyceum, Troy. 

Ideals, Shubert, Newark. 

Imperials. Lyceum, Washington. 

Irwin's Big Show. Gayety. Columbus. 

Jersey Lilies, Gayety, Indianapolis. 

Jolly Grass Widows. Howard. Boston. 

Jolly Girls, 13-15, Jacob's, Paterson; 16-18, Star, 
Scranton. 

Kentucky Belles, Century, Kansas City. 

Knickerbockers. Empire, Toledo. 

Lady Birds, Park, Brooklyn. 

Lid Lifters, 13-15, Bijou, Reading; 16-18, 
Gayety, Scranton. 

Majesties. Gayety. Washington. 

Mardl Gras Beauties, Casino, Phila. 

Masqueraders. Gayety, Detroit. 

Merry Maidens, L. O.; 20-22, Gaiety, Albany; 
23-25, Lyceum. Troy. 

Merry Makers, People's, Cincinnati. 

Miss New York, Jr., Bijou, Phlla. 

Morning Glories, Trocadero, Chicago. 

New York Stars, Euson's, Chicago. 

Nightingales, Standard. St. Louis. 

Night Owls, Greenwall, New Orleans. 

Orientals, Academy, Pittsburg. 

Parisian Belles, Monumental, Baltimore. 

Parisian Widows, Gayety, Phlla. 

Pat White's Gaiety Girls. Star, St. Paul. 

Reeves' Beauty Show, Standard. Cincinnati. 

Reilly ft Woods, Lafayette, Buffalo. 

Rentz-Santley, L. O.; 20, Majestic, Kansas City. 

Rlalto Rounders. 13-15, Evansvllle, L. ().; 20, 
Empire, Chicago. 

Rice ft Barton, Murray Hill, N. Y. 

Rolliekers, 13-15, Lyceum, Troy; 16-18, Gayety, 
Albany. 

Rose Hill. Gayety. St. Louis. 

Rose Sydell, 13-15, Gayety, Scranton; 16-18. 
Bijou, Reading. 

Runaway Girls, Palace, Boston. 

Sam Devere's. Met. O. H., Dulutb. 

Scribner's Big Show, Gayety. Milwaukee. 

Star Show Girls, Folly. Chicago. 

Strollers. Empire. Chicago. 

Thoroughbreds. 13-15. Des Moines; 16 18, St. Joe. 

Tiger Lilies, Columbia. Boston. 

Toreadors. 13-15, Indianapolis; 16-18, Terre naute. 

Trans-Atlanties, Lyceum, Boston. 

Troeaderos, Garden, Buffalo. 

20th Century Maids. Avenue, Detroit. 

Vanity Fair, Westminster, Providence. 

Washington Society Girls, Buckingham, Louis- 
ville. 

Watson's Burlesquers. London, N. Y. 

World Beaters, Gayety, Toronto. 

Yankee Doodle Girls, Colonial, Cleveland. 



Acuna, J. If,; Allison, Mrs.; Arden, Edwin. 



Barnold. Charles: Buree, Jim: Berguln. Nellie; 
Bohme, W. A.; Runnln. Rose; Burke, Chas.; 
Baird and Dunn (Chicago office): Barry, W. 11. 
(Chicago office); Bedlnl. Gehan; Backman, Marie; 
Baron. C. (Chicago office): Brown. Mrs.: Btlllng- 
ton. E. C: Borfllng, S. ; Blair. Eugene, and Com- 
pany; Blake's Animal Circus; Bernard. Nat; Bell. 
Mrs. Pete; Benson, Mrs.; Burkes, Juggling. 



Cavaln, Joslah; Conklln. Al.: Calhoun, William; 
Carleton and Terre (Chicago office); Claftin, 
Joule; Collins. M. D.; Crane, Lawrence; Charline 
and Charline; Curtis. W. D. (2); Cogswell. Sarah 
L. (2); Castellane. Tony; Carlisle, II.; Carrlllo. 
Leo (2). 



Darnell. Edith: Denny. Walter: Dumas. Flor- 
ence; Denting. Arthur; Donnelly. Henry V.; Dutch, 
Mr.: Dudley, Harry. 

E 

Evans. Charles; Elliott and West (Chicago 
office); Emerson ft Baldwin; Bckhoff & Gordon. 



JEROME & SCHWARTZ 

ILLUSTRATED BONOS. 

"COME BACK TO OLD 
MANHATTAN, DEARIE" 

A Novel Ballad, Something Different from 
Anything Else In Slides. 



" MY IRISH ROSIE " 
"Any Old Time at All" 

The Big Hit of "The Rich Mr. Hoggenheimer" 
AND THE NEW SENSATIONAL IRISH HIT 

"MlSSKlU-ARNEY" 

Beautiful Slides by DeWitt O. Wheeler. 
All Bongs Published by 

FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 

PUBLISHERS 
15 W. 30th ST., NIW YORK CITY 



Fox, Mort; Fsy, Elfle; Ford. John; ray, 
Elfle (Chicago office); Fullara, Tom; Farren, 
George (2). 



Gardener and Revere (Chicago office): Gaudy, 
Louise; Gilbert. John D.; GUllngwater, Claude; 
Gallando; Gibbons, Thomas (Chicago office); 
Grant, Bert and Bertha; Griffin, F. B.; Geer, 
J. H.; Guardot, Etiume and Company; Gardener, 
Gladys. 



Herbert, Will: Hunting. Tony; Hammond. 
Charles; Hughes, Gene; Henry. William; Hale and 
Francis; Hill. Hamilton; Hale, George G. (Chi- 
cago office) ; Hefron, Tom. 



Kara. Mr.: Kelly, John W.; King, Qusele; 
Kent, Dorothy. 



Lackey. Jas. ; Le Monts, The; Lawler, Charley, 
sod daughters; Lacey, Harry, and Company. 



Manton. George; McCart. William r Marks, AL; 
Mears. Crace; Moore, Frank II.; Moore. Rhodes; 
Mills. Beeeher II.; Morrison. Altrea; Mead, Will; 
Murata. Toklo; Moll, Holtt.; Myers. George; Mc- 
Waters and Tyson; McDonald. Mike; Mandell, 
Richard; McCord, Louis; McClalr, Chas. 



Nobles, Milton and Dolly; Neascr, Gus. 

O 

Otulta. Mile. 



Prlngle, Aubrey; Palmer, Austin. 



Qulgley, nelen. 



Rose. Mr. (Spencer, Kelly and Rose); Roes, 
Budd (Chicago office). Robinson. W. A.; Rice, 
James R. (2); Ray, Elizabeth; Rollins, Msybelle; 
Reeves, Billy. 

8 

St. Onge, Fred; Salter, Irving; Sarli, Tony; 
Shayne. John; Simonda, Teddy; Smith, Charles 
Stephens, Hal.; Sutton, Harry; Sterling, Evelyn; 
Stanley. Gertrude; Sheck, E.; Sargeant, R.; 
Sellgman, Minnie. 



Tobln Sisters. The (2); Toledo, Gus; Tulsa; 
Tlson and Brown; Thomas, Win. H. ; Tenley, 
Elmer. 








U 


Ulpas ft Ilclla. 






V 


Vasco. 





W 

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FRED KARNO'S Comedians 

Original London Comedy Company. 
Manager, ALF. REEVES. 

To whom address all communications, en route. 

MONDAY, JAN. IS, ALHAMBRA, HARLEM. N. Y. C, "A NIGHT IN AN ENGLISH 
MUSIC HALL," with BILLIE REEVES, original "Drunk." 

Playing return dates everywhere with bigger success than ever. 

Slums of London, etc., in repertoire. 

Productions Copyrighted. Pirates keep off. 



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A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL. 




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Doyle 



Week Jan. 6, Majestic Ft. Worth, Texas. ("All Right") Week Jan. 18, Majestic, Dallas, Texas. 

THE SPEAKER OF TALK 

PHIL MILLS 

In LEW SULLY'S nonsensical narration entitled "ORATORICAL DISTURBANCES" 

The 

Juggling 

Kid 



COOK 



IN HIS OWN ORIGINAL NOVELTY, "JUGGLING IN THE DEPOT.' 



Direction JACK LEVY. 



LILLIAN HALE & co 

IN "THE PHANTOM RIVAL," BY SAGER DEAN. 
One of the best laughing sketches in vaudeville. Big snooess everywhere. 

JUST KIDS 

RAWSON and CLARE 

FEATURED WITH WEBER ft RUSH'S "BON TONS." 



CIRCUS PARODIL 



BARNLM 
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I AM RICH, NOT IN MONEY, BUT 

IDEAS. 



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RIC 




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THE DUTCH CLOWN WITH 
THE TANGLEFOOT DIALECT. 

VARIETY 



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GHIGftGO 



By FRANK WIESBERG. 

VARIETY'S Chicago Office, 
Chicago Opera House Block, 
(Phone Main 4380). 

MAJESTIC (Lyman B. Glover, mgr. Monday 
rehearsal 9).— Stella Mayhew and Blllee Tavlor 
are the top liners. Miss Mayhew has a few 
catchy "coon" ditties, winning favor. "The Rain- 
Dears." with Louise Montrose, Is the same scenic 
and eleetric novelty. Emmet Devoy and Company 
presented "In Dreamland"— well acted and writ- 
ten. Lew Hawkins hns a few new stories, and 
made his usual hit. Daisy Ilarconrt Is a talented 
comedienne and sang In a very pleasing manner. 
The novelty musical offering of Ferry Corwey 
brought response. Marie Florence is possessed of 
■ cultivated soprano voice, and her range com- 
pares favorably with Edith Helena. Teddy Trio 
showed acrobatics from a spring board with com- 
edy, and Rockaway and Conway in singing and 
dancing, made a hit. considering the earlv place. 
Lea and Opp have a very good string of Hebrew 
conversational talk and excellent parodies. The 
pair work well together, but are too hasty In 
delivering the material. They ought to do well 
»* the large houses. Walter Beemerfl assisted by 
« young woman, opened with club Juggling. Three 
Lelghtons were billed, but transferred to the 
Oljmplo. Booker's Arabs closed. 

EUSON'S tSld J. Bason, nigr.).— "Dr. Dopey's 
Dippy Den." is properly named. It is In Man- 
chester's "Gay Mas«pieraders." The vehicle is In 
two acts, and If anything Is a "concoction" this 
output of Billy Hart's Is a mild example. In 
■pite of the chaotic nature there are pertinent 
subjects and a story which drifts aimlessly after 
the first act. It concerns Idiots, undertakers, im- 
beciles and other pitiable objects, transformed 
into mock satire. One of the amusing incidents 
was when Billy Hart sauntered In the aisle of 
the lower floor In burlesque "mind reading." 
There are a great deal of nonsensical episodes, and 



each reflects more or less of the theme. Spangled 
di esses seem to be Mr. Manchester's hobby, for 
there is a liberal display. There are several 
catchy numbers, among them "Merry Milk 
Maids," rendered by Susie Fisher and girls, In 
drab gray dresses and lavender underskirts. -Miss 
Fisher looks her best in that costume. "Marl- 
utch," with Spanish costumes, was encored. Billy 
Hart handled the comedy in a thoroughly capable 
manner and gave the other male members oppor- 
tunities. Eva Bryan is a prepossessing blonde. 
Harry Hayward was amusing as a "sissy" cow- 
l»oy. Miss Fisher's low themulous contralto was 
clear and powerful. The Ha} ward-Hay ward 
Company. Including Harry and Jessie Hayward, 
George A. Mae and Lou Pistel, contributed a 
sketch entitled "The King of Blackwells," in 
which considerable comedy is derived by the 
black face comedian who is given much scope. 
It has amusing situations. Stewart and Raymond 
are expert Instrumentalists and were encored. 
Bessie l'ardue and "Eight English Roses," made 
better showing In a series of dances than moat 
of the other English girl acts imported for bur- 
lesque Smith and Baker are an animated pair 
of eccentric dancers. One Is a fairly good come- 
dian. They did very well; better than others in 
their line seen here. 

EMPIRE (William A. Singer, mgr.).— "The 
Colonial Belles," second time In Chicago this 
season, remains unchanged. 

AUDITORIUM (Klaw & Erlanger, mgrs.: Mil- 
ward Adams, director. Sunday rehearsal 10:30, 
Colonial Theatre).— A diverting bill of excellence 
this week. There is a foreign atmosphere to it. 
Josephine Cohan and Company present a playlet 
by Fred Nlblo. entitled "A Girl of the Times." 
It Is full of action and some bright talk and 
proved very entertaining In view of the fact that 
sketches have an arduous road in the huge thea- 
tre. Madie Scott is a new-comer and hails from 
Ireland. She is billed as "The Daintiest Girl In 
Ireland." and acquitted herself admirably as a 
singer of the catchiest songs. She scored a real 
hit in an early place. Collins and Hart, prominent 
on the opening bill a few weeks ago, shared the 
laughitng hit of the show with George Evans, 
who was billed to appear next week and strolled 
In at the last moment from Streator, where he 
makes periodical visits when In the Middle West. 
Fred Nlblo held the stage with a good string of 
humorous stories, signalized by applause and 
laughter. Hardeen makes his initial appearance. 
His work is very similar to Houdlnl's. and he is 
making a good showing. The Gaudschmidts re- 
turned with their acrobatics, and May Belfort, 
Llane D'Eve and Eight Yulllans hold-over. 

OLYMPIC (Abe Jacobs, mgr. Mondav rehearsal 
9).— "Ye Colonial Septet." Inez McCauley and 
Company. The Pecchlanis. Emlle Subers, Bar- 
tholdi's Cockatoos, Cartwell and Harris, Radle 
Furman, Zellah Covington and Company, Naomi 
Ethards. Russell and Church, Galacratus, Harry 
Jones. Gordon and Chacon. 

HAYMARKET (Wm. Newkirk, mgr. Monday 
rehearsal 9).— Herrman the Great. Motweef-Hugos- 
ton Company, Grace Hazard, Berry and Berry, 
O'Brien. Havel and Lawrence. Hanover and Lee, 
Paul Barnes, Leeds and LaMar, Chas. Sanders. 
Fiddler and Shelton, Claus and Radcllffe, Tops 
and Topsy. 

SCHINDLER'S (L. Schlndler. mgr.).— Laurent 
Trio. Sparks and Sparks, Roberts Four. T. Roy 
Barnes and Bessie Crawford, Dorothy Vaughn, 
James Brown. Mav and Companv. 

NORTH AVENUE (Paul Sittner. mgr.).— Peter- 
pen Brothers, Seven Russell Comedians. Delgrau 
Trio, Jim II. Rutherford and Company, Lesslk and 
Anita. Geo. Dlllford and Companv. 

TF.DDY (Geo. Powell, mgr.).— Forrest Family. 
Fielding and Fisher. Qnlnn Trio. Le Conde and 
Le Clear. Cherry Goode and Company, Mabel 
Walker. 

IOLa (A. W. Roth, mgr.).— Three Daltos, The 
Great Pamplln, Crawford and Gardner, Three Bar- 
neys. Levin and Jackson. 

IMPERIAL (P. J. Schaefer, mgr.).— M. Sam 
uels. Dancing Aehwells, I. Levere, The Harts, 
Billy McKenzio. Ruth I)e Mar. 

NATIONAL (C. R. Svenlng. mgr.).— Marvelous 
Molls. Wolmsley Brewer and Company. Welling- 
ton Brothers. liemlng nnd Brogan. Evelyn Pearl, 
Jaekmiin Brothers. Famous Wilson. 

CRYSTAL (Fred Schneffer. mgr.).— Geo. and 
Pauline Kidd. Eugenia Wand Seguln, Levigne and 
Jcrdon. 

LYRIC (Chicago Heights) .— LeRoy Blaud. 
Walker ami Rurrell. Chns. Belles, Lillian Burnell. 

GARY (Gary. Ind.).— Ray Lee Wells, Roach and 
Hart, Minnie Hess. Arranmore Sisters. Bessie Lee. 

FOLLY (John A. Fennessey, mgr.). — Ancient 
history properly served might enthuse a coterie of 
erudite individuals from an educational standpoint. 
hot when an attempt is made to offer a repetition 
of obliterated humor such as constitutes ''Married 
by Telephone," an alleged two-act musical farce 
exploited by the "Rrlgadlers" with Intent to 
arouse the generous laughter of a burlesque audi- 
ence, the effort should be abolished as Irksome and 
futile. The piece was evidently not "written." 
but arranged by an anonymous veteran of the old 
burlesque school. If there is a plot It Is not dis- 
cernible, except for occasional reference to a 
political campaign which carried the action. There 
are too many conversational arguments and the 
talk is too draggy. The buffoon "camera" busi- 
ness, "heated chair" and slap stick are utilized 
as In the palmy days. There Is a decided lack 
of agreeable comedy elements. There is very 
little in the proceedings to recommend. A new 
rag doll Is badly needed. The "prop" cnrrlage 
brought laughter. The stuffing of bread in the 
ears Is not funny. Tim Healy Is the principal 
comedian. In the second act he occupied the cen- 
ter of the stage most of the time. He seemed to 
be troubled with a cold and for that reason should 
be absolved, although the material Is more at 
fault, and he handled the particles as well as 
could be expected under the disadvantage. The 
same characters prevailed through the show. Ed 
Rogers wore neat clothes and a black mustache, 
but contributed little to the comedy. There are 
several attractive musical numbers, mostly popu- 
lar selections. The chorus has been selected with 
care. The girls are uniformly good looking and 
should be given credit for their effort to sing. 
They do not pose or "stall," as evident In other 



shows. The costumes are not so expensive or 
pretty as in the other Whallen and Martell at- 
tractions, except the very resplendent tights dis- 
played in the "Amazon" drill. The stage was 
too dark in the "Good Bye, Tony" number. Les- 
ter Pike sang effectively in a deep baritone voice 
and Minnie Harrison rejuvenated the songs she 
sang. She is an ambitious young woman, always 
smiling and possesses a quantity of vivacity. 
Miss Moure also figured actively In numbers. 
Emma Krause commands a good Southern dialect 
and bandied her share in an equally capable man- 
ner. "Cotton Blossoms," with special scenery, 
proved the olio feature. It was staged by Ed 
Rogers. The act Is as good, if not better, than 
some of the "girl acts" seen at the first class 
vaudeville theatres. Lester and Moure In "A 
Day at the Beach" scored with their comedy and 
eccentric antics. Ed Rogers and Alice Warren 
have an old theme for "The Little Joker," In 
which Coster and East Side character songs are 
Introduced to the liking of the audience. New 
material and more brisk action is necessary to 
make the show compare with the average. In its 
present condition it deserves commendation for 
its clean and untainted qualities. 

NOTES.— Carrie Starr has Joined Will H. Cross 
In a sketch now playing the time booked by the 
Western Vaudeville Association. — Gllmore and 
Castle, having finished their time on the Sullivan 
and Consldine Circuit, are scheduled to open at 
Pastor's Theatre, Feb. 10. — Bush and Elliott are 
at present In California playing for Sullivan and 
Consldine. They are due in Chicago about April 1. 
Daly and O'Brien, with "Romance in 
Ireland" Company, will resume their vaudeville 
dates around New York in May and contemplate 
sailing for the other side June 15, having 
arranged time in London. — Bob Adams, the song 
writer, In charge of the professional department 
of Chas. K. klacfts' Chicago office, It is rumored, 
will sever connections with the music publisher 
soon. — W. B. Watson, the burlesque manager. Is 
negotiating with the Bellclalre Brothers for one 
of bis Western Wheel shows next season. They 
will be featured as an added attraction. — Dora 
Marshall, who left the "Washington Society 
( ; iris"' at Minneapolis on account of sickness, re- 
joined the company at the Folly last week. — 
Hallen and Fuller, and Walter Perkins and Com- 
pany are headed for the Coast, opening on the 
Sullivan-Consldine Circuit. — Grace Wilson, the 
pretty songstress playing the prima donna role 
in "The Show Girl," will leave that organization 
next week and probably return to vaudeville. — 
SIgnor Parbranl. of Daniels' Scenic Studio, left 
on Jan. 1 for Mexico, Cuba and South America 
in search of tropical scenes and other material 
for scenery. Edward Biederman. of the firm, is 
on a similar expedition in Europe. — Lew J. 
Welsh and Marie L. BstSS will close with the 
Grace Hayward Company soon and return to 
vaudeville.— The bill at the Grand, Madison, Wis., 
this week, consists of Henderson's "School Boys 
and Girls," Roberts, Hayes and Roberts, the 
Raymonds, Ed. Hayes.— Dlsbro and Hardell, hav- 
ing closed with the Frank Spellman show, are 
now playing dates. — Dick and Alice McAvoy have 
a new act, entitled "Herald Square Jimmy," and 
are looking for an opening in this vicinity. — Busi- 
ness In the Far West lias not been affected by 
the money stringency and slump in theatricals. 
According to authentic reports all the vaudeville 
theatres In the Northwest and Coast are doing 
their usual good business. — The Novelty. TojK'ka, 
Kansas, operated by Sullivan Consldine, opened 
on Monday. 8. R. Wells Is the resident man- 
ager. — The Ward Amusement Compauy, a vaude- 
ville combination at present Journeying In the 
South, will play dates for four weeks commenc- 
ing next week. The organization Includes Harry 
Ward, Manoro, Cuttell and two others.— Warren 
and Howard close with the Whlteslde-Struuss 
Company at Akron. Ohio, on Jan. 18, and will 
resume their vaudeville engagements. — I^>w Wat- 
son, manager of the "Washington Society Girls." 
was presented with a gold beaded cane by the 
company. Fearing a dearth in chorus girls next 
season, Mr. Watson has signed up twenty-two 
damsels for next year. 



S^IN PRftNGISGO 

By W. ALFRED WILSON. 
VARIETY'S San Francisco Office. 
1115 Van Ness avenue (Room 112). 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.).— Week 
29: The Road Show continued In its second 
week, with The Arlington Four and Gallagher and 
Barrett added. 

NATIONAL (Sid Grauman. mgr.).— Week 30: 
The program was of unusual length, with the 
result that some of the acts were cut from dif- 
ferent performances and seldom, if at all, during 
the week was the bill given at its full strength. 
Howard and De Leon in a series of well chosen 
equilibrist ie and contortion feats opened the sliow. 
meeting with a favorable reception. McGreevy 
and Brown, song and (lance duo, followed the 
usual routine, showing up well In their double 
work. Jack Lyle, monologist, was well thought 
of. thanks to some new material and a pleasing 
voice. (Jracelyn Whitehouse was hilled as the 
"Lillian Russell of Vaudeville." She |K»ssesses a 
voles <>f remarkable clearness and reached some 
high notes with charming ease. A stunning gown 
of cream and spangles won an open-eye stare 
from the women In the audience. Mr. and Mrs. 
Monroe had a vehicle In their "Beauty Doctor" 
that afforded them little opportunity, being a 
conglomeration of rough material that belongs 
to the past. The Kaufman Brothers, with their 
■nappy singing and dancing act, registered one 
of the hits of the bill. Madam Voynon and her 
Trained Cockatoos was a big number In closing 
place. An elaborate stage setting and a large 
troupe of well trained tropical birds gave the 
act a good appenrance. Grace Travers and Com- 
pany In Frank Bacon's Japanese sketch, "As In 
a looking Glass." was on at the matinees onlv. 

WIGWAM (Sam. Harris, mgr.).— Week 30: 
Mrs. Tom Thumb was featured, with Mystlcus 
and The Three Kuhns given considerable promi- 
nence In heavy-faced type. Mrs. Tom Thumb and 
her Llllputlan Company offered their familiar 
sketch, "Two Strings to Her Bow." Herman 




First-Class Film 
Rental Service 

199 THIRD AVE., NEW YORK 

AGENTS FOB 

Gaumont's American Films 

18Vb CENTS FEB FOOT. 

"THE PERSEVERING LOVER" 

Agents for OAUMONT CHRONOPHONE. 
Telephone 2994 Stuyvesant. 



fink $ Ortloff 

Cattere 



1806 BBOADWAT, 

Formerly with Max Maxx. 
Telephone 4467 88th St. 



W A NT IT !■ Headline™ and 
▼T ill* 1 JC#if Good Acts . . . 

who wish to break jump. 
Send full information in first letter to 
TYSON, NEW BON TON, 

Vaudeville Theatre, Phils, 



GROUND TUMBLER AT LIBERTY 

Doing fulls and half twists. Good cross 
tumbling. Late of Melrose Troupe. 

Frank Collins 

499 PAWTUCKET ST., LOWELL, MASS. 



nnd Bice worked energetically with comedy acro- 
batics for laughs and not them. The Colby 
Family in their musical sketch. "An Evening at 
Home," made a strong Impression, as did Charles 
l.eora, who opened the show with some clever 
work on the Hying trapeze. The Three Kubna 
made their usual strong showing. Olive Madison 
and Company, producing "The Match Maker," 
received the "white envelope" after their first 
showing, and the clever girl trio, Buford, Bennett 
nnd Buford were added to the bill, to Its ad- 
vantage Fred Lancaster, the baritone, went well. 

VICTORY (I. Coleman Levy. mgr.). — Week 30: 
The bill was .»f a good standard and in pleas- 
ing quality ranked well with any local program 
of the week. The Two Raymonds, baton and 
wheel Spinners, opened the program, the man 
being well up and scoring heavily. Kred Mc- 
Kenna's Trained Dogs were a pleasing feature. 
Reginald Travers and Company produced a 
dramatic sketch, entitled "The Rehearsal," In 
Which the clever delineation of an old man char- 
acter by Travers stood out. Al Fields closed after 
the tlrst performance nnd Fiona Leonard replaced 
him with chnrscter changes and songs, polk and 
Martella. a pair of hard working eccentric come- 
dians, earned a good volume of laughs. Fred 
Gsmbold, in an old opening net. revised almost 
beyond recognition, was one of the hig successes 
of the week. The clever support rendered by 
the girls of the cast helped largely. Al Jolseu In 
his second week was still the feature, going as 
strongly as he did In his opening week. 

EMPIRE (llnl Curtis, mgr.).- Week 30: "What 
n Night" was the title of the J. P. Lee pro- 
duction by the stock company. Possessing a well 
defined plot, interpreted with clever dialogue (a 
trifle risque at times), the opportunities for 
laughs were frequent. In the olio were The 
I.uigl -Plearo Troupe of Acrobats, The Manillas, 
rag modelers, ami Zlmm's Dancing Olrls. 

SIXTEENTH ST. (Al Ouken. mgr.).— Weeh .10: 
Don Carlos and his Dogs made the feature, clos- 
ing the show. Miles and Raymond, comedy 
sketch, won the lauuhs. West and Van Slcklen, 
musical offering. "The College Gymnasium." 
stood In good fnvor. Wilbur Amos, the comedy 
Juggler, amused and Interested. Belle Howard 
and The Blackberry Sisters completed the pro- 
gram. 

MISSION (X. Fried, mgr.). 
following was the line-up of 
sidlne acts: Polly and Ethel 
way. The Wernts, Teleptnn 
Morgan and McC.arry. The Nelson Farnum Tronpe. 

NOTES.— The Tsrrlngtoo, a Western States 
house at Long Beach. Cal.. was burned to the 
ground on the morning of 23. — Harry Spear, of 
the Empire, was married to Nona Ritchie the 
past week.- -The Norris and Rowe shows will 
open at the Auditorium Jan. 11. — The Kaufman 
Brothers are now playing the Sullivan-Consldine 
time. — The Three Kuhns have signed for four 
week on the Psntages time of the Western 
States Circuit. Their wives. Buford. Bennett and 
Buford. will also follow that route. 



—Week f.O: The 
the Sulllvan-Con- 

Itssel, Nick Con- 
Military Sextet, 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



26 



VARIETY 



. 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTI9T8 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




z 




Address WESLEY and PINCUS 




rn 0C3 
ObB LfHSaRKiFiSrc 



MAXIM No. 41 

Such Is an Important factor In every man's life, 
but too many people depend upon it for success. 
Such Is usually found when It isn't needed; It 
generally goes with those who work for it. 

BOOKED— ASK WILTON. 



Th « Great Caicedo 



KINO OV THE WIRE. 



Address per route or V. T. CLXFFER. 



Develde & Zekfo 

.ArtisNc tquilibriste 



En Bomte, Season ltffM, "THE LADY BIRDf." 



WHAT THEY ALL BAT: A GREAT ACT. 



BESSIE WYNN 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 
Direction of KB. E. F. ALBEE. 



ABNER 



HARRY 



ALI 



AND 



En Route T. W. Miner's "HIGH JINKS." 



PEISER 

ECCENTRIC COMEDY ACROBATS. 



WEEK JAN. 13, TROCADERO. PHILA. 



RUBE 



Welch-Francis 

Assisted by COYLE, BEATRICE and DYER. 

BOOKED 80LID. Direction JACK LEVY. 



AL RAYNO l CO. Castellans 

^^ ^ ^ ^ ™ ™ ■■ •■ ^"^ ^"^ THE MOST SENSATIONAL TRICK CY( 



AND 



Bro. 



Introducing Their Wonderful Acrobatic Bull Dogs. 



Direction ALT T. WILTON. 



THE MOST SENSATIONAL TRICK CYCLISTS IN VAUDEVILLE. 

Address Care VARIETY. 



ELLA 



Claus and Radcliffe 

Opened at the Haymarket, Chioago, this week. Result! Three little bows, and Mr. and Mrs. Audience in one loud acclaim, "Immense!" Majestic Theatre, Chicago, week Jan. IS. 



CLAUDE 



James R. Waters 

"THE SINGER OF THE GHETTO." 
MANCHISTER'S "VANITY FAIR" COMPANY Jan. 18, Westminster, Providence. 



SPECIAL FEATURE. 



Potter and Hart well 



THE MAN WITH THE TWO HEADS. 



NELLIE WALLACE 

The Inimitable, Eccentric Comedienne 

Re-opened December 30, Colonial Theatre 



DALY « O'BRIEN 



THAT FUNNY "TANGLEFOOT" DANCING ACT. 



Not one in one like this one. 



EUROPE JUNE 15th. 




A BEAUTIFUL SINGER OF NEWEST SONGS 

GRACE 
WILSON 

Closed with "THE SHOW GIRL" and will re-enter 
Vaudeville. 

Address care VARIETY, Chicago Office. 



BILLY HART 

Principal comedian and producer of all the material in 

BOB MANCHKtTER'S "GAY MASQUKRADCR9," 

a show that is being so well talked about all along the line. 




THAT DAINTY ATHLETE 



Little Belle Gordon 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



RAY MAZIE 

DUNCAN and HOFFMAN 

Comedians. 17 Minutes in "One." HOPKINS', LOUISVILLE, THIS WEEK. 



•TOUR 



AND 

SIXTEEN 

CURTAIN 



•» 



Phlla. North Am. 



44 



THE SONG BIRDS 



77 



With WILLIAM BURRESS 

Music VICTOR HERBERT 

Management WILLIAM BURRESS— X. -P. Circuit 

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THIRTY 
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Representing Only the Best Vaudeville Acts 
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BOSTON 



By EENE8T L. WAITT. 
VARIETY'S Office, 278A Tremont St. 

The vaudeville Hit nation In Boston Is back 
to the jwlnt where It was before the Steam Roller 
whistled and Htarted up the road. In other 
words. B. F. Keith Is "It" here, in vaudeville. 
He has no opposition. 

In the Keith house this week there is an anni- 
versary bill. It is a biff bill, comprising four- 
teen acts and the kinetograph. Clayton White 
and Marie Stuart were headlined in their Hobart 
sketch, "Cherrie," a merry farce with some un- 
usually bright lines. Bessie Wynn, with her new 
song, written by her little self, comes next and 
makes a good impression. She still uses the 
"plant" in the 1m>x and the gallery, but the 
audience likes it, even if it Is old. Bert Levy 
returns, whistling "The Artist's Dream" and 
throwing his pictures on the canvas — a great act, 
finely done. The Romany Opera Company, a 
"K. & E. take-over," made a great success. This 
is one of the greatest singing organizations in 
vaudeville. Florence Quinn, although a tiny girl, 
can give many grand opera singers cards and 
spades. Walter C, Kelly as "The Virginia Judge" 
has a lot of new stories. He Is very popular. 
The l.iisky Quintet Is finely presented and artisti- 
cally perfect. Cooper and Robinson were the only 
colored folk on the bill, and made good in- 
stantly. Caron and Herbert as "The Clown and 
the Acrobat" are always good here, the finale be- 
ing a scream. The Clarence Sisters, soubrettes; 
Ed BstUS, acrobatic balancer; The Heras Family, 
really wonderful tumblers; The La Nole Brothers, 
COtuedy bur; Dudley and Cheslyn and the veteran 
Charles Frederick, Illusionist, complete the bill. 
It is a good variety bill, every number full of 
laughs. Business big all week. 

ORPHBUlf (S. M. Howry, mgr.).— Even with 
Its headliner out of the bill all week after Mon- 
day night, the Orpheum show is strong. Lily 
Lena made a big hit Monday. Her simplicity of 
manner and personal charms were not the least 
import ant part of it. Harry and Kate Jackson 
have a good sketch In "His Day Off," and do it 
well. The Kemps in "Going to Dahomy" get 
good hands, while the dramatic sketch, "The 
Operator," keeps everybody tense. This Is one 
of the strongest, most thrilling sketches ever wen 
In Boston. The audiences seem to like and talk 
about it. It is another argument in favor of 
the belief that a strong, tense, dramatic sketch 
once iu a while gives the substance to a bill 
which, many times, is lacking when an all- 
variety, all-comedy bill is put up. The Sisters 
Macarte, with their midair serpentine dance, are 
as good as when they were at Keith's recently. 
Hill and Whitaker have a good instrumental act, 
with some vocal novelties. W. II. Dillon returns 
with a new song or two, and The Madcaps do a 
romping acrobatic and dancing act that takes 
well. Fred Karno's "Night In an English Music 
Hall" also returns. Business very good. 

AUSTIN & STONE'S (Stone & Shaw, props.).— 
Prince Luca's Cossacks are again the feature, with 
Caffrey and Orant, physical cultnrlsts; the La 
Rues, aerial poses; Chief Debro, the Eskimo, and 
his wife. In the theatre were Dolan and Dillon, 
Hnghes Brothers, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Edwards, 
Charette, Orace Toledo, Norma Phara, and The 
Meadows Comedy Company. Business good. 

LYCEUM (O. H. Bachellor, mgr.).— Harry 
Bryant's Extravaganza, one of those busy shows, 
is on this week, playing to good business. The 
girls are all quick workers. 

PALACE (O, II. Waldron, mgr.).— Sam Hyams, 
of Joe 1 1 urtig's "Girl from Happy Land," didn't 
know what struck the audience Wednesday night, 
for he got an enormous reception. But the house 
was tilled with bis friends, for he is a Boston 
Iniy. This company Is new here, with new cos- 
tumes, new faces and two new skits, "The Do- 
ings of l'aris" and 'On Shipboard." 

HOWARD (Jay Hunt, mgr.).— Pictures of the 
Burns-Moir fight held high place this week and 
drew big crowds. "The Cherry Blossoms," the 
traveling company, with John Perry at their 
head. Llllle Perry, and Markey and Moran were 
the olio features. The Howard's own bill Included 
Matthews and Harris in "Adam the Second"; 
Gorman and West, singers; Keegan and Mack 
In "The Cowboy and the Squaw"; Mr. and Mrs. 
Larry Shaw, fancy dancers; Phil and Carrie Rus- 
sell, The Two Dalys, Pike Brothers, and Dave 
Shaffer. 

COLUMBIA (II. N. Farren, mgr.).— Johnnie 
Weber is the goods with the "Broadway Gaiety 
Girls." He Is Just the right kind of s comedian 
to please everybody. Blanche Washburn has a 
big place to fill, but does it nicely, for besides 



doing a stunt In the burlesques she Is in the 
olio in a good sketch. The Bennington Brothers 
have a good ring act, while Clarence Marks, coon 
shouter, and Beatrice Haynes, singer, complete 
the bill. The Columbia stage on Thursday nights 
Is used for a basket ball game, which draws lots 
of people. With the wrestlers Tuesday and 
amateurs Friday, the Columbia is a pretty busy 
place. 

MOTION PICTURE HOUSES.— A new one, The 
Old South, opens next week on Washington street, 
opposite the Old South Church. This Is on the 
site of the old Morris Brothers' Minstrel Theatre, 
famous years ago. Nat Burgess will manage It 
and the house will seat 700. The Scenic Temple, 
In what WSJ formerly Berkeley Temple, is draw- 
ing good custom. In the vaudeville bill there 
this week are Henry T. Walte, violinist; The 
Visocchls, concertina artists; 'Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Bonnin, and • J. W. Mey wers, singer. At the 
Premier this week is featured Josselyn's pano- 
rama of "Ben Hur." The Comique is playing up 
"The Indian's Love Story," and tire Unique is 
running "Parsifal" to good business. Manager 
Mack at the Hub has engaged Dave Ballantlne, 
tenor; A. J. Fontaine, basso, and Tom Plant 
as his singing corps, also Master Francis E. 
Doherty, boy soprano. German scenes are fea- 
tured at the Star this week, with a lot of comedy 
films. 



PHILADELPHIA 

By GEORGE M. YOUNG. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.).— Although 
the Keith house has no opposition now in cater- 
ing to high class vaudeville patronage, there was 
no falling oft In the class of entertainment offered 
this week. Six of the acts taken over from 
K. k B. were on the bill, and there was no dis- 
position to give these acts any the worst of the 
placing. May Irwin played the second and last 
week of her engagement. According to the terms 
of her contract, no other act was allowed to In- 
terfere with her in singing "coon" songs, and she 
met with the same favor as last week. She has 
proven a big drawing card. The new George 
Ade sketch, "The Mayor and The Manicure," 
was given Its first showing and won its share 
of honors. It Is bright and snappy. The Sheuck 
Brothers made their second appearance and won 
more honors with their splendid head and hand- 
balancing feats. The Zaretsky Troupe of Rus- 
sian dancers pleased mildly, though their dancing 
in native style and costume ranks well up among 
the troupes shown here. The Kitamura Japs of- 
fered a familiar routine of perch, balancing and 
foot work, with their usual good effect. No 
number on the bill went better than Orth and 
Fern, who gave their familiar musical specialty, 
"Sign That Book." The Seven Mowatts held 
down the closing position nicely with their club 
juggling. The Meredith Sisters were back again 
with the same songs. The girls do very well 
with what they have, but each of their songs is 
well worn and needs replacing, particularly 
"Laughing Water," which will soon be as old 
as "Hiawatha." The sisters work hard, using 
five or six changes, and with new songs their 
act would still rank well up. The specialty used 
by Kelly and Ash by Is also In need of a change. 
The boundlng-table work just carries the act 
along, though several other acts are showing Im- 
provement along the same lines. Foster and his 
dog "Mike" were among the early acts and won 
their share of the honors. Collins and Brown, 
a German act, showed no Improvement over their 
last appearance. Hafford and Mantell sprung 
some moth eaten Jokes and cross fire talk. Esfe, 
Button and Este did well with their comedy acro- 
batics and cycling. Thomas Notter Dunne met 
with fair success in imitations, the place ou the 
bill probably operating against him. Deery and 
Francis were more of the old school talent, choos- 
ing worn 8ong> and junir comedy. Whether pur- 
posely or by accident, Deery follows Jimmy 
Powers in his' rube make-up, talk and actions. 



AUSTRALIAN NOTES. 

Sydney, Nov. 16. 

Sydney Is in the throes of a great coal strike. 
All the miners at Newcastle (N. S. W.), the 
greatest coal producing city in Australia, are out 
and there are turbulent times ahead if a settle- 
ment is not arrived at. 

Williamson's "Mother Goose" Pantomime Com- 
pany were to have opened in Newcastle during 
the strike week, but have decided to hold off 
Indefinitely. Theatrical managers have apprised 
their employees living across the bay that they 



must live In the city until the strike terminates. 

The leading electric lighting stations have noti- 
fied the various playhouses that they have only 
enough mstMiat-Ja hand for- aether Wttfc*! Wf « 
ply of light. 

Sydney's Tlvoll has a very strong bill Just 
now. Arthur Croxon, an acceptable London 
mimic, making a successful first appearance In a 
monologue. Most of his business has been worked 
by various performers at different times, bnt 
Croxon's work stands out. The Molasso Quartet 
has lost the principal male member, he being 
down with appendicitis. The remaining trio are 
working very hard to make the act go, but it 
loses a great deal of Its value by the loss of the 
Molasso. Seeley and West, musicians; Alexander, 
Risley act; Five Whiteleys, Madame Rhodesia, 
juggler; Fred Bluett, Cranston and Mrs. Bennett, 
weak. 

NATIONAL AMPHITHEATRE.— Manager Bain 
Is back from the Melbourne show and reports 
splendid business from both houses. Little Laurie, 
a clever child contortionist; Joe Charles, come- 
dian; Frank King, Pearl Lovell, Addle Barton, 
Brightie Smith, provide a very good bill. 

Nowcastle-Klng's Hall, despite the strike, main- 
tains a great share of popularity. Several hold- 
overs were reinforced on Saturday last by 
Kavanagh, boy Juggler; Scott and Beresford, 
sketcbists, very good; Beattle McDonald, Golden 
Duo, and Scott Brothers. Percy Wenton, who Is 
a first favorite, la also on the bill. 

THEATRE ROYAL (Brisbane).— Jack Russell, 
character vocalist, a very clever performer, is 
topllner. Victor Myers, a llliputian comedian, also 
goes big. On a varied bill are Con Morenl, 
comedian; Professor Parker. handcuff king; 
Blutch Jones, coon comedian; Eileen O'Neill, child 
instrumentalist, and the Lonton Trio. 

TIVOLI (Adelaide).— Pastor, acrobat; Chrystal 
Sisters; I lagan and Eraser, Clara Keating, and a 
picture machine. 

At Hobart, Lucas' "Gaiety Entertainers'* are 
going well, Fanny Powers, a youthful mimic, 
scoring a big hit. Will Stevens, comedian; Frank 
Herbert, balladist; Powers Brothers, Jones and 
Williams, Rhodosbury and Dawson, Olive Carr 
and Ethel Leslie complete. 

Rumor has it that there is to be a meeting of 
vaudeville managers in Sydney early this mouth. 
The Australian Vaudeville Association is attain- 
ing such dimensions that the proprietors are be- 
coming afraid of it, hence the meeting. So far 
as A. V. A. matters are concerned there la no 
reason for complaint. Everything seems to be 
going on smoothly, with one exception, and that 
is the proposed amalgamation of the Sydney and 
Melbourne bodies. So soon as this great move 
is accomplished the London V. A. F. will gather 
the A. V. A. into Its fold. 

At Melbourne Opera House Tom Finglas, coon 



comedian, Is the only new arrival since my last 
letter. He is credit- with being a clever dancer. 
Also on the bill are Price and Revost, the "copy" 
act; Hay man and Franklin, La fgr-lfffce, Jack 
Willis. 

Talking of "copy" acts, s well-known Aus- 
tralian acrobatic team have Introduced a great 
deal of the comedy business of Price and Revost 
Into their act. The "pinch" la pronounced, but 
little effect Is obtained. Again, a youthful jug- 
gler has built his act all-around that of Hartley, 
the English school boy juggler; bis "pinch" la 
even more absurd than the previous one, and 
met with shrieks of silence when I saw It last 
week. 

At the Melbourne Gaiety Brennan's Entertain- 
ers have put up a record. Strong bills have been 
served up each week. McKlsson and Kearni, 
Antonio's Dogs and Monkeys, Carlton and Sut- 
ton, Olga Montry, Arthur Tauchert, and Coleman 
Sisters. 

At Wonderland City William Anderson per- 
petrated a Coventry pageant anent Lady Codlva. 
The introductory performance was spoiled by a 
heavy shower of rain. 

Melbourne A. V. A. gave Maurice Geraldo (of 
the Juggling Geraldos) a splendid send-off last 
week. 'IT. "re was a suggestion that he should 
bo presented with :l gold badge In consideration 
of the good work he had accomplished for the 
association, but Maurice said "No. boys, give me 
one of the plain ones, such as you wear your- 
selves." and it went at that. 

Michael Nolan leaves for England shortly. 
Mike is not the "bhoy" of old, but the trip out 
lias worked wonders with him, and he should do 
Well on his return. 

Noni Rlckards, daughter of King Harry, and 
the wife of Treasurer Maas, of the Sydney Tlvoll, 
has presented hubby with a baby daughter. 



ALBANY, N. T. 

GAIETY (II. B. Nichols, mgr.).— Dnve Marlon 
and his Dreamland Burlesquers is the best show- 
to strike Albany this season.- PROCTOR'S 

(Howard Graham, mgr. Monday rehearsal 10).— 
Reynard, ventriloquist, well received; Camille 
Trio, acrobats, good; Brown, Harris and Brown, 
did well; McKenzle and Shannon, "Shine Flirta- 
tion," good; Clifford and Burke, conversational- 
ists, well received; Ethel McDonough, "The Girl 
Behind the Screen," fair; Parker's Trained Dogs, 
pleased. MARTKL. 



ATLANTA, GA. 

ORPHEUM (Ben. Kahn. mgr.).- Fred Zobedle. 
equilibrist, none better; "Little Jim" McKachern, 
juvenile songster, went big; Leo Carrlllo, monolo- 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



TWENTY-FIFTH SEASON. 




EMPERORS 



OF MUSIC. 
TWENTIETH WEEK WITH 




GRACE CAMERON OPERA CO. 



FRANK RUSSELL, Manager. 



ELLIS 



MONA 



Blamphin 

I England's Premier Hij 



and 



Hehr 



High-Class Comedy Duettitts. 
Success, Cumberland, Md. (second week), special attraction. 



Wanted 



For 
the 



Hub Quartette 



A No. 1 BASS and TENOR. Mutt have strong voices. Big act. Big money. Bookings right to 
Now York. Apply or writs 

FRED LANCASTER, Wigwam Theatre, San Francisco, Cal. 



"When anmccring advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



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VARIETY 



REPBESBINTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRCSCNTATIVB ABTI8TS 



FRANK FOGERTY 



"Ain't I Right, Boys?" 

The Dublin Minstrel 



Booked Solid until June, 1908. K. A- P. Circuit 



BERRY 



AND 



BERRY 



"Berry and Berry, in a musical melange, infuse lots of pretty musical numbers on various instru- 
ments, and a bunch of good, wholesome, infectious fun into their act, which pleases mightily." — 
(Orpheum Theatre) — St. Paul Pioneer Press, Dec. 9th. 

JAN. 6, HAYMARKET, CHICAGO. 




Afrlr 



#r*& 



Juttrmlr Arttata 

JJrrurnttng a tuntrl fringing ana Banring sprrialty 

Address M per route, or 248 W. 45th 8t., V. Y. City. 

Act staged by JSed OUyburn 




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SCOTT I WHALE Y 

ECCENTRIC COLORED COMEDIANS. 

NOW ON KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



IN/lclN/IAHOIM'S 




44 



PORTER MAIDS 



19 



THE MAGNETIC 



MAIDA DUPREE 



'High School Girls." 



Binging and Dancing Comedienne. 

Jan. 13-15. Gayety, Albany; 16-18, Lyceum, Troy. 



A 12 MINUTE LAUGH. 

The Versatile Comedienne. 

Time filled until Feb. 15. 
Permanent address 875 Central Park West. New York. 'Phone 7518 River. 



DEARLY ARVILLE 



VAUDEVILLl SURPRISE 



JOLLY JOHN LARKINS 



ORIGINAL 
CONCEPTION IN ONE 

Wesley & Pincus 

Exclusive Agent* 




OZARTO 



Double Instrumentalist 

Presenting the most Artistio and Sensational 
Musical Novelties extant. 

The Aot that has never been duplicated. 
A revelation to the musical world. 

ALL AGENTS. 

Address MOZARTO 
257 West 341b St., NEW YORK 



Phil Ott, Nettie Nelson 
and Al Stedman 

with the "Sam Devere" show 
in "DR. NEARLY, A DOCTOR." 



Return to Vaudeville 




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California's Favorite Comediennes 



A REAL OOMEDY AOT. 



UNDER PERSONAL DIRECTION 



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IMS BWAY.. M. Y. 0. 



THE 



A SENSATIONAL EUROPEAN NOVELTY. 




ERNESTS 



TRAMPOLINE HORIZONTAL BAR ARTI8T8. 
A featured attraction on 8ulliv*n-0onsidin. Circuit. Address oare VARIETY. 



ADAMINI - TAYLOR 

In his ITALIAN CHARACTER impersonations, assisted by eminent Violinist, a* 

"THE STROLLING MUSICIANS" 

. JAN. 18TH, PROCTOR'8, TROY, N. Y. 



Correspondents Wanted Wherever There is a Variety Performance* 



GEO. J. 



LAMBERT WILLIAMS 



E X X /\ 



This Week. Nov.lty, Brooklyn 



LIGHT ENTERTAINERS 



TJ«der Direction of JCNIK JACOBS, 1402 Broadway, Now York 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



Noxft Woo* (Jon. 18). Got Ham. Brooklyn 



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Europe's Representative Gymnastic Comedians 

ID KEITH-PROCTOR 



CIRCUIT 



glit, one of the bits; Stanley and Cogswell, com- 
edy skit, well rewarded; Olympla Quartet carried 
off honors: Aletbea Duo, fair; Marzello and 
Woulfe, comedy bar. held them nicely. BRIX. 



BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 

ARMORY (R. Hart. mgr.).— Exceptionally 
strong bill, headed by The Military Octet, wblch 
proved a treat; James P. Conlan and Lillian 
Steele, singing and dancing, good; Went worth, 
Vesta and "Teddy," the unique clowns and their 
educated dog, very good; Cecelia Weston, charac- 
ter comedienne, good; The Five IMuosoffls, Jug- 
glers, very entertaining; Kelso and Lelghton, 
"The Lady Burglar," good; Hal Merrltt. "Foster 
Girl Monologue," entertaining. JOGGARET. 



BUFFALO, N. T. 

With the opening of comic opera at the Teck, 
"Advanced Vaudeville" steps out, leaving the field 
clear for Shea's. SHEA'S (M. Shea, mgr. Mon- 
day rehearsal 10). — A capital beaunne" bill and 
capacity business. Minnie 8eligman and William 
Bramwell, "A Dakota Widow," proved a one-act 
comedy causing much laughter; World and Kings- 
ton pleased In singing and dancing; DeWltt Burns 
and Torrence, in "The Awakening of the Toys," 
very clever; Bellclair and Kramer In feats of 
strength, good; Elimore Sisters in "The Actress 
and the Maid." a laughing hit; Dixon Brothers 
were original and excellent; Murphy and Frances, 
good coon sbouters; Paul Conchas gave an act 

seldom equalled on the stage. GARDEN 

(Columbian Amusement Co., directors; Charles E. 
White, local mgr.). — Is doing a capacity business. 
The Golden Crook Burlesquers have a big drawing 
card with John L. Sullivan, Jake Kllraln and Kid 
Cutter. The company carries a good line of 
vaudeville specialties which take well. Next: 
"The Trocaderos." LAFAYETTE (Empire Cir- 
cuit, directors; Charles M. Baggs, mgr.). — "The 
Twentieth Century Maids" filled the bouse. Terry 
McGovern and Young Corbett were special fea- 
tures. "A Trip to Panama," Cornelia and Eddie, 
Pauline Moran. Fern Melrose, Abe St. Clair, May 
Strehl and others in the olio and a good chorus. 
Next: Rellly and Wood's Big Show. HIPPO- 
DROME (Jas. Atherton, mgr.). — La Contra and La 
Rue In a musical act, went well. 111. songs and 

animated pictures to good returns. GRAND (A. 

Schlayter, mgr.). -'-Gertrude Richter, child song 
and dance, pleased, and changes in 111. songs and 

moving pictures pleased; good business. 

BIJOU DREAM (Chas. E. Dempsey. mgr.).— Jack 
Morton and Fred Delaware pleased in singing; 
new motion pictures and HI. songs-filled the house. 

GOLDEN PALACE.— Doing a good share of 

business. Frederick the Great, a skillful magician, 

helped out a good bill. NEW.— The Passion 

Play has bad a run of ten weeks. The East 

Side motion picture shows are having good busi- 
ness. La Grant finds favor with West Side audi- 
ences. NOTES. — The Golden Crook Co. lost 

Monday's matinee at the Garden on account of 
non-arrival of baggage.— The Stewart Comic Opera 
Co. occupy the Tech instead of "Advanced Vaude- 
ville." and had a packed house on the opening 
Monday. DICKSON. 

CAMDEN, N. J. 
BROADWAY (John C. Peebles, mgr.).— There 
was a strong bill offered here this week with 
Robert L. Dalley and Company In the sketch 
"Fun on a Trolley" as the big feature, and It 
proved a big hit. Martlnettl and Sylvester, com- 
edy acrobats, were also well liked; Hoey and 
Lea, Three Nightingales, Emll Hoch and Com- 
pany, Pbll Bennett, Zarrell Brothers and Zalno 
made up the remainder of the program. 



CINCINNATI, 0. 

COLUMBIA (H. M. Zlegler. mgr. Sunday re- 
hearsals 10). — Three dumb acts In eight spoil 
any bill. The show may be classed as fair. The 
opening. Mile. Martha, strong; George W. Day, 
blackface, good; Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Barry In 
"At Hensfoot Corner," clever; the Ruppelts, acro- 
bats, great; Chris. Richards easily the hit of the 
bill, and will be expected to return regularly; 
Six GUnserettls, acrobatics, cleverly performed; 
•That" Quartet, the best; Harry Houdlnl, "Jail 
breaker," big drawing card. Houdlnl performed 
the feat of escaping from a large milk can for 
the first time here, and had them all guessing. 

STANDARD (Frank J. Clement, house agt.).— 

"Behman Show." If an audience had ice water 
In their veins they would have laughed at the 
work of Pete Curley, Mark Bennett, Tommy Glen- 
roy, Frank Moore, Ned Dandv and James C. 
Morton In "Hey-DIddle-Dlddle," the closing bur- 
lesque. The opening brings out the entire strength 
of the company In "The Passing Review," a 
cleverly written musical piece. Mollle Williams 
is the real thing among the women. The 
"Hehman Show" would make a hit In any first- 
class theatre In the country, and Is playing to 
i a pa city business. 



CLEVELAND, 0. 

HIPPODROME (Max Faetkenheuer, mgr.).— 
The opening number, "Coaching Days," Is still 
retained with Its former success; Power's Ele- 
phants do many stunts; Harry Brown, colored, 
pleased; Clnquevalll, marvelous Juggling; Alex- 
andoff Troupe, Russian dauces; Baron's Burlesque 
Menagerie, much delight; Edmund Bosanquet, 
violinist, master of the Instrument. The close 



of the show, "The Cloudburst," creates enthus- 
iasm. Seats are all sold out at every per- 
formance up to date. KEITH'S (H. A. Daniels, 

mgr.), — An all-star bill is at Keith's this week, 
being one of the best vaudeville shows In this 
town. Asra opened the show and proved a 
clever billiard ball manipulator; WUIle Weston, 
Imitations, won favor; Willard Simms in a 
laughable comedy, "The Crickets," novel sing- 
ing and dancing act; Swor Brothers, blackface 
artists; Clarence Wilbur In "The New Scholar," 
hit of the bill; Carrie I)e Mar, comedienne, very 
good; Ella Bradna and Frank Derrick, daring 
bare back act and they do many feats of skill. 

WALTER D. HOLCOMB. 



CUMBERLAND, MD. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC (Mellenger Bros., nigra.). 
Nilssous' Aeriel Ballet, good; Forbes and Forbes, 
blackface, very clever; Adele Nllsson, serpentine 

dancer, good. WEILAND (John Kirk, mgr.).— 

La Petite Jean, "Dixie Queen," clever; May 
Brady. 111. songs".'—— SAVOY (Ben Wolf, mgr.).— 



Motion pictures and HI. songs. 



W. D. ROIIRER. 



DALLAS, TEX. 
THE MAJESTIC (Interstate Amusement Co. 
Monday rehearsal 11).— Week Dec. 30: Melbourne 
MacDowell and Virginia Drew Trescott, bead- 
liners, pleased; the Five Columbians scored 
heavily; Arthur Huston and Company, comedy 
Juggling, much satisfaction; Bert Lennon, char- 
acter Impersonations, well received; Edward 
Berger, equilibrist, interesting; Geo. W. Stewart 
entertained. Enjoyable bill. Business good. 

M. S. F. 



DENVER, COL. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— Week 
Dec. 3U: Tom Nawn and Company, familiar 
sketch, big favorites; the La Scala Sextet, op- 
eratic vocalists, added feature, repeatedly en- 
cored; "Slivers" Oakley and Chas. Slegrlst. 
luughlng hit. Slegrist's "Double From the Floor" 
a sensation; Eva Mudge scored strongly; Pete 
Baker, songs and stories, won laughs; Vivians, 
sharpshooters. Interesting exhibition; "The Golden 

Graces" held the audience to the finish. 

MAJESTIC (Jno. Cordray, mgr.).— This house has 
caught on well. Harry First and Company In 
"The Marriage Fee," excellent playlet, the laugh- 
ing hit; the Faust Brothers, pantomimists, scored 
heavily; Harold Shaw and Company in "Out In 
the Night." well received. The act has the 
familiar "burglar and child" plot, but was ban- 
died nicely. Delll Fraud Domenelo, operatic 
tenor, unable to finish on account of severe cold; 
L. T. Johnson, ventriloquist, good; Flood and 

Hayes, barrel Jumpers, pleased. CRYSTAL 

(Wm. A. Weston, gen. mgr.). — The Jewel-Morton 
Troupe, clubs, excellent and handsomely cos- 
tumed; Baroness Von Zieber, vocalist, enthusiasti- 
cally received; Gehan and Spencer, dancers, hit 
of show; Gilllhan and Brogee, singers and 
dancers, comedy to themselves, scored heavily; 
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Bartlette, Juvenile sketch, well 

liked. NOVELTY (Bert Plttman, mgr.).— 

Williams. Thompson and Copeland, rough comedy, 
caught on big, Thompson funny comedian; Frank 
Bacon and Company, "Going Home," well re- 
ceived; Garrler and Etherton, another sketch, 
good; Jessie Livingston, comedienne, did nicely; 

I/eCall, gymnast, very good. NOTE. — Geban 

and Spencer, at the Crystal, were with Jos. M. 
Woods' "Boy Wanted, which disbanded after 
playing the Novelty week 16. None of the boy a 
received their last week's salary. H. X. B. 



DES MOINES, IA. 

MAJESTIC (Fred Buchanan, mgr.).— Week 30: 
Fetching Brothers, musical act; Three Meers, 
comedy wire, good; Watson, Hutchlngs and Ed- 
wards, comedy sketch, rough but carried; "Ace 
of Trumps," by Rose Coghlan, weak; ()kal>e 
Japs, excellent acrobatics; Dixon and Fields, 
"German Sailors," interesting; "Eight Vassar 
Girls," musical, enjoyable; kinodrome showing 

pew films. EMPIRE (Ruben Bros., mgrs.). — 

Howard and Germalne, acrobatics, good; Rankin 
and I^eslle,- comedy musical, ordinary; Claire 
Maynard, character linger, entertaining; Hcr- 
Bhall's Dogs, well trained; Ruth Severence and 
Company In "Nowadays," exciting and amusing. 



DUBUQUE, IA. 

BIJOU (Jake Rosenthal. mgr.) .— Bellclalre 
p. rot hers, gymnasts, best ever; Dolph and Susie 
Levlno, very good; Zola Sisters, mirror dance, 
novelty; G. Herbert Mitchell, monologlst; Lewis 
Joseph, dancing, fair; Al. Tleniey, ill. songs, in- 
definite, and kinodrome. LYRIC (William L. 

Bradley, mgr.). — Moving pictures: fair business. 
Sunday agitation by local law and order league 
may stop Sunday operations. VERA V. HAAS. 



DULUTH, MINN. 

BIJOU (Joe Malt land. mgr.>.— Al. Carlisle's 
dogs and ponies, very good; St. John and Le 
Flore, well received; Ilobson and Sheldon, neat 
sketch; Sheffer and Trimmer, song and dance, 
good; Manning Twlu Sisters, clever; John Mc- 
Dowell, 111. songs. ABE. 






EUGENE CLINE 

Stores Located as Follows: 

EUGENE CLINE, 59 Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 

EUGENE CLINE. Third and Nicollet Aves., Minne- 
apolis. Minn. 

EUGENE CLINE, 268 S. State St., Salt Lake City. 

Utah 

EUGENE CLINE. 6th and Olive Sis., St. Louis. Mo. 

EUGENE CLINE, 1021-23 Grand Avenue, Kansas 

City, Mo. 

EUGENE CLINE. 7 1 7 Superior Ave.. N. E„ Cleve- 
land. Ohio 

EUGENE CLINE, 221 S. Broad St.. Atlanta. Ga. 



EAST0N, PA. 

ORPHEUM (J. W. Osterstock, mgr.).— Harry 
La Rose and Company in "The Sailor and the 
Horse," very acceptable headline attraction; The 
I'antzer Trio, gymnasts, scored heavily; Brown 
and Nevarro, character changes, very good; Sain 
Williams, pianologue, excellent; Geo. Whiting 
and the Melnotte Twins in "A Whirlwind of 
Nonsense," highly pleasing, got a number of 
calls; Lavelle and Sinclair, songs and dances, 
well received; Belle Hatbaway's Monkeys, very 
amusing. G. GREUP. 



ELMIRA, N. Y. 

FAMILY (G. W. Middleton, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10). — Three Fredericks, strong act; 
William II. Burke, good; MeWade, May and Com- 
pany, hit; Tyson and Fennell, clever dancing act; 

Georgt W. Evers, scored. RIALTO (F. W. Mc« 

Connell, mgr. Monday rehearsal 1:30). — Lizzie 
B. Raymond, Falardaux and Itohinc, Brand Sis- 
ters, Harry Reed, Laura Martiere and Minnie 
Wilson; strong bill. J. M. BEE US. 



EL PASO, TEX. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— Week 
1-0: ("lias. Ledegar, honoring rope, very good; 
Kathleen De Voe, monologlst, fair; Inman's Dogs, 
Cantteld and Carleton, very amusing; ('apt. 

Webb's Seals. MAJESTIC (Frank Rich, mgr.). 

— Week 1-7: Sherman and Fuller, entertaining; 
Olive and Mack, well received; Lillian Starr, fa- 
vorite; Onslaw and O'Brien, amusing. 

F. W. CAMPBELL. 



FORT DODGE, IOWA. 

MIDLAND (Wm. P. Dermer, mgr.).— Com- 
mencing this house, heretofore dramatic, will 
have vaudeville three nights a week. The acts 
will play the week between Mason City and Fort 

Dodge. EMPIRE (I. H. Bernstlne. mgr.).— 

Moving pictures and 111. songs pleasing good 
crowd*. Blanche Tennant has severed her con 
nection here and Is now singing at the new De- 
light. DBLIOHT (II. P. Spencer, mgr.).— Mov- 
ing pictures and 111. songs pleasing good crowds. 



FORT WORTH, TEX. 

MAJESTIC (Interstate Amusement Co.).— Week 
Dec. HO: Mile. Esmeralda, xylophone, good; Carol 
and Farnum, acrobatic, fair; Coletta Powers and 
Company, laughable sketch; James F. McDonald, 
monologlst, good; Marlon and Pearl, acrobatics, 

fair; Charles Silow, contortionist. LYRIC (tveo. 

W. Barnhart, mgr.). — Vane and Declalrvllle, 
aerial, topnotchers; G lady I Meddleton. soprano, 
good; Curran and DeGray, comedy sketch; c. e. 
Able, HJ. MMlgl. F. II. BARNES*. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

POLES (Harry Bailey, mgr.).— Capt. Geo. Auger 
and Company, "Jack, the Giant Killer," bead- 
liners, and have a first clas 8 act; Gertrclla, sou- 
brette, excellent as a gymnast also; C. W. Llttle- 
tlehl Is well liked, his skill as a mimic unequalled, 
his singing very sweet and a good story teller; 
Mr. and Mrs. Robyim present "The Counsel for 
the Defence," a good act In which he excels; 
Knight Brotbera and Bawtelle, dance splendidly, 
sing well, comedy Im>Iow the average; The Searl 
and Violet Allen Company. In ••'Hie Traveling 
Man." funny and moves lively; Dunedln Troupe, 
acrobatic cycll>ts. work hard and win solid ap- 
plause. SCENIC (H. C. Young, mgr.).— Hen- 
derson and Dotson, colored entertainers, very good; 
Cliff Bailey, pleased; Jim Dilkes, selections on 
different Instruments, fair act; Ernest Pillion, a 
local singer, Is winning deserving applause singing 
HI. sOOgi. M. W. MORRON. 

HOBOKEN, N. J. 

EMPIRE (A. M. Brtlggemann, mgr. Monday 
rehearsal 10).— Will II. Murphy and Blanche 

Nichols head the bill. "From Zaza to Uncle Tom," 
the bit: Zascll and Vernon Company, Interesting 
acrobatic COinedy pantomime; Kennedy ami 
Rooney, pleasing; Martin Brothers, xylophone ex- 
perts, clever; Nctta Vesta, very neat singing act; 
Anita Hart ling, Juggler, fair; Henry (.'live, moool- 
Ogist and burlesque magic, very clever; Murray 
K. Hill, songs and talk. JOHN KAY. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 
GRAND (Sharer Zlegler. mgr. ).— Big t,|t of 
program Julius Tannen, ruoaologlst ; Eleanor 

J'alke, always popular here; Hurry Alllster, very 



30 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 





THE FAMOUS 

JACKSON 
FAMILY 

WORLD'S MOST MAR- 
VELOUS CYCLISTS. 



WILDER 



Marshall 
P. 



866 W. 97th St., New York. 
Phone 8188 Riverside. 




HERBERT LLOYD 

And His Principal Assistant 

LILLIAN LILYAN 

In Front of the "RAADHUS" (City Hall), 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 



It isn't the name that make* the act— 
It't the act that makes the name, 




THE KINO OF IRELAND, 

JAMES B. DONOVAN 

AND 

RENA ARNOLD 

QUEEN OF VAUDEVILLE. 

DOLNO WELL, THANK YOU. 

ALF T. WILTON, Agent 




FRED ZOBEDIE 

World's Renowned Gymnast. 
Booked Solid Until June let, 1908. 

LaNoleBros. 

Gomedv Gymnastic Novelty 

REICH A PLUNKETT, Agents. 



WILBUR DOBBS 

Comedian— Miner's '* Americans " 




Chris 
Richards 



England's 
Eccentric Comedian 

JAN. 13, KEITH'S, 
COLUMBUS. 

MARINELLI, AGENT. 



SALLY 



Rice - Cohen 

Presenting "A Bachelor Wife." 
WEEK JAN. 18, ORPHEUM, OAKLAND. 





NOVELTY ACROBATS. 

Watoh our "Mat" 
In Vaudeville. 



THE MYSTERIOUS CONJURER 

"SILENT" MORA 

And Hit Company of Trained Chicken*. 
At Present Feature Grahame Stock Company. 

ROWLAND 

The Great Tramp Juggler 

dick McAllister 

ORIGINAL 

SECOND 8EASON, Gua Hill's "Around the 
Clock" Company. 

America's Original "That Bad Boy (Late of 
Fred Karno's), "Night in an English Musical 
Hall." 

Permanent Address, care DI8BECKER, 
66 IRVING PLACE, NEW YORK CITY. 

Clifton Crawford 



Direction JOE HART. 



Melville ^ Morgan 

TWO DANCING GIRL8, with "Avenue Girls." 



RICE & PREVOST 



IN 



"Bumpty Bumps 



99 



GRACE 



Ritterand Foster 

ACROSS THE POND. 

Address care 80MER A WARNER, 

1 Tottenham Court Road, London, Ens;. 

ALF T. WILTON, American Agent. 

Grace Orma 



SIX FEET IV "ONE 
DIRECTION OF 



»» 



JENI E JACOBS 



BENJ. CHAPIN 



LINCOLN 




In His Own 
Original One- 
Act Play 

THE 

WHITE 

HOUSE" 

HEADLINER 

Week Jan. 13 

KEITH'S, 

PHILA. 



BainoaidShaw 

BURLE8QUE ECCENTRICS. 

N. Y. Hippodrome, indef. 

George Connors I JANE GILBERT 



'STRAIGHT MAN' 
With "Avenue Girls"— "The Hallway Tenor." 



With MAY TULLY IN "8top, Look and Listen" 
JAN. 13, SHEA'S, BUFFALO. 



Why not have a cartoon of yourself or act for lobby, or a diagram of your tricks ? 

I'LL DRAW THEM FOR YOU 







If you are, this is the 




ORIGINAL 
protection 



Address oare VARIETY 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



31 



■acccssful ' with Impersonation!. Headline act, 
liana San and Company in "The Gelaha'a 
Dream." Attractive In • pictorial way. Guyer 
and Crlspl's hurrah finish brought applause. The 
Barrows-Lancaster Company well liked In their 
"A Jolly Jollier," and the Montrose Troupe gave 
fine acrobatics. A French team of singers, Lee 
Aubin Leonel, Interest, but the Interest soon dies 
put, as the latter half of their offering Is hardly 

worth while. GAYBTY (Edward Shayne, 

mgr.). — "New York Stars." Tyson Sisters much 

In evidence, and a good lot of chorus girls. 

EMPIRE (Henry Burton, mgr.). — "Star Show 
Girls" to good business. Q. W. 

JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

MAJESTIC (L. B. Cool, mgr.).— Adelaide Herr- 
mann in a clever magic act, headllner; Middleton 
and Spelltnyer, "A Texas Wooing," a close second 
and is featured; The Dixie Serenaders, colored 
entertainers, are pleasing the audiences; Lambertl, 
musician, Impersonations, fine; Rossalne and 
Doretto, eccentrics, good; Whittle, the ventrilo- 
quist, good; Gilbert and Katen, Hebrew come- 
dians, amusing. PARK (II. W. Scherer, mgr.). 

—Minerva, handcuff queen, the feature act, good; 
Kennard Brothers, eccentric acrobats, ordinary; 
De Chantal Twins, in songs, sing well aud dress 
well; The Sllbor Four, singers and dancers, clever. 

CAMBRIA (H. W. Scherer, mgr.).— Al 

Field's Minstrels, good, the singing being especial- 
ly fine. Kellar aud Thurston, 10 17. 

JESTICAM. 



JOLIET, ILL. 

GRAND (L. M. Goldberg, mgr.).— Week 6-8: 
The l'oiriers, headiiners. Nettle Fields, good; 
Funny Gerdallar, pleased; Young and Brooks, well 
received; Russel and Devere, liked. 

- -- - A. J. STEVENS. 



KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

MAJESTIC (H. W. Crull, mgr.).— Week Dec. 30: 
Hay tlen Family, wire, flue; Joseph Ketler and 
Company, comedy sketch, clever; Sang Fay Lee, 
Chinese violinist, fair; Bryant Saville, comedy 
musicians, fine act. DIZ. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 

The Orpheum has now formally taken pos- 
session of the Shubert Theatre. Martin Lehman, 
resident manager of the Orpheum, la In control 

there. ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.). — 

Hilda Spong, headllner, "Kit," hit; Eight Vassar 
Girls, musical, excellent; Four Amatls Sisters, 
pianists, very good; Those Four Girls, singing 
and dancing, good; The Christie Duo, novelty 
acrobats, very good; Marguerite and Hanley, ac- 
robats, very good; Bandy and Wilson, dancing, 
hit; Masslas O'Connor, juggler, good. SHU- 
BERT (Martin Lehman, mgr.). — Long and Cot- 
ton, headiiners, "My Wife's Diamonds," bit; 
Vasco, "The Mad Musician," clever; Greene and 
Werner. "Babes In the Jungle," very good; 
Barnold's dogs and monkeys, second week's en- 
gagement; Qulgley Bros., comedians, good; New- 
hold and Carroll, very amusing; Alexander and 
Bertie, aerlalists, good; Lily Flexmore, singing 
and dancing, dainty. Week 13: Bertha Kallsh. 

CENTURY (Jos. R. Donegan, mgr.). — Week 

G: "The Nightingales." Next week: "Kentucky 

Belles." MAJEOTIO (Clint Wilson, mgr.).— 

Week 6: Rose Hill Folly Company, fine show. 
Next week: Bon Tons. COLISEUM (S. Water- 
man, mgr.). — Saturday, 4th, opening of finest 
skating rink in Kansas City. FAIRPLAY. 



LONDON, CAN. 

BENNETT'S (W. D. Elms, res. mgr.).— 
Hutchinson and Balnbridge, "Out All Night," 
proved quite funny; Aurie Dagwell, songs, well 
received; Gillette's Four-Footed Actors, an excel- 
lent dog act; Phil and Nettle Peters, abundant 
applause; Wiiton Bros., horizontal bar, fine; The 
Van Bros., musical, very good. 

M. G. HUESTON. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

MARY ANDERSON (Max Friedburg. mgr.).— 
Trlxie Friganza. headllner, won much favor; 
Prince Kokln Juggled deftly; Foresto and Dog en- 
tertained; De Faye Sisters, well received; Four 
I. esters, good comedy bicycle act; Jack Norworth, 
monologlst, hit; Leroy and Clayton in "Hogan of 

the Hansom," amusing. HOPKINS (Win, 

Reich in an. mgr.). — Kara made his second appear- 
ance of the season and again scored with his won- 
derful Juggling; Press Eldridge, blackface co- 
median, well received; Rome, Mayo and Juliet, 
good; Mine. Czlnka Pnnna, musical, Interesting; 
The Balzers, acrobats, clever; Ida O'Day, vocalist, 

Rood; Duncan and Hoffman also appeared. 

BUCKINGHAM (John Whnllen, mgr.).— "Califor- 
nia Girls" opened to two crowded houses Sunday 
and presented a bright, clean show. 

ARTHUR WITTELSHOFER. 



LOWELL, MASS. 

HATHAWAY (John I. Shannon, mgr.).— Marie 
I.eeea Brack men, "The Gainsborough Girl," a 
hit; The Four Rians, good; Chas. Kenna, "The 
Street Fakir," great; May Duryea and Chas. 
Deland, "The Imposter," good: Leveen and Cross, 
good: Al. II. Weston and Irene Young, "The 
Gadding Gossipers," a hit: Wm. B. Bayllss, Jr., 

'eellist, very good. BOSTON (Wm. Lyons, 

mgr. ). — Nina Searl's Burlesquers. Olio: Lew 
Orth, Bullan and Lyman, Vena Davis, Nellie 
Hartford, burlesque, a decided hit this week. 

JOHN J. DAWSON. 



MAHANOY CITY, PA. 
FAMILY (E. F. McAtee, res. mgr.).— The Five 
Lublns, "Uncle Ben's Birthday," fair; Reed 
Brothers, novelty gymnasts, very good; Jennongs 
and Renfrew, singing, parodies very good; See- 
bach, bag punching, received much applause: 

J. O. ASIITON. 



MALDEN, MASS. 

AUDITORIUM (Samuel L. Tuck, mgr.).— John 
and Mae Burke, "How Patsy Went to War." hit; 
Ascott Eddie Trio, comedy acrobats, good; Sisters 



Majestic Circuit 

INTERSTATE AMUSEMENT CO. (PROPRIETORS). 

E. F. CARRUTHERS, General Manager. 

PLAYING MODERN VAUDEVILLE IN THE 



MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. 

Opens Mondays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. 

Opens Mondays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

DALLAS, Texas 

Opens Sundays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

FT. WORTH, Texas 

Opens Mondays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

HOUSTON, Texas 

Daily Matinees. Opens Sundays. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas 

Opens Sundays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


LYRIC THEATRE, 

MOBILE, Ala. 

Opens Mondays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

WACO, Texas 

Playing Traveling Companies. 
Popular Prices. 



OUR BOOKING DEPARTMENT IS PREPARED TO FURNISH BANDS, VAUDEVILLE ACTS, 
ETC., FOR ALL THEATRES AND OCCASIONS IN THE SOUTH ON SHORT NOTICE. 
ADDRESS" AXL MAIL TO 

E. F. CARRUTHERS, iuestib tieitre bin.. CHICAGO, ILL. 



FIRST AMERICAN REAPPEARANCE OF 




And her "PICK. CHICKS" 

After seven years of travel and success throughout Europe. 
ENORMOUS HIT, Novelty, Brooklyn, this week. 
NEXT WEEK (Jan. 13), GOTHAM, BROOKLYN. 
Sole Direction JENIE JACOBS, 1402 Broadway, New York. 



FILMS FOR RENT=PILMS TOR SALE 

ALL THE LATEST SUBJECTS CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
OUI* SERVICE GUARAINTBEB SUCCB6S 

Write, phone or Call. 

Manhattan Rllm Rental Co. 



Phone 5502 — Oram. 



116 E. 23d STREET, NEW YORK. 



HART & DAVIS, Mgrs. 



Established 1880 



THE LEADING ENGLISH THEATRICAL AND VAUDEVILLE NEWSPAPER. 

Foreign Subscription, 
3/ lOd. per Quarter. 



THE STAGE 



May be obtained at Samuel French's, 22-24 West 22nd Street, New York. 
ARTISTS VISITING ENGLAND are cordially invited to register at "The Stage" offices Imme- 
diately upon their arrival. The Editor of "The Stage" will always be pleased to welcome them. 
Advance notices of sailings and opening dates should be posted to the Editor. When an artist has 
registered at "The Stage" office, which may bo regarded as his permanent London address, all cor- 
respondence will be immediately forwarded. 

London Offices; 16 York St., Covent Garden, London, W. C. 

A Somewhat Different Western Comedy, "The Loneville Jollier," 
. Ilorwitz. The players of alnive comedy, 



A BIG HIT FROM THE START. 

by Chas 

HENRY 



AND 



YOUNO 



Big Hit at Pastor's Last Week. Next Week (Jan. 13), Keith's, Phila., Pa. 



Bcardsley, singing comediennes, fair; Bertie Her- 
ron. the minstrel Miss, well received; Little 
Johnnie McGuire, 111. songs, hit; Gertrude Mans- 
field and Company, "The Girl in the Bed Kl- 
mona," headiiners; Hill's Troupe of trained dogs 
and goats, fair. THUS. C. KEN NEW 



W. Raymond, mgr.) — Motion pictures. 

KARL J. INGLEDUE. 



MARION, IND. 
CRYSTAL (Amnions & Dubois, props. Monday 
rehearsal 10).— Week Dec. CO: The Three Rivards, 
comedy sketch, excellent; Bates and Neville 
shared honors, but handicapped by small Stage; 
Murray and Williams, very good; Irene White 

Ammon, ill. songs. GRAND (Sam Picketing, 

mgr. Monday rehearsal 10). — OtOTO Japanese 
Family, best ever seen; Gladys Carey, violin, 
good; Tom Ripley, blackface, good; Tom and 1/cu 
Hnnnaher, good; Jake Montross. ill. songs. 

L, (). WETZEL. 



MARSHALLTOWN. IA. 

BIJOU (T. Nels. 

L M .>: Oracle May and 

best ever; Mobaincd 
Khan. Hindoo wonder 

Three llutehlnsons. gooi ly. 

ire: 

(Busby 



Downs, mgr). — Week Dec. 
Little Jaek iii "Uncle Cy's 
Visit." hit; Billie McRobie 

worker, pleased. The 

llutehlnsons, good; Musical Beely 
average; McGuire. bag puncher, ordinary. 
ODEON (Busby Bros., mgrs.).— "Nightingales." 

' (S. Hor- 

...ie Smith 

THEATORIUM (P. 



ODEON (Busby Bros., mgrs. ).— "Night 

Jan. 1, pleased good business. ELITE 

wits, mgr.). — Moving pictures and Mam 
in 111. songs; good crowds. THEATOR 



MILFORD, MASS. 

LYCEUM FAMILY (S. B. Stifter. mgr.).— 
Nellie Hartford's Tyrolean Extravaganza Company 
is drawing good bouses with the following olio: 
Sachs and Harding, good; Nellie Hartford, fine; 

Blanch I.oring. good; Fields and Moson, tine. 

MUSIC HALL (Gordon Brothers, mgrs.). -Moving 
pictures and ill. songs. — SCENIC I J, F. Maloiie. 
mgr.).— Moving pictures and songs. REY- 
NOLDS' ITANY VAUDEVILLE (M J. Reynolds, 
mgr.). — Pictures and songs, NOTES. Lew 
Orth, principal comedian with the Nellie Hart 

ford show, fell and broke his arm at the Hotel 
Clark 0, preventing him from working here this 
WT-ck. lie WCn I home to Boston. 

(HAS. E. LACKEY. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

ORPHEUM (<J. B. Raymond, mgr.).— Fetching 

Brothers, clever and pretty mushal novelty; John 
Birch, successful burlesque melodrama; Tlvolj 
(JUartet. well dressed; William Haw trey, n pro- 
nounced dramatic triumph in a sketch of un- 
usual merit, b-- L. J. Vance; Carbrey Twin 
Brothers, speedy dancing; Ward and Curran, 
"The Terrible Judge"; Curzon Sisters, aerial act, 
spectacular. LEWIS. 



MOBILE, ALA. 

LYRIC (G. Neubrlk, mgr. Monday rehearsal 
10).— Week Dec. 30: Lillian Beckwltb, tremend- 
ous hit; Thos. J. Keogh snd Company, good; 
Mills and Morris, success; Allen Wight man. clay 
modeling, good; Art Fisher, songs and imitations, 
very clever. NAN.' 



NEWARK, N. J. 
PROCTOR'S (R. C. Stewart, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 9).— Well-balanced bill this week includes 
McRao aud Poole, sharpshooters, seen here be- 
fore; V. G. Ruth Allen snd Company, in "We 
Need the Money," clever girl in bright sketch; 
Cameron and Flanagan, "On and Off," also re- 
peat their former success; Johnny Stanley and the 
Blonde Typewriters, amused; Harry Breen's paro 
dies and local hits caused smiles; Curtis, Palmer 
and Company in their absurdity, "Mamma's 
Darling Boy," had them laughing; The M I lea- 
st ravordale Quintet did some very remarkable 
playing on stringed instruments; Hatty's Bears 

performed feats showing patient training. 

WALDMANN'S (Eastern Wheel; Lee Ottellngul. 
mgr.). — Bat (heller's "Boston Belles" gave a good 
performance of variety and musical comedy; Ed- 
gar Blxley, In "The Wanderer from Nowhere," 
made a hit, as did his associates. Specialties by 
Bixley, May Bryant sings well, Minnie Burke can 
dance and as an added feature Imperial Japanese 

Troupe, who are clever. EMPIRE 1 (Western 

Wheel; Harry Hyams, mgr.). — Fay Foster Co. Is 
giving a good show here. The two burlettas 
labeled "Dress Parade" and "Manila Bay" were 
well staged. Lena Lacouvler, the stately song- 
stress, was beard at her best; The Great Carrol 
gave lightning changes well; Queen and Ross, 
comedy duo, good; Allen and Dalton, musicians 
with comedy, entertained very well and the Hll- 

tons on their wheels do a nice, clean-cut act. 

ARCADE (L. O. Mumford, mgr.).— Good houses 
right along to listen to the HI. songs, see the 
motion pictures and have a laugh at the "book" 
actors Wednesday nights. Mr. Mumford sold out 
the house Thursday night to the Eureka Lodge 29, 
F. & A. M., when there was a special program 
presented. JOB O'BRYAN. 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

HATIIAWAY'S (T. B. Baylies, mgr.).— Howard 
Truesdell occupies the big type position and is 
going fairly well; "Lind," has a wealth of beau- 
tiful scenery and costumes, but falls to please; 
OrlfT, the "Jestive Juggler," Is one of the few 
hits; Marron and Helnes, "The Two Man Min- 
strels," are pleasing them, as do Keno, Walsh 
and Melrose; Mr. and Mrs. Bacon get all the 
music there is out of the banjos and Joe Flynn 
receives good returns for bis funny stories and 
parodies. NEMO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

POLI'S (S. Z. Poll, prop.; F. J. Windlsch, 
res. mgr. Monday rehearsal 10). — Wm. Court- 
lelgh and Company, "Peaches," star feature. 
They are receiving deserved recognition. Coin's 
Dogs have a merry time in "Dogvllle" and enter- 
tain; The A. B. C. I). Girls in songs and dances 
gave some acceptable novelties; The Five Majors 
In musical offering were good; "Marco Twins," 
the long aud short of It, and Joe Demlng, mono- 
logue, completed the bill. E. J. TODD. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr. Monday 

rehearsal 1).— "A Night With the Poets," Jnllc 

Heme and Company, "Between the Acts," Fates. 

"Fishing," Sisters O'Meers. Piccolo Midget and 

Clinton and Jerraon. GREEN WALL (H. Greeu- 

wall, mgr.). — Rents Santley opened to capacity 
houses. The organization Is minus a musical 
director, the former wielder of the Leavitt baton 
having resigned at Birmingham. The local orches- 
tra leader went through the numbers without a 
hitch. "A Day's Frolic at Atlantic City," written 
by Barney Gerard, forms the (Irst part. The 
"where shall I place It" trunk episode Is Intro 
duced at the opening. The comedians employ 
the "shut tip" dialogue made familiar to vaude- 
ville audiences by Howe and Scott. There Is the 
usual expectorating in the hat, shampooing the 
hair with wine. etc. The "Humpback" song 

has I n resurrected. Charles D. Webber opens 

the olio, Jnggling hats and rubber balls. Mr. 
Webber makes his entrance In an automobile with 
a string attached. A large watch Is brought 
into evidence, also a coat with U.'i labels on the 
back. Matches Ignited on the beard, and apple 
catching on a fork are also used for comedy 
purposes. Roacoe and Sims are billed as musical 
artists. The audience "kidded" the pair. 
Charl es and Anna GiOCker are showing a new 
drop depicting the Capitol, and Miss Glocker Is 
wearing a "diamond" dress, not used heretofore 
if memory serves correctly, Owing to an affec- 
tion of the throat Frank Ross did not appear. 
Fred Russell substituted, 
pnsent a dainty dancing 

comedy 
entitled 

written 

whirh 



Fishet and Berg, 
closing burlesque, 
Demon." Is well 
musical numbers, 
riiangt 
■loo. 



Marshall and King 

and singing specialty. 

eyr lists, closed. The 

"The Darlings of the 

contains many racy 

together with several 

of cost nine created a favorable Impres- 

O. M. SAMI'EL. 



PITTST0N, PA. 
FAMILY (Harry Scott, re«. mgr.).- John and 
Mamie Conroy, singers and dancers, good; The 
Mysterious Bennetts, pantomime comedy, very 
clever; Dawson and Whitfield, eccentric Come 
rtlann, good; Harry Green, ill. songs, pleasing; 
Or* 1 Otf and Company, one act comedy, a bit. — — 
DREAMLAND (Claude Westley, mgr.).— Moving 
pictures and ill. songs. TUB GEM <M. F. 
Early, mgr.). Moving pictures and III. songs. 
NOTES .las. A. Welsh. Of the Welshs. 
Jllliies, Frank and Celia. was taken down with 
the grippe New 'Star's Eve. After tw<« days In 
bed he managed (o get hack to work Saturday. 
The Welshs ranee I led Immediate time mid took 
Jim home to Buffalo to recuperate.- James Jones 
is piano player st the Family Theatre, Pittston, 
Pa., replacing Harry Ross, who went to Phlla 
delphla. DAVE IIEIMAN. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Vabhctt. 



32 



VARIETY 



RCPnCSCINTrtTIVB AHTI8TS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTIST© 



THE VENTRILOQUIST WITH A PRODUCTION 



Ed. F. 



REYNARD 

And Hii Famous Mechanical Figures. 
WEEK JAN. 13. BHUBERT, UTICA. 

Elinore Sisters 

in new act in ONE, season of 1907-8, entitled 
"THE ACTRESS AND THE MAID" 

Copyright Class D. XXC. No. OHM. 

Direction of GEO. HOMANS. 

"THE MAN WITH THE FUNNY SLIDE." 
CHA8. J. 

BURKHARDT 



■ ■ 



^^■^■^•WWI 



Russell; Held 

The Dancer and THE LADY MAGNETIC. 

ALF T. WILTON. Arent. 

JAN. 18, AUDITORIUM. LYNN. 

<iE0. MOZART 



Address VAUDEVILLE CLUB. LONDON, ENO. 



We cany special scenery and electrical effects. 




0* Is 



AL. 11. 




MARY E. 



PRESENTING 



"A COUNTRY BOYS LUCK" 

A rural comedy playlet with original Idea* and 
novel situations. 

' ALF. T. WILTON, Agent. 





"MOTORING. 
Usual Success, Alhambra, This Week. 




\AJ I LB U R 

MACK 

AND COMPANY 

KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 







GERMAN DIALECT COMEDIAN. 

"Avenue Girls," Presenting "Tom, Dick and 

Harry." Season 1907-08. 

JUNO SALMO 

KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



NELLE 



TH» HAMEOW TELLER. 9 

The Italian and His Sweetheart 

T HE PIOTTIS 

CHARACTER SONGSTERS. 

18 Mine, in One. 
Address care VARIETY. 






Going it alone once more and always making 
good. What do you think of that? 

WORK I QWER 

Seaaon of 190d-1907. with ORPHEUM ROAD 
SHOW. Season 1907-1908, KEITH ft PROC- 
TOR'S. 

Representative, ALBERT SUTHERLAND, 
St. Jamea Building. 

GEO. W. BBS 



"FORK CHOF8" 

Permanent Address, 
White Rats, 1658 Bway., N. Y. City. 



FINN -FORD 

NOVELTY ECCENTRIC DANCERS. 
Watch 'em on the Bullivan-Considine Circuit. 




he 



Hallbacks 



A Knockout in the East. 
Booked solid till Feb. 8, 1908. Address all agents. 



3 Ernesto Sisters 3 



E 



Europe's Greatest Wire Artists. 

XLAW A ERLANGER CIRCUIT. 
Direction HENRY MEYERHOFF. 



A 

N 
D 





Pastor's this week. Next week, Orpheum, 
Easton. Pa. 

All communications REICH & PLUNKETT, 
1188 Broadway, N. Y. 

"Veil, I got anudder von." 

LEO ST. ELMO 

"The Musical German." 
14 Minutes in "ONE." 



WIGGINS FARM 

Apply to THE CHADWICK TRIO. 

PRINCESS CHINQUILLA 

and NEWELL 

JENIE JACOBS, Sole Representative. 



Gartelle Bros. 



HOMER B. 



MASON 



AND 



MARQUEKITE 



KEELER 




GAVIN, PLATT 
and PEACHES 

Presenting "THE STOLEN KTD. M 



BILLIE REEVES 

ORIGINAL DRUNK. 

Fred Karno Co., "A Night In English Musie Hall." 
TIME ALL FILLED. 




Ein Abend in Einem Amerikanischen Tingle-Tangle 
Now Playing Klaw A Erlanger for 80 Week*. 





THE FAMOUS 

HEIM CHILDREN 

The only act that gets their sodlence on the 
Impulse of the moment. Booked w>lid till July, 
1908. Management CHRIS O. BROWN, N. Y. 



Have Your Card in Variety 




ECCENTRIC MUSICAL ENTERTAINERS. 

OPEN for Eastern Wheel BURLESQUE cr 
FARCE COMEDY. A. W. Stanley plays respon- 
sible parts. Mayme Bcanlon, one of the BEST 
DIALECT CHARACTER COMEDIENNES on the 
stage. 

Address, care VARIETY, Chicago. 



JAMES F. HAYES 

Character and Straight — Miner's "Americans." 



Pearl Evans 



INGENUE 



• •*» 



D 








_ . M 




SEASON 19O7-'08 




JAS. P. LEE 

"THAT COMEDIAN." 
Here's a record breaker— 25 weeks, Lyceum, 'Frisco; 104 weeks, Unique, 
Los Angeles; 26 weeks, People's, Los Angeles. Now in his sixth week of a 
successful engagement at the Empire Theatre, San Francisco. 

Address JAS. P. LEE, Comedy Players, Empire Theatre, San Francisco, Cal. 



GOING WEST AFTER PLAYING THE WILLIAMS CIRCUIT. 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



And "The Six 
English Rockers'* 



JAN. 8. ALHAMBRA, NEW YORK. 



VARIETY 



33 



A SHAVING (CREAM 

"SHRP SHAVR" 

plst* 8»f*ty Rmior for the prlM of a Shan, 




Or 13 

2c. Stamps. 

Shrp Shavr 

Stropper 10c. 



U|* Complete outfit. Raior g*f| j* 

OUCl 6 extra Blades, Stropper. OUva 
No more apologies for a "Sunday growth" 
in a "Jay Town." A Dressing Room Luxury. 
Blades Guaranteed Beat High Grade Steel 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 

SCHROCDCR-SPAHN CO. 

Dept. V., 320 Broadway, New York. 



LOUIS WESLYN 

letlll If "TWO lf3N AND ABOTT'.V ♦»>*. 
farcical hit of Howard Truesdell and Company. 
Writer of sketches and songs for Nick Long and 
Idalene Cotton. Carter and Waters, Halleo and 
Puller, Wllla Holt Wakefield, Lillian Apel, Hearn 
and Duncan, Lillian Ashley, Innes and Ryan, 
and many others. 

LOUIS WE8LYN 
SKETCHES AND BONOS, 
'quarters, Grand Opera House, Indianapolis. 



MATT WOODWARD 

Pn»ducer; Play. Lyric and Sketch Wrifer. Pro- 
ducer and co-author of "BUSY 1ZZY." "ROYAL 
CHEF," "JOLLY BARON," Ac. 

1 make a specialty of exclusive GET-BACK 
BONOS or PARODIES, giving brilliant finish to 
an act. 

As for SKETCHES, my only "Budget" Is my 
brain, and that la boiling over with original 
ideas. Great Parody: "Shove lie and the Girl Is 
Mine," $1.00. 

Studio. 215 W. 49th St., N. Y. City. 



CHARLES HORWITZ 

Sketches from the pen of Horwitz are the best 
in vaudeville. Order your sketch, monologue or 
lyric from the author of those great hits now 
being plHyed by Frederick V. Bowers A Co., 
Harry First A Co., Oracle Emmett & Co.. Chad- 
wick Trio. Henry and Young, Coombs and Stone, 
Le Roy and Clayton, Somers and Storke and over 
one hundred other big successes. 

QHARLE8 HORWITZ, 
102-104 W. 38th St., 

Mark-Stern Building. New York. 

MATTHEW GOLDMAN 

SKETCH WRITER. 

Up-to-date writer with up-to-date ideas. Char- 
acter, Jewish. Slang. Protean. Italian acts, eto. 
Author: "The Marriage Fee." "For the Love 
of Mammy." "The Call of the Blood," "Stage 
Struck," "Behind the Footlights." 

High grade vaudeville acts a specialty. 
109 WEST 111TH ST., N. Y. CITY. 



PORTLAND, ORE. 
GRAND (Jas. H. Errickson, mgr.).— Week 
Dec. 30: Tom and Edith Almond, headllners, very 
good; Bush and Elliott, comedy acrobats, kept 
audience convulsed with laughter; Madge Malt- 
land, mimic, encored repeatedly; Musical Bells, 
excellent; the Great Pascatel, aerlallst, very 

clever; Joe Thompson, ill. songs, popular. 

PANTAGES' (John A. Johnson. mgr.).— Bunth 
and Rudd, eccentrlques, return engagement, excep- 
tionally good; J. Francis Dooley and Corlnne 
Sales, up to date; Pan J. Harrington, ventrilo- 
quist, audience In uproar; the Browns, gymnasts, 
very clever; Lizzie N. Wilson. German comedi- 
enne, liberally applauded; Fred Bauer, ill. songs, 

very good. FRITZ'S (Fred Fritz, prop.).— Eva 

Fonda. Rooney and Forrester. Martello, Lotta 
Goldman. Jack Woods. Reed and Reed, Virginia 
Vernon. Jones and Raivelle, Bobby Pulllara, Peter 
Malcolm, Eva Fonda and stock, "Wanted a Hus- 
band." good show, playing to capacity. 

NICKELODION AND EDISONIA (Jos. St. Peter, 
mgr.). — Moving pictures and ill. songs. 
OUPHEUM AND HIPPODROME (Dlllwyn 
Daniels, mgr.). — Motion pictures and 111. songs. 

NOTE.— It Is rumored the Orpheum Circuit 

have secured a theatre in this city, to open 16. 

W. R. B. 
• 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

KEITH'S (Chas. Lounburg, mgr.).— Eva Tan- 
guay, headllner, who was a phenomenal hit; other 
good numbers were Valadon, magician; Dillon 
Brothers, Dolan and Lenharr, Relff Bros., Bedouin 

Arabs. Amerlcus Comedy Four. IMPERIAL 

(John P. Hill, mgr.).— "The Tiger Lilies" have 
good material, but work throughout with lack of 
Interest. Geo. F. Murphy, a good comedian, hut 
be falls to put energy In his work. The opening 
piece. "The Twin Sisters," is nn absurdity with 
no change of costume for the chorus. The olio 
opened with John Marlon and Grace Lillian, In a 
good specialty act; Ealer and Webb, a lively 
twenty minutes; Mr. and Mrs. H. Ellsworth, "Silk 
Stocking," possesses little comedy; Jack Irwin, 
ordinary. The closing burlesque drags somewhat, 



but with tuning up the show could greatly be 

Improved. SCENIC TEMPLE.— The Joyces, 

Ceclle Darnelle and good pictures make up a 
good show. S. M. SAMUELS. 

QUEBEC, CANADA. 

BENNETT'S (J. H. Alos, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10). — Valoul, Juggler, very neat offering, 
well received; Laura Ordway, English comedienne, 
did not impress the audience a» being clever; 
Frederick Brothers and Burns, one of the best 
musical acts seen here this season, and for three 
people are very clever; Welch Francis and Com- 
pany, easily the bit of the bill; Marzello and 
Miliay. the two are first rate bar performers, 
and the burlesque wrestling bout was a riot; 
Le Roy and Woodford, Mr. Le Roy is a very 
clever comedian, his stuff well pointed and very 
bright; Apdale's Animals, one of the best animal 
acts ever seen in this city. 

J. GORDON HENRY. 



READING. PA. 

ORPHEUM (C. Floyd Hopkins, mgr.).— Ruby 
Raymond aud her dancing boys, Chester and 
Jones, good; Four American Trumpeters, 'cello 
solo, winning liberal applause; Carroll and Baker, 
very well received; Capt. Winston with sea lions, 
an entertaining and popular act; Chas. W. Bowser 
and Company, "Home, Sweet Home." fair; Avery 
and Hart got several calls; MePhee and Hill 

pleased. BIJOU (Updegraff and Brownell, 

mgrs.). — Half week: Blue Ribbon Girls, good. 

Second half: Parisian Widows. FAMILY (Rels 

and Appell, mgrs.). — Omega Trio, The Bartelles, 
Dorothy Randall, Cantor and Curtis, Delmore and 

O'Nelda. NOTES— Margaret Daly -Vokes, who 

appeared at the Orpheum last week, has cancelled 
all engagements and gone to the mountains near 
iiullaud, Vermont, in iu<- hope of regaining her 
health. Alarming symptoms developed during her 
visit to this city, but plucklly finished the week's 
engagement. — An added attraction at the Or- 
pheum on New Year's Eve was the competition 
for prises offered by Manager Hopkins to mas- 
queraders in attendance. GEO. RITER. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

COOK'S OPERA HOUSE (Vtessas* JtrWTallnm, 
mgr.). — Boston Fadettes, headllner, greatly 
pleased; Willy Pantzer Troupe, acrobats, pleased; 
Will Rogers, interesting; May Tully, "Stop, Look 
and Listen." scored; Emma Francis, went well; 
Nichols Sisters win applause: Dixon and Anger 

Company make good; -Max Duffet, good act. 

NOTE.— Henry C. Relff. brother of Relff Brothers, 
Is in St. Mary's Hospital suffering from appendi- 
citis. 



SALT LAKE CITY. 
ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— Week 
Dec. 30: La Belle Oterlta. poorly appreciated; 
Urma Sisters, aerial, graceful; Mayme Reming- 
ton and "Picks," great success; The Baggesens, 
headllners, comedy juggling, good; "The" Quar- 
tet, not of the highest order; Chas. Marvel, 

clever. BONTON (J. H. Young, mgr.).— Car- 

rolton, monologue, did not get the hands de- 
served; Dale. Carreg and Altman. good; Cook and 
Cook, "Dutch" comedy, unique; May Blossom, 

songs, pleases; Prof. Ferguson, Imitations. 

ELECTRIC (J. McCleary. mgr.). ELITE (Max 
Florence, mgr.), ISIS (Trent A Wilson, mgrs.), 
CRESCENT (H. S. Mills, mgr.). MAJESTIC (P. 
P. Jansen. mgr.). GEM (H. Bradbury, mgr.). 
moving pictures and ill. songs. NOTE.— Re- 
gardless of the closing down of the mining In- 
dustry here In Utah and the general slump af- 
fecting the countrv, the amusement houses are 
playing to full houses. JAY E. JOHNSON. 



SANDUSKY, OHIO. 
MAJESTIC (Joe Howard, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10).— Half week Jan. 2: Kitty Bingham, 
impersonations, headllner, very clever; Corrlgan 
and Hayes, song and dance, held over, very good; 
Williams Duo. musical act. good; La Jess and 
Company, novelty acrobatic act, a winner; Eddie 
Baar and Company, burlesque on "Uncle Tom's 
Cabin," big laugh. Half week .Tnn. rt: Radcllffe 
and Belmont, sharpshooters, headllners (New 
Acts); Billy Durant. Chinese musical act. hit; 
Wayne Christy, blackface monologue, fair: Arnold 
and Gardner, comedy sketch, "The Minstrel and 
the Broadway Swell," more than made good. 

DOC. 



SCRANTON, PA. 
I'OLI'S (J. n. Docking, mgr.).— "A Night On 
a House Boat," very good: Big City Quartette, 
good; Oracle Emmet and Company. "Mrs. Mur- 
phv's Second Husband." good; Charles F. Semon. 
the laughing hit of the bill: J. W. Winton. Aus- 
tralian ventriloquist, very good: Elsie Faye, Bin- 
sett and Miller, dancing, good: Keeley Bros., bug 
punching, fair. H. S. HOLLAND. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

COLISEUM (Sullivan A Considlne. props.).— 
Week 30: Alblnl. magician and Illusionist ;Paul 
Stevens, wire; Kellar's "Virginia Belbs"; Bessie 
Allen, sonbrette; Zinelll and Bontelle. comedy 
operatic; Byron and Blanch. In sketch: Eddie 
Roesch, balladlst: motion pictures. STAR i Sul- 
livan A Considlne, props.).— Rlnaldo, violinist; 
St. Onge Brothers, comedy bicyclists; Bob Stlek- 
ney, dog and pony act; Ameen Abou Hamad 
Troupe, whirlwind acrobats; Nellie Martini. Ital- 
ian street singer; Roy McBraln, balladlst; motion 

pictures. PANTAGES (Alex. Pant ages, prop. 

and mgr.). — The Trio Delanr. European operatic 
singers (feature*; J. Francis Donley and Corlnne 
Sales; Dan J. Harrington, ventriloquist; Lizzie N. 
Wilson, German dialectic comedienne; The 
Browns, gymnasts and contortionists; El well; 

Pnntagescope. NOTES. — The Moore Theatre, 

built at a cost of $."»0O.()0O. and with a seating ca- 
pacity of 2.700, opened last week with "The 
Alaskan."— Manager Alex. Pnntnges was present 
at the opening of his new theatre at Vancouver. 
This house has a seating capacity of I. BOO. It 
opened with the following bill: Bunth and Rudd. 
Dnvey atid Everson, Frank Hall and the Hon 
"Wallace." Jno. T. Chick and Company, and 
The Rustlcana Trio. Work Is being rapidly pushed 
on the alterations of Pantages* Tacoma house. 
This house will be large and fully up to date. — 



The Grand, Edmonton, Alberta, opens 13th under 
the direction of Manager Fowler. This Is the 
first vaudeville house In that territory and will 
be devoted to high class features. The same man- 
agement will erect three other houses In that 
territory In the near future. — Harry Leavltt, an 
old and experienced show man, is now handling 
the Sulllvan-Consldlne hooking agency in Seattle. — 
The Orpheum, on Second avenue, one of the first 
of the Sullivan-Consldlne bouses, will soon be 
demolished to make room for a sky scraping otTlee 
building. — The Star, lately playing musical com- 
edy, will now play, an entire bill of vaudeville and 
will accommodate all of the acts that would 
otherwise play the Orpheum. 

MILTON G. WALER. 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

EMPIRE (Jno. Connors, mgr.). — The Musical 
Smiths are the feature, good; Shannon and Straw, 
song and dance, win applause; Nellie Showers, 
an old favorite here. Is back with a daring aerial 
act; Blossom Harris, song and dance, pleased; 
Carrie Scott, physical culture, applause: Evelyn 
DeOrvllle, song and dance, pleased: Harry Sefton, 
Comedian, well received. The Empire Stock Com- 
pany completes the MIL; OLYMPIC (C. J. Mc- 

Cann. mgr. >. — Brown and Wilson. Wilson 




8HAM0KIN, PA. 

FAMILY (W. D. Neilds. mgr. Monday rehear- 
sal 10). — Campbell and Brady, club jugglers, ex- 
cellent; Kimball and Donovan, banjolsts, clever; 
Smith and Champion, comedy, very good; At wood 
and Terry, entertainers, fair; Johnson. Marvelle 
and Company, comedy, good. MILLER. 

SIOUX CITY, IA. 

ORPHEUM (David Beehler, mgr.).— Rose Cogh- 
lan, assisted by William Sams, "The Ace of 
Trumps," the headllner, clever and very well 
staged number; Watson, Hutchlns and Edwards, 
"The Vaudeville Exchange," slap-stick comedy, 
act well received by audience; Fred Watson and 
the Morrissy Sisters, singing and dancing special- 
ties, a decided hit; George Austin Moore, character 
vocalist, very good; Joe LaFleur, ladder gymnast, 
an accomplished gymnast; Joseph Carroll, sing- 
ing, dancing and talking comedian, very good. « 

UNIQUE and SCENIC (Tierney A Cameron, 
mgrsj .— Mfiy.pi*' nl.cj.yjej*, and., Hj\ „ sones.— ^TR A'S- 
TAL (F. B. Donahue," mgr.*).— Moving pictures 
and 111. songs. R. E. M. 



JUST OUT! 

Push-Cart 

PUBLISHED EVERY NOW AN' THEN FOR 
B0NO8 AND 8INGER8. 

THI8 WILL INTEREST YOU. 

BEND FOR FREE COPY. 

WILL R088ITER. 

15S Lake Street, Chioago, 111. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 

PANTAGES' (E. Clarke Walker, mgr.).— Lois 
Ceclle Hobson, soprano, good; Coleman and Mexls, 
sharpshooters, very good: Hall and Colborn won 
applause; Davis and Walker, singers and dancers, 
tUj-JlP Laur-De Brernonte Trio, singers, excel- 
lent"" Leo Wnite, m. songs. WASHINGTON 

(Geo. E. Blakeslee. mgr.). — Paul Stephens, equi- 
librist, very good; Byron and Blanch, fair; Bessie 
Allen, singer and dancer, pleased; Virginia Nlles 
and her "Virginia Belles," dancers, hit: Zlnell 
and Bontelle. good; the Great Alblnl, magician, 
excellent; Pete Dunsworth, HI. songs. 

J. J. HUGHES. 



and 

Tom 

The 

Ly- 



Vcrnon. Kittle Edwards. Bessie Skldmore. 
Finnegan, The Big O Four, Kitty Wilson, 

Olympic Stock , Company. NOTES.— The 

ceum. a picture show with a ten cent admission, 
managed by O. T. Crawford, St. Louis, was ob- 
liged to close owing to poor business Dec. 25. 

C. F. NORRED. 



SYRACUSE. N. Y. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE (Grand Amusement 
Co., mgrs. Monday rehearsals 10:30). — The bill 
this week was the best offered this season. Rlgo- 
lefta Bros., good: Anderson and Golncs, good; 
Alfred rtelcy and Florence Guise, good; Kleln-Ott 
Brothers and Nicholson, went big; Pat Rooney 
and Marion Bent, decided hit; Lala Selblnl. good; 
Mathews and Ashley, went big: Polly Pickle's 
Pets, good. SAM FREEMAN. 

TOLEDO, O. 

THE ARCADE (Chester Sergent, Mgr. Sunday 
rehearsal 10). — The bill this week Is of a much 
higher grade than has been seen for some weeks 
past. The headllners are Charlotte Parry and 
Company and Fred Ray and Company. Miss 
Parry Is seen to good advantage In "The Coin- 
stock Mystery." Fred Ray and Company closed 
the bill with a funny Roman burlesque and were 
well applauded. KIpp and Klppy opened with 
their novelty comedy juggling, good; Carl Molter. 
Ill, songs; Prof. Ed. Martin, a really good act 
with trained dogs, cats and monkeys; Lillian Dow 
sang four songs; Joe and Sadie Bret ton. colored, 

are as good as ever. THE EMPIRE (Abe 

Shapiro, mgr.). — "The Casino Girls." very good. 
The olio Is fine. Moran and Wise are the feature 
with their clever hat juggling and throwing and 
their wonderful clnh throwing finish. Graham 
and Randall. In "Across the Bridge," are also 
scoring heavily. The burlesque Is clean ami 
original, the comedians funny and the chorus 
attractive. NOTES.— Abe Shapiro, of the Em- 
pire, has bought the Surtmann cafe, adjoining 
his theatre, and Is learning to dispense cocktails, 
etc. — The Toledo T. M. A.'s are to give a big 
banquet on Thursday. Jan. 0. This will be for 
the installation of officers for 10'iH. 

SYDNEY WIRE. 



TORONTO, ONT. 

SHEA'S (J. Shea. mgr. Monday rehearsal 10).-- 
A splendid, well balanced hill drew capacity busi- 
ness all week. Marie Lloyd received an ovation 
at every performance; Walter Joins, Blanche 
Deyo and Company, good; Mason and Keeler and 
Company In a very funny skit; Quaker City 
Quartet, good ; Frank Bush, a favorite; Reldy and 
Currier, clever: Clara Bnllerlnl. novel turn: Paul' 
ton and Dooley. good.— OAYETY (Thomas R. 
Henry, nurr.). — "The World Beaters" made good. 
Col. Gaston Rordoncrry. the rifle shot, big fea- 
ture! the specialties were clever and the burlesque 
fanny and tuneful. — STAR (F. W. tftalr, mgr.). 
Jack JohnSMI, the great colored pugilist, was a 
big drawing card with Reiiiy A Wood's rtlir Show 

and attendance was good all week. PICTURE 

HALL. — This new resort Is doing a splendid busi- 
ness with moving pictures. 111. songs and parlor 
msglc. HARTLEY. 



Jack Burnett 

GRAND OPERA ROUSE, CHICAGO, 
The "ACTWRIOHT," Still 

WRITES 

REAL SKETCHES. 

Any of my 150 "clients" will tell yon 
I write absolutely 

NOTjjIWg BUT HITS 
M. STRASSMAN, 

Attorney, 853 BR0ADWAT, NEW TORS. 

NOTICE ' 



DAN, O'BRIEN, 

The Leapar, 

HAS FURNI8HED ROOMS, 

Bath, Steam Heat. 

260 W. 88TH ST., NEW YORK. 

^BjB^^ THEATRICAL 

Scenery 

Vaudeville and Production. Largest Scenio Concern la ake 
World. Water Odor, Mike and Dy. DANIEL* SGENJP 
ai UDlOg, CHICAGO 

\A/ I G S 

TOUPEES. Paints, Powders. Send Stamp for 

price liat. 
G. SCHINDHELM, 118 W. 26th St., New York. 



TOMMY 



GUNNER 



BURNS — MOIR 

ORIGINAL. 

Eight pictures to rent taken by the Chaa. 
I'rban Trading Co. at the ringside of the Na- 
tional Sporting Clnh of London, England, Decem- 
ber 2. 11)07. Absolutely the best light pictures 
ever taken. 

Address John Krone. Auditorium Hotel, Chicago. 

TROY, N. Y. 

PROCTOR'S (O. A. Graves, mgr. Monday re- 
bcarsal 10).— Robert Hilliard and Company, "As 
a Man Sows," a very good act; The Six American 
Dancers, very good: Jack Gardner's Musical Mono- 
logue, good; The Jupltere Bros., cowboy spiritual- 
ists, caught on; Dora Ronca, violinist, pleased; 
Radford ami Winchesters, comedy Jugglers, good; 

Robinson and Eanchette, sketch, pleased. LY- 

( ECU (R. H. Keller, mgr.l.— The first half of 
the week the New Century Girls are here. The 
Dreamland Burlesquera are the attraction for the 
last half. J. J. |f, 

WHEELING W. VA. 
WONDERLAND (II. w. Rogers, mgr.). -Wonder- 
land had a record breaking attendance this week, 
packed to the door at every performance. Grace 
Darnley, contortionist, very good and wall re- 
celved; The Martinez, a musical team, very 
clever; Harry Walton, Chinese Impersonator, 
very good; Murphy and Mldocq were the bit of 
tin show; Louis Scevalier and Company In a 
(lever comedy sketch, "A Refined Liar." well 
received. C. M. H. 

WORCESTER, MASS. 
I'liM'S (J. C. Cuddle, mgr. I. -The Plying 
Martins, some of the most wonderful trapeze 
work that has been seen here; Banks and New- 
ton, comedians and dancers, very good dancers 
and SOUgS went well, they were given several 
encores; Agnes Scott and Horace Wright, "The 
Wall Between," bit; lee Long Poo, "Chinese Bar* 
itone," well received; Baptlste and Eraneonl, 
equilibrists, very good; Wynn and Lewis, "The 
Sophomore and the Eresbinan," made good from 
the start; Rogers and Deely, "Robinson Crusoe's 
Isle," one of the best musics] comedies that 
has been here and a hit - PRANKLIN SQ. (J, 
«'. Matthews, mgr.).— The bill "pens with Rice 
nod Elmer, clever b:ir act; Hodge* and Launch 
mere, colored entertainers, good Voices and re- 
ceive loud applause; Edwin Eatcll in "A Pilgrim's 
Progress," made good from the sturf and look 
several encores; Charles If, Hurke, Pat Tmihcy 
and Company, "The Birthday Party." was very 
good; The Revcngala, "TelepaH was rery 

good, pleased; Virginia Grant; contralto singer, 
was very good. W. M. SHERMAN. 



When answering advertisement & kindly ,,icntian V Aft! ATT. 



34 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



WEEK JAM. 1*, DEWEY. M. Y. 



HCUCK & rCNNCSSY'S 



U 



EMPIRE SHOW 



•• 



DIRECTION W. H. HISS. 



THE TWO EXTREMES 

ED JEANETTE 

JQHNSTONandBUCKLET 



'Why, Ker-Soit-ny" 



AL. ZIMMERMAN 

Character and Singing Comedian 



•IBS DOT SOI" 

GE K 

8TILL WITH THE BIO SHOW 



GEORGE KLEIN 



The Sensational Acrobatio Comedians. 

MONUMBOandHURL-FULS 

The Peer of Comlo Acrobats 

iiiii and cliii 

"IN A STRANGE HOTEL" 

EHMA^WtSTON 

CONTRALTO, THAT'S ALL 

LEW H. SPOOLER 

MU8ICAL DIRECTOR 



AND 








WORLD FAMED 



Dunedin Troupe 

Mervellout, Artiitio and Acrobatio Cyclists. 




* 



Si 

o 5 

o 

H 



Challenge the World to Find Their Equal. 
Jaa. E. Donegan, MgT. Addrotl car© Clipper. 




IN "SUPPRESSING THE PRESS." 
BOOKED SOLID. 



PHIL 



NETTIE 



PETERS 

JAN. IS, BENNETT'S, OTTAWA, CAN. 



THIS TIME IT'S ME. 

True Rice 

An Acrobat. 
JUST NOW, BUMPING WITH 
, "8 BELLS." 

Address, WHITE RATS, 46TH 
ST. and B'WAT, NEW YORK. 




HARRY EARLE 



VETA 




Presenting "A DAUGHTER OF THE GODS." 
Lo Preparation, "The Chaperon" (4 People). 



WEEK JAN. 19, PEOPLE'S, CINCINNATI. 

THE "MERRY MAKERS" 

JOHN GRIEVES, Manager. 

La Belle Marie and 
M. J. O'Reurke 

Singing. Dancing and Novelty Wire Act. 

WM. MAUSSEY 

THE 8COTCH CHARACTER COMEDIAN. 



GLADYS 



TILLIE 



St. John and Cohen 

THE RUFFY FLUFFY GIRLS. 

H. P. KELLY 



'THE MEDIUM BOY." 



W. A. WOLF 

THE MINSTREL BASSO. 

GEO. A. STREET 

Su pported by Mrs. Oeo. A. S treet and Com- 

traying historic events in the careers of the 
world's great military commanders. 



SAM J. ADAMS 



"THE LONO BOY.' 



1 



SUTTON 



AND 



SUTTON 



The Rube and the 
Living Pumpkin 

En Route with the 

High School Girls 

JAN. ISIS, OAYETY, ALBANY; 
16 18, LYCEUM, TROY. 



"Tie 5 




(THANK MAJOR A CO.) 

Address. FRANK MAJOR, 

COMEDY CLUB, V. Y. CITY. 



Le BRUN g* 

Strongest Singing Aot in Vaudeville. 

Magnificently Costumed. 

Management ALBERT SUTHERLAND. 



Lillian Tyce 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



The Really Funny Monologist. 

JAMES J. MORTON 

Still on the Theatrical Platform. 

KELLY m KENT 

ORPHEUM BOAS SHOW. 



Week Jan. 18, Star, St. Paul. 



PATWHIItrGAItlYdlRlS 



Zelma Summers 

The Girl from the Golden West. , 



WM. 



MABEL 



JenningsandWebb 

Not Ahead But Neck and Neck With the Best 



Tommy O'Neill 

IN 80NG8 AND DANCE8 



FourTerrors 

In Singing and Acrobatic Dancing 



Grace Addison 
Barrett 



COKTHALTO 



CHAS. B. 



AL. 



Watson and Bert 

"A Busy Business Man" 

5-Malverii TlUlipu-5 

WHIRLWIND ACROBATS 



WITH 



I 



PAT WHITE 



Netta Vesta 



SINGING COMEDIAN 

Keith Circuit 
Address oar© VARIETY 




Seattle "Times," Not. 26.— 
"Good fun and clever work 
characterize Bush and Elliott's 
acrobatic turn, which is high 
class and very skillful. Good 
acrobatic work on the vaude- 
Tille stage is becoming a mat- 
ter of course, and the marvelous 
is becoming the rule, but this 
act belongs in the Coliseum's 
own category of 'extra good.' " 

ALF T. WILTON, Agent. 




MR. AND MRS. 



TRUESDELL 

Time all filled. 

Address/ care VAUDEVILLE COMEDY CLUB, 
147 W. 45th St., N. Y. City. 

"A CORKER IN CORK." 

GEORGE 
ATKINSON 

TIME ALL FILLED. 




YIP! YIP! YIP! 



GOING WEST, WHOf 

AND 



MCCL01N - SHELLY 

Eccentrio Singing and Danoing Aot. 

Guide, L0UI8 PINCUS. 
First Scout, FRANK BOHM. 

A Good Singer of Good Bongs. 

JOSIE AINSLEY 

Direction of JAMES J. MORTON. 

Bob Van Osten 

THE MAN WITH THE DUCK NOSE. 



Pete Curley 

PRINCIPAL COMEDIAN, 
The Behman Show. 

Management, Jack 8inger. 
Beaaon 1907-08. 



cc 



I 




IT? 



11 



Ryan-Richfield Co. 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 
DIRECTION MAO HAGOERTY'B FATHER. 




EDWIN STEVENS 

in 
"A Night Out." "Julius Caesar Up To Date." 
"An Evening with Dickens" "An American Raffles" 

Assisted by MIS8 TINA MARSHALL. 
Time all filled till June 7, 1908. 

STUART BARNES 

Direction GEO. HOMAN8. 



'THE PLAYERS.' 



MR. 
and 
MRS. 



John T. Powers 

VAUDEVILLE "TIT-BITS." 

Agent, ALF T. WILTON. 



MARION 



VICTORIA 






Direction AL SUTHERLAND. 



Thanks to Mr. Percy Williams for letter stating 
that owing to the congested conditions of vaude- 
ville at present ho is sorry he oannot give me 

' next week. Shall have to 
spend the time exploring 
Boston. Will Mr. Keith 
please lend me his auto- 
mobile? 




(RIFF 



LINCOMPUSHABLE. 

Of whom the Lynn "News" says: "Very good, 
notwithstanding that he is direct from London." 
Jan. 20, Hathaway's, Lowell, Mass. 

ROBINSON 
PARQUETTE 
TRIO 

AL MAYER, Art. 



X. A P. CIRCUIT. 



MISS ST. QEORQE 

HUSSEY » CO 

Assisted by 0. F. LORRAINE. 

A Startling Comedy Success in Vaudeville. 
Address WESLEY A PINCUS, Agents. 



THE BUSY GIRLS, 




Character Singing and Dancing. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 






VARIETY 



35 






VAUDEVILLE THEATRE MANAGERS 



* 



ATTENTION 




t 

Do Not Allow Anyone to Make Yoo Believe That Thoro I* a Scarcity of 

Good, High-Class 
in the Vaudeville Field 

I Hat* as mbnndsaos of the Boat Material as My Books* aa msaal, and 

Can BooK Any Number of Theatres on 24 Hours 9 Notice 

ALL Honaaa Receive Equal Treatment in My Office, 

WILLIAM MORRIS 



ChlOOt-O Office), 167 D«»rborn St. 1440 Bi 



M.w Y< 



BARBOUR— He Books the Acts 

For Vaudeville, Fairs and Parka. Managers, send for lists. Artists, ssnd opea time. 

E. L. Barbour, 119 La Salle St., Chicago. 



PQA traveling to Europe should tako advantage of the exceptionally low 
Kim rates now prevailing and in effect until March 81st, 1808. Oall or 
■SSSP writ* for full particulars. 

PAUL TAU8IG, 104 aLmaf 14tH Strwwt, 

NsLW TORI CITT 



-HL MATTER OF RECORD- 



KLAW & ERLANGERS Wvanced 



Vaudeville 



THEATRES ; THE MOST PROSPEROUS IN AMERICA 



RECORD Auditorium 







MAKING 



CHICAGO, 
has enter- 
la i n e d 
more people than all the other 
vaudeville houses in that oity 
oomblned. 

THEATRE. 
Playing to the 
largest vau- 
deville business ever reoorded 
in the metropolis. 



New York 



Sid J. Em's 

V. Clark and Einxie 8ts., JKZOAOO. 
46 Seconds from Clark St. Bridge. 

BID J. ETJ80N, Leisee and Manager. 

Playing la burlesque sttractions of tao Colum- 
bia Amusement Company. Matinee erery day. 
amateur night Friday. 



FOLLY 

State Street near Congress 
CHICAGO 

EMPIRE CIB.CTJIT CO., LESSEE. 

John A. Fennessy, Manager. 

The moat popular burlesque theatre la Chicago, 
playing the attractions of tao Empire Circuit. 
Nothing bat the boat. Two shows every day. 
Amateurs Friday. 



Baker 




Most Laughable Comedy Cycle Act is Vaudeville 

FIFTI WE. THEATRE, JAN. 13 Myron Baker, Her, 



PASTOR'S 

14th St.. 3d At. Continuous, 20 * 80 Ota. 

NEXT WEEK, MONDAY, JAN. 13, 1808. 

CHA8. H. BURKE, PAT. TOTJHEY ft COMPANY 

KELSO AJTD LEIOHTON. 

WOOD AND LAWSON. 

Geraldlne McQana . and Company. 

The Msrinellas. 

JOHNSON AND RICHARDS. 

Mildred Kenfleld Leo 8t. Elmo 

Gorman and Bell Louis Guertln 

Will and Mabel Casper Vitagraph. 

LAURA MORRIS AND COMPANY. 



HAMMERSTEINS 



VICTORIA 



AMERICAS MOST 
FAMOUS VARIETY 



Open the Yaar Around 



Percy ©• 

a 




CIRCUIT 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OP HIOH CLASS VAUDEVILLE TNBATKBS 

M. MBYERFBLD. JR., Pres. 

HAitTi^ BECK, o«iJtt«l aaaaaifVrr 

FRANK VINCENT, N. Y. Repreeentatlre. 
AH Applications for Tim* Must be Addreased to 
O. B. BRAY, Booking Msnsger. 
Msjestlc Theatre Bldg.. Chicago. I1L 



VAUDEVILLE HEADLINES 

- GOOD STANDARD ACTS 

If yoa bare an open week yea waat to nil at 

abort notice, write to W. L. DOCKSTADBR. 

Carrie fc Theatre. Wilsalngtea. DeL 

Can close Ssturdsy night and make sny city east 
of Chicago to opea Monday night. 



COLONIAL 
ORPHEUS 

ALHAMBRA 

ORPHEUS 
MOVELTY 



New York 
Brooklyn 
Harlem 
Boston 
Williamsburg 



eOTHAM East New York 

Addrew all PERSONAL letter* to 
PERCY --& ■ "UIAtflS. ST. JAMES 
BU1LDINO, Z«TH ST. AND BROAD* 
| WAY, NEW YORK CITY I 



\ 



i 



Theatrical Exchange, 

ta la sallm ar., ohioaoo. 

iting first olaas managers Of 
vaudeville thee I ree, vaudeville 
liners, novelties, big acts. Send your opei 
Address W. F. HEJTOERSOM, 
Prop, and Manager. 
CHAS. B. DOUTRICK, Aeat. Mgr. 
P. 0. DOYLE, Eepresentative. 



OZART 

Vaudeville Circuit. 

10— Theatres— 10 V 

FEATURE ACTS ALWAYS WANTED. 

All communications to Edward Moxart, Mala Offloe, 
Family Theatre, Lancaster, Pa. 



Nil 





Madlaon Street Nam r U elated 
CHICAGO 

WILLIAM SINGER, MANAGER. 
Handsomest burlesque kease la •■Otlgl, 
ing Empire Circuit attraotieae exclaetrely. 
Shows ohanged every Sunday. Matin— s A 

NEW STAR 

- MXLWAUKKK, WIS. 
FRANK R. TROTTMAN, Msaager. 
Handsomest end safest burleeoue theatre Sa 
America. Playing Empire Circuit Shews. Mstlaee) 
■very Day. 

Visit the new Rathskeller Downstairs. 
The beat in the Weet. 

I Want Performers 



To know that I build 

Parodies, etc., ef quality. 

CHARLES E. WELCH 

Vaudeville Contractor. 
Per address f •' 

COOK'S OPEftA HOUOt, BOOEISTZB. » T. 



BEST PLACES TO STOP AT. 



MEDEA HOTEL 

JOHNSTOWN. PA. 

Self blook from Majestio and Cambria Theatres. 
Rooms with or without bath. Rates moderate* 
"The House Recommends itself." European Plea. 

7. P. KNUFF, Proa, 

NICELY FURNISHED 

ROOMS 

NEAR ALL THEATRES 

Mrs. J. WILLIAMSON 

231 IE. 14th Street 



lfcS^ ARTISTS, NOTICE 

Hotel Faurot 

SCR ANTON, PA. 

3 Minutes from Theetree 

American Plan Rate* Modern** 

E. RAlSLCYa 244. Astama St. 

J^attonal Rotd 

CHICAGO 

Cor. Van Buren 8L and Wabash Ave. 

Half block from Auditorium Theatre. In vicinity 

of all theatres. Weekly rates made. 

D. A. DOOLEY, Prop. 



I 

WANT 

ACTS 



That are willing to keep going on "the small time," whlla waiting for the big 
place. No room for beery ecrobatlc acts. Comedy specialties end novelty singles 
desired. Address. 

NORMAN JEFFERIES, Ninth and Arch, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Variety's Chicago Office 



IS IN THE 



Chicago Opera House Block 

Advertisement and subscriptions received at regular rates. 

News items may be forwarded there, and will be promptly transmitted. 



When answering adverti»emenU kindly mention Variety. 






CLAYTON WHITE 

AND 

MARIE STUART 
WALTER C. KELLY 



BESSIE WYNN 



BERT LEVY 



. * • 




ALEXANDER BEVAN 
ROMANY OPERA CO. 



January 6 J 908 

Wkm • mvmr i n g odvertUemmt* kindly mention Vamett. 



CARON and HERBERT 



hirty-Six Pages 



TEN CEN 




VOL. IX„ NO. 6. 



JANUARY 18, 1908. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 







VARIETY 



- 



Keith's 




this week 



TIM 



McMAHON 






AND 



CHAPPELLE 




AND THEIR 



r? ; 



li 



PULLMAN 





GET THIS BOSTON PAPERS GOOD READING 



BOSTON "TRAVELER."— "aicMahon 
and Chappelle and their 'Pullman Porter 
Maids' are one of the excellent 'girl acts' 
that is most mirthful and entertaining. 
There are a number of catchy songs intro- 
duced, and the two principals introduce 
their suit case specialty 'Why Hubby Missed 
the Train.' The act concludes with a pretty 
darky melody." 



BOSTON "AMERICAN." — "If one 
wants to forget the worries and troubles of 
life, if eager to look at the world once more 
through the optimistic glasses of merry 
laughter, see 'McMahon and Chappelle' and 
their 'Pullman Porter Maids.' He will laugh 
till he is tired, then laugh some more, and 
when it will seem as if there is no more 
laughter left in his system, he will have to 
laugh again. The act is one of the most 
amusing ever seen at Keith's." 

When annotring odverttiemmtt kindly mention Vamttt. 



ANOTHER WITHOUT THE PAPER'S 
NAME.— "The varied star features at 
Keith's Theatre this week make a selection 
for the greatest hit difficult . . . 'Mc- 
Mahon and Chappelle' and their 'Pullman 
Porter Maids' made a big success. In this 
sketch is a 10- minute dialogue, presumably 
between husband and wife, on the outs. It 
is intensely funny, and the big audience 
showed their appreciation in long and in- 
sistent applause." 



Thirty-Six Pages 



TEN CENTS 




VOL. IX., NO. 6. 



JANUARY 18, 1908. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



"CHIPPING IN" FOR SECOND 
"SETTLEMENT" ASSESSMENT 

: 

$125,000 in Certified Checks Will Be Turned Over to 

Klaw & Erlanger by the United Booking 

Offices on February 3rd. 



With the discontinuance of "Advanced 
Vaudeville" and the near approach of Feb. 
3, the date set in the settlement agree- 
ment between Klaw & Erlanger and the 
United Booking Offices, the managers of 
the United who have been commissioned 
to gather in the shekels for the second 
payment of the bonus to be received by 
K. & E. for giving up their vaudeville ven- 
ture have started to gather the money 
together. 

Calls have been made upon managers in 
the East and West to have certified checks 
for the amounts they were assessed at the 
United Offices in due time. W T hen the call 
of "All's clear" has been heard, which 
will mean that "Advanced Vaudeville" has 
passed beyond the range of vision, $125,000 
will be turned over to the firm. 

This will be the second installment of 
the "settlement" money. The same amount 
was received by Klaw & Erlanger on Nov. 
7, last, when the paper was signed calling 
for their retreat. 

Morris Meyerfeld, Jr., president of the 
Orpheum Circuit, is said to have carried 
to his home in San Francisco after the 
arrangements were completed the only 
complete list of the assessments against 
the United managers. The sums to be 
paid by the different managers or circuits 
are reported to vary greatly, falling as 
low as $2,000 for an individual or firm, 
and running as high as $25,000 for a cir- 
cuit. 

It has been stated, and believed in many 
quarters, that the payment of $125,000 to 
Klaw & Erlanger on Feb. 3, bringing the 
amount which they will have then re- 
vived up to $250,000, constitutes the en- 
tire cash consideration K. & E. derives 
from the deal. 

Other reports place that amount as a 



yearly payment during the term of the 
ten-year agreement, while $1,500,000, and 
even $3,000,000, has been mentioned as 
the ultimate compensation to go to Klaw 
& Erlanger for giving up "Advanced 
Vaudeville." 



JIM MORTON NOT WORKING. 

Late last week the Klaw & Erlanger 
offices believed James J. Morton, the 
monologist, would play at the 58th Street 
Theatre this week for the United Booking 
Offices, bringing the K. & E. contract 
which Morton had been informed was can- 
celled back to life. 

No official notification was forwarded 
to Mr. Morton, however, and he did not 
play, remaining idle this, the second week 
since his refusal to play a Sunday show 
in the Grand Opera House, Syracuse. 

Mr. Morton received an offer during the 
week from the United that if he would 
tear up his K. & E. agreement a United 
contract for the same time and price 
would be issued in its stead. No allow- 
ance being made for the two weeks now 
ending, he did not accept the tender. 

Up to Thursday no routing for next 
week had been received by Mr. Morton. 



LUESCHER MANAGER OF WEBER'S. 

In two weeks Mark A. Lueecher will as- 
sume the managerial reins at Joe Weber's 
Music Hall. 

William Raymond Sill and L. J. Rodri- 
quei have been directing the place. 

Mr. Lueecher was genernl press repre- 
sentative for Klaw & Erlanger from the 
infancy of "Advanced Vaudeville." While 
in charge of the newspaper bureau Mr. 
Lueecher established a record for publicity, 
having seen rod more free advertising for 
the Klaw & Erlanger vaudeville circuit 
than lias ever been given any other the- 
atrical enterprise in a similar period. 



CASEY IN CHARGE. 

After to-morrow (Sunday) P. ("Pat") J. 
Casey will be practically in charge of the 
vaudeville end of Klaw & Erlanger's busi- 
ness, giving his attention to the settle- 
ment of the several matters naturally 

arising between the artists and managers; 
also investigating and adjusting the com- 
plaints which may be entered in the future 
by "K. & E. acts." Mr. Casey will re- 
main at the New York Theatre building. 

For some time now "Pat" has been the 
haven sought by disgruntled artists, with 
real or fancied grievances. His handling 
of the situation secured for him the con- 
fidence of the managers, both in the 
United Offices and the Klaw & Erlanger 
headquarters. Mr. Casey's personal popu- 
larity with the artist gives him a stand- 
ing which makes his rather diplomatic and 
difficult task of satisfactory adjustment 
the more smooth, artists having faith 
that Casey will protect their interests. 

Were not Mr. Casey a heavy man, with 
the proverbial good nature which attaches 
to avoirdupois, the New York Theatre 
would have been the scene of many warm 
arguments the past few weeks. 

It will probably be about a month be- 
fore Casey relinquishes his position of 
general peacemaker. Several offers have 
been extended to him for future employ- 
ment. 

The managerial reins of the new Geo. 
M. Cohan theatre, "The Gaiety," are his 
for the taking, and some of the vaudeville 
circuits want him, but Casey gives no 
intimation of his intentions. It may be 
ventured, however, that "Pat" will not 
"tie up" with anybody. He is too big, 
and requires too much room for himself. 



BUSINESS BETTER WEST. 

Chicago, Jan. 10. 

Business in the Middle West showed a 
decided increase the past week, especially 
in the larger cities. 

The out-of town theatres are also report- 
ing better results than at anv time since 
the slump before the holidays. A num- 
ber of houses which were forced to close 
on account of poor business have reopened 

Reports reaching here from all nVcr the 
count iv day that this is the best week in 

* * 

theatricals since Christ mas. 



CANCELLING FOR CAUSE. 

An officer of the Orpheum Circuit an- 
nounced this week two foreign acts were 
cancelled upon its time for breach of 
contract through failure to provide the 
personnel of the act, as originally booked. 

In other cases, also foreign acts, the 
Orpheum man said, notification had been 
given that unless the acts were played as 
seen on the other side, cancellation would 
immediately follow. Information to this 
effect was sent to two foreign acts at dif- 
ferent points on the circuit in the West 
by wire from the New York headquarters. 

The warning was deemed necessary, 
owing to the discovery that baggage, 
which would have been "excess" had it 
been carried, was left in New York to 
escape the payment of the charges. The 
baggage contained either setting or para- 
phernalia required to give the acts prop- 
erly. It was left behind to avoid the pay- 
ment of the extra baggage charge, the 
acts' contracts carrying no guarantee for 
excess. 

Acts booked by the United Offices, Or- 
pheum Circuit and Klaw & Erlanger were 
implicated, said the officer, and it was 
considered by the circuit an outright at- 
tempt to do its shows an injustice. 

Irregular personnel and abbreviated acts 
occasioned by improper setting or other 
causes would not be tolerated, it was em- 
phatically stated.' Any act failing to pro- 
vide the exact turn engaged upon the 
other side would be immediately cancelled. 
The Orpheum Circuit has the means at 
first and second hand of distinguishing. 



CLUBS ON AFFILIATION. 

A committee of the White Hats of 
America and Vaudeville Comedy Club 
were in conference recently. The meeting 
was held for the purpose of discussing ad- 
visability of some sort of an affiliation 
between the two societies. 

The committees have not reported yet, 
If is understood the general feeling among 
members is that favorable action should 
be taken. 

INMAN WILL CASE ADJOURNED. 

The Catherine Row ■ will cjase in which 
the I n man fa mil) is interested was ad 
jourucd for one week when it came up on 
Monday before the Surrogate in Brooklyn 






VARIETY 



WHAT ARE THE BEST STEPS 
FOR ARTISTS' PROTECTION? 



Editor Variety : 

It is with much pleasure I note that 
Variety is once more appealing to the 
common sense of the artist ; once more you 
are trying to open the eyes of the vaude- 
ville artist and rouse him out of the trance 
before it is too late to protect the future 
welfare of the mass of vaudeville artists. 

I am under the impression that your 
past efforts through the columns of Vari- 
ety when you advised the artists to or- 
ganize has borne fruit to-day ; a good per- 
centage of the variety profession is an 
organized body. Many have taken the 
advice given by you and are now part of 
the many associations that exist in this 
field. While the strength is practically in 
its infancy, it is a sleeping giant and when 
the component parts come together an as- 
sociation of artists will be a stern reality. 

Those not in the movement will sit up 
and take notice. No profession, trade or 
calling will be so thoroughly organized as 
the theatrical profession in the very near 
future ; no obstacle can prevent it and 
those who are bending every effort at this 
time to prevent consolidation will be over- 
whelmed by a tidal wave of spontaneous 
sentiment directed to a common goal ; unity 
of feeling, concentration of sentiment, 
combination of strength, and absolute unifi- 
cation of the different forces solidly com- 
bined with a mutual understanding and 
working with a set purpose in view. 

If your efforts through the columns of 
Variety accomplish nothing in the future 
other than recording theatrical history, 
this one movement should be the means to 
place you in the unique position of one 
who has done the greatest good unselfishly 
to better the material welfare of artists, 
nnd the theatrical profession would look 
upon you as the great force necessary and 
responsible for the ultimate result ac- 
complished. 

In my humble capacity I am willing to 
assist you in the great work contemplated. 
There are many things to be explained ; 
many false notions to be eliminated, and 
the absolute truth thoroughly and clearly 
presented, and placed in such form as to be 
readily understood. Vaudeville actors are 
in a receptive mood ; they have an idea 
what they want; they realize that some- 
thing must be done ; they are willing to 
do their whole duty, but they fear mistakes 
by those in authority, feeling that an er- 
ror at this time would retard any con- 
certed move for many years to come. 

There are many men of good under- 
standing, intelligent and capable of master- 
ing the situation, who are now in the 
ranks of the artist. 

This movement will bring thorn to the 
front. It needs cautions, far seeing, honest 
men who would sot aside personal am- 
bitions other than the credit due for the 
accomplishment of a good purpose. You 
have it in your power to bring forward 
these men. A continuance on the Same 
lines you have been WOlking on will meet 
l he success it deserves. 

Any information I can give you at any 
lime is at your disposal, and I can assure 
von that my associates in the progressive 
movement of the day would willingly assist 
jn the good work fostered by you. 



I beg to subscribe myself as one who 
appreciates your efforts. 

Harry De Veaux, 
International President, Actors' Union. 



(Correspondents are not limited to one 
letter. Mr. DeVeaux is earnestly invited 
to contribute often. — Ed.) 



The question is one that has been dis- 
cussed pro and con for some time — "What 
Are the Best Steps for Artists' Protection." 
I will try to give my opinion in as few 
words as possible to Vahiety's timely 
question* 

The best protection for an artist is: 
firstly, to have his own original creations 
protected in every possible way. His say- 
ings, his songs, protected so that any in- 
fringement upon the same would be sub- 
ject to penalty by the courts. 

For the artist, the real artist, to be 
protected from "fakers," who purloin the 
fruits of his brains and who with "gall" 
and "nerve"* find some representative 
who will "boost" and "plug" these acts; 
these appropriators of real merit. That 
would, indeed, be a first step in the right 
direction. 

I think that the real evil to-day is that 
which exists amongst artists themselves, 
in this respect. 

When the first step has been taken, the 
trouble of real artists walking the streets, 
when so many bold imitators are working, 
will have been probably partially elim- 
inated. 

When the manager finds that if he en- 
gages an artist, who has appropriated the 
goods of another who is the originator, 
that it is a legal offense, the first step for 
protection has been won. 

If the representative finds also he is 
amenable to law, and the artist who has 
purloined original material finds the same 
result awaiting him, many waiters, window 
cleaners, plumbers and fanners will be 
forced to retire, and the real artists will 
have the work, through the sole reason of 
possessing ability and protected originality. 

Managers are only human and above all. 
business men. They have created a great 
demand for artists by making vaudeville a 
fad. 

The public will accept a passable imita- 
tion as quickly as they will the original. 
So there is no redress there. 

The first steps then for artists' protec- 
tion are those I have suggested. 

To make this a law constant agitation 
by the powerful actors' organizations will 
be necessary. Then will the vaudeville 
profession have taken the first best step 
for its own future protection. 

(Name of writer withheld. Nil.) 



ERNEST HOGAN IN SANITARIUM. 

Ernest Hngutt, the colored comedian, is 
reported to ho seriously ill. At the Motel 
Marshall, when- ll«»gan lives when in New 
York, it was said he i- at irrescnl in •> 
Kanitarium at Boston. 



NO CHANGE IN NEW ENGLAND. 

Springfield, Mass., Jan. 10. 

There has been no change in the vaude- 
ville situation, either here or in Worcester, 
where William Morris occupies the vaude- 
ville theatres in opposition to S. Z. Poli. 

Morris has an injunction ready to serve 
upon anyone attempting to regain pos- 
session of either the Nelson, this city, or 
Franklin Square, Worcester. 

It is reported Klaw & Erlanger will 
take no steps to oust Morris, but fight 
the injunction case, which will rake over 
the legal points. 

Announcements were inserted in the 
local papers this week signed by the Will- 
iam Morris Amusement Company stating 
the efforts of Poli and Klaw & Erlanger 
to compel the discontinuance of vaude- 
ville in the Nelson Theatre had failed. A 
painted board in the lobby of the Nelson 
with the word "Poli*' displayed in strik- 
ing similitude to that manager's way of 
using his name as a trade- mark bore the 
same reading matter. The advertisement 
ami lobby placard are said to have an- 
noyed 'Mr. Poli, who was in the city on 
Monday. 

William Morris was here at the same 
time, accompanied by his counsel, Geo. M. 
Leventritt, of New York. The three men 
talked together for about two hour% in 
the hotel where all stopped. Neither Mr. 
Poli nor Mr. Morris would tell the sub- 
ject of the lengthy conversation. 

Messrs. Morris and Leventritt returned 
to New York on Tuesday. Mr. Morris, 
when asked if the report that he had been 
offered $.">,000 to vacate Springfield and 
Worcester, replied vaguely, but denied 
that lie would accept that amount or even 
one-half of the $15,000 posted by Poli to 
be turned over to Klaw & Erlanger when 
the New England houses were clear of the 
Morris shows. Mr. Morris would not com- 
mit himself upon the amount he would 
leave the towns for. 

On the street the talk was that Kla\v& 
Erlanger were not worrying over the pos- 
sibility of Poli withdrawing his $15,000 
on Feb, 4 if the houses remained open 
with vaudeville. On the Poli Circuit of 
theatres there are two playing legitimate 
attractions booked through "The Syndi- 
cate'' (Klaw & Erlanger). The opinion 
was freely expressed that Poli was in no 
position, with the legitimate houses on his 
hands, to act arbitrarily, or contrary to 
the wishes of K. & E. 

ACTS LAYING OFF. 

There will be about 'JO acts under con- 
tracts "laying off" next week, either bookeo 
by Klaw & Erlanger or the United Offices, 
but mostly of the former. 

The closing of the New York and Audi- 
torium to-day. the final pair of the Klaw 
& Erlanger Circuit, caused an oversupply. 

The United managers were in session 
on Tuesday and Wednesday, attempting to 
route the consignment sent down from 
the K. & E. offices. 

Acts which were "layed off" last week 
Itnd at other times, especially the foreign- 
ers, have been threatening legal trouble 
lately as the time for their departure 
draws near. 

Any quantity of law suits is expected 
I' follow the final closing of the "Advanced 
Vaudeville" circuit. 



ANDERSON-ZIEGLER HAVE LOUIS- 
VILLE. 

Louisville, Jau. 16. 

Anderson & Ziegler have secured con- 
trol of the Hopkins' and Mary Anderson 
theatres in this city. 

The Hopkins' will discontinue vaude- 
ville, and play stock. The Mary Ander- 
son will be the vaudeville house here- 
after, booked in conjunction with the 
other Anderson-Ziegler houses in Cincin- 
nati (Columbia), and Indianapolis (Grand 
Opera House). 

Mr. Friedberg, who has been manager 
of the Mary Anderson, will probably be 
retained by the new lessees. 



LEASE CIRCLE. 

A lease of the Circle was given this week 
by Sullivan & Kraus, the present tenants. 
U Felix Isman, of Philadelphia, and Gus 
Edwards, the music publisher and com- 
poser. Possession will be taken on March 
1. The term of the agreement is for eight 
3 cars. 

On Monday "Lonesome Town," a musi- 
cal piece, will play in the house, commenc- 
ing a six weeks' run which is optional 
Upon the success of the play. 

Commencing with January 10, Sunday 
concerts will be conducted by Mr. Ed- 
wards at the Circle. Upon the house com- 
ing into the new managers' possession, it 
W ill be re-named. The next title may be 
"(Jus Edwards' Music Hall." 

A light music hall piece, designed to run 
through the summer, will be produced by 
Mr. Edwards. He will compose music for 
it, but states all authors and composers 
who contribute have an equal chance. Any 
song accepted will have the writer's name 
programmed. From the manner in which 
Mr. Edwards imparted this information, it 
is believed to be an unusual privilege. 

William Morris, the vaudeville agent, 
lad conferred with Oeo. Kraus regarding 
a lease for vaudeville. A hitch in the ne- 
gotiations, said to be due to some provision 
Mr. Morris wished guaranteed in reference 
to repairs on ihe building, if ordered by 
the authorities, brough the matter to a 
(lose, when Isman & Edwards secured it. 

The Circle has had a tumultuous time 
of it so far this season. Several shows 
have been there, each for a short period 
Cnly. Last season, "Wine, Woman and 
Song," Mortimer M. Thiese's burlesque 
show, had a long and profitable run in the 
house. 

No house stall has been selected. Sev- 
eral vaudevillians have been approached 
by Mr. Edwards to join his company. 
Among those he mentions are Hobby North 
and Mabel Iliie. 



COLLINS AND HART IN PLAY. 

The Klaw & Erlanger vaudeville con- 
tract held by Collins and Hart, the bur- 
lesque "strong" men, has been canceled. 

The team is rehearsing on the New Am- 
sterdam Theatre roof with "The Soul 
Kiss," and will appear in that Zicgfeld 
production at Philadelphia on Monday. 



Maida Dtiprce has hit 'The 
School < Jirls," 



High 



ARTISTS SELL PAPERS ON STREET. 

Easton, Pa.. Jan. 16. 

The artists on the bill at the Orpheum 
sold papers on the street this week, by 
auction, in aid of the Boyertown fire suf 
ferers. 

Itrindamoiir bought the tii-t ropy for 
ten dollar<. The actors were in an auto 
mobile, and attracted a large crowd. 



VARIETY 



Hk/ety 

A Variety Paper (or Variety People. 

Published ever/ Saturday by 
THE VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 



1 102 Broadway, 

Telephone 



J 4022 ]- 3Sth% 
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New York City, 
t. 



SIME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 22, 
1905, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., 
indcr the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

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Copyright, 1007, by Variety Publishing Co. 



Vol. IX. 



JANUARY 18. 



No. 6. 



There is a quotation from the Latin 
commonly used to express a death. It 
might be revived for the moment as the 
obituary notice of Klaw & Krlauger's "Ad- 
vanced Vaudeville/' which jumps off the 
end to-morrow night at the New York 
Theatre. With the epitaph should be sub- 
joined "A Great Opportunity Lost." 



Jack Irwin leaves "The Tiger Lilies" 
r.ext week. 



Al (rroasmnn has recovered his health, 
;ind will resume his vaudeville engage- 
ment h. 

Pcmberston and BrCnn have been obliged 
lo cancel seven weeks owing to Mr. Pern* 
bcrston's illness. 



McN'ish and Pen fold replaced Coukley 
and M< T.rido at the Fifty-eighth Street 
Theatre this wnrir. 

l'ertina. a toe dancer and one of H. II. 
I fiber's foreign booking*, will open on the 
I'nifed time 1 'eh. 10. 

Buckner, the 'cyclist, who represented 

Al Sutherland while in Europe, returned 
t<> New York this week. 



Rhodes and Engel, comedy acrobats, sail 
to-day for Cuba, having closed with "The 
Bad Boy and His Teddy Bears." 



Harry L. Webb, the comedian, has a new 
comedy sketch named "10 A. M.," with 
two people, Cora Wilmont and Lee Walter. 



The booking of Grace La Hue for the 
Wintergarteif, Berlin, was entered into 
through the II. B. Marinelli New York 
bianch. 



<ieo. Evans goes on the United time 
next week to fulfill his remaining six- 
teen weeks under a Klaw & Erlanger 
contract. 



Bert Walton will not rejoin his former 
partners, the Barth Brothers. Mr. Wal- 
ton's present act is known as "Bert and 
Lottie Walton." 



The Peerless Mowatts sail for Europe 
Feb. 19 for a six months' engagement, 
opening on the Stoll Tour at Edinburgh, 
Scotland, March 2. 

Following Leo CaTrillo's "jump" from 
Philadelphia to Atlanta, he "leaped" back 
to tlv Noveltv, Brooklvn, where Mr. 
Carriii *s this week. 

The Josettis, a foreign "Hisley" act, 
six people, open at Keith's, Providence, on 
Jan. 27 for their first American appear- 
ance. II. II. Feiber engaged it*. 



Barry Keeler is no longer with "The 
Dainty Duchess." The show was chaiiged 
about after Mr. Keeler left, leaving the 
vacancy unnecessary to fill. 

Phil Isaac, manager of "The Dainty 
Duchess," is wearing a new gold watch, 
appropriately inscribed, presented to him 
by the members of his company. 



Charles .T. Stine is temporarily substi- 
tuting for (harles H. Hopper this week 
at the Fifth Avenue in Charles E. Evans' 
sketch. "It's Vp to You. William." 

Victor Bedini in a jockey act including 
three girl*, n man and a dog, will open 
at the Hippodrome February 17th, 
brought over here by II. B. Marinelli. 



Grace (Janier is to appear in a sketch in 
"one" written by Jack Mason. Besides 
Miss Garner, there will be three men. 
The title of the act will be "Three For 

tine." 



Walter Plimmer has booked Belle Trav- 
ers, now a member of Watson's "Oriental 
llurlesquers" (Western Wheel) for the 
Kentz-Sant ley show (Eastern Wheel) next 
season. 



Bigo, i he gypsy violinist, now playing 
at the Majestic Hotel in Philadelphia, in 
reported to lie preparing for a juvenile 
celebration. Itigo's wife was formerly 
Kit i ie Emerson. 

.1. < '. Matthews, ;ii present in charge of 
the Franklin Square Theatre, Worcester, 

i- onlj tilling, tl Hgagemeiii temporarily. 

Mi. Matthews ha- a booking ofliee at 1431 
Broad w ay. 



Louis Harris is the present treasurer 
of the Trocadero, Chicago, Harry Hyama 
having retired from that position. 
( harles Abbott is in charge of "The 
Parisian Widows," Mr. Harris' late capac- 
ity. 



The Vernon Sisters have been obliged 
to cancel all time, caused by the serious 
illness of Miss Amelia. Miss Vernon was 
operated on for appendicitis on Jan. 4 at 
her home in Buffalo, and is slowly recover- 
ing. 



Maidie Scott, the foreign act, who was 
to have opened at the New York this 
week, held over at the Auditorium, Chi- 
cago, instead. May Bel fort filled the place 
on the New York's bill left open by her 
absence. 



Lily Flexmore was not at the opening 
matinee of the New York this week. A 
railroad wreck caused the delay. Madge 
Fox filled her position on Monday. Miss 
Flexmore played the week out commenc- 
ing Tttetday. 



Birnie Lewis is a young man who ex- 
pects to offer impersonations soon on the 
Keith-Proctor Circuit. Mr. Lewis has de 
parted from the customary practice of the 
mimic ; he will not announce his subjects, 
leaving that for the audience to discover. 

James R. Waters, the Hebrew comedian 
with Manchester's "Vanity Fair," has 
written a sketch called "Isaac's Lottery 
Ticket," in which he will appear next 
season in the title role. Three others are 
also cast for the piece. 



Al Sutherland, the agent, will be absent 
about five or six weeks in Europe. His 
young son, ten years old, accompanied 
Mr. Sutherland. Before his father returns 
the boy will be placed in a French school 
for a course of study in the foreign land. 

Troja, the singer, opens Feb. It} at Win- 
nipeg, Man., for a sixteen weeks' tour of 
the Sullivan-Considiue Circuit. Until a 
few weeks ago she was a special attraction 
with one of the Eastern Burlesque Wheel 
shows. Walter Dimmer booked the vaude- 
ville time. 



William Torpey, stage manager at the 
New York during the vaudeville reign, will 
continue in the same position with the 
house. Although new to vaudeville when 
the season opened. Mr. Torpey did excel- 
lent work from the beginning. He was 
much esteemed by the artists playing the 
theatre. 



Woodward's Seals, now the property of 
Cliffe Berzac, are working in England, !»• 
ing booked well ahead. The animal act 
\>as shipped from America Dec. LM and ar- 
rived in London ten days later. I'pon 
their arrival there was not a date booked, 
but last Week tin- act had more time of- 
fered than could 1»»' taken care <»f. 

Lmv.iI. I he foreigner, and his remarkable 
h allied <!">u. have lieeii engaged by the New 
York Hippodrome for I went j weeks next 
season, . MiniiM'iH iiin November *_'.">. 1 lie 
If.ikim: was made through II. B. Mariucllh 
A number <>t American malingers were 



after the act. John Bingling, the circus 
man, offered it two seasons' continuous 
work with his show, but foreign contracts 
prevented the acceptance. 



Victor Herbert is addressing a communi- 
cation to all members of "The Friars," 
begging their support and active aid in 
helping along the copyright bill which will 
secure to American composer! and authors 
tie right to demand payme.it from the 
makers of mechanical musical instruments 
for the use of their works. "The Friars" 
have decided to espouse the cause, and ap- 
pointed a committee to take the matter in 
(barge. 

No foreign acts are being booked at 
present for the United circuit's next sea- 
son. H. 11. Feiher, one of the United's 
foreign representatives, usually abroad at 
this time of the year, is in New York. 
Nothing has been heard of any engage- 
ments made through II. B. Marinelli, the 
other international representative of the 
agency. Foreign acts must be booked well 
ahead for the following season. It is al- 
most too late now on the other side to 
select for '08 -'09. 

The departure of "Advanced Vaudeville" 
from the variety scene takes with it 
Louis F. Werba, its general manager, one 
big source of sorrow to the vaudevillians 
who know Mr. Werba well. The short 
stay of Klaw & Erlanger in vaudeville 
brought Mr. Werba to the fore, and made 
it pleasurably noticeable that here and 
there is a nice fellow even outside the 
vaudeville gates. There was general com- 
ment among the foreign acts playing nt the 
New York of the hospitable treatment ac- 
corded by its manager, Mr. Werba, some- 
thing entirely new to them, as the 'Ilerr 
Direktor" on the other side is always 
the "llerr Direktor," and never human. 
But Mr. Werba will still remain in the 
city, and that's some compensation for the 
direct loss. 



"Advanced Vaudeville" may leave the 
New York Theatre, but "Walter" re- 
mains. "Walter" is the gentleman of 
color who has been general director of 
everything "Advanced" about the theatre 
between the ground and fifth floors. He i* 
also the superintendent of the basement. 
chief in charge of the main hall, head 
carriage opener, outer guard of the 
"boas' office at day, general guard at 
night, handy man at all times, and the 
bureau of information to the public. Ijist 
November, when the New York had been 
opened nearly two months with variety 
shows, "Walter" stood outside the theatre 
one day trying to figure the side of the 
street the sun would first shine on the 
following morning. He had bet a brother 
worker at the Hotel Astor "two bits" on 
the proposition. He was worried. A 
young man walked up, inquiring if 
"vaudeville'' was being played there. "N'o. 
sab." said "Walter." "This am de loss' 
show. Yu 'ad better lo right over to that 
If a miner stein's for youah voodavale." 
Louis F. Werba, "the Ih»ss," leaving the 
theatre just then, "Walter" said: "Yo 
heah dat man, boss.' Heali whs' he ask 
for? Voodavale. I mogged him over to 
Hauimerst cin's. For de lor sake, boss. 
I'sc tired telling dis p<»' white trash da* 
can't read de dgns ivha' kind of a show 



we is jfivin'." 



VARIETY 



BIG BURLESQUE DEAL RUMORED. 

Tt is stated from an excellent source 
that there have been approaches made on 
behalf of certain burlesque managers at- 
tached to one of the opposing wheels to 
"jump" the wheel they are now associated 
with, taking over to the other side houses 
and shows. 

If this goes through it will have a seri- 
ous result, it is said, upon the wheel suf- 
fering the loss. No money inducements 
are being considered, the report saying 
the proposition for the "flop" was made 
without any conditions. 

There is another authentic rumor that 
each wheel is about to agree that a cer- 
tain house in a city where there is oppo- 
sition shall be abandoned for burlestjue. 
In effect the wheels have agreed to trad** 
the closing of a theatre each, giving both 
a clear town where before the business had 
been split. 

If the arrangements go through one 
theatre in the west, and one in the east 
will be removed from the route sheets. 



"AMATEURS" AT PEOPLE'S. 

Cincinnati, Jan. 16. 
"Amateur Night" had its premier at 
the People's last Friday evening. 'The 
Hook" was in use, and the performance 
seemed to be liked, besides attracting con- 
siderable attention. 



MANAGERS' CASE TRIED. 

A court decision is expected in a few 
weeks in the suit of Thomas W. Dinkins, 
the Western Burlesque Wheel manager, 
against Weber & Rush (Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel) for an accounting. The case was 
argued a few days ago before Justice 
McCall in the Equity Term of the Su- 
preme Court. Decision was reserved and 
counsel for both sides were invited to file 
briefs. 

Mr. Dinkins alleges that he held a 
partnership contract with Weber & Rush 
under which he was to have an option 
of participating in all Weber & Rush's 
business enterprises outside their bur- 
lesque noldings. The plaintiff asserted 
that he was not offered an interest in 
the firm's enterprises in Lawrence, Mass. 
(since sold by Weber & Rush), Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., Binghamton and Atlanta, Ga. 

The defense set up by Weber & Rush 
was a general denial of Dinkins* allega- 
tions. 



GRACE HAZARD. 

The large oval on the front page this 
week holds a picture of Grace Hazard, 
who appears at Hammerstein's next week 
(January 20) in her own original and 
unique conception styled "Five Feet of 
Comic Opera," less than one year old. 

Miss Hazard is the "five feet," and sings 
the well known airs of the most popular 
light operas, dressed appropriately for 
each. It is the singer's manner of reach- 
ing the different costumes, together with 
her charming stage presence and pleasant 
voice, which have attracted universal at- 
tention to her for the past few months. 

"Five Feet of Comic Opera" is highly 
entertaining; everyone admits that when 
seen, and it has earned for Miss Hazard 
the distinction of being called "Advanced 
Vaudeville's Biggest Hit." Miss Hazard 
has been playing since the season opened 
on the Klaw & Erlanger Circuit. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETS. 

Chicago, Jan. 16. 
A meeting of the executive committee 
of the Empire Circuit (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) was held this week in Cincinnati. 



RECEIPTS ABOVE GUARANTEE. 

"The High School Girls" (Western 
Burlesque Wheel), which played three 
nights of "lay off" time in the Grand 
Opera House, Chester, Pa., last week, ex- 
ceeded their guarantee by a round sum. 

The show received a surety of $150 a 
day to cover expenses. The company is 
understood to have drawn down a neat 
profit in addition. Another Western 
W h o ol «s how io playw rg-- the same house 
the latter half of this week and Miner's 
"Bohemians" goes in next week. 



SEVEN STANDS FOR "LAY-OFF." 

Jack Singer, manager and part owner 
of the Behman Show (Eastern Burlesque 
Wheel), has arranged to play seven one- 
night stands between New Orleans and 
Kansas City instead of "laying off" for 
that week to make the jump. 

The schedule will be : Jan. 20, Jefferson, 
Lafayette ; 27, Rapids, Alexandria ; 28, 
Grand Opera House, Shreveport, La. ; 29, 
Dallas; 30, Greenwall O. II., Ft. Worth; 
31, Opera House, Denison, Tex. ; and Feb. 
1, Opera House. Parsons. Kansas. 



WILLIAMS ON MADISON SQUARE 

ROOF. 

When the show is presented upon the 
Madison Square Roof next summer Harry 
and Sim Williams, the Western Burlesque 
Wheel managers, will have a finger in the 
pie. 

They have arranged with Henry Pincus 
to make the production on a sharing plan. 
Mr. Pincus possesses the lease. Jack 
Mason will stage the piece, also engag- 
ing the company. He will have a share 
in any profits as well. 

Well known vaudeville names will be 
secured for attractions in addition to any 
regulation show played. 

Harry Williams is likewise said to have 
contemplated leasing Wallack's Theatre 
for ten weeks next summer, placing there 
a burlesque show, exactly as it is given 
"on the road." With the warm weather 
and other details considered, it is prob- 
able Mr. Williams has abandoned this 
latter project. 



TOO MUCH ROOM. 

The Empire Circuit Company's New 
York headquarters will remove from their 
present location on the seventh floor of the 
Knickerbocker Theatre building annex. 

There is room to spare in the suite now 
occupied and it will take a lease upon a 
smaller space, probably on a lower floor 
of the same building. 



SPARROW CASE TO BE TRIED. 

The suit brought against various mem- 
bers of the old Travelling Managers' Asso- 
ciation by the Sparrow Amusement Com- 
pany of Montreal, Canada, following the 
split of the burlesque circuits, may come 
to trial in February or March of this year. 
It has been pending for more than a year. 

Leon Laski, representing certain of the 
co-defendants, was in Toronto last week 
taking depositions of F. W. Stair, of the 
Empire Circuit Company (Western Bur- 
lesque Wheel). 

Certain of the defendants were inclined 
to regard the suit as more 'or less of a 
joke, but the plaintiffs have exhibited 
every indication of going into court. 



"The Soul Kiss" opens at the New York 
Tuesday, Jan. 28. 




• 



• 



EASTERN MANAGERS ON TRIP. 

Next Thursday, January 23, L. Law- 
rence Weber, Sam Scribner and Gus Hill, 
three of the big managers of the Eastern 
Burlesque Wheel, will step inside the 20th 
Century Limited en route for Chicago, 
where they will remain until the opening 
of Hyde & Behman's new $400,000 "Star 
and Garter" burlesque theatre in that 
town on January 26. The theatre will 
play the Eastern attractions. 

Following the event, a trip will be 
taken, keeping the managers out of New 
York for two or three weeks. Upon their 
return an announcement is expected of 
new accessions to the Eastern time. 



THEATRE'S NARROW ESCAPE. 

The Empire Theatre, the Western bur- 
lesque house now building in Williams- 
burg, escaped a mishap early this week 
which might have delayed its opening sev- 
eral months. 

One of the big steel trusses which sup- 
port the roof had just been set in place 
and the guy ropes removed, when a gust 
of wind toppled it over and let it drop 
through the interior to the basement. The 
beams weigh between seven and eight 
tons, and had the mass failed to the other 
side thev would have struck the canti- 
lever trusses and torn out half the west 
wall. 

Although a score or more riggers were 
working in the interior of the building, no 
one was injured. The roof beams were 
broken near the ends, but workmen quick- 
ly repaired the damage and by to-night 
the contractors promise that the building 
will be under its permanent roof. The 
accident has not delayed the work, and 
the building, it is promised, will be ready 
to turn over to the Empire Circuit Com- 
pany, or the subsidiary corporation which 
controls the house by March. 



ABE LEAVITT ALL RIGHT. 

It commences to look as though, when a 
person takes a trip to French Lick Springs, 
it is equivalent to sending out an order for 
the undertaker, according to the reports 
which then spread. 

Abe Leavitt, manager of the "Rentz- 
Siintley" Company, was reported in 
Variety last week from New Orleans as 
in a serious condition at French Lick, 
where he had gone while his company was 
playing Cincinnati. 

Mr. Leavitt says for the past ten years 
he has been making an annual trip to the 
springs and arrived there this season in the 
usual way, walking down to the depot, 
purchasing a ticket, entering a car, and 
the engine did the rest. When he arrived 
there Mr. Leavitt's friend, Tom Taggart, 
chairman of the Democratic National Com- 
mittee and president of the French Lick 
Hotel Company, completed the job started 
by the engine. 

"The Rentz-Santley" show will be a new 
production next season. Matt Woodward 
is writing the pieces. 

The first part will be called "The Mar- 
ried Widow," the burlesque "The Girl of 
the Golden Vest." A costly scenic in- 
vestiture will also be on exhibition. 



BELLE t.ORDON. 
"The Dainty Athlete." 

Belle Gordon 1b now playing In the West, where she has repeated over the vaudeville circuits. Miss 
Gordon, in her athletic specialty, has attracted wide notice, and she sayt "originality it my only 
trademark." . 



Jeannette Marlboro, of Woodford and 
Marlboro, is an honorary member of 
Wheeling (W. Vn.) Lodge, No. 51, 
T. M. A. 



VARIETY 



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8 



VARIETY 



TWENTY MORE FOREIGN ACTS. 

There are about twenty foreign acts 
yet to come pyer to this side under Klaw 
& Erlanger eontnu-ts. Whenever the op- 
portunity presents they are being advised 
to cancel the American time. The press 
of the situation here is explained, to- 
gether with the likelihood of "lay offi," 

etc., which the other foreign acts now- 
here have experienced. 

Little Pich, due to open at one of the 
United houses, is a "K. & E." act, sup- 
posed to remain at home. Pich cabled 
over to K. & E. asking if his contract held 
good. Informed that it did. he was ad- 
vised his cancellation would be accepted. 
This was thought to have been closed, 
the English artists having an intimate 
knowledge of the present conditions, but 
Little Pich's London agents informed him 
they would demand the amount of their 
commission, cancellation or no, so the art- 
ist concluded he had better play the 
American engagement. 

He sailed from England this week on 
the "Amerika." 



W. V. A. OFFER STEADY TIME. 

Chicago, Jan. 10. 



NEW YORK'S ENDING. 

To-morrow (Sunday) night the bells 
will toll, and the orchestra try to catch 
the right swing for the last "rag" of 
"Advanced Vaudeville," which leaves the 
New York Theatre a couple of weeks 
ahead of its time limit. 

Though "Advanced" goes out, plain 
"vaudeville" will come back at regular 
weekly intervals, the New York continu- 
ing to give Sunday concerts in the even- 
ing only, according to the present inten- 
tion. 

The settlement agreement made by Klaw 
& Erlanger with the United Booking Of- 
fices specified Klaw & Erlanger could not 
play vaudeville in an "opposition city" for 
ten years to come, but it is understood 

there will be no objection to the Sunday 
concerts at the New York. 



STILL ANOTHER IN JOHNSTOWN. 

Johnstown^ Pa., Jan. 1G. 

Another vaudeville theatre was opened 
here Monday. The town now holds four. 
One is booked by the United Booking Of- 
fices and William Morris, of New York, 
supplies another. 

The last house was promoted by J. D. 
Foley, an intimate acquaintance of John 
Harris, manager for Harry Davis, of the 
Grand Opera House, Pittsburg. 

Mr. Foley fixed up the place, called 
"The Globe," at an expense of $8,000. Four 
vaudeville acts and moving pictures are 
shown. It is continuous. 



"THE WALTZ DREAM" FREE. 

The music of "The Waltz Dream," the 
newest operatic production which has not 
as vet reached New York, seems to be 
in the same category as "The Merry 
Widow," where the music is concerned. 

It is not copyrighted, and free to all 
comers, although Jos. W. Stern & Co. 
have made claim to the publication rights 
through their attorneys, advising Maurice 
Shapiro action would he taken if he 
offered for sale any of the score. 

Mr. Shapiro's lawyer advised him to go 
ahead, and a medley of the opera's strains, 
arranged by Fred. Soloman, will he placed 
by Mr. Shapiro on the market. 



In the smaller theatres of the Middle 
West booked through the Western Vaude- 
ville Association. notices have been 
posted attracting attention of artists to 
the affiliation between the \V, V, A. and 
United Hooking Offices. 

It is promised that all acts agreeing to 
play exclusively for either of the agencies 
will receive from 30 to 40 weeks, consecu- 
tive time, without "lav off." 

The route for one year back of all art- 
ists desiring future time must be turned 
in, giving the theatres which they have 
played in. The notices are for the bene- 
fit of the acts playing the small houses. 
Heretofore thev have been booked off and 
on. 

While consecutive time is promised) no 
route will he given, but a blanket contract 
will be issued. "Jumps" and "shifts" 
must be made according to instructions. 
The consecutive time is assured. That i*> 
supposed to compensate for any possible 
inconvenience. 

The routing of acts for next season will 
shortly commence in the Western Vaude- 
ville Association's offices. 



PLAYED SKETCHES ON SUNDAY. 

In a few of the variety theatres in New 
York last Sunday, .sketches were played as 
a part of the twice-daily program. Unan- 
nounced the attempt to better the Sunday 
shows brought no perceptible increase in 
the attendance. 

No one interfered with the managers of 
the respective houses, and no complaints 
were entered against any for a violation 
of the Sunday law. 

In the Jefferson Market Folice Court 
this week John Buck, the assistant man- 
ager of the Union Square (Keith & Proc- 
tor) was arraigned for allowing Dolan and 
Lenharr and James A. Kiernan and Com- 
pany to play .sketches on Sunday, Janu- 
c.r 5. 

Maurice Goodman, who appeared for 
Mr. Buck, set up the defense that the as- 
sistant-manager was not responsihle for 
the show, nor had he authorized the ap- 
pearances. 

Briefs were submitted, and decision was 
n served. 



YUILIANS TO RETURN HOME. 

The Eight Yuilians will not play the 
Orpheuni Circuit on this American visit. 
They will return to their native land in a 
few days. 

On Wednesday, Yuilian, the head of the 
act, received a cable his wife had died in 
Italy, leaving the four acrobatic youngsters 
who work in the act, motherless. Four 
more are on the other side, while others, 
making twelve Yuilian children in nil, are 
carried along with the father. 

The Yuilians believed they would have 
to play the Orpheum Circuit, without hav- 
ing a "fare" clause in their K. & E. con- 
tract. The Orpheum Circuit, however, 
gave the act a contract for next season 
over its time at the same salary. The 
transportation is to be paid by the cir- 
cuit. In consideration of this, the Yuilians 
agreed to cancel their present agreement. 

Similar action will be taken with Mar- 
stro and Orettn at the New York this 
week. / 



FOGERTY HOT AFTER COPYIST. 

I'rank Fogerty. the story teller, is play- 
ing at the Empire, Hoboken, this week, 
and runs over to New York between 
shows. On the coldest davs of the week 
Mr. Fogerty could be seen walking along 
Broadway chewing upon a piece of Ice 
to keep his temperature down. 

The ire of Mr. Fogerty has been 
aroused through hearing that Arthur 
Whit claw, a monologist, had been using 
his own story, a political speech inter- 
spersed with frequent exclamations of 
"Ain't I right, bovs? You can bet vour 
life I am." 

No one excepting Mr. Whitelaw has 
l»een heard of who disputes Mr. Fogerty's 
stage right to this story, and it is so 
peculiar in it^ const nut ion, Mr. Fogerty 
i.eliveriiig it with .in Irish brogue, that 
the question of priority is reduced to a 
minimum. 

The taking of the story by Whitelaw 
has further wilted Fogerty's collar by 
Whitelnw's assertion that he told the 
story first, and previous to Fogerty. This 
statement was made by Whitelaw to 
Harrv l.eonhardt. when the latter was 

* 

manager of the lMi\ Street Theatre, when 
Whitelaw last played there. 

.Mr. I.eonhardt induced Mr. Fogerty to 
take up i vaudeville tour, and he thought 
himself pretty well informed on the 
Fogerty act in consequence. He inno- 
cently inquired of Mr. Whitelaw where* 
he had first told it. Whitelaw replied he 
had written it out. and given it to Su- 
preme Court Judge Aspinall, of Brooklyn. 

Meeting the Judge at Stanley's one 
evening, Mr. Fogerty, in erinpanv with 
John J. Butler, the restaurant's manager. 
inquired of him when Whitelaw had 
turned over the story to him. Judge 
Aspinall was perplexed for some time be- 
fore he caught the drift of the question. 
He then denied knowing Whitelaw or of 
having ever met him. Upon this being 
repeated to Whitelaw, he answered. 'Y<>u 
heard what I said." and let it go at that. 

Mr. Fogerty has written to vaudeville 
managers asking protection against 
Whitelaw if he attempts to tell the story, 
and says his responses have all been satis- 
factory, he heing readily recognized as the 
owner of it. Whatever other steps are 
possihle to suppress the repetition of his 
matena"i by others, Mr. Fcgertv also ad. Is 
he will take. 



COOPER MAY SUE AGAIN. 

The lawsuit brought and won against 
Vesta Victoria by Pert Cooper is not the 
last of his claim against the English 
singer, according to Mr. Cooper. 

He says the first action, for $l,2f>0, rep- 
resented his charge for services for ten 
weeks of Miss Victoria's K. & E. contract. 
As to the remaining time played, said 
Cooper, he would again sue for a like 
proportion (0 per cent.) of her earnings. 



SILENT ABOUT "NO COMMISSION." 

The story in Vauikty of a week ago 
that a big manager in the St. James 
Ituilding had a scheme afoot to do awa.v 
with the commission now charged by the 
I'nited Hooking Offices and Western 
Vaudeville Association caused a hum of 
comment among the artists and agents 
this week. 

No one could conjecture how it would 
be arranged. The manager working on 
the idea would not say anything further. 
Hv next season he ventured it would 
probably be in operation, but how it was 
to he done remained untold. 

Asked if the move also included an at- 
tempt to do away with the outside agent 
and his commission as well, he replied: 
'"No; I encourage the agent." 



LUCY WESTON IN "FOLLIES." 

On Monday at Philadelphia* Lucy Wen- 
ion will appear in "The Follies of 11)07" 
singing some of the songs which have made 
her successful at the New York this wcck 
on her first American showing. 

Miss Weston reached New York w it'll a 
Klaw & Erlanger contract, calling for a 
moderate weekly salary. Since her "hit," 
the weekly tigure sounded even smaller. 
She was asked to go West to play, but 
Miss Weston refused. Upon l>eing told it 
would Ik 1 necessary for her to play far 
away from the hig city, the English girl 
said she would cancel her contract. 

This happened on Monday after her 
first appearance had been made. She was 
immediately engaged by Florenz Ziegfeld 
at .$1<H) weekly to join "The Follies." Miss 
Weston has canceled all or postponed all 
her foreign time, and intends to remain 
over here indefinitely. 

There is said to have been some ques- 
(icn raised hy the I'nited Hooking Offices 
over the right of Klaw & Erlanger to re- 
tain the services of Miss Weston, the set- 
tlement agreement calling upon K. & E. 
to turn over all acts up to a certain limit. 

The "limit" line straightened out the 
argument. 



The weekly salary of Adeline Genee 
while playing over here is reported from 
London at $750. 



FEIBER LIKES CHEAP VAUDEVILLE. 

* So well- satisfied is II. IT. Feiher, one 
of the I T nited's foreign booking rep- 
resentatives, with his venture at the 
Perth Amboy (N. J.) theatre, where a 
combination moving picture and vaude- 
ville show is being given under his di- 
rection, that Mr. Feiher is on a quest 
for locations to give the cheaper form ot 
vaudeville onlv. 

A circuit of unlimited size will W 
placed together, Mr. Feiher says, if he 
can secure the necessary houses. 




DRAWEE 

(Of Drawee, Frisco and llambo). 

Mr. Drawee la reading VARIKTY nt Ruonos 
Ayres, Smith America, when- the photograph wa- 
taken. It Is n postal picture, nn<1 dated Dec. l.'f 
The paper Is tlint of OcJoIkt 20th With ffott) 
King's pictures adorning the title page. Drawee 
Frisco and Hainho were pitying the Casino. Kuen<>- 
Ayres, at the time. l*»lng booked over the Sequin 
Circuit In that country. 



VARIETY 



IMPORTANT FILM CONVENTION. 

The Deaf approach Of the second coll 

volition of film manufacturers, which is to 

Im> held in Buffalo Jan. 2. r >, is awakening 

activities all along the line. The indi- 
vidual exhibitors and such film renters as 
are not likely to be welcomed to the fold 
are awaiting the formal organization of 
the manufacturing and retailing interests 
with considerable apprehension. 

The avowed purpose of the manufactur- 
ing organization to sell its wares only to 
the members of the film renting association 
will eliminate the "cut-rate" film renting 
firms from any share in the new produc- 
tions of American manufacturers. The in- 
dividual exhibitoffl who rent from these 
"cut-rate" firms will be compelled to turn 
to the association dealers for a supply of 
films costing materially more than they 
have been accustomed to paying. 

Whether or not the increase in rates will 
reduce the number of exhibitors is prob- 
lematical, but in any event the association 
dealers and manufacturers anticipate no 
net loss in their total business. The sales 
agreement to be entered into between the 
manufacturers and film renters will pre- 
sumably be rigidly adhered to for a time 
at least and the exhibitors may surely ex- 
pect to pay more /or their films than they 
have in some time. 

Exhibitors will be further concerned in 
the association's plan to demand a deposit 
from all who rent films and the general 
public will benefit under the scheme, which 
will call in all damaged reels. There are 
several other points in the proposed deal 
between manufacturers and retailers which 
will presumably benefit the moving picture 
industry in general and the business of ex- 
hibiting in particular. 

The Buffalo convention will be of great 
importance, for at that time the plane and 
details of the two organizations will be 
perfected and immediately put in opera- 
tion. Many radical changes in the moving 
picture business may be looked for forth- 
with. Then an organization of exhibitors 
having a national scope may be expected, 
for there will be another side of the sub- 
ject developed unquestionably. 



COMPLAINT AGAINST BERNSTEIN. 

A complaint was filed this week with 
Commissioner of Licenses Bogart against 
Sam Bernstein, who has been in charge 
of the Sunday concerts at the Star The- 
a I re. 

The information laid with the Bureau 
bj Inneas ami Ryan recited that Bernstein 
had booked them for last Sunday's con- 
ceit. When pay time arrived, Bernstein 
( (Tered each act the amount agreed upon, 
less $5. Some accepted, other did not. 

The license office upon looking over its 
records found Bernstein had not obtained 
an agent's license. It is further investigat- 
ing. 



ARCADE, TOLEDO, CLOSES. 

Toledo, Jan. 1(5. 

The Arcade, playing vaudeville under 
the management of Hurtig & Seanion 
since the opening of uie season, closes 
Saturday night. Poor business the cause. 

il. B. Lainkin ran the house with the 
same style of entertainment at one time, 
without complaint, until B. F. Keith open- 
ing the Valentine, a much larger and 
better house, caused .Mr. Lainkin to give 
up tne Arcade. Hurtig & Seanion had 
no opposition. They have another house 
in Dayton, O. 

The theatre may become a moving pic- 
ture place. Hurtig & Seanion have inter- 
ests in the Eastern Burlesque Wheel, 
which has a burlesque home in the city. 
The firm holds the Arcade under lease. 
That will prevent the Western Burlesque 
Wheel from obtaining it, should they care 
to. 



GRANVILLE TAKES "STAR BOUT." 

"The Star Bout," a vaudeville piece 
originally owned and produced by Ned 
Wayburn, is now claimed by Taylor Gran- 
ville, the principal member of the cast. It 
is playing at the Fifth Avenue this week. 

The Bankruptcy Court was entered by 
Wayburn lately to relieve himself from 
pressing creditors, who had previously 
caused him to close his "Training School 
for the Stage" after a committee of Way- 
bnrn's debtors had infTectually attempted 
to continue it profitably. 

The present ownership of "The Star 
Bout" is said to have been brought about 
by Wayburn making a statement for the 
reason of the non-satisfaction of a judg- 
ment held against him by Nat Wills for 
$-HK) to the effect that he had no property. 
He said at the time "The Star Bout" be- 
longed to Taylor Granville. 

It is not a matter of record whether Mr. 
Wayburn had a verbal understanding with 
Mr. Granville over this affair, but Mr. 
Granville at once stepped into the posses- 
sion of the act. Wayburn's bankruptcy 
proceedings are a bar to the establishment 
by him of any ownership which would be 
productive of net returns to himself, but it 
is understood a former employe of Way- 
burn's claims to have invested money in 
the production for which Wayburn gave 
him an interest in il. 

To recover this the employe, it is said, 
will sue Granville. The act receives $800 
weekly. There is a profit, inclusive of the 
salary Mr. Granville drew, of from .$12(X) to 
$300 a week in the sketch when it is 
playing. 



W. 



L. ABINGDON AND BIJOU FER 
NANDEZ. 



ENGLISH ACT GOES HOME. 

Last Wednesday, Kitts and Windrum, 
thq, English act playing "The Cuckoo," 
sailed for their home, canceling the Klaw 
ft Erlanger contract upon receipt of the 
return transportation. 

Kitts and Windrum had no "fare" 
clause in the agreement, and protested 
Mrongly against the long "jumps" they 

were subjected to. K\ pressing a desire 
to be released unless a satisfactory route 
could be arranged, the offer was accepted. 



W. L. Abingdon and Bijou Fernandez 
have a vaudeville sketch which they want 
to try out. M. S. Rentham is in charge of 
their variety affairs, 

Miss Fernandez last appeared with Ed- 
win Arden in vaudeville. 



MABEL HITE NEXT WEEK. 

Monday will witness Mabel Elite's re- 
turn to vaudeville through the Orpheum, 
Yonkers. Miss 1 1 it«> was hilled there for 
this week, but illness caused the delay. 

Mike Donlon, Miss Elite's husband and 
tie 1 New York Baseball Club's fielder, ex- 
pects to go South soon with the nine for 
the annual Spring practice. 



KNOWLES RESIGNS OFFICE. 

Contemplating an extended tour of the 
world on the lecture platform, R. G. 
Knowles has resigned as second vice-presi- 
dent of the Vaudeville Comedy Club, and 
Francis Morey, the lately elected third 
vice president, takes Mr. Knowles' place. 

Howard Truesdell filled the vacancy 
left by Mr. Morey 's advancement. 

PROUTY PROMOTED. 

Clarence "Jed" Prouty is no longer at- 
tached to the office staff of the United 
1 booking Offices. He was moved last week 
to the post of assistant manager of Keith's, 
Providence. 

His apprenticeship in the New York 
hooking offices was designed to fit him for 
this position. It is probable that he will 
settle in the Iihode Island town. 



THE AUDITORIUM AGAIN? 

Chicago, Jan. ltJ. 

There is a persistent rumor afloat thai 
the Auditorium will revert to vaudeville 
next season. 

The report started in Cincinnati and 
emanated from those in touch with the 
present situation. 

William A. Brady and Klaw & Erlanger, 
wiih others, are interested in the lease of 
the Auditorium, although those mentioned 
have the larger share. Mr. Brady was 
solicitous at all times during the settle- 
ment proceedings as to the outcome. 

With the Auditorium playing vaudeville, 
booked by the Kohl & Castle contingent, 
Chicago vaudeville would not be greatly 
changed from that at present. Unless a 
high calibre were to be maintained in the 
entertainment offered the immense pa- 
tronage of the past weeks could not be 
held up, but in any event, and even though 
a Hippodrome show should be placed in 
the mammoth playhouse, the other vaude- 
ville theatres about town would again 
sutler in attendance. 



J. A. FYNES BUILDING. 

J. Austin Fynes is erecting a theatre ill 
Newark, N. J., to add to his chain oi 
"picture shows." 

It is said there are one or more large 
and important exhibitions of this nature 
in pretention* edifices around the imme- 
diate vicinity in which, while Mr. Fynes' 
name dees not appear in the manage- 
ment, he is largely interested, and has 
extended his list of holdings until the 
aggregate now mounts up to a large 
figure. 

Mr. Fynes was one of the fir->t to 
grasp the future of "picture shows'' and 
he was also the first to introduce moving 
pictures on the theatrical stage in this 
country, hiving imported a dim when 
general manager for B. F. Keith some 
tears ago. 



ACT CANCELS NELSON. 

Springfield, Mass., Jan, Hi 
The Smith-Bowman Trio did not j 
at the Nelson, Monday, and no one ap- 
peared in their place until the Tuesday 
matinee. 

The a<t is colored, and sent word t" 
tin' William Munis office in New York 
tliev intended to break-up, going South. 
'I hey hive lately been working over the 
liiited houses, and it is suspected the 
suggest ion wajj made t<» them by some 
one that a vacation of at least tin Spring- 
lit Id week might do them a great deal "i 
Hood in even wav. 



GENEE AND DAZIE. 

A most interesting event just at present 
is the coming of Adeline Genee, from the 
Empire, London, heralded as the foremost 
European dancer; to which interest is 
stimulated by her initial appearance be- 
ing made in Philadelphia on Monday next, 
where Dazie, the leading and most bril- 
liant American contestant for high terpsi- 
chorean honors, is also appearing. 

While comparisons and the reviews of in- 
dividual merits of the representative 
dancers of the two great countries are in- 
evitable, neither of the principals, it is 
said, desire that be done. Dazie is an 
ardent admirer of Genee and considers her 
the greatest classic dancer of the age. 

But a short time ago the writer had oc- 
casion to speak of the approaching arrival 
of the English artiste to the dainty Ameri- 
can dancer, who said: 

"Americans simply must like Genee. 
She is the most remarkable dancer I have 
ever seen, and her riding habit novelty will 
be a genuine sensation. Her wonderful ex- 
ecution lies partly in the ease with which 
she pirouettes about the stage, and partly 
in the poetry which distinguishes all her 
movements. Genee has phenomenal skill 
fostered by years of hard practice and she 
deserves her very great success." 

Xo artiste in America is more admired 
by her associate players than is Dazie, 
whose simple and unaffected manner, and 
charming personality oft the stage have won 
her that enviable honor. The same is true 
of the English dancer, who has rallied to 
her support the afTections of every pro- 
fessional in England. 

But both have acquired fame, distinc- 
tion and a large following, and each has 
enthusiastic and constant admirers. Mont- 
gomery Rhister, the dean of dramatic writ- 
ers of the West, said of Dazie: 

"There is expression in every movement 
of her graceful body, there is meaning in 
every wild fiing of her arms, and soul in 
each pose so dramatically assumed. Her 
pantomime, as in the doll dance, is ex- 
quisite, and in the picturesque and dra- 
matic Salome, passion, sentiment and feel- 
ing are expressed, not only in the eye and 
face, not only in the supple form and 
finely moulded limbs of beauty, but in each 
graceful motion and fascinating position." 

And George C. Jenks, the eminent Eng- 
lish writer said of Genee: "In our historv 
there are four famous danscuses of a 
former day Taglioni, Charlotta Crise, 
( erito and Lucille Grahn. Some critics in 
London declare that Mile. Genee is a better 
dancer than any of these four. And she 
desen e« the t ribute." 

LAMP STARTED FIRE. 

According to all the newspaper reports 

• •I the catastrophe at lioyertown, Pa., this 
\\<ck when over I"" lives were lost in the 
destruction <•! the opera house by fire, the 

me was m»i started by the explosion of 
moving picture machine, as the first, 

lew spa per repoi t h stat cd. 

\ calcium light was used for the pic- 
tures No explosion was heard in the rear 

• •I the theatre until tin- (lames, caused by 
one of the "il Iniups improvised for foot- 
light* ex piodi.ug, had reached the picture 
machine. 

Moving picture people this week were 
"i the opinion through the false reports 
•ipreadiu^ in the early press despatches 
I he business of i he picture shows would be 
afTected for a short while. 



10 






VARIETY 



GIRGUS NEWS 



London, Jan. 4. 

Regarding circus ventures in Europe, 
John Ringling said : "I am just here on 
the look-out for novelties and to fix up 
some sort of arrangement for bringing over 
a show next year. How long I stay here 
depends upon how quickly I can get 
through my business. 

"I have seen sufficient of your great city, 
however, to realize that the London public 
would love a real good circus and general 
round of shows such as were given by 
BaVnum & Bailey. As you know, we 
have what used to be called the "greatest 
show on earth," and we intend to improve 
it and generally embellish it so as to make 
it really greater than it was before. 

"You want my history. Why, I have 
none. 1 am merely John Ringling, age 
30. I am one of the five brothers Ring- 
ling, sons of a Chicago merchant, whose 
fortune was severely injured by a fire. We 
turned out to work, and being musical 
started public concerts. These were a great 
success in the winter months. In the sum- 
mer we worked a circus and did well. 

"At the present day — well, I must not 
talk big — we are the Ringling Brothers, 
who employ and control a staff of 3,500 
people, and own 400 railway cars, which 
we use for transport purposes. We have 
our agents in all the principal cities on 
the look-out for novelties, and these repre- 
sentatives, when they find anything good, 
report to us at our head offices ic New 
York. For these novelties we are willing 
to pay any price, and we generally get 
the pick because, owing to our tours in 
America, we are enabled to offer people 
long engagements. 

"During the few days I have been in 
London I have seen some of your leading 
shows, and I have formed the opinion that 
the English are very eager for amusement 
of any kind that is good in character and 
free from vulgarity. I hope soon to be 
able to make an announcement as to my 
future plans, but just now my arrange- 
ments are not yet settled." 

Mr. Ringling promises to bring here a 
show that has had no equal, and there is 
no doubt he will do this very thing if he 
clinches his final arrangements. The 
Anglo-British exposition, with Olympian 
sports, etc., will draw crowds to London 
next year. 



The Greater Norris & Rowe circus has 
been increased in size and will take the 
road as usual early in March. Messrs. 
Norris & Rowe recently purchased all the 
animals of the Chutes company, situated 
in San Francisco, consisting of elephants, 
camels, tigers, lions, etc. Over thirty an- 
imals were in the collection. 



Ernie and Percy Clark (The Clarkoni- 
ans) are at the Circus Rush, Berlin 
(Ger.), whore they are the feature of the 
bill, giving two acts. On the same pro- 
gram are Cottrell and Cavallini, clowns. 



London, Jan. 4. 

Reports from the Theatre de Varieties 
at Bezieres, France, recount a most curious 
accident to the brute that pushes stuck 
bandwagons out of the mud. It seems an 



applauded elephant was about to bow off 
after a due demonstration of "man's power 
over the brute creation," and to show his 
appreciation, the chef d'orchestra held out 
a carrot. The walking mountain ap- 
proached the edge of the stage, and by 
using those 40,000 muscles Buffon ascribes 
to its trunk reached out for the savory tit- 
bit. Just then the front of the stage gave 
way, precipitating the elephant into the 
orchestra, along with two zebras which 
had been performing with him. Two violin- 
ists were hurt, and the big bass drum will 
never be heard again. The elephant wound 
his snorting trunk round the conductor and 
threw him out in the audience, while the 
rest of the players wildly fled. Finally a 
gangway was improvised to the stage, and 
the elephant's black keeper lured it back 
and into* its quarters. 



W. W. ("Doc") Freeman, booking rep- 
resentative for the Ringlings, is still in 
Europe. He was with John Ringling when 
the latter was abroad, but did not accom- 
pany him home. It is said Freeman is 
authorized to sign up any feature he may 
find during his stay on the other side. 



London, Jan. 4. 
George O. Starr is waking things up at 
the Crystal Palace, and breaking away 
from over-conservative methods. The great 
glass house was getting well ahead at last 
reports, and makes a bigger display this 
season than it ever did before. 



The Dick Bell show opened in the Or- 
rins Building in Mexico City last Sunday. 
No word has come north from the Pubil- 
lones outfit since it was at Vera Cruz, 
but it is believed that it will be in the 
city very shortly. Both the Bell and 
Pubillones shows were in Vera Cruz at 
the same time, the last week in Decem- 
ber. Each declares in letters to New 
York agents that the other did no busi- 
ness. One thing is certain, neither did 
much in Merida, Yucatan, once the rich- 
est show town in Central America. A dis- 
astrous slump in the hemp market is 
given as the cause of the bad business. 
Products which formerly marketed for 
$20 are now begging for purchasers at less 
than $5. It is said a financial panic is 
imminent there. Both shows played 
Merida early in December. 



The publication of the amount of the 
fortune left by the late James A. Bailey 
caused great surprise in New York. The 
circus man's will was probated in London, 
and whereas it was supposed he had left 
at least $4,000,000, the statement of his 
wealth in the legal proceedings was set at 
about $650,000 gross. Of this $150,000 is in 
Europe, the remainder over here. The 
net value of the estate will not exceed a 
half-million, it is estimated. 



Pete and Eva Bell are playing for the 
Western Vaudeville Association. In March 
Mr. Bell, one of the best leapers in the 
tented division, will rejoin the Barnum- 
Bailey show. The following Fall he 
leaves for Europe. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS DEAD. 

News was received in New York early 
this week of the death in Hastings, Eng- 
land, of William Francis, senior member 
of the music publishing firm of Francis, 
Day & Hunter. 

Mr. Francis had been ill for many 
months, and his death was not unexpected. 
A year ago his son, William Francis, Jr., 
who was at that time attached to the 
New Y r ork branch of the house, was hur- 
riedly called^ home, the doctors fearing 
even at that time the end might be near. 

William Francis was born in Burton, 
Warwickshire, England, and was about 65 
years old. He founded the publishing firm 
which bears his name thirty years ago. At 
that time he was a member of the Mo- 
hawk Minstrels, which played at Agri- 
cultural Hall, London, for twenty years or 
more, and the publishing house was 
formed primarily to exploit the songs 
made popular by that organization. 

David Day, a member of the same com- 
pany, and James Francis were the other 
members, Henry Hunter not coming into 
the firm until some five years later. The 
original name was Francis Bros. & Day. 
Both Messrs. Day and Francis had pre- 
viously been connected with London 
music-publishing firms. 

Mr. Francis retained his connection 
with the Mohawk Minstrels until 1902, 
when it disbanded. During that period 
the property was merged with the Moore 
& Burgess Minstrels, its only British rival, 
and transferred to St. James Hall, London. 
It disbanded when that building was de- 
molished to make room for a big modern 
office structure. 

Six sons and a daughter survive. The 
body was removed to London, and funeral 
services were held late this week from the 
Francis town house there. 



JACK BERNARD PASSES AWAY. 

On Wednesday last the funeral of Jack 
Bernard, a brother of Sam and Dick Ber- 
nard took place. 

Some years ago he, with his wife, Jen- 
nie, were well known in the variety 
houses. The deceased had been ill for 
some time with a lingering ailment. 



SHEEDY BOOKING BROCKTON ALONE. 

The vaudeville bill at Sheedy's, Brock- 
ton, for next week has been booked by 
M. R. Sheedy. Louis Pincus, who has sup- 
plied Mr. Sheedy's house with its pro- 
grams since the opening, was not called 
upon to further interest himself. 

It is said Mr. Sheedy will book individ- 
ually for the Brockton Theatre, while his 
Fall River (Mass.) house will be filled by 
acts from the United Offices as heretofore. 

The new Hathaway theatre in the city 
where Sheedy is perplexed will be in read- 
iness to open some time in March. Hatha- 
way was given the preference by the 
United directors for the franchise of 
Brockton after Sheedy had announced his 
intention of playing vaudeville there. This 
decision caused the selection of Mr. Pincus 
to book the Sheedy house. 

Hathaway is reported to feign indiffer- 
ence to the present vaudeville situation In 
Brockton His representative, T. B. Bay- 
lies, confidently says that "Sheedy will be 
all right w*hen the time comes." 



AUDITORIUM WINDS UP. 

Chicago, Jan. 16. 

Saturday is "get-away" day for "Ad- 
vanced Vaudeville" at the Auditorium. 
Illustrated advertisements have been car- 
ried in the paper announcing the bill for 
the last week in a fanciful fashion. 

The program is Josephine Cohan and 
Company (heading), Fred Niblo, "That" 
Quartet, Simon and Gardner, Duffin-Red- 
cay Troupe, Balzers, Seymour and Hill, 
The Ruppelts, Klein, Ott Bros, and Nichol- 
son, Maidie Scott. 

In the advertisements also were caustic 
remarks on the opposition. The finale is 
described as "The Great, Grand, Gorgeous, 
Gay, Glad, Go-Bang, Gee Whiz, Good-Bye 
Week." 



HARRY LA ROSE DIES SUDDENLY. 

On Monday last, at his home in Will- 
iamsbridge (Bronx), New York, Harry 
LaRose died suddenly of pneumonia. 

Mr. LaRose had played an engagement 
at the Orpheum, Easton, Pa., last week. 
Upon returning to this city he succumbed. 
Mr. Rose was booked for the Orpheum, 
Allentown, this week. "The Side Show" 
was sent instead. 

Harry LaRose was born in Worcester, 
Mass., about forty years ago. His name 
in private life was Lally O'Neill. For 
over twenty years he has been a well 
known 'figure in variety, and at one time 
made a trip to England, where as "Leo 
DeValto" he gave spiral ascensions. 

LaRose was sturdy and rugged, and 
although not of herculean build, was a 
giant in strength, even up to his death, 
which came as a great surprise. 

Mr. LaRose married one of the Coul- 
son Sisters, who survives him, together 
with a grown-up son. 

His latest vaudeville sketch was "The • 
Sailor and the Horse," written by Will M. 
Crcssy, and in which Mr. LaRose played 
last week. 



MOZART'S FIFTEENTH HOUSE OPENS. 

Erie, Pa., Jan. 1G. 
The Alpha Theatre, the fifteenth house 
on the lately extended vaudeville circuit 
owned or controlled by Edward E. Mozart, 
opens next Monday. The house represents 
an outlay of $40,000 and is fireproof in 
construction. It will seat 900. Six acts 
and moving pictures will be offered, 
changed weekly. 



SPECULATION OVER SENATE BILL. 

Considerable speculation was occasioned 
this week by a dispatch from Albany an- 
nouncing the introduction of a new bill in 
the State Senate by Senator Martin Saxe 
having to do with certain changes in the 
laws covering theatrical performances. 

The wording of the newspaper report 
left the purpose of the bill rather vague. 
One story had it that the scheme was to 
make an opening for performances at the 
Children's Theatre of the Educational Al- 
liance, but this was scouted, inasmuch as 
such a step would be special legislation. 
Another statement was to the effect that 
the bill aimed to provide the right of ap- 
peal from a Supreme Court decision re- 
voking a theatre license, a right which is 
denied under the regulations now in force. 

The usual printed copies of the bill have 
not yet been seen. 



Er. Lawshe, of the late press department 
of "Advanced Vaudeville," remains at the 
New York Theatre as publicity promoter 
for the house. 



VARIETY 



11 



NEW ACT S NE XT WEEK 

Initial Presentation, First Appearance or 
Reappearance in New York City. 

Cotton and Long (New Act), Hammer- 
stein's. 

Valoni, Colonial. 

Albert Whelan, Colonial. 

Maidie Scott, Alhambra. 

De Lion, Union Square. 

Gertrude Mansfield and Company, Pas- 
tor's. 

Welch and Earl, Pastor's. 

Neapolitan Serenaders, Gotham (Brook- 
lyn). 

Lucy Weston. 

Songs. 

29 Mins.; One. 

New York. 

"Be Good." If you haven't hoard about 
it sung by Lucy Weston at the New York 
this week on the occasion of her American 
debut, you will. After taking two bows 
Monday evening upon concluding the num- 
ber, Miss Weston refused to appear again, 
although the audience applauded continu- 
ously for nearly two minutes, keeping it 
up during the slow opening of Collins and 
Hart, who followed the Englishwoman. It 
was said around the theatre that Miss 
Weston was making a change for another 
selection to answer the applause with but 
it is just as well she stopped when she did. 
"Be Good" is a fine finisher. Nothing bet- 
ter could have been found. It riveted the 
hit made by Miss Weston which had be- 
come well clinched when she sang "As You 
Walk Down the Strand." Besides these 
two, much by far her best, Miss Weston 
also gave "Winnie From Winchester," 
"That's All" and "Y. M. C. A." A change 
of costume was introduced with each new 
scng, the waits averaging seventy seconds. 
The young woman is very pretty, and par- 
tial to the quaint style of looks and dress, 
having curls drooping over her face. Miss 
Weston's gowns are works of art in them- 
selves, and one, an Empire directoire, just 
made the house stare. In "As You Walk 
Down the Strand," Miss Weston attired 
herself in the garb and dialect of a York- 
shire lassie. The chorus is the best de- 
scription of the song: 

"When you walk down the Strand 
With the guide-book in your hand, 

Never look at any fellows in the town. 
Whatever may be the weather 
Keep your feet close together, 

For fear you may slip down." 

"Be Good," which would be fire-proofed 
in a number of vaudeville theatres over 
here before it reached the footlights, in- 
forms girls what to do under different cir- 
cumstances, the advice being crowded into 
the chorus, which says : 

"Be good, be very, very good, 

Wear a look both meek and prayerful. 

When you go out with a man 

Be as good as you can ; 
If you can't be good, be careful." 

One couldn't become offended at any- 
thing Miss Weston said on the stage; she 
makes too sweet a picture for that, but 
were she to sing her two strong cards 
only, it would Ik? ample. Lucy Weston 
has "the songs," and knows how to sing 
them. Sime. 



NEW AGTS Or THE WEEK 



Ruth Allen and Company (3). 
"We Need the Money" (Comedy). 
28 Mins.; Full Stage (Interior). 
Fifty-eighth Street. 

Ruth Allen is the main factor in the 
piece. She makes a decidedly charming, 
breezy torn -boy sort of girl, with an ir- 
resistible faculty for overriding all sorts 
of obstacles and getting her own way. 
She looks the part of Nancy Rock in 
Charles Kenton's sketch, and acts it to 
the Queen's taste. Nancy, so runs the 
plot, is the daughter of a Wall Street 
mogul. She loves Eric Whipple, her 
father's ward and an employe in his 
otlice. Father won't allow the pair to 
be married until Eric has a million dol- 
lars of his own. Eric is a soft youth, 
and that million looks a long way ahead 
until Nancy undertakes to make it for 
him. This she does in fifteen minutes 
by plunging in the wheat market on a 
"tip," secured by listening to a confer- 
ence of financiers over a crossed telephone 
wire. The plot is mighty unconvincing, 
but if you can lull your sense of realities 
into somnolence, and accept the sketch 
on its face value, Miss Allen's work is 
a real delight. The finish, with Nancy 
and Eric at one ticker watching the mar- 
ket soar, and Rock, who is on the wrong 
side of the rise, at the other, trying to 
hold the boom down by buying up all the 
wheat in sight, is extremely well worked 
up and really striking bit of stage man- 
agement. Comedy values are supplied by 
Nancy's brother, who comes down to busi- 
ness after a riotous night out and be- 
comes involved in all exciting incidents 
despite a "morning after head" wrapped 
up in a towel. Notwithstanding its lack 
of plausibility the sketch is interesting, 
thanks very largely to Miss Allen's in- 
dividual excellence in the leading role. 
The supporting company is well picked. 

Rush. 



Chas. H. Burke, Pat Touhey and Company 

"The Birthday Party" (Comedy). 
25 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Pastor's. 

"The Birthday Party" allows of Chas. 
H. Burke giving a quantity of talk and 
business he has shown at different times 
with other partners. Most of the material 
was last seen on the Madison Square Roof 
last summer where he was principal com- 
edian. There is little to the sketch itself, 
the act dwindling to a conversation be- 
tween Pat Touhey and Burke, both first 
rate Irishmen of a widely different type. 
The talk is for the most part bright, but 
it is the manner in which the material is 
handled that brings the laughs. Mr. 
Touhey adds to the atmosphere through 
his first class playing of the Irish bag- 
pipes. May Touhey and Marriette Car- 
ver are also in the act, but neither has 
anything of importance to do. The for- 
mer dances an Irish reel nicely, while the 
hitter has but to look well, which she 
does. The sketch was a big hit at Pas- 
tor's. Several minutes could be cut witli 
profit. . Dash. 



Laura Morris and Company (2). 
"Cynthia's Visit" (Comedy). 
19 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Pastor's. 

The author's name of "Cynthia's Visit" 
is not printed. Perhaps that was a stipu- 
lation. There is nothing to the piece, and 
that's letting it down easy. Aunt Cyn- 
thia (Lam. 1 Morris) calls on her niece 
(Laura Dean Hart). Discovering her 
niece's husband (Harry Morgan) is 
"broke" Cynthia hands him some money. 
Nothing else. It required a little longer 
on the stage to tell is the difference. There 
are several vain attempts at comedy. 
Falling backward from a rocking chair, 
displaying old-fashioned underwear is not 
funny; nor is the showing of a corset 
over a red sweater. Mr. Morgan has a 
pleasing singing voice. It rallied things a 
bit at the finish. Whatever laurels there 
are go to Miss Hart. She is wasting her 
time in this piece. Possessing a pleasing 
personality, besides injecting life into her 
work, and dancing nicely, Miss Hart 
soared far above her surroundings. Dash. 



Johnson and Richards. 

Acrobatics. 

14 Mins.; Two (n); Close One (3). 

Pastor's. 

Johnson was formerly of Johnson, 
Davenport and Lorella, while Richards is 
late of Reno and Richards. The pair have 
worked out rather an entertaining knock- 
about acrobatic offering that scores in the 
opening through the good ground tumbling 
of Richards. There is a quantity of com- 
edy of the "slapstick" order that should 
be weeded out in the early portion. John- 
son is too good a comedian to resort to 
the "bladder" for laughs. His first rate 
travesty stuff at the finish is good enough 
to receive more attention, and should be 
followed up with good results. Dash. 



Julian Eltinge and his business man- 
ager, J. H. Harras, are quietly selecting a 
cast for "A School for fJirls" in which 
Kltinge will be starred next season. 



Fourteen new members were received 
into the New York Lodge of the Actors' 
I'liion at ils last meeting, 



"The Six American Dancers." 

Dancing. 

15 Mins.; One. 

Colonial. 

The sextet, made up of three men and 
an equal number of girls, get a tremendous 
amount of action into the small stage 
space they occupy, and fitted perfectly in 
the place just before the closing number 
which required a full stage. Numbers 
which fulfil this requirement are not too 
numerous and if only for this reason "The 
American Six" should find plenty of de- 
mand for their services. All the members 
are exceptionally good wooden shoe 
dancers. The onlv fault that could be 
found with the frame-up of their act is 
that they have chosen a very stagey style 
of dressing. A dancing floor spread in 
front of the drop in "one" is used. Three 
girls open with clog stepping, They are 
dressed rather inartistically in soubrette 
costume of red, white and blue. Two men 
follow in sinii!;ir steps, and from that point 
they began to work up a splendid dancing 
finish involving all six, adding one number 
at a time until they were all in a tremend- 
ous ensemble dancing finale. The applause 
at the fini'-h was extraordinarily enthu- 
siastic I'ush. 



Whiting and Melnotte Sisters. 
Songs and Dances. 
17 Mine.; One. 
Fifth Avenue. 

This is the third combination in which 
the Melnotte Sisters have been concerned 
in the course of the last year. The idea 
is the same in all. The girls make a 
bright snappy sister pair, with quaint, 
pretty dressing, gracefully carried. The 
dancing is nicely done, and the voices, 
although not of remarkable calibre, are 
well handled. George Whiting does much 
better with the singing than in the other 
branches, although he fits in well enough 
throughout. His rendition of an Irish 
number, "Harrigan," is worthy of special 
mention. He gets more out of it with 
only the aid of the two girls than others 
who have been using the entire stage 
crew. The act was in the fourth position 
of a big bill at the Fifth Avenue house 
this week, and scored strongly, as it prob- 
ably will anywhere. Dash. 



Will and Mabel Casper. 
Songs and Talk. 
17 Mins.; One. 
Pastor's. 

Will and Mabel Casper are singing and 
talking. There is a quantity of brighter 
talk than usually heard in the early por- 
tion of a Pastor program. Some bright 
pointed dialogue is capably handled, hav- 
ing the desired effect. Miss Casper should 
sing less and seek a different dressing 
scheme. The combination of voice and 
dressing gives a poor impression at the 
opening hard to overcome. Casper handles 
his material nicely, but the "rube" char- 
acter could be improved with a little 
thought. The pair did very well. Dash. 



Two Hardts. 

Travesty. 

10 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Pastor's. 

Mr. Hardt was formerly of Collins and 
Hart. The present act is along much the 
same lines as the old specialty. There is 
a bit of novelty introduced through the 
employing of a woman. Burlesque strong 
business, the lifting of weights, etc., at 
the opening by the women is followed by 
hand-to-hand balancing employing the 
wire. There are some laughs scattered in 
both departments, but the act is loosely 
woven and the burlesque is too apparent 
to make it effective. The wire is plainly 
visible. The act will need a vast amount 
of remodeling before it can hope to com- 
pete. Dash. 



Mildred Kenfield. 
Songs and Dances. 
16 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Pastor's. 

Mildred Kenfield sings and dances, as- 
sisted by four pickannies. She is an at- 
tractive looking blonde, rather inclined to 
overdress, with a fairly good voice for the 
numbers rendered, (if the four "picks," 
one does absolutely nothing throughout, 
although he was probably placed in for 
comedy. The taller of the colored girls 
was the only one who belonged at all. She 
danced as though enjoying it. The danc- 
ing finish is not nearly lively enough, and 
probably never will he until three more 
"picks" like tin 1 one mentioned can be se- 
cured. Dash. 
( Continual <>n page 13.) 



12 



VARIETY 






LONDON NOTES. * 

London, Jan. 4. 
The holiday boom is still on, and all the 
places are doing very well ; Stoll seems 
to have hit the right idea at the Coliseum, 
cheap priee* and fresh bills weekly pulling 
in the crowd. People who have fine clothes 
and not too much money can cut an awful 
dash at the Coliseum, as six can occupy 
« box and be looked at all evening for about 
$2.50. The new Coliseum patrons 
thoroughly appreciate the grandeur of the 
house and the refinement of their sur- 
roundings, and it is much to be hoped that 
during these holidays the English will get 
the Coliseum habit. Stoll is booking a lot 
of acts that never before got any chance 
at the West End; the old "keep-em-out 
gang" were too strong. These turns are 
making hits, too, and reach the crowd quite 
well. 



One thing we can predict, and that 
is that an arrangement will soon be made 
between the Coliseum and Oxford (and 
perhaps Tivoli) relaxing the "barring" 
clause between house*— and then both will 
put up a stronger "bar" against Gibbons. 



Of new year prosi>ects, Walter Gibbons 
said: "In the variety world during 1908 
there will be many new music halls built, 
and a much better feeling between managers 
and artists. The music hall strike cleared 
up many misunderstandings. Proprietors 
and artists now cherish no animosities, and 
with a plain, straightforward contract to 
work upon, know precisely where they are 
in the matter of booking, barring and trans- 
ferences." Mr. Gibbons recounts that last 
year at this time he had only six music 
halls, whereas now he has twelve. That is 
one more in London than the "Syndicate," 
which will even the number by the new 
house erecting at Ilford. On the heels 
of this project George Dance has purchased 
a site at Ilford, and will build a new hall 
which will doubtless go on the Stoll tour. 



At Sheffield, Barrnsford has permanent- 
ly opened his new Hippodrome, at first an- 
nounced to open temporarily, as it was 
hardly dreamed that the house could be 
completed in a little over four months. The 
interior is mainly white and gold, with 
caryatides or Atlantean figures support- 
ing the boxes, from which on the opening 
night hung festoons of smilax and flowers. 
"The Hip" seats 2,750, the gallery alone 
holding 1,000. It is built on the cantilever 
principle without one obstructing column. 
There is a sliding roof for summer, and 
there are twelve exits. The stage is 40 
feet deep and high, and the proscenium 
opening is 3GV& feet. 



Now that Barrasford has opened at 
Sheffield, Stoll's Empire Palace there is 
beginning to buck up. Decorators and 
burnishers have been shining it for four 
weeks. From the housetop a big electric 
light shines over the city of razors, while 
a large finger shows the various razor 
sharpeners the way to the main entrance. 
Inside is a perfect riot of rich colors and 
gilded ornaments, and everything looks 
very bright. 



At Valence a groundless alarm of fire 
excited a serious panic; a child of three 
was trampled to death ; two others had 
their legs broken, and many were crushed 
and bruised in the fight to reach the en- 
trance. 



George Ley ton dined seventeen old 
Crimean and Indian veterans at the Coli- 
seum rehearsal room on Christmas. He 
has raised thousands of pounds for these 
people, and has been made a vice-president 
of the United Service Club in recognition, 
a most unusual honor. 



At Brighton, Mrs. Thomas Barrasford 
has transformed the old Coliseum Varieties 
into a beautiful home for pantomime, now 
known as the Court Theatre, and is doing 
well with the "Babes in the Wood." 



Moss Empires take the Broadway The- 
atre, New Cross, from DeFrece's partner 
Mouillot after the pantomime season. 
Drama for the present. 



The juggler Bernardo, who was touring 
Ireland with a small circus the past season, 
has won £415 by a lucky Limerick line 
sent the periodical "Answers." 



At Rhyl a handsome new beach pavilion, 
nearly square and handsomely domed and 
turretted, will supplant the one lately 
burned. 



Doran. the horizontal bar expert, just 
back from Berlin with his partner, came 
near being asphyxiated in that city by one 
of those should-be-prohibited gas jets that 
keeps on burning after the gas is turned off. 
A hotel work-woman luckily smelled the 
gas and pounded loudly on the door. Doran 
was just able to stagger to the door and 
turn the key, after which he fainted away, 
and it was feared for a time he might not 
revive. However, he still lives to tell the 
tale in the practice intervals at Cragg's 
gymnasium down Kennington. 



Lounge halls for theatre queues are now 
aimed at in new structures, several Gibbons 
halls having put them in. as well as Mouil- 
lot at Bournemouth and several cities 
north. For women especially they are a 
grateful convenience. 



GAIETY OPENING IN APRIL. 

The new Gaiety Theatre, the Geo. M. 
Cohan home, will have its premier about 
the early part of April instead of in Feb- 
ruary, as anticipated. 

The theatre is now building at 46th 
Street and Broadway. Mr. Cohan is writ- 
ing the play which will be first presented 
in the house during his present trip on the 
other side. 

In the cast so far selected will be, be- 
sides "The Yankee Doodle Comedian," his 
father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry 
Cohan, and James J. Morton, the monolo- 
gist. 



"The Neapolitan Serenades," a vocal 
and instrumental organization, composed 
of fourteen persons (10 women, 4 men), 
with special scenic surroundings, will play 
their first engagement at the Gotham, 
Brooklyn, next week. The act was or- 
ganized by Arthur M. Hopkins. 



EDWARDS' TWO MUSIC STORES. 

The Gus Edwards Music Publishing 
Company has opened two stores for the 
sale of sheet music. One is in Philadel- 
phia ; the other on 125th street, New York. 

Mr. Edwards says he may extend that 
Ivanc'h of his publishing business. 



FUNABASHI. 

If "Funabashi" means the same thing in 

Japanese as " ! ! !" in Park Row 

type, the new Thomas W. Ryley musical 
piece which opened at the Casino last week 
is well named. The proceedings, aside from 
a few of the musical numbers and inciden- 
tal passages are of a discouraging dullness 
to be described only in dashes and excla- 
mation points indicative of pain and In- 
dignation that such a mess should be of- 
fered to Broadway. 

Irving S. Cobb wrote the book, Stafford 
Waters the lyrics and music and Al. M. 
Holbrook, staged the production. The 
credit for whatever is worth while in the 
three-act horror — it's little enough to be 
sure — goes to the last named. 

London has sent us a good many musical 
pieces which failed to interest us, but we 
never retaliated. Now here's the golden 

opportunity to even the score. If some- 
one will ship "Funabashi" to London, the 
account will be satisfactorily balanced. It 
would be a fine, delicate vengeance, too, 
because, so carefully has the English model 
of boredom been followed in this pseudo- 
American product, that the Londoners will 
never suspect but that it was the handi- 
work of their most prominent musical 
comedy lyricists. 

Plot! There's plot enough to fit out 
three musical comedies, and enough over 
to wreck a vaudeville act or two. It takes 
ten minutes of dialogue to lead up to a 
simple music cue. Introducing a musical 
number is cumbersome business, involving 
about half a column of very prosey prose- 
poetry. There's more top-heavy language 
in the book than in a senatorial debate — 
and less humor. 

Jack Carter (Walter Percival), an 
American officer, has fallen in love with 
Polly Rivers (Vera Michelena), an Amer- 
ican girl, who masquerades in Japanese 
costume throughout the three acts. You 
have to get in at the opening of the first 
act to learn why... . Tf you are )at* the. cir- 
cumstance remains a mystery. The couple 
occupy themselves with their lovemaking 
in the picturesque Japanese resort of Fun- 
abashi unconscious of impending trouble. 
The awakening comes in the person of 
Carter's father, the United States secre- 
tary of war, on a mission of peace to 
Japan. Father has arranged a match for 
his son and brings along his prospective 
daughter-in-law, Miss Hillary-Hoops (Mar- 
garet Rutledge), a British heiress, whom 
the son has never met. 

Father is a determined person and young 
Carter's love affair must be concealed. So 
Polly is forced to pose as the wife of Monty 
Beauchamp (Percy Ames), young Carter's 
chum, and described as an English club- 
man — an unqualified bore and a talkative 
imbecile. Nan Livingston (Alice Fischer), 
a New York widow, is dragged into these 
complications and in seeking to aid the 
young people in their deception flounders 
about pathetically. 

She is chiefly prominent for certain 
"bright" cynical observations that have 
been put into her mouth by the dialogue. 
"There's many a slip between the engage- 
ment ring and the wedding cake," is one 
and fairly represents how "bright" her 
ep ; grams are. Among the other things 
that Carter is forced to conceal from his 
father is the ownership of an automobile 



and chauffeur. So, on the advice of Mon- 
ty,, the chauffeur is disguised as a foreign 
nobleman, and set to making love to Miss 
Hillary-Hoops. This is another sample 
of delicate humor. At the end Nan, with 
serpent wisdom, suggests to the secretary 
of war that he "himself marry the British 
heiress. The secretary "bites" and just 
about the time the auditor's senses are reel- 
ing from following the plot complications 
all is made clear sailing for Carter and 
Polly. 

But this was well along toward the end 
of the evening, and the day was already 
hopelessly lost. 

Walter Percival made a fairly manly 
and good-looking lover. His was a highly 
conventional character, and no one ex- 
pected much, of him, so he passed without 
very severe criticism. But Ames held an 
important place in the comedy department 
and his struggles to be funny were painful. 
How any one could have written the 
speeches to which he gave voice is a mys- 
tery. There was not a wreath of a smile 
in his whole performance. As an evideuca 
Of the regard in which several of the prin- 
cipal comedians were held in the estima- 
tion of the audience it was noticeable that 
whenever they appeared just at the con- 
clusion of a number, applause immediately 
became enthusiastic for an encore, appar- 
ently on the principle that the agony of 
a ten-minute conversation fest could be 
thus put off by a repetition of the song. It 
was this that made a number of chorus in- 
terpolations go extremely well. 

William Rock was a great personal hit. 
cvershadowed by only one person in the 
cast — Maud Fulton. Miss Fulton as 
Macy Bloomingdale Saks, a New York 
shop girl, was the only human type in the 
show. Both had merely incidental roles, 
practically unconnected with the play, but 
they alone enlivened the dullness of the 
piece. Rock had a capital topical song in 
the first act called "One, Two, Three — 
Down and Out," and his eccentric dance 
won a cordial reception. Together with 
Miss Fulton he had several good comic pas- 
sages, although he might have done more 
with them. "I'd Guess You," by Rock and 
Miss Fulton, went a long way toward mak- 
ing the second act endurable, thanks to 
their animated dancing and incidental busi- 
ness. Rock is by no means a polished 
comedian, but in his present company he 
stands out, and Miss Fulton's natural skill 
and cleverness as a soubrette are empha- 
sized by the fact that she has the whole 
field to herself. 

The third act was the best of all, for it 
was filled to the limit with numbers, and 
this system successfully choked off the tire- 
some dialogue of the principals. Also it 
brought back the eight gorgeous show girls 
who had appeared in the first act, and 
been in hiding during the second. A* like 
number of chorus men was also introduced, 
rivaling the show girls in the splendor of 
their costumes. They -rvere dressed as dip- 
lomats and loaded to the ears with gold 
braid. A number called "Flirtation" in- 
volved the whole sixteen and went nicely 
enough, and another "1 Walked Around," 
at which pretty much everybody in the 
company took a try, helped some more. 

There are practically no specialties In 
"Funabashi," although George S. McCone 
and Sam Burns did an unannounced im- 
personation of Rice and Prevost for half 
u minute in the first act. The usual com- 
plement of girls was provided, but they had 
not half a chance to work. Rush. 



I 






VARIETY 



13 



RICE & BARTON'S BIG GAIETY. 

Another item is added to the weight of 
evidence that the farce comedy is not 
well adapted to burlesque purposes. 
"Broadway After Twelve" is the opening 
piece of Rice & Barton's "Big Gaiety" 
show. It is well enough written and the 
farcical complications are swift and funny, 
but by the nature of the action numbers 
and chorus ensembles are excluded and 
the final curtain was received with relief. 

Charles Barton, of course, has the prin- 
cipal comedy role. He is effective in his 
familiar way and scored laughs. 

Alf. P. James is practically the only 
other male member who attains promi- 
nence in the early proceedings although 
Nick Glynn and Tessie Burns as house 
maid and bellboy come to the surface at 
intervals. 

Annie Dunn Mullen has the principal 
female role. It is a straight talking part 
which offers but scant opportunity. Kate 
Prior is no more fortunate. Alice Maizee 
appears with the chorus at the finale for 
a minute and thanks to a glittering, 
frock, impressed himself upon the audience 
more in two minutes than the other wo- 
men had in forty. This also was one of 
the results of using a farce comedy. 

A minstrel parade was on for the finale, 
being made fairly effective. The com- 
pany got a whole lot of whoop hurrah 
music into the affair and the audience was 
willing to welcome anything that gave 
them a relief from dialogue. 

The burlesque was infinitely better. 
Bert Baker came forward in a grotesque 
role, listed as a "Rube," but really an un- 
classified eccentric character. The action 
had to do pretty much with the ancient 
money -changing "bit" extended to extreme 
dimensions, but Baker and Glynn as the 
"easy marks" and Barton and James as 
the sharpers managed to make it really 
funny. Credit for this result goes largely 
to Baker. Indeed he is the chief laugh 
getter of the cast. In the burlesque also 
there was a good scattering of musical 
numbers, and the chorus was brought into 
satisfactory view. 

Mildred Gilmoie. pretty much in hiding 
during the first part, came to the front 
in the burlesque. She and Kate Prior 
appeared in tights, and led most of the 
numbers. 

Amy Nelson had a Spanish song in this 
part. Miss Nelson overstrains her voice 
in an effort to give volume to her tones 
and the result is far from agreeable. At 
times she is off key. 

Baker was the strong point of the olio, 
a particularly strong one throughout. 
His "Tad" characterization is far and 
above the most intelligent delineation of 
the type as it is interpreted in burlesque. 
Baker's talk registers its laughs unfail- 
ingly without Baker descending to rough- 
ness and holds closely to his character. 

Pierce and Maize did splendidly in their 
dancing and singing number. Miss Maize 
has a "Gibson Girl" number, beautifully 
and appropriately dressed in addition to 
the familiar routine of the act. Three 
changes are shown. They open nicely 
with a "conversational" song and the 
number runs through without a halt in 
the interest. 

Mildred (Jilmore, singer, in a gorgeous 
ball gown; Glynn, Miller and Hunt, com- 
edy musical act, and McKee and Van, 
blackface singers and dancers were the 
others beside Sie Hassan Ben Ali's Too- 
zonin Arabs, the extra attraction. Rush. 



EMPIRE BURLESQUERS. 

Roger Iinhof, who seems to be about all 
there is to the comedy forces of the Em- 
pire Burlesquers, has the not unusual 
faculty of investing familiar burlesque 
material with fresh humor. His Irish 
comedy character is well drawn and capit- 
ally handled, and although a great deal 
of the pieces is patchwork of stock 
"bits" he makes his part of the show en- 
tertaining. As Casey in the opening piece 
he had frequent passages that won spon- 
taneous laughs and were well done accord- 
ing to the accepted burlesque standard, 
which considers the means by which com- 
edy is secured only casually so long as 
the laugh is scored. This is by no means 
to say that Imhof descends to suggestive- 
ness. Indeed, the whole show is singu- 
larly free from spoken suggestion, al- 
though there are several places where 
risque situations are implied in the action. 

The show is much in need of a sprightly 
soubrette or two. Jeannstte Buckley and 
Susanne Corinne are assigned the sou- 
brette roles, but they do not work with 
the ease that is necessary in parts of this 
sort. They dress prettily enough, but 
saunter through their parts and for the 
most part fail to give that touch of 
briskness that is so essential. Neither do 
they read their lines with the requisite 
grace. The show is practically without a 
good dancer. 

Apparently the producer depended upon 
Miss Weston to support the girl depart- 
ment. Miss Weston is a statuesque per- 
son — mountainous would better describe 
her Homeric proportions — and in tights 
she makes a figure worth going any dis- 
tance to see, but she does not do much 
toward brightening up the feminine con- 
tingent. Her olio number, made up of 
three or four straight songs — one with a 
faint suggestion of spice — was enjoyable 
in a light way, and her contralto voice 
was heard to good effect in several inci- 
dental numbers. 

Napoleon Montambo gave very little life 
to an Irish part that should have been 
worked up to aid Imhof, but held up the 
comedy end of a grotesque acrobatic act 
in the olio which scored nicely. Ed. S. 
llurlfalls, the straight end of the act, 
was concerned in the first part only Inci- 
dentally as a bellbov. 

There was little excuse for the pres- 
ence of George Glein in a "cissy" part, sel- 
dom, if ever, funny, and in this case a 
mere succession of senseless and tasteless 
clowning, without a shred of originality 

or noveltv. 

Ed Johnson had a semi-straight role, al- 
though he played it with a suggestion of 
Irish brogue, but failed to make it par- 
ticularly distinctive, and Al Zimmerman 
was the conventional bad man from the 
wild-and-woolly. 

The burlesque is set in Turkey. The 
money changing bit is employed at great 
length, but Imhof managed to give it a 
fresh twist and made it fairly funny, 
thanks largely to some bright dialogue. 
The locale of the piece gives opportunity 
for the introduction of Turkish costumes 
suggestive of Oriental display* but the 
choristers refrained from anything that 
could be construed as a naughty wriggle. 

There are frequent costume changes, 
the dresses of the choristers being eloquent 
of the flashiness of burlesque taste, al- 
though several of the simpler designs were 
pretty. The girls are rather above the 
average for looks and their singing passed. 



COLONIAL. 

With Vesta Victoria and Julius Steger 
and Company sharing headline honors, the 
bill at the Colonial this week is a heavy 
one. The rest of the show is made up of 
straight variety numbers and furnishes 
good, consistent, straightforward enter- 
tainment from beginning to end. 

Miss Victoria, as might have been ex- 
pected, scored a tremendous hit in the play- 
house where she made her bow to the 
American public two years ago upon her 
return visit. She has moved the new 
"Mary, Queen of Scots" number up to sec- 
ond place. It went much better with the 
Colonial audience Tuesday night than 

when it was first tried out at the New 
York a week or two ago. For the rest she 
used "Man, Man, Man" and others of her 
familiar repertoire, finishing with "Poor 
John" at the demand of the capacity audi- 
ence which would not be denied. 

Closing the first half Mr. Steger received 
a veritable ovation at the curtain of his 
exquisite dramatic offering "The Fifth 
Commandment." The sentiment of the 
piece is as delicate, true and dignified as 
the haunting melody of "Castles in the 
Air," which as sung by Mr. Steger estab- 
lishes a perfect atmosphere and does much 
toward making the piece one of the most 
vital bits of dramatic composition and pre- 
sentation in vaudeville. 

Batty's Bears opened the show. The act 
is sorely in need of more pretentious dress- 
ing and equipment. As it stands it is an 
extremely well handled and contructed ani- 
mal act, with striking features to hold in- 
terest and a good by-play of comedy. It 
is a pity that so much should be sacrificed 
for the need of care in incidentals. 

The Reiff Brothers did decidedly well in 
their dancing and singing act in "one 
The team have a first rate arrangement in 
a running medley, the verses being punctu- 
ated with bits of dancing steps. There U 
not too much dancing at any point. The 
boys dress neatly and in the pink of 
fashion without at any time looking 
stagey, and their wooden shoe dancing 
makes a good finish. 

The Sleedes, pantomimists, were seen 
over here last year. "The Mysterious Ho- 
tel." ("black art") has some good points, 
but is injured for American use by the 
British broadness of their comedy. The 
stuff in which thev use water bottles is 
rather mUBSy and not very funny, but 
the trick won attention and laughter. 

The Kinsons opened the intermission in 
their musical novelty. Since the pair first 
showed their specialty in this country last 
Summer the arrangement has been some- 
what changed. The comedian has rather 
more prominence than formerly, which 
works to the advantage of the number. 
His imitations of musical instruments are 
really wonderful. The harp is perhaps the 
best of his repertoire. 

Louise Agoust, closing the show, kept 
the audience interested until the picture 
drop was lowered. The juggling is simple 
and there is rather more talk and forced 
comedy than seems necessary in the act, 
but Miss Agoust's personal beauty and 
prace were more than equal to the task 
of holding the masculine portion of the 
audience, while the feminine contingent 
found enough to claim their attention in 
her marvelous frocks. "The Six American 
Dancer*" are under New Acts. Rufk. 



»» 



FIFTY-EIGHTH STREET. 

It is a curious arrangement and selec- 
tion of acts of the Fifty-eighth Street 
Theatre this week which puts four talk- 
ing and singing teams in the early part 
of the bill. Of these three open with 
a quarrel. There was a certain sameness 
about the show up to the latter end, and 
every one of the eight numbers depended 
in large part upon their comedy. 

Morris and Morris opened, and for an 
act in that position went extremely well, 
taking two bows at the finish. They 
win laughs by their rough knockabout, 
the burlesque "strong work" going par- 
ticularly well. The pair miss a good deal 
of the effectiveness of this material by 
failing to work up an appearance of real- 
ity, and by allowing the wire to be plainly 
seen. 

Fentelle and Carr return with their 
tramp talking and singing novelty. They 
have an excellent opening and most of 
the talk is bright and pointed. A 
dancing finish let them off to good ap- 
plause. 

Charles and Fanny Van were one of the 
laughing hits in the conversational act 
in "one" called "A Case of Emergency." 
The sketch catches attention at the out- 
set and from the appearance of Van 
moves along to the accompaniment of 
solid laughter. The dialogue is exceed- 
ingly well written and smoothly deliv- 
ered. It is away from the routine of 
comedy talking numbers in many par- 
ticulars, although the main idea is not 
altogether new. There were a few points 
of vague similarity between the Van act 
and that of Kennedy and Rooney, which 
had preceded. Both have a dispute 
between the principals, and even though 
the "bit" was treated very differently in 
each case, the similarity was distinctly 
noticeable. 

Clayton Kennedy and Mattie Rooney 
were moved to an earlier position than 
that in which they were programmed, 
owing to stage arrangement. Mr. Ken- 
ned v makes an extremely effective ec- 
centric comedian with an altogether novel 
method. His funniments have spon- 
taneity and the dancing finish went with 
a whoop. The pair have an unfortunate 
l>ent toward punning that they could well 
correct. Miss Rooney showed three very 
pretty costume changes, and her dancing 
was neat and graceful. 

Lalla Sclbini Ins added a close in "one" 
to lier novelty act. Dressed in character 
she sings "Mariuteh at Coney Island," 
while her midget assistant, in a bur- 
lesque dressing of a dancer cavorts about 
the stage. The midget is much the 
greater part of the number. Miss Sel- 
bini'a appearance in the unlovely garb ot* 
an Italian following her appearance as 
"the bathing beauty'' left a disagreeable 
impression, for which the fun of the song 
was no compensation. "The Song Birds'* 
in the closing place and Ruth Allen and 
Company (New Acts) were the others. 






Walter Vincent, New York representa- 
tive of the Orpheum Circuit Company, 
who is seriously ill in Dr. Mull's Sani- 
tarium, was reported Thursday night as 
renting comfortably, a decided change for 
the better having occurred in his con- 
dition. Earlier in the week it was said 
the patient had -suffered a turn for the 
worse. 



14 



VARIETY 



NEW YORK. 

The final week of "Advanced Vaude- 
ville" in vaudeville and at the New York 
found a good bill at the theatre, tnce it 
got started. Three strange numbers, Lucy 
Weston, Marstro and Oretta and Three 
Danie Sisters (New Acts), were spread 
over the program, with Madge Fox in the 
No. 2 position, replacing Lily Flexmore 
(New Acts), who did not go into the show 
until the Tuesday matinee. 

Geo. Evans is the lone act to have been 
on both the opening and closing vaudeville 
bills of the New York. To commemorate 
the event, Mr. Evans had a few new 
jokes and a couple of new songs. One of 
the latter, "O'Brien Had No Place to Go," 
Mr. Evans said on Monday evening was 
sung for the first time. With his usual 
energy, the blackface comedian "plugged" 
the song, the "plugging" now being a part, 
perhaps a half, of his act. In inviting the 
audience to join in the chorus, Mr. Evans 
remarked as he brushed the ashes of the 
cigar he never smokes, "You can't tell, so 
I'll save it. This may be a hard season 
with 'Advanced Vaudeville* retreating." 
Someone applauded, and Evans added, 
"Yes, but in good order." Then the argu- 
ment subsided. 

The new songs were Whit Cunliffe's 
contribution in his third week for the ben- 
efit of those who had heard him before. 
"You Can Never Tell What a Girl Can 
Do," and another on "The Merry Widow" 
made the duo. Pretty close to the opening, 
a position he did not deserve, but made 
necessary perhaps through the make-up 01 
the show, Mr. Cunliffe proved his quality 
by a most substantial success. He is one 
of the five single acts on the program this 
week, three women and two men. His 
song "Hello" is billed, but not sung. "The 
Merry Widow" is an American composi- 
tion likely, and made a lively number. 
Mr. Cunliffe has contracted the "audience" 
habit if he did not have it before. It la 
growing very prevalent and annoying. 

A short while since May Belfort played 
a run at this same house, and returns with 
her character singing offering, placed to 
follow other songsters on the bill. There 
has been no change in Miss Belfort's act 
excepting a new dress at the opening, and 
she did as well as could be looked for under 
the conditions. 

A fast working and first class acrobatic 
act is given by the Gaudschmidts, with 
two dogs, the animals picking up their 
cues like old-timers. The Germans are 
good workers, one taking especially high 
graceful leaps for his somersaults, while 
the lively music helps to give a brisk snap. 

Closing the show before the pictures are 
the Eight Yiulians, the corking French 
acrobatic and "Risley" collection who late- 
ly came over from the other side. 

Madge Fox sang a few songs, dancing 
a little, without doing any acrobatic feats 
in connection with it, and Collins and 
Hart reappeared with a new silk hat worn 
by Sim Collins, besides some new tricks 
in their burlesque "Strong Men." 

Collins is using a billiard cue for the 
cannon balls, and seems to have given up 
trying to scare those in the front rows 
with the rubber ball. There are two or 
three other new bits. The act is always 
a "scream," and some of the impossible 
acrobatic tricks forces the laughter of the 
spectator, regardless of the number of 
times it has been seen. Simc. 



ALHAMBRA. 

Eight comedy acts out of nine numbers, 
with the odd one in question as to its 
classification, make up a first-class enter- 
taining bill at the Alhambra this week. 

Felix and Barry, Clifton Crawford, Nel- 
lie Wallace and Karno's Comedy Company 
were equal favorites on Tuesday evening, 
judging from the applause, with the Karno 
Company entitled to the first choice 
through its position, closing the show 
after following all the laughable acts. 

It's rather remarkable how this act "A 
Night in an English Music Hall" has the 
power to draw the quantity of laughter 
with so many repetitions. The Alhambra 
audience applauded the several members 
as they appeared. The finish where Billie 
Reeves in his excellent impersonation of 
the "drunk" wrestles with "The Turk" 
brought roars at near 11 o'clock, bringing 
the program to a screaming finish. Alf 
Reeves is playing the uncle. Unless he 
speaks louder or makes his motions more 
emphatic no one will believe he is an 
honest actor, though he makes up well. 
Geo. Welch is the lively "kid," and the 
other members, including the Misses Dixon 
and Minister, give their usual good show. 
The company at the opening seemed to 
have doubts of its reception with knowl- 
edge of the location occupied, but the 
house quickly got to work. 

Another repeater with great staying 
powers is "The Boy Next Door" which 
George Felix and Lydia Barry present. 
Mr. Felix's acrobatics and pantomimic 
comedy are as potent as ever, while 
Miss Barry in a new dress ornamented by 
a violet imbedded with a large diamond is 
impersonating different persons singing 
"Handle Me With Care." In the imitation 
of the operatic singer who essayed vaude- 
ville with that song, Miss Barry gave an 
exact impersonation of someone out of 
memory; also out of vaudeville after the 
first week. Emily Barry in a graceful 
dance looked very pretty in a pink gown, 
and might try more for the "kid" effect 
with a high-necked dress, not quite so long 
as the present one. The act went through 
with a rush. The ardor of the principals 
was not even dampened when Mr. Felix 
accidentally caused a vase to fall off the 
mantle, Miss Barry remarking sotto-voice: 
"$4 for that." 

And still another repeat was Dolan and 
Lenharr in "Taking Chances," an oft- 
told story in vaudeville, but still most 
enjoyable. Jas. F. Dolan as the "crook" 
gives a natural humorous performance, 
while Ida Lenharr appears altogether too 
wholesome to have the dialogue accuse 
her of "swiping" silk stockings. 

Clifton Crawford might be termed fa- 
miliar, but Mr. Crawford is a monologist, 
and "has a way about him." He changes 
his matter somewhat now and then, 
though holding well to the routine the 
season was started with excepting a new 
opening song "Martha Gray" with a 
pretty melody. Mr. Crawford upon an- 
swering the plaudits after Kipling's "Gun- 
ga Din" bemoaned the condition of his 
voice, telling a story to appease. The story 
may have been told by Mr. Crawford be- 
fore, but it "listened" new. Here it is:- 
"When I was in London some years ago I 
drove downtown each day with the same 
busman. One morning my busman catch- 
ing up with anothor bus, pulled out a long 
piece of string, with a knot at the end, 
waving it to and fro. The other driver 
fumed and swore at him. I asked my bus- 



man why he was doing it. He replied : 
'Oh, his father was hung two years ago, 
and he has got a rotten sense of humor.' " 
Mr. Crawford intimated he had ready a 
new recitation to replace the Kipling 
verse. Had not the explanation of the 
vocal condition been made, it might have 
been supposed from his statement that 
Kipling had palled upon him, which would 
not be strange considering the continuity 
of the same thing twice daily. A loss of 
expression might likely follow. Another 
to alternate at least would give both 
probably the vigor each demanded. 

The simulated English accent of Mr. 
Crawford removed the edge from the very 
English of Mr. Hymack, "The Chameleon 
Comedian," with the London brand plas- 
tered all over. Mr. Hymack is a recent 
importation. 

His act, that of changing gloves, with 
disappearing and reappearing collars, ties, 
boutonieres, etc., makes a novelty num- 
ber purely through not having been done 
before in all respects as Mr. Hymack 
handles it, but there is hardly anything 
mysterious. The much-heralded trick of 
changeable gloves is simple. Some por- 
tions of the act seem to be worked me- 
chanically, perhaps by something ap- 
proaching a time-lock system, or it may 
all be accomplished by movements of the 
arms or feet. 

The dialogue, without special point, be- 
comes tiresome, running incessantly all 
through as a covering. Perhaps if Mr. 
Hymack had taken a partner, working it 
as a "two-act" with both going through 
the same operation, a number would have 
developed which might have become stand- 
ard (if another could acquire the speed). 
A lightning strip change for the finish 
brought a solid encore. The act causes a 
buzz all the way. 

That very much eccentric and very 
much comedienne Nellie Wallace has re- 
turned for another American trip. Miss 
Wallace is the acme of eccentricity in 
work and make-up. She becomes liked, 
and her second visit is proof of her value 
over here. 

There is a funny blackface man in The 
Quaker City Quartet. If the remainder 
of the act, who play as blacksmiths and 
"straight," could build up to him in their 
department, the act would play a con- 
siderable number of weeks around New 
York each season. The opening in a spe- 
cial set (which might be repainted) is 
shorter than the encore (which might be 
shorter). 

"The Nightingale's Courtship" is the 
title of the Permane Brothers' offering. 
Dressed as clowns, the act promises well 
at first, caused by a bounding ball and 
other comedy which follows. Then it 
takes a break, closing slowly with a 
whistling duet "The Nightingale's Court- 
ship." One of the clowns has an ex- 
pressive face under the chalk. He should 
use it to better advantage than the 
whistle affords. 

If Al M. Friend of Friend and Downing 
considers he requires no make-up to im- 
personate a Hebrew, then why not dress 
the part in immaculate evening attire, 
otherwise playing it the same? And as 
Mr. Downing makes no pretensions to 
the Hebrew character, why bill it as "He- 
brew 'comedians'"? Also, when "Number 
Two" on the program, why should they 
feel discouraged sufficiently because "they 
are still coming in" to fall off in the ef- 
fort to please the early arrivals? Sime. 



FIFTH AVENUE. 
The Fifth Avenue Theatre, now in its 
second week, bids fair to become a most 
popular variety house. On Monday there 
were capacity audiences at both the after- 
noon and evening performances. The big 
bill offered undoubtedly kept up the 
attendance throughout the balance of the 
week. 

Eva Tanguay is the headline attraction 
this week, and it may be the fidgety 
comedienne is drawing them in, but it is 
more likely the merit of the entire bill 
does that. Miss Tanguay doesn't seem to 
be quite as energetic as formerly, but 
there were enough wriggles left to satisfy 
the audience, wHich was most generous to 
the singer. The house insisted upon hear- 
ing "I Don't Care" after Miss Tanguay 
had sung four songs and then she made a 
speech. 

Chas. E. Evans and Company unrolled 
about twenty minutes of solid laughs in 
their skillfully arranged playlet "It's Up 
to You, William." Mr. Evans met with 
warm appreciation in this house, where 
the audience is of about the right grade 
for tht) better class of comedy. The sup- 
port is uniformly good, Chas. J. Stine 
(who replaced Charles H. Hopper at short 
notice) doing exceedingly well in the very 
prominent part. 

Only six of the Seven Mowatts ap- 
peared Monday night. It might better 
have been five. The woman carried does 
not add to the offering in any way and 
looks entirely out of place. The speed and 
sureness with which the boys handle the 
clubs is little short of marvelous, and the 
apparent pleasure with which they per- 
form strengthens the good impression 
made by the juggling. 

Harry L. Tighe is welcomed back into 
the fold in "Those Happy College Days," 
a sketch played for some time last sea- 
son by him. There is no material change 
in the offering, and there has no need to 
be. A better college atmosphere surrounds 
the proceedings that has been in many a 
college play. The men keep the "college 
boy" characters well within bounds, play- 
ing it as though human. The only thing 
out of the picture is Bud Strong (Mr. 
Tighe), star football player, parading 
around his room after practice in his foot- 
ball togs. The part could be made just as 
convincing and much truer in a sweater 
and peg-tops. Loris Scarsdale is a pretty 
winsome little person. She makes an alto-t 
gether pleasing soubrette. A little care 
should be practiced in handling of her 
skirts while sitting. 

The Baker Troupe of cyclists gave the 
bill a good opening. Comedy is gone in 
for very strongly, and several new effects 
are disclosed in this line. The ridiculous- 
ly small bicycle ridden by one of the men 
caused the most merriment. 

"The Star Bout," in the closing position, 
holds the interest to the end. Granville 
Taylor seems to be staggering under the 
weight of being "starred," and is allowing 
Laura Pierpont to run away with the 
lion's share of the honors. 

The Otto Brothers, after ridding them- 
selves of that first bunch of talk, did very 
nicely, principally through the freak voice 
of the thin member. 

Whiting and the Melnotte Sisters, New 



Acts. 



Dash. 



V A R I E t Y 



r * ' 



i£ 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK. 

(Continued from page 11.) 



Lily Flexmore. 

Singer, Dancer and Contortionist. 

jo Mist. 

New York. 

Lily Flexmore appeared at the Audi- 
torium, Chicago, for a couple of weeks, 
opening at the New York on Tuesday. 
She is an English brunette. As a con- 
tortionist, there is no one who could tell 
her anything, but as a singer and dancer, 
excepting the high kicking which goes 
with the latter, there is not much Miss 
Flexmore needs to know, for it is the 
bending alone upon which she depends. 
Whoever may like contortionists can see 
a wonderful twister in Miss Flexmore. 

Sime. 

Three Danie Sisters. 
Acrobatic Dancing. 
New York. 

The Three Danie Sisters, good looking 
and prettily dressed, an American act, 
played at the New York Theatre this 
week for the first time. The girls may 
have been members of other combinations. 
One is a very good acrobat for a female. 
There are also some contortions, and a song 
at the opening. In the early portion of 
the program the act would have gone bet- 
ter ; it is not quite important enough to 
have occupied the position of opening the 
second half of the bill, as it did on Mon- 
day evening. Sime. 



McNish and Penfold. 
Dancing and Singing. 
One. 

Fifty-eighth Street 

McNish and Penfold placed their pres- 
ent offering together last summer and have 
played it out of town, but this is the first 
showing in the city. They substituted at 
the Fifty-eighth Street for Coakley and 
McBride. Frank E. McNish, remembered 
for his original and famous 'Silence and 
Fun," has revived some of the minstrel 
dancing of the "Essence of Virginia" days. 
He does it extremely well, and to a gen- 
eration which does not remember the 
palmy days of minstrelsy, the performance 
is decidedly interesting on its merits. To 
the older folk, its association will give it 
an added recommendation. Thomas J. 
Penfold, who works "straight" opposite 
McXish's blackface characterization, has 
a splendid voice and a solo won him solid 
applause. The number was decidedly well 
liked in the "No. 3" place. Rush. 



Roger Imhoff and Susanne Corinne. 
"In a Strange HoteP (Comedy). 
15 Mins.; Two (Special Interior Drop). 
Dewey, Empire Burlesquers. 

The title and the sketch which it de- 
scribes are merely excuses for the intro- 
duction of a semi-monologue with occa- 
sional bits of dialogue. Roger Imhof, in 
Irish makeup, enters a hotel sleeping room 
to explain that his horse had just fallen 
dead far from home and left him with a 
wagon load of vegetables on his hands. 
This develops in conversation with a 
daughter of the hotel keeper (Miss Oor- 
inne). Imhof then goes to bed, reeling off 
a running fire of comedy talk. With the 
exception of certain observations and busi- 
ness having to do with the uncleanliness 
of the bed, the matter is funny and a 
quaint comedy finish brought the sketch 
to a good close. Rush. 



Marstro and Oretta. 

Juggling. 

11 Mins.; Full Stage (Palace). 

New York. 

Marstro and Oretta are announced as 
making their first American appearance at 
the New York this week. They open the 
show. The greater part of the act consists 
of juggling by the man, running to tricks 
which have been shown over here by ait 
foreign jugglers and including the billiard 
bail work of W. C. Fields. One trick with 
a billiard cue is new, the cue being released 
from a spring by a bullet shot by the man, 
who catches it on his forehead after an 
aerial flight. A rather good finish is brought 
out by the woman supporting the billiard 
table, while on a board placed over her 
body from knees to shoulders. The man 
mounts this, giving additional weight, and 
raises himself upon the handles of two bil- 
liard cues. It is spectacular, and the po- 
sition held by the woman is maintained 
for a longer time than usual. She is of 
amazon build, and has one change of cos- 
tume. In houses where the well known 
jugglers have not appeared, Marstro and 
Oretta would be a feature; elsewhere they 
will suffer through the similarity. 

Sime. 



Leo St. Elmo. 

Musical. 

1 a Mins.; Two. 

Pastor's. 

"The Musical German," the billing 
reads. Mr. St. Elmo would do well to 
drop the German end of it. No especial 
effort is made for comedy, and there is 
very little talk. St. Elmo is a really good 
musician and should develop that spe- 
cialty. A selection on the bassoon, an in- 
strument quite uncommon, was very well 
done, and received hearty recognition. 
The man would probably do much better 
were he to take a partner, and work out 
either a straight or comedy musical act. 

Dash. 



Dunn Sisters. * ^~** 

Songs and Dances. 
10 Mins.; One. 
Pastor's. 

The Dunn Sisters will have to acquire 
an easier stage bearing before they will 
be able to make an audience accept them 
seriously. Both are hopelessly amateur- 
ish. The girls make rather a good look- 
ing sister combination, and the dressing 
shows some care. One is a fairly good 
dancer, but the other should not attempt 
dancing until she has gained more con- 
fidence. The voices average well enough 
for acts of this kind, and the selections 
are well chosen. Training is the most 
urgent need. Dash. 



Moving Picture. 
"Military Tournament." 
Alhambra. 

A "Military Tournament" is a Pathe 
film, and taken somewhere in France. It 
is of a cavalry drill. The field where the 
tournament accurred seems so large in the 
square arena the photo camera must have 
been located a considerable distance from 
the objects, soldiers and horses. It gives 
the impression the film is indistinct, but 
the movement may be easily followed, and 
there is some magnificent riding shown, 
also formations. The series is a good 
average one. »S'tme. 



Moving Pictures. 

"Irish Scenes and Types." 

New York. 

The moving picture this week at the 
New York is "Iiish Bcww and Types," 
manufactured by C. Urban, of England. 
This is the manufacturer who got out the 
Burns-Moir pictures, and in this, as in the 
fight series, the films are unusually clear, 
hardly a blemish occurring during the 
lather long unreeling. The scenes are of 
Ireland, commencing with the streets of 
Dublin, and covering country life, bringing 
into the light several amusing and interest- 
ing living subjects, from very old Irishmen 
and women to young bashful girls. All the 
persons in the pictures were especially 
posed, and this is laughable, shown by 
their evident knowledge of it. The series 
could be termed stereopticon pictures illus- 
trated, and although in spots perhaps a 
trifle dull for children not old enough to 
catch the instructive side, the film as a 
whole will be amusing and interesting to 
all ages. It ought to suggest the advisabil- 
ity of importing more pictures of this 
character, and the futility of presenting 
poorly "faked" numbers when live subjects 
like "Irish Scenes and Types" may be had. 

Sime. 



"SKIQIE" SAYS SUNDAY LAW IS 



it 



BUM." 



OUT OP TOWN 



Izetta Jewell and Co. 
"Solving the Problem" (Comedy). 
24 Mins.; Full Stage (Interior). 
Wigwam, San Francisco (Week Jan. 6.). 

The title is inappropriate for while there 
is an attempt to solve the servant prob- 
lem by the introduction of an automatic 
servant it is all mere by-play and does 
not figure in the development of the plot. 
A married man seeking solace from the 
inconveniences of home life, occasioned by 
the advent of a baby has installed himself 
in bachelor quarters in the "Ideal" apart- 
ments. He is finally stricken with home- 
sickness, and resolves to return to his 
domicile. An advertisement is placed in 
the paper announcing his rooms to let. 
His wife who has decided to maintain in- 
dependent quarters in the city as a re- 
buke to his neglect answers the "ad" and 
rents the rooms during the absence of the 
vacating tenant. The husband returns and 
the wife by dropping her veil remains 
"incog." A flirtation follows during which 
hubby announces himself as a bachelor. 
Disclosing her identity the wife denounces 
him and demands a separation. The stereo- 
typed dialogue in such situations ensues. 
The curtain falls upon a reconciliation, 
brought about by a telephone conversation 
in which Pa, Ma and baby participate. The 
playlet contains much of the superfluous 
that could be dropped with advantage The 
character of the janitor (low Irish com- 
edy) is at variance with the idea of a 
supreme ruler of a fashionable apartment. 
Miss Jewell has a well established reputa- 
tion in legitimate circles here and readily 
adjusted herself to vaudeville. Should she 
continue she is sure to find a place. Her 
support was not of the best. 

W. Alfred Wilson. 



Lester Rosenthal, stenographer for P. J. 
Casey while Mr. Casey was busily en- 
gaged in directing the Klaw & Erlanger 
circuit of late, will be retained at the 
New York Theatre as private secretary 
to Louis F. Werba, manager of the house. 



Doesn't Like the Show at the Har- 
lem Opera House, but is Glad 
Alan Dale "Picks a Good 
One Sometimes." 




• . 






("Sklgie" is now nine year* of age. The fol- 
lowing la the first story he hat written out him- 
self. Previously they have been taken down from 
his dictation. No changes hare been made In the 
wording of this article excepting correction of 
"Sklgle'a" spelling— quite a task In Itself. 

I went to the Harlem Opera House 
(January 12) to see a Sunday show. 
"The Blonde Typewriters" went fine. But 
I didn't like it because they could not 
dance, and Johnnie Stanley pulled some 
bad stuff. They had four new girls and 
they looked fair. 

Win. Courtleigh in his sketch ("Peaches'*) 
was good and I liked it very much, and 
he wore a black and white suit and it 
looked swell. He had a nice pair of shoes 
on and I bet I could run in a shoe like 
that, and I think he could have picked a 
better girl than the one he has, and I 
liked "Biff." 

Cameron and Flanagan were there, but 
they didn't play their sketch ("On and 
Off") because it was Sunday and I was 
good and sore, and I think that Sunday 
law is bum. They can't dance or do any- 
thing just because it's Sunday. 

Ituth Allen wins a million dollars, and 
I think I have seen her before somewhere 
and I liked the way she whistled, and she 
looked pretty fair. 

The Bradfords sing "Just Help Youiv 
self," and I think our phonograph has them 
beat to a finish, but they were pretty fair. 

They had illustrated songs and the girl 
sang "Two Blue Eyes" and it was almost 
a song. She sang "Won't You Be My 
Honey?" too. It was better than the other 
song. 

Orth and Fern always look good to me 
and Fern almost had his stage clothes on. 
The act looks better than when I saw 
them at the Alhambra. 

I didn't like the moving pictures, and 
they ought to get the hook twice in the 
same place. 

And some more. Alan Dale thinks that 
Courtleigh is all right and I am glad he 
picks a good one sometimes. 



Tom Coyne, the comedian with "The 
Bachelor Club," was married at Rochester 
on Jan. 11 to Florence Byrne, of "The Six 

Lancashire Lassies." 



Although in receipt of several offers, 
including foreign engagements, Burt 
Green and Irene Franklin (Mrs. Green) 
do not believe they will be able to work 
next Summer. 



Joe Dillon, of Dillon and Moore, it 
w ith "Our Friend Fritz" for the remainder 
of the season. 



16 



VARIETY 



f 



'■ 



VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK JAN. 20 

« 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED. 

(The routes here given, boaring no dates, axe from JAN. 19 to JAN. 86, inclusive, de- 
pendent upon the opening and closing days of engagements in different parts of the country. 
When an address follows the name the act is "laying off" for the week and may be written 
or telegraphed to accordingly. All addresses are furnisbed VARIETY by artists and may be 
relied upon at accurate. Addresses oare managers or agents will not be printed.) 

"B. R." ^h the list Indicates the route of the burlesque company named, with which the 



■; 



artist or act ik with and 



if 



«H^P 



found under "BURLESQUE ROUTES." 



Abel, Geo. A Co., Poll's, Scranton. 

A. B. C. D. Girls, Poll's, Hartford. 

Abdullah Bros., Three, Bennett's, London. 

Abbott- Andrew Co., 207 W. 88, N. Y. 

Adair Art, 27, Wasson's, Joplin, Mo. 

Adams, B. Klrke, A Co., P. O. Box 21, Guyan- 

dptte. W. Va. 
Adams Bros., Imperials, B. R. 
Adams A Drew, 281 W. 43. N. Y. 
Adams A Kirk, Lady Birds, B. R. 
Addison A Livingston, Palmetto Beach, Tampa. 
Adler, Harry, Park, Alameda, Cal., lndef. 
Adler, Flo, Orpheum, Denver. 
Ahearn, Charles, Golden Crook, B. R. 
Abern A Baxter, Bachelor Club. 
Aberns, The, 290 Colorado, Chicago. 
Albanl, 1418 Broadway, New York. 
Aldo A VaniuTsoii, o. II., No. Adams, Mass. 
All A Pelser, High Jinks, B. R. 
Allen. Bva, Ideala. B. R. 
Allen, Josle, 806 W. 112, N, Y. 
Allen A Kenna, Crystal. Frankfort, Ind. 
Allen, Leon A Bertie, 118 Central, Oskosb, Wis. 
Allen, Searl A Violet. Poll's. New Haven. 
Alllstsr, Harry, 11 Rue Geoffrey Marie, Paris. 
Alpha Trio, Altmeyer, McKeesport, Pa. 
Alpine Troupe, Majestic, Evansvllle. 
Alrona Zoeller Trio, Orpheum, Newark, 0. 
Alvarettas, Three, Trocadero, B. R. 
Al Barnes, Bijou, La Crosse, Wis. 
Alvora, Golden Crook, B. R. 
American Daacers, Six, Orpheum, Brooklyn. 
American Newsboys Quartette, Pantage's, Bell* 

Ingham, Wash. 
American Newsboys' Trio, Wisconsin Hotel. Mari- 
nette, Wis. 
Amerlcus Comedy Four, Shubert, Utica. 
Ampere, Electrical, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. B. 
Anderson. Carl, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 
Apdale's Animals, Bennett's, Ottawa. 
Appleby, B. J., Orpheum, Mansfield, O. 
Apollo, Orch., Benton Hotel, Benton Harbor, Mich. 
Apollos, The, Park Family, Johnstown, Pa. 
Anderson, Richard, Orpheum, Memphis. 
Ardelli, Franklyn, Pa. 

Archer, LaDella A Davey, Jolly Girls, B. B. 
Ardo A Bddo. 817 Hoyt Ave., Astoria, L. I. 
Arlington Four, Orpheum, Oakland. 
Arlsonas, The, 148 W. 88, N. Y. 
Arnold, Lucia, Boston Belles, B. B. 
Araot A Gunn, 218 6th Ave., N. Y. 
Asbton A Earle, Orpheum, Canton, O. 
Astrellas, The, Poll's, Scranton. 
Atkinson, Geo., Magicland, Connellsvllle, Pa. 
Anberts, Lei, 14 Frobel Str. III., Hamburg, Oar. 
Auburns, Three, 335 Beacon, Somerville, Mass. 
Auers, The, 410 So. 4th Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Austin, Claude, 86 No. Clark, Chicago. 
Austins, Great, Rockvllle, Conn. 
Austins, Tossing, Hippodrome, Manchester, Eng. 
Avery A Pearl, 683 Wash. Boul., Chicago. 



Baader La Velle Troupe, 383 Christiana, Chicago. 

Baker, Nat C, 82 Division, N. Y. 

Bain* A Shaw, Hippodrome, N. Y., lndef. 

Banks, Chas., Boston Belles, B. B. 

Barton, Joe, Bohemians, B. B. 

Barrett, Grace, Pat White's Gaiety Glrla, B. B. 

Barrett A Belle, Century Girls, B. R. 

Barrett, Charles, High Jinks, B. R. 

Barry, Katie, 541 W. 168, N. Y. 

Barry, Mr. A Mrs. Jlmmle, Orpheum, New 

Orleans. 
Barry A Wolford, Orpheum, Allentown. 
Barto, Eddie, Rolllckers, B. R. 
Bartlett, Al, Hunt's Hotel, Chicago. 
Bates A Neville. 48 Gregory, New Haven. 
Beard, Billy, 1401 Drayton, Savannah. 
Beattles, Juggling, 137 Park, PaterBXi. 
Beauvais, Arthur, A Co.. 123 W. 26, N. Y. 
Bedell Bros., Poughkeepsle, N. Y. 
Bedinl, Donat, A Dogs, 220 W. 88, N. Y. 
Beech er A Maye, 23 Atlantic. Bridgeport. 
Belford Bros., 223 First, Jersey City. 
Belford, Allan G.. Washington, N. J. 
Belmont, Harrlette, Jolly Girls, B. R. 
Belclalre Bros., Olympic. Indianapolis. 
Bell Boy Trio, Norwich. Conn. 
Bell, Frank, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Bell, Norma, Trans-Atlantlcs. B. B. 
Belmont A Brennsn, Imperials, B. B. 
Bennett, Laura, 14 Linden, Jersey City. 
Bensons, Musical, Genl. Del., Chicago. 
Bentley, Harry, Imperials, B. R. 
Benton, Maggie. 136 Taylor. Springfield, 0. 
Berkea, The, 409 W. 30, N. Y. 
Bernard, Cassia, Rose Sydell. B. B. 
Bernler A Stella, 22 Haywood, Providence. 
Berzac's Circus. Haymarket. Chicago. 
Berry A Berry, Great Valley, N. Y. 
Beyer A Bro., 293 Henry, N. Y. 
Big Four, High School Girls, B. B. 
Big City Quartet. Cropsy A Bay 26. Bonsonharst. 
BIJou Comedy Trio, Watson'* Burleaqnere, B. R. 
Blmni. Bomm A Brrr, Orpheum, Minneapolis, 
Bingham, Kittle, 335 Beacon, Somerville, Mass. 
Bingham, 335 Beacon, Somerville, Mass. 



Binney A Chapman, Ruby, Family, Memphis, 

iudef. 
Birch, John, 133 W. 45th, N. Y. 
Bishop, Francea, Century Girls, B. R. 
Bixley, Edgar, Boston Belles, B. R. 
Blancbard, Elenor, Mrs. Leslie Carter Co. 
Block, John J., Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
Booth A Gordon, Bell, Oakland. 
Blue Cadets, 61 Hanover, Boaton. 
Blush, T. E., 3241 Haywood, Denver. 
Blanchet Bros. A Randolph, Hanlon Superba Co. 
Bobker, Henry, 63 Forsyth, N. Y. 
Bohannan A Corey, Century Glrla, B. R. 
Boises, Five, 44 Curtia, Grand Rapids. 
Bottamley Troupe, Clrco Bell, Mexico. 
Bouldon A Qulnn, Winter Fair, Amherst, N. S. 
Bowers, Walters A Crooker, Bennett's, Quebec. 
Bowery Comedy Quartet, 821 Charles, W. ■*» 

boken. 
Bowen Bros., Coliseum, Seattle. 
Bowman Broa., 826 W. 43, N. Y. 
Boyce, Lillian, Jolly Girls, B. R. 
Boyce, Jack, Trocaderoa, B. R. 
Boyd A Veola. 119 B. 14. New York. 
Bragg. John D., Toreadora. B. B. 
Bradna A Derrick, Proctor's. Albany. 
Bradshaw, Chas., A Co., Bennett's, Hamilton. 
Bradys, The, 721 Copeland, Pittsburg. 
Brady A Mahoney, Irwin's Big Show, B. B. 
Brlnn, L. B.. 23 Haymarket, London, Eng. 
Brennan A Downing. Falrbope, Ala. 
Brennen A Rlggs, Century Glrla, B. B. 
Brentford, Tom, Park Hotel, Port Chester, N. Y. 
Broadway Quartette, 1558 Bway., N. Y. 
Broadway Trio, Wine, Woman A Song, B. B. 
Brobt Trio, Imperial, Tremont, O. 
Brooks A Vedder, 210 B. 17, N. Y. 
Brooks A Jeanette, Bijou, Winnipeg. 
Brooks, Harvey, High Jinks, B. R. 
Brooks A Clark, 2464 Patton, Philadelphia. 
Brooks, Jeanne, Parisian Widows, B. R. 
Brown A Bartoletti, City Sports, B. B. 
Brown A Wllmot, 71 Glen, Maiden. 
Brown A Wright. 844 W. 45. N. Y. 
Browning, Mr. A Mrs., 126 W. 88, N. Y. 
Browning A Le Van, 895 Canldwell, N. Y. 
Bruce, Al., Toreadors, B. B. 
Bruces, The, 1525 State, Chicago. 
Bryant, May, Boston Belles, B. B. 
Bryant A Seville, Crystal, Milwaukee. 
Burke, Wm. H., Family, Braddock, Pa. 
Burton A Brooks, Fair Haven, N. J. 



BUCRNER 

SENSATIONAL CYCLIST. 

Associated with AL. SUTHERLAND. Vaude- 
ville Booking, St James Building. 



Buckley, Wm. C, Union St., Knoxvllle. 
Buckleye, Musical, 297 Ave. B, N. Y. 
Buckeye Trio. 646 B. Center, Marlon, O. 
Burdette. Madeline, 212 W. 44, N. Y. 
Buckeye State Four, 2364 B. 57, Cleveland. 
Burgess, Harrey J., 637 Trenton, Pittsburg. 
Burke A Urline, 110 E. 14, N. Y. 
Burke, Wm. II., Family, Braddock, Pa. 
Burnham A White. Waterloo, Waterloo, la. 
Burns, Morris, A Co., 54 Hermen, Jersey City. 
Burtlnos, The, 1370 Richards, Milwaukee. 
Burton A Burton, 309 W. 55, N. Y. 
Burnell, Lillian. 511 W. North, Chicago. 
Burton, Matt, 1185 Valencia, San Francisco. 
Burton, Hughes A Burton, Star, Herkimer, N. Y. 
Burton A Shea. Ill 7th Ave., N. Y. 
Burton A Vass, 25 Haskln, Providence. 
Burkes, Juggling, Majestic, Mongomery. 
Burrows Travers Co., 116 B. 25th, N. Y. 
Bunch Family, Excelsior Springs, Mo., lndef. 
Bush A Elliott, National. 'Frisco. 
Bussler, Walter II.. Orphla, Madison, Wis., lndef. 
Bulla A Raymond, Wash. Society Girls, B. R. 
Butley A Lamar, 2319 9. Bouvier, Philadelphia. 
Buxton. Chaa. C, Crystal, Menasha, Wis., lndef. 
Byers A Herman, Poll's, New Haven. 
Byron & Langdon. Keith's, Phila. 
Byrons' Muslcsl Five, 6138 Indiana, Chicago. 



Caesar, Frank. & Co., Gaiety, Galesburg, 111. 
Callahan A St. George, K. & P. 58th St., N. Y. 
Cameron A Flanagan. Shubert, Utlca. 
Camp, Sheppard, Kentucky Bellea, B. R. 
Campbell & Cully, 1613 Bourbon, New Orleans. 
Caldera, A. K., St. Charles Hotel, Chicago. 
Calvin, James. 445 W. 64. Chicago. ' 

Caprice, Mile., Colonial, N. Y. . 
Campbell. W. S.. Rone Sydell, B. R. 
Carbrey Bros., 1347 E. Oxford, Phils. 
Carberry A Stanton, Gaiety, Springfield, I1L 
Carrlllo, Loo, Nyack, N. Y. 
Carr, Jeasle, Toreadors, B. R. 
Carol Sisters, Lyric, Hot Springs. 



Carroll A Cooke. Hotel York. N. Y. 
Carroll, Joe, 231 Liberty, Peterson. 

Carroll, Great, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Casad A Do Verne, 812 Valley, Daytoa. 

Carson A Wlllard, 2210 No. Lambert. Phlla. 

Carson Bros., 168 Bergen, Brooklyn. 

Carter, Taylor & Co., Mohawk, Schenectady. 

Carter A Taylor. 256 W. 43, N. Y. 

Carter A Waters, 158 Greenfield, Buffalo. 

Cartwell A Harris. 1031 McDonoagh, Baltimore. 
Carver A Murray, 229 W. 88, N. Y. 

Carver A Pollard, 1822 W. 6th. Davenport, la. 

Casper, Will A Mabel, Pastor. York, Pa. 

Caswell, Msnde, Gibbons Tour. 

Caatanos, The, 104 W. 61. N. Y. 

Chadwlck Trio. 229 W. 88, N. Y. 

Chamaroys, The, 60 Manhattan ave., N. Y. 

Chandler, Anna, City Sports, B. R. 

Chantrell A Shuyler, 219 Prospect, Brooklyn. 

Chapln, Benjamin, Lotos Club, N. Y. 

Chester A Jones, Broadway, Camden, N. J. 

Chriaty, Great, Knickerbockers, B. B. 

Christy, Wayne O., 776 8th ave., N. Y. 

Charch City Four, Strollers, B. R. 

Clalrmont. 2051 Ryder Ave., N. Y. 

Clarence Sisters, Maryland, Baltimore. 

Clark. Bdward, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Clark, Geo. G., Wellr.nd, Morganstown, W. Va. 

Clark, John F.. 425 Foreat, Arlington, N. J. 

Clark, Mul, Bowery, B. R. 

Clark A Temple, Majestic, Mobile. 

Clarke, Harry Corson, Lambs Club, N. Y. 

Clsrke, Wilfred, Lambs Club, N. Y. 

Claudius A Scarlet, 50 Chapin. Canandalgua, IT. Y. 

Clans, Martha, 134» Concord, St. Paul. 

Claus A Radcllff, Olympic. Chicago. 

Clermento, Frank A Etta, 129 W. 27. New York. 

Cleveland, Claude A Marlon. 215 Shurtleff, Choi- 
sea, Mass. 

Clipper Sisters, 466 Blewett, Seattle. 

Cllto A Sylvester, 214 No. 8. Philadelphia. 

Olivette. 274 Indiana, Chicago. 

Coate, Charlotte A Sunflower, 1553 Broadway. 

Coccla A Amato, Pantage's, Portland. 

Oogan A Bancroft, 1553 Bway.. N. Y. 

Cohen, Louis W., W. New Brighton, N. Y. 

Colleens. Singing, 104 W. 88, N. Y. 

Collins, Eddie, Oshkosh, Wis., lndef. 

Collins, Nina, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Collins, James J., Jolly Girls. B. R. 

Collins A Brown, 148 Kosciusko, Brooklyn. 

Coltons, The, Chsmpsgne Girls, B. R. 

Connolly A Klein, Empire Show, B. B. 

Comrade*, Four, 834 Trinity, N. Y. 

Contlno A Lawrence, 249 So. May, Chicago. 

Cohen, Will H., Rolllckers, B. R. 

Comerford, Vaughn, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Conn, Downey & Wlllard, Majestic, Streator, 111. 

Connelly. Pete, Weast's, B. R. 

Conway, Nick, Novelty, Denver. 

Cook, Billy, Toreadors, B. R. 

Cook, Frank. Austin A Stone's, Boston, lndef. 

Cook, Joe, Hathaway's, Brockton. 

Cooke A Rothert, Olympic, Chicago. 

Cooper A Robinson, Poll's, Springfield. 

Cooper. Harry, High Jinks, B. R. 

Cooper, Harry L., Fay Footer, B. B. 

Coasar, Mr. and Mrs., 208 W. 121, N. Y. 

Cotton, Lois, Shea's, Buffalo. 

Cottons, The, Champagne Glrla, 9. B. 

Oouthoul. Jessie. 6532 Harvard Art., Chicago. 

Court lei gh, Wm., Keith's, Boston. 

"Covington, Marse," Orpheum, Oakland. 

Coyne A Tinlln, 1036 Washington, Chicago. 

Craig, Rlcby, 335 Third Avenue, New York. 

Crawford A Manning. 258 W. 48, N. Y. 

Crickets, G. O. H., Pittsburg. 

Criterion Male Quartette, 156 6th Ave., N. Y. 

Gronln, Morris, 21 Alfred pi., London, Eng. 

Cross, Will H., A Co., travel; Gaiety, Galesburg, 
111. 

Crystal, Herman, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

Cummlnga A Merley, Unique, Loa Angeles, lndof. 

Cummlngs, Thornton A Co., Majestic, Denver. 

Cunningham, Al., 200 W. 44, N. Y. 

Cunningham, Bob and Daisy, Broadway, Middle* 
town, O. 

Cunningham A Smith, 183 B. 94, N. Y. 

Curt In A Blossom, 91 Newell. Greenpolnt, Bklyn. 

Curtis, Palmer A Co., 2096 Nostrand, Brooklyn. 

Cnshman A Le Claire, Lady Blrda, B. R. 

Outtya, Musical, 3034 E. Baltimore, Baltimore. 

Cyril, Herbert, K. A P. 58th St., N. Y. 



Dacre, Louie, Parisian Belles, B. R. 
Dsgneau A Bruce, Orientals, B. R. 
Dagwell. Aurle. 21 E. 20. N. Y. 
Daley, James, Parisian Wldowa, B. R. 



D'Alvlnl. Rocky Point, R. I., lndef. 

Dale, Wm., Crystal, Elkhart. Ind., lndef. 

Daly A Devere, 115 E. 115, N. Y. 

Dale, Dotty Dainty. 252 W. 36th. N. Y. 

Dale, Sydney, Guy Broa.' Minstrels. 

Dale, Will, Bucklen Hotel, Elkhart. 

Dalley Bros., 1379 No. Main. Fall Rlvor, Ml 

Darling, Fay, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Darmody, Harry Bryant'a, B. R. 

Davenport, Bdna, Yankee Doodle Glrla, B. B. 

Davis, Edwards, Majestic, Johnstown, Pa. 

Davis, Floyd, Temple, Boulder, Col., lndef. 

Davla, Hal, A Co., Grayling, Mich. 

Davis, II., Air-Dome, Murphy sboro, 111., lndef. 

Davis, Roland, Fay Foster, B. R. 

Davla A Davla, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. R. 

Dawson A Whitfield, 346 E. 58, N. Y. 

Deaves, Harry, A Co., Bergen Beach. Brooklyn. 

De Camo, Chas. A Dog, 8 Union Sq., New York. 

Decry A Francis, 328 W. 80th, N. Y. 

Delavoye A Fritz, 2667 Madison, Chicago. 

Dell A Miller, Hippodrome, Buffalo, lndef. 

Dell A Fonda, 207 E. 14, N. Y. 

Meltons, Three, Jolly Grass Wldowa, B. R. 

Delmore, Misses, Novelty, Brooklyn. 

De Chautal Sisters, 263 Ogden, Jersey City. 

De Graff Sisters, Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

De Lisle, Mae, Colonial Belles, B. R. 

Delapbone, 54 Wlllougbby, Brooklyn. 

De Coe, Harry, Orpheum, Omaha. 

De Haven & Sidney, Poll's, Springfield. 

Demonlo A Bell, Pantages, Seattle. 

De Mont, Robert, Trio, Majestic, Houston. 

De Venn. Hubert, Majestic, Little Rock. 

DoMora A Graceta, Imperial, B. R. 

De Muths, The. 26 Central. Albany. 

De Velde A Zelda, Lady Birds, B. R. 

Do Voy A Miller, 209 B. 14. N. Y. 

De Witt, Burns & Torrance, Cook's, Rochester. 

De Witt, Young A Sister, Washington, Spokane. 

Doming Joe, Poll's, Worcester. 

Dervin, Jas. T., 516 So. Flower, Loa Angeloa. 

Diamond A May, Fischer's, Los Angeles, lndof. 

Diamond, Jas., Kentucky Belles, B. R. 

Dixon, Bowers A Dixon, 5626 Carpenter, Chicago. 

Doherty, Lillian. Moulin Rouge, Paris, France. 

Donald A Carson. Alhambra, N. Y. 

Doner. Joe A Nellie. High Jinks. B. R. 

Donnelly A Rotall, 3 Copeland, Boston. 

Donnette, Ira, 133 W. 45. N. Y. 

Doherty. Jim, High Jinks. B. R. 

Douglas, Chas. W., Brosdwsy Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Dove A Lee. 422 W. 48. N. Y. 

Dowlin, John, Toreadora, B. R. 

Downey, Leslie T., to Feb. 3, Electric. Baelae, 

Wis. 
Doyle, Phil., Lady Birds, B. R. 
Doyle, MaJ. Jas. D.. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Drawne, Frisco A Hambo, Casino, Buenos Aires, 

S. A. 
Dreano, Josh., Rerere Honse, Chicago. 
DuBois, The Great, Automatic, Alliance, O. 
Dudley, O. E., Crystal, Ind.. lndef. 
Duffy. Thos. H., High School Glrla. B. B. 
Dunedtn Troupe, H. A S., Dayton, 0. 
Dunne, Thos. P., 128 B. 19, N. Y. 
Dunham, Heslln A Barardl. Jolly Glrla, B. B. 
Duncan, A. ().. H. & S., Dayton, O. 
Dunn, James, Bijou, La Crosse, Wis. 
Dupree, Bob. Canvas, Provo. Utah, lndef. 
Dupree, George A Libby, 251 W. 87. N. Y. 
Dupree. Jeanotto, Hotel Albany, N. Y. 



Eckhoff A Gordon. 246 W. 26th. N. Y. 
Edmonds A Haley, 308 B. 60, Chicago. 
Edmonda A Monle. 308 B. 60, Chicago. 
Edwards, M. A C. B., Hippodrome, Buffalo, lndof. 
Edwarda, Jennie, Bowery Burlesquera, B. B. 
Edwards, Ralph, Parisian Widows, B. B. 
Edwards A Vaughn, 2039 N. Lawrence, Phlla. 
Ehrendall Bros.. 1344 Lefflngwell, St. Louis, 
wiser, Carrie, Tiger LUlleo, B. B. 
Elastic Trio, Majestic. Pittsburg, lndef. 
Kldredge, 59 No. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Blen, (ins, Edith Villa, Thurlelgh Ave., Balfcaaa. 

London. 
Eltlnge, Julian. 1014 E. 163, N. Y. 
■lllott A West. 2909 Ellsworth. Phlla. 
EUer, Goldle, Fay Foster, B. R. 
Ellinore Sister3, Proctor's. Albany. 
Elliott, Belalr A Elliott, Harry Bryant's, B. B. 
Ellsworth, 4, Tiger Lilies. B. R. 
Emery, Maude, 2110 B. Federal, Baltimore. 
Emerald Trio, 443 Central Ave., Brooklyn. 
Emerald, Monnle, 41 Holland rd., Brixton, S. W., 

Loudon. Eng. 
Emerson & Baldwin, Hotel Churchill. N. Y. 
Bmorson A Wright, Kansas City, Mo., lndof. 



USE THIS FORM IP YOU HAVE NO ROUTE CARDS 



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CARDS WILL BE MAILED UPON REQUEST 



VARIETY 



17 



UNPRECEDENTED HIT OF AN ALL-STAR BILL AT KEITH-PROCTOR'S FIFTH AVENUE THEATRE THIS WEEK. 

GEORGE WHITING - MELNOTTE TWINS 

IN THEIR SOMEWHAT DIFFERENT NOVELTY " ARTISTIC NONSENSE " 

OUR FEATURE SONG HIT, •• SO DID I. " ESPECIALLY WRITTEN FOR US BY FRANK ORTH. 

Under the Personal Direction of REICH & PLUNKETT 



Enimett, Grade, Chase's, Washington. 
Emperors of Music, Four, 431 W. 24, N. T. 
Empire Comedy Four, Jan. 1-31, Kounacbera, 

Vienna. 
Engleton, Nan ft Co., Empire, Dea Moines. 
Erb * Stanley, Molina, 111. 

Ergottl ft Kiuf, Circus Ciuiselli, Warsaw. Rossis. 
Esmeralda, 8 union Sq., N. Y. 
Espe, l)u t tor. & Eape, Sbeedy's. Fall River. 
Esmeralda Sisters, Scala, Copenhagen, Den. 
Isterbrooka, Tbe. Miss, N. Y., Jr., B. B. 
Eatella ft Wills, Jolly Grasa Widows, B. B. 
lug ena ft Mar, 1740 W. 103, Chicago. 
Evaua ft Lloyd, 208 Am. Bank Bldg., Seattle. 
Evans Trio, 24 Bulflncb, Boaton. 
Etsih, Billy, Colonial Bellea, B. B. 
Everett, Butb, Ideals, B. B. 
Everett, Sophie, ft Co., South and Henry, Jamaica, 

L. I. 

F 
Falrchllds, Mr. ft Mrs. Frank, O. H., Greenville, 

O. 
Falke ft Coe, Jolly Grass Widows, B. B. 
Falke, Elinor, Hopkins, Louisville. 
Fuutas, Two, 211 E. 14, N. Y. 
Farb, Dave, 610 W. 6, Cincinnati. 
Farrell, Charlie, 332 Main, W. Everett, Maas. 
Farrell, Billy, Moss ft Stoll, Eng. 
Favar's, Marguerite, Saratoga Hotel, Chicago. 
Fay, Bay F., Alamo, Cedar Rapids, la., lndaf. 
Fay, Coley ft Fay, 1553 Bway, N. Y. 
Felix & Barry, K. ft I*. 5th Avenue, N. Y. 
Fentelle & Carr, Keith's, Fhila. 
Ferguson, Dave, Miss N. Y., Jr., B. B. 
Ferguson ft Du Free, 313 B. 71, N. Y. 
Ferguson. Barney ft Dick, 68 W. 63. Bayonna. 
Ferrell Bros., travel, Orpheum, Minneapolis. 
Fern ft Mack, Paterson, N. J. 
Fiddler ft Sbelton, 2713 Dearborn, Chicago. 
Field Boys. 148 B. 97, N. Y. 
Fields ft Hanson, Waterloo. Waterloo, la. 
Fields ft Wooley, Parisian Widows, B. B. 
Fllson ft Errol. 122 So. Austin, Austin Station, 

Chicago. 
Fink, Henry, 160 Potomac, Chicago. 
Fisher, Mr. ft Mrs. Perkins, 631 Washington, 

Brookllne, Mass. 
Finlay ft Burke, Box 4103, Onset, Mass. 
Fisher, Robert, Lady Birds, B. B. 
Fisher ft Berg, Benti-Santley, B. B. 
Fltsgerald ft Qulnn, Trana-Atlantlce, B. B. 
Flatow ft Dunn, 205 E. 14, N. Y. 
Fleming, May Agnes, White's Gaiety Girls, B. B. 
Flemen ft Miller Kentucky Belles, B. B. 
Flora. Mildred, Night Owls. B. B. 
Flynn, Jas. A., 1213 Penn. Ave., Washington. 
Frank Fogerty, Orpheum, Allentown. 
Follett. Lonnle, Keith's, Fhila. 
Forber, Princess, Columbus, O. 
"Fords. Famous," 301 Gatea, Brooklyn. 
Foreman, Edgar, ft Co., Elks' Club, N. Y. 
Forrest, Edythe, Innocent Maids, B. B. 
Foster ft Dog, Trent. Trenton. 
Foster, Geo., Olympic, So. Bend. 
Forrester, Sidney, S\ ft C. Leavens worth. 
Fox, Will H., Empire, Leeds, Eng. 
Fox ft Hughes, Empire, Boise, Idaho, indef. 
Fox, Will. Lady Birds, B. R. 
Francis, Adeline, Olympic, Chicago. 
Frank, George, Lady Birds. B. R. 
Francis, Emma. & Arabs. Shea's, Toronto. 
Franklin & Green, Enston, Pa. 
Frana, Cogswell ft Frant, 246 W. 21, N. Y. 
Francis. Harry, Jolly Glrla, B. R. 
Frederic Bros. & Burns, Bennett's, Ottawa. 
Freligh, Lizzie. Trana-Atlantics, B. R. 
Frevoll. Frederick. G. O. H., Steubenvllle, 0. 
Frey ft Allen, Ideals, B. R. 
Fredo ft Dare, 207 E. 14, N. Y. 
Frederick. Snyder ft Poole. 200 N. Gay, Baltimore. 
French, Henri, Sherman House, Chicago. 
Frey Trio. Chicago Post, Chicago. 
Froato, Chris, 017 W. 6, Faribault, Minn. 
Fnklns ft Arakl Troupe, Main, Peoria. 
Fullerton ft Derry. Scenic, No. Tonawanda, N. Y. 
Futurity Winner. Shea's. Buffalo. 



Cabbert ft Garrett, Orpheum, Leavensworth. 

Galando, 82 Sumner, Brooklyn. 

Galettl's Monkeys, Majestic, Johnstown, Pa. * 

Gallagher ft Barrett, Orpheum, Ix>s Angeles.. 

Galloway, Albert B.. Orpbeum. Turtle CTeeto, Pa. 

Gardner, Eddie. Orpheum. Portsmouth, O. 

Garden ft Somera, Toreadors, B. R. 

Gardiner Children, 1058 No. 8. Philadelphia. 

Gardiner & Vincent, Empire. Bradford, Eng. 

Gardiner, Jack. K. ft P., Union So,.. N. Y. 

Gardner, Andy, Bohemians, B. R. 

Gardner, Arline, 105S N. 8, Fhila. 

Gartelle Broa., 416 S. Main, Gloveravllle, N. Y. 

Gath, Karl & Erma. Muskogee, O. 

Gavin, Piatt ft Peaches, 4417 3d Ave., N. Y. 

Gaylor ft Graff, 244 W. 16, N. Y. 

Gaylor, Bobby, 5108 Princeton, Chicago. 

Gehrue, Mayme. & Co., K. ft P.. 58th St., N. Y. 

Geiger ft Walters, Orpheum. 'Frisco. 

Genaro-Theol Trio, Jan. 1-31, Appolo, Chemnitz, 

Ger. 
Gennero's Band. Poll's. Waterbnry. 
Gertrella. K. ft P.. 125th St.. N. Y. 
Gibson, Fay, Standard, Davenport, la., Indef. 
Glll»ort, Jane, Toronto, Can. 
Gillette Sisters, Bijou, Winnipeg. 



Gilmore. Stella, Jolly Glrla, B. B. 

Gilroy, Hayes ft Montgomery, Coliseum, Seattle. 

Gladstone, Ida, 335 W. 50. N. Y. 

G locker, Chaa. ft Anna, Kent* San t ley, B. B. 

Godfrey & Henderson, Majestic, Denver. 

Goetx. Nat., 1818 Tree, Donora, Ps. 

Golden ft Hughes, Bijou, Superior, Wis. 

Goldsmith ft Iloppe, Bennett's, London. 

Geforth ft Doyle, Majestic, Houston. 

Gordon ft Cbalor, 144 W. 26, N. Y. 

Gordon ft Marx. 230 W. 38, N. Y. 

Gordon, Amy, Rose Sydell, B. B. 

Gordon, Cliff, 8 E. 106, N. Y. 

Gordon, Max, Reeves' Beauty Show, B. B. 

Gorman ft West, 52 E. 88, N. Y. 

Goss, John, Wetland, Morganstown, W. la. 

Gossans, Bobby, 400 So. Smith, Col., O. . 

Gotham Comedy Quartet, City Sports, B. B. 

Gracea, Two, Miner's Americana, B. R. 

Grant, Anna, Pat White's Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Grant, Sydney, 10 W. 65, N. Y. 

Graham, Geo. W., Scenic, Providence, Indef. 

Gray ft Graham, 34 Bullett, Roanoke, Va. 

Green. Sam, White'a Gaiety Girls, B. B. 

Gregg, Frank, Tiger Lilies, B. B. 

Gregory, Geo. L., ft Co., 043 Lorimer, Brooklyn. 

Gregorya. Five, Lleblcha, Breslau, Ger. 

Grlmea, Tom ft Gertie, 1616 No. Front, Phils. 

Gruet, Jack, Al. Marie Ideals, B. B. 



Hall, Alfred. Rolllckers, B. B. 
Hall, Geo. F., 180 Center, Boaton. 
Haley, Harry R., 236 Ogden, Chicago. 
Halperln. Nan, Bijou. Lorain, O. 
Hammond ft Forrester, 101 W. 88. N. Y. 
Haney. Edith, ft Lee, Jr.. 4118 Winona, Denver. 
Hanson ft Nelson, 502 10th St., Brooklyn. 
Hanson & Drew, Bijou, Lansing, Mich. 
Harris ft Randall, Palace Hotel, Chicago. 
Harcourt, Frank, 44 Pleasant, Worceater. 
Harmonious Trio, Bijou, Winnipeg. 
Hart, Fred, 303 8th Ave., N. Y. 
Hart, J. C. ft Co.. Tiger Lilies, B. R. 
Hayea ft Carew, Bohemians, B. B. 
Hart, Sadie, 1163 Jackson, N. Y. 
Hart, Willie ft Edith. 1018 S. 11, Philadelphia. 
Harland ft Rollison, Cirque Medram, Paris. 
Harlowe, Beatrice, High Jinks, B. B. 



nolmao, Al ft Mamie, Olympic, Kleff, Russia. 
Holmes, Gertrude Bennett, 13 Central, Greendals, 

Maaa. 
Holmes ft Holmes, Unique, Los Angeles. 
Holman, Harry, Majestic, Dallas. 
Holt. Alf.. Moss Stoll Tour, England, Indef. 
Hoover, Lillian. 252 James, Syracuse. 
Horton ft La Triska, Grand Victoria, B. C. 
Houston, Frits, 202 King, London, Ont., Can. 
Howard Bros., 220 W. 88, N. Y. 
Howard ft Cameron. 470 No. Clinton, Rochester. 
Howard ft Esher, Waterloo, la. 
Howan ft Kearney, Orientals. B. R. 
Howard & Howard. Shea's, Buffalo. 
Howard ft St. Clair, Charing Croaa rd., London. 
Howard, Ed, 50 Madison. N. Y. 
Howard, Harry ft Mae, 155 So. Halated, Chicago. 
Howard, Jos. B.. Aleda, 111., indef. 
Howard, May, 3003 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 
Howard's Ponies ft Dogs, Bloomlngton, Ind. 
Hoyden ft Hogdn, Crystal, Frankfort, Ind. 
Hoyle, William, 16 5, Attleboro, Maas. 
Hoyt, Frances, ft Co., Sherman House, Chicago. 
Huehn, Musical, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Huegel Bros., 2417 French. Brie, Pa. 
Hughes, Florence, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
Hueated, Sadie, Yankee Doodle Glrla, B. B. 
Hurleys. The, 185% So. Orange, Newark. 
Hyde, Walt. M.. ft Co., 3506 6, Pittsburg. 
Hyde, Mr. ft Mrs. Robert, Camp Bast, Cbemo 

Lake, Clifton. Me.. Indef. 
Hymer ft Kent, Hathaway's, New Bedford. 



Imbof ft Corlnne, Empire, B. R. 

Imperial Musical Four. 148 Dearborn, Chicago. 

Inman, The Great, 812 W. 24, N. Y. 

Irwin, Jack, Casino, Allegheny, Pa. 

Italia, 356 Maaa. Ave., Boston. 



Jack Lew ft Bro., 9240 So. Chicago, So. Chicago. 
Jackson Family, Moss ft Stoll Tour. 
Jackson, Harry ft Kate, Jersey City, N. J. 
Jacobs ft West, Sam Devere, B. B. 
James, Byron, Bijou, Flint, Mich., Indef. 
Jenkins ft Clark, Box 205, Appleton, Wla. 
Jennings ft Jewell, Knickerbockers, B. B. 
Jennings ft Renfrew, 338 Spruce, Chelsea, Maaa. 



Kooper, Harry J., High Jinks, B. B. 
Kohler & Marlon, O. H., Owego, N. Y. 
Kokin, Mignonette, Majestic, Johnstown, Pn. 
Kokin. Prince, 400 Concord, Chester, Pa. 
Kolfage, Duke, Crystal. Elwood, Ind., lndaf. 
Koppe, 215 E. 86, N. Y. 
Kratons, The, Bennett's, Ottawa. 
Kretore, 110 Wash, Altoona. 
Kurtls Busse. 6 W. 8. Erie, Pa. 
Kyle, Ingram, Allegheny, Pa. 



I 



POSTER PHOTOS 

BEAUTIFUL OVAL, SQUARE, OR VIGNETTED WITH COLORED BACKGROUNDS ARTISTICALLY 

ENGRAVED— V4-»/4-l-8-8 SHEETS AND LARGER. 
SOMETHING NEW, THE KIND YOU HAVE ALWAYS WANTED. ALL SHADES, STYLES AND 

COLORS. SAMPLES FREE. PRICES RIGHT. 
THE CLARENCE E. RUNEY POSTER PRINTING CO., CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Harris, Sam, Automatic, Alliance, O. 

Harrlty & Herr. 123 Church. Lancaster, Pa. 

Harson, Jules, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. B. 

Harrington, Hilda, Rose Sydell, B. R. 

Harris, Bobby, Toreadors, B. R. 

Harris, Charley, Harry Bryant's, B. B. 

Harrison, Minnie, Brigadier, B. R. 

Harvey & Adams, Tallabasee, Fla. 

Harvey ft De Vora, Rialto Rounders, B. B. 

Harvey, Elsie, 138 E. 14, N. Y. 

Harvey, Harry, 3110 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago. 

Haskell, Loney, Orpheum. Minneapolis. 

Hayes ft Haley. 147 W. 127, N. Y. 

Hayes, Edmund, Jolly Glrla, B. R. 

Haynes, Beatrice, Broadway Gaiety Glrla, B. B. 

Hayea ft Wynu, 530 Bergen, Newark. 

Healy ft Vance, 215 W. 106. N. Y. 

Hearn, Tom, Pantomime, Liverpool, Eng. 

Heath. Thomas G., Majestic, Chicago. 

Heclow, Charles ft Marie, 452 N. High, Chilli 

eothe, O. 
Helm Children, Majestic, Birmingham. 
Hallbacks, Tbe, 2010 Armour. Chicago. 
Hellman, Benj., Toreadors, B. R. 
Heath ft Emerson, 200 Berriman, Brooklyn. 
Henly ft Elliott, 4025 Cypress, Pittsburg. 
Heuraan Trio, 155 So. Cbannlng, Elgin, HI. 
Henry ft Francis, Jolly Grass Widows, B. B. 
Henry ft Young, 270 W. 39. N. Y. 
Herbert. Mabel, 404 Main, Worborn, Mo. 
Herrmann, Adelaide, Gilsey House, N. Y. 
Ilerron. Bertie, Orpheum, Boston. 
Herrmann the Great, Orpheum, New Orleans. 
Hertzman, Julia, Imperials. B. R. 
Hess Sisters. 258 W. 55. N. Y. 
Hewlettes, The, Frits, Portland, Ore., Indef. 
Hlbbert & Warren. Orpheum, Reading. 
Hickman Bros. & Co.. Lyrl<\ E, Liverpool, O. 
Hickman, George, Grasa Widows, B. R. 
Hleatand, Chas. F., 2030 Iowa Ave , St. Loula. 
mil, Cherry ft Hill, Gay Morning Glories, B. R. 
Hill. Edmons Trio, 202 Nellson. New Brunswick. 
Hllllard, Robert, Maryland, Baltimore. 
Hiltons, Marvelous, Fay Foster. B. R. 
milyers, Three. 702 Bsy 2."», Bensonhurst. 
Hlnes ft Remington, Harrison. N. Y. 
Hlrsh. Fstelle. Bijou. Muskegon, Mich. 
Hobelman. Martha, Harry Bryant's, B. B. 
Hoch. Kmil, ft Co.. Lowell, Mass. 
Hoffmans. Cycling. Lyric, Cleveland. 
Holdsworths. The. Majestic, Houston. 
Holman Bros., Circo Bell, Mex'co City, Mex. 



Jennings. William, White's Gaiety Glrla, B. B. 

Jerome, Nat. S., 1287 Washington, N. Y. 

Jess. John W., Lid Lifters. B. R. 

Johnson. Cheater, 333 3d Ave., N. Y. 

Johnson, Mark, Bijou, Muakegon, Mich. 

Johnson Bros, ft Johnson, Grand, Reynoldsvllle, 

Pa. 
Johnson, Geo., Scrlbner'a Big Show, B. B. 
Johnson, Jess P., 022 So. 4, Camden, N. J. 
Johnsons, Musical, Albambra, London, Eng. 
Johnston ft Buckley, Empire, B. R. 
Jones ft Sutton. 102 W. 17, N. Y. 
Jones & Walton, Oarrick, Burlington, la. 
Jorden, Tom, Lady Blrda, B. R. 
Joyces, The, Scenic Temple, Wulthaui, Mass. 



Kallnowskl Bros., Trans-Atlantlcs, B. R. 

Kaufman Bros., National, San Francisco, Indef. 

Kalmo, Chas. ft Ada, Maywood, N. J. 

Kccgan ft Mack, 1663 Broadway, N. Y. 

Kelfe. Zena, 608 W. 135, N. Y. 

Keelcy Bros.. Orpheum, Allentown. 

Keene, Juggling, 1360 Boston Rd.. N. Y. 

Kelly, Sum & Ida, Unique, Fau Claire. 

Kelly, John T., Elmhurst, L. L 

Kelly ft Rose, 40 W. 28, N. Y. , 

Kelly, M. J., 46 Johnson, Brooklyn. 

Kelly. Walter C, Portland. Ore. 

Kelly ft Massey, Family, Lebanon. Pa. 

Kemp's Tales of the Wild, Keith's, Providence. 

Keller. Major, Poll's, Wnterbury, indef. 

Kennedy Bros, ft Mac, 32 Second, Dover, N. H. 

Kennedy ft Wilkens. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Keno & D'Arvllle, 27, Orpheum. Oakland. 

Keno, Walsh ft Melrose, Shea's. Buffalo. 

Kenton, Dorothy, G. O. II., Indiana pedis. 

Keogb ft Francis, Majestic, Ft. Worth. 

Kherns, Arthur H., 6 Wisconsin, Chicago. 

Klein, Ott Bros, ft Nicholson, It) W. 30, Bayonne 

Kimball ft Donovan. Family. Klmlm. 

Kingsbury, The. Phillips, Richmond, Ind. 

King, Sam. ft Nellie. 2374 Fit kin, Brooklyn. 

Klnh-Ners, 343 N. Clark, Chicago. . 

Klnsons, The, 21 K. 20, N. Y. 

Kiralfo, Gns, 1710 Third Ave.. N. Y. 

Klrsehhorns. 207 So. 13, Omaha. 

Knight, Francis, Keith's, providence. 

Knight ft Seaton. 1800 Morgan. Sprlng6eld. O. 

Knight Bros, ft Sawtelle, 1710 Cornelia, Chicago. 

Knowles. Harry, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Knox, W. H.i Elyalan Grove, Tucaon, Arls. 






* I 

La Centra ft La Rue, Family, Olean, N. Y. 
I-a Dells, Four, Decatur, Ind. 
I<a Crandall ft Carlta. 27 Puebla, Mexico. 
La Fleur, Joe, Orpbeum, New Orleans. 
La Nole Bros., 212 E. 14. N. Y. 
Lu Toska. Phil. Bijou. Bay Citv, Mich. 
Lakola, Harry, Box 76, Fernando. Cal. 
Lampe Bros., Villa Rosa, Almecon, N. J. 
Lamb ft King. 363 State, Chicago. 
Lamb's Manikins, 466 Pippin, Portland, Or*. 
Larklns ft Burns, Luna Pk., Mexico City, Mex. 
Lawler ft Daughters, 100 W. 105, N. Y. 
La Maze Bros., Novelty, Brooklyn. 
La Raab ft Scottle, Gem, Monongahela, Pa. 
La Mont's Cockatoos, 254 E. Ontario, Chicago. 
Laredo ft Blake, 826 E. 14, N. Y. 
La Marcbe. Frankle. 436 B. 26, Chicago. 
La Toy Broa., Parisian Wldowa, B. B. 
La Vsn ft La Valette, Majestic. Pittsburg, Indef. 
Larrlvee ft Lee, Music Hall, Independence, Mo. 
La Veen ft Cross. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
La Veils ft Grant. 226 B. 14, N. Y. 
Lavette ft Doyle. 840 N. 2, Hamilton, O. 
La Vine Clmaron Trio. K. ft P., 58th St., N. Y. 
Lavlne ft Leonard, Empire, London, Eng., Indef. 
Lavlne ft Hurd, New Century Maida, B. B. 
Langdona, The, 704 6th Ave., Milwaukee. 
Lauder, Harry, Court, Liverpool, Eng. 
Lawrence, Pete, Al Beeves' Big Show, B. B. 
La Gray, Dollle, Bijou, Baclne, Wla., Indef. 
Lawrence. Bert, 8 Laurel, Roxbury, Mass. 
Lee Tung Foo, 1223 2d, B. Oakland. 
Le Clair ft West. Star, Carnegie, Pa. 
Le Claira. Two, 403 W. 61, N. Y. 
Le Pelletlera, 144 B. Elisabeth, Detroit. 
Leahy, Frank W., Manhattan. Norfolk, Vs., Indef. 
Leeda, Adelaide, Parlaian Widows, B. B. 
Le Brun Grand Opera Trio, Colonial, Norfolk, V». 
Le Dent, Champagne Girls, B. R. 
La Fevre ft St. John, Majestic, St. Paul. 
Le Malre ft Le Malre, 673 Lenox, N. Y. 
Leigh, Andrew, Lady Blrda, B. B. 
Udghtona, Three, Columbia, St. Louis. 
Leonl ft Leonl. 10 B. Seventh, Cincinnati. 
Leonard, Jamea F., Yankee Doodle Girls, B. B. 
Leonard. Jos. and Sadie, Orpheum, Memphis. 
Leonard, Gua, Acme, Sacramento, Indef. 
Leontlna. Marie, 17 E. 07. N. Y. 
Leonore ft St. Claire, 4048 Baaton, St. Louis. 
LeRoy ft Woodford, 2417 Wylle Ave., Flttabnrg. 
Leslie, Bert, ft Co., Orpheum, Kansas City. 
Leslie ft Williams. Phillips', Richmond, ind. 
Lester. Will, 281 John R.. Detroit. 
Ltvlno, Doiph ft Susie, People's, Cedar Raplda. 
Levy, I'.ert, Maryland, Baltimore. 
Levy, Mra. Jules, and Family, 102 W. 08, N. Y. 
Lewia ft Harr, 125 W. 16, N. Y. 
I^wls, Phil, 121 W. 110. N. Y. 
I/ewia, Oscar, White'a Gaiety Girls, B. B. 
I^ewls ft Thompson, Merry Msldena, B. B, 
Le Witt ft Aabmore. 200 No. State, Chlcage. 
LIbbey ft Trayer. 802 W. 47, N. Y. 
Llna A Calljul, Fay Foater, B. B. 
Linn, Benn, Half Dime. Jeraey City, N. J., indef. 
I»der, Chas. A.. Rose Lawn. Areola, Pa. 
Lomison, Wllllard, 228 Montgomery, Jersey City. 
Ixtng. John, Family, Erie, Pa., Indef. 
l/oulse and Dottle. Bowery Burleaquera, B. ■>. 
Lovltta, The, 314 Beverly rd., Brooklyn. 
Lowe, Musical, Unique, Minneapolis. 
Lucas, Jlminle, G. O. 1L, Pittsburg. 
Luckle ft Yoast, 380 Sumpter, Brooklyn. 
Luce & Luce, Dainty Duchess, B. R. 
Lucler. Marguerite, Quincy Adsms Sawyer 0*. 
Lucy ft Lucter, Olympic, Chicago. 
Lulgl I'lcaro Trio, Empire, Reno, Xev. 
Lutz Bros., 213 Grant, Corona, N. Y. 
Lukens, 4, Reading, Pa. 

Lynton, Chris, Empire, Ix>s Angeles, indef. 
Ljrons, Jr., Chsmpagne Girls, B. R. 

M | 

Macarte'a Monkeys. Fhila.. Pn. 
Msearte Sisters, k. ft P., Jersey City. 
MaeAuiev. Me/, Columbia, Cincinnati. 
Mack, Wilbur, Bumctl's, Montreal. „, 

Mucks. Two, 245 \V. 50, W. I'hlla. ,. 

Maek ft Dugal, 7609 Dretel, Chicago. 
Mack, James. Wesley, Rose Sydell. B. B. 
Madcaps, Winkler's, K. ft V. 6th Ave., N. Y. 
MacDonsugb, Ethel, oh W. 107, N. Y. 
Magutre, II. S., North Adams, Mass. 
"Madle." 403 W. 61. N. Y. 
Mshr, Agnes, Keith's, Columbus, O. 
Makarenkos Duo, 300 E. 5, N. Y. 
Malcbow, Geo., Rljou, Oshkosb, Wla., indef. 
Malvern Troupe, White's Gaiety Girls, B. B. 
Manbasset Comedy Four, Rose Sydell, B. B. 
Mauley ft Norrls, 617 Walnut, Hamilton, O. 
MantelK Marionette, Family. Helena, Mont. 
Marshlnl Lulgl, Bijou, Baclne, 
Mardo Trio. Wash. Society Girls, B. R. 
Mario Trio, Circo Fubilloues, Mex., Ilex. 



18 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




AND \A/MI 




POSITIVELY THE 



DANCING ACT IN VAUDEVILLE 



SIX AMERICAN DANCERS 

A SEXTETTE OF STYLISH STEPPERS 
THIS WEEK, COLONIAL. NEW YORK CITY NEXT WEEK (Jan. 2Q), ORPHEUM, BROOKLYN 

ORIGINAL 
JONGLEUR 
PANTOMIME 

Management LYKENS & LEVY, Mo W. 42nd St., New York. 





LATEST EUROPEAN NOVELTY. 



Marion A Pearl, Clifton Hotel, Clifton, N. J. 
Marks, Clarence, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. B. 
Marlon * Lillian. Tiger Lillles, B. B. 
Marlowe, Plunkett A Co., 27 Gaylord, Dorchester, 



Msrab, Joe, 3122 Lucas, St. Louis. 

Martin, DaTe A Percle, Lyric, Alton, 111. 

Martlnettl & SylTSSter, 2001 North Carlisle, Phlla. 

Martynne, C. B., Orpheum, LeaTenworth, lndef. 

Martynne. Great, Boas Sydell, B. B. 

Martin A Crouch, Coeur D'Alene, Spokane, lndef. 

Marshall A Klnf, BenU -Santley, B. B. 

Martini * Maximilian, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. B. 

Marty, Joe, 1628 Hancock, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Mason A Fllburn, Coeur D'Alene, Spokane, lndef. 

Mason A Keeler, Lyric. Dsyton. 

Mssse. Bd A Nettle, Portland. Pa. 

Mathews, Joes, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. B. 

Maxwell A Dudley, 106 W. 06th, N. Y. 

May, Arthur O., P. O. Box 023, Norman. Okla. 

Mayer, Bobert. High Jinks, B. B. 

Msyne. Bllsabeth, Harry Bryant's. B. B. 

Melville A Azelle, Yale, Kansas City. 

MeCabe, Jack. Century Girls, B. B. 

McCsbe A Peters, Asbland Hotel, Kansas City. 

McCale. Larry. Imperials, B. B. 

McCarthy, Myles, Union Hotel. Chicago. 

McCarvers. The, 218 W. 28, N. Y. 

McCree. Jonle, La Salle, Chicago, lndef. 

McCullough, Walter. Alexander Hotel. Chicago. 

McCune A Grant, 8 Banton, Pittsburg, Pa. 

McFarland, Frank, 811 W. 142. N. Y. 

McParland A McDonald, Colonial Belles, B. B. 

McGinnls Bros., 70 Brsdford, Springfield, Mass. 

McGrath A Paige, 08 Wash, Mlddletown, Conn. 

McGregor, Lulu, Grand, Altoona, Pa., lndef. 

McLaughlin, L. Clair, SheridanTlUe, Pa. 

McLeod. Andy, Kentucky Belles, B. K. 

McMahon'a Watermelon Girls, Orpheum, Lawrence, 

McKlnley. Nell, Jersey Lilies. B. B. 

McWilllams, G. It.. Majestic, Chicago. 

Meaney, Lottie, A Co., Bijou, Superior, Wis. 

Melville A Higglns, 272 So. 2d. Brooklyn. 

Melvin Bros., Kentucky Belles. B. B. 

Melroy Trio. Elite, Mollne, 111. 

Merrltt, Raymond. Empire. Los Angeles, lndef. 

Mlddleton, Gladya. Fischer's, Loa Angeles, lndef. 

Middleton, Minnie. 120 Bay 17th. Bath Besch. 

Mlgnon, Helene, Empire, St. Paul, lndef . 

Mills, Joe. Sollickers, B. B. 

Mills. Win., 20th Century Maids, B. B. 

Millard, Frank, Lady Birds, B. K. 

Millard Bros., Crackerjacks. B. B. 

Millerablp Slstera, Watson's. B. B. 

Miller, Elisabeth, 1726 W. 31 PL. Cleveland. 

Miller, Grace, Phillips'. Bichmond, Ind., lndef. 

Mills A Lewis. 114 E. 11, N. Y. 

Mills A Morris, Clarendon Hotel, N. Y. 

Mitchell A Cain, 611 Sterling Pi., Brooklyn. 

Mitchell Slaters, Monarch. Lawton, Okla., lndef. 

Mitchell A Quinn. 20 Bay 26. Bensonhurst. L. I. 

Mitchells, The, Elmirs, N. Y. 

Monroe, George. 1003 Broadway, N. Y. 

Montambo A Hurl Falls, Empire, B. B. 

Montrose, Louise, 450 So. 1st Ave., Mt. Vernon. 

Montague's Cockatoos, Flying Jordans Co. 

Montgomery, Geo. P., Lyric, Hot Springs, lndef 

Montgomery A Moore, Orpheum, Allentown. 

Montray, 814 Western Ave., Allegheny, Pa. 

Morette Sisters. 1287 Lee. Philadelphia. 

Moon. Eddie, Majestic. Houston. 

Morris A Hemingway, Majestic, Dallas. 

Mooney A Holbein, Hippodrome, Brighton, Eag. 

Moore A Dillon, Fay Fester, B. B. 

Moore. Tom, Poll's, Bridgeport. 

Moorehead. Harry (Dreamland), Norfolk, Va. 

Morgan A Chester, Vanity Fair, B. B. 

Morgan, Loa, Parisian Belles, B. B. 

Morgan A McOarry, 48 Wyckoff. Brooklyn. 

Moire. Chas., Lady Birds, B. B. 

Morre. Helen J., Night Owls, B. B. 

Morrelle, Marie. 1807 tt Main, Parsons. Kaa. 

Morris A Krsmsr, Dainty Dnchees, B. B. 

Morse, Billy, Anhenser's, Aberdeen, Wash*, ledef. 

Morse-Bon, Touring South America. 

Morton, James J.. 147 W. 40, N. T. 

Morton. Bd.. Sollickers. B. B. 

Mozarts, Fred A Era, Bijou. La Crosse. 

Muehlners, The, Howard, Huntington. O. 

Mullen A Correlli. Orpheum, Oakland. 

Mueller A Mueller. Columbia, Cincinnati. 

Muller, Chum A Muller. Bijou. Marinette. Wla. 

Mnlllnl Sisters, Washington Society Girls, B. B. 

Monger, Mort M., Frsnkfort, Ind. 

Murphy A Andrews. 116 Washington pi., N. T. 

Murphy A Mages, Ideals. B. B. 

Murphy A Palmer. 800 8d eve., N. Y. 

Murphy A Wlllard. 600 No. 7th. Philadelphia. 

Murphy. Geo. P., Tiger Lilies. B. B. 



Murray, Elizabeth M.. Columbia, Cincinnati. 

Murray Sisters, Trent, Trenton. 

Murray, Wm. W.. 223 E. 14, N. Y. 

Murray A Williams, Crystal, Anderson, Ind. 

Murtha. Lillian, 211 E. 10. N. Y. 

Muaketeers, Three, Jolly Grass Widows, B. B. 



Nagel A Adams, Calgary, Alberta, Can. 

Narelle, Marie, Chris tcburch. New Zealand, lndef. 

Natua, Julie, Tiger Lilies. B. B. 

Nawn, Tom. A Co.. 420 W. 52. Phlla. 

Neff. John. 136 Main, Bridgeport. 

Nellls, Neill A Chapman. 1652 B. Main. Bocheater. 

Nelson Farnum Troupe, 8141 Beverly rd., Brooklyn. 

Nelson, Kstherlne, 10 How land. Box bury, Mass. 

Nelson A Egbert, 488 Atlantic. Pittsburg. 

Nevada A Eden, Lyric, Dubois, la. 

Newell, Jlmmle, Union St., Knoxville. 

Newell Sisters. Jolly Girls, B. B. 

Newell A Nlblo. Empire, Shoredltch, London, Eng. 

Newmsn, Jules, Lady Birds, B. B. 

Niemeyer A Odell. Bine Blbbon Girls, B. B. 

Nichols A Hogsn, 1044 Broad wsy, Brooklyn. 

Nlcolal. Ids, Bohemians, B. B. 

Night On a House Boat. Maryland, Baltimore. 

Night With the Poets, Majestic, Chicago. 

Noble, Billy, 20th Century Maids, B. B. 

Noblette A Marshall, Majestic, Topeka. 

Nolan, Fred, Boston Belles, B. B. 

Normsn's, Juggling Six, 0804 Mansfield, Chicago. 

North. Bobby, 40 W. 116th, N. Y. 

Nosses, The. 170 W. 47th. N. Y. 

Nowlln A Roth, Waterloo, Waterloo, la. 

Nugent, Eddie, Trana-Atlantlca, B. B. 

Nugent, J. C. The Oaks, Canal Dover, «v 



O'Brien-Havel, 616 02, Brooklyn. 
Odell A Hart, 2063 Strand, Seattle. 
Odell A Kinley, 127 W. 21, N. Y. 
Ogden, Helen, 270 Cly bourne, Chicago. 
Olivette, 220 Pacific, Brooklyn. 
Omega, Ollle, Parisian Widowa, B. B. 
"Onetta," Park Hotel, Port Cheater, N. Y. 
Onthank A Blanchetto, P. 0., Boston. Mass. 
O'Neill, J. H.. A Co.. Orpheum, Mansfield, Pa. 
O'Nell. Tommle, Whlte'a Gaiety Girls. B. B, 
Orbasany's Irma. Majestic, Ft. Worth. 
Ollfans, Three. Gaiety, Galesburg, 111. 
Oliver, Clarence, Columbia, Cincinnati. 
0' Began, Box 300, Ottawa, Can. 
Orloff, Olga, Toreadors, B. B. 
O'Bouke A Marie, Merry Makers, B. B. 
Otto Bros., 10 I lowland, Roxbury, Mass. 

P 

Palmer A Dockman, Lyric, So. McAllister, Tex. 

Palmer A Saxton, 110 E. 14, N. Y. 

Palfrey A Hoeffler, Jan. 27, Gaiety, Phlla. 

Paradise Alley, Proctor's, Jersey City. 

Parisian Grand Opera Co., 636 Lexington, N. Y. 

Parka, Dick. 1268 E. 20, Loa Angeles. 

Patton, Grace. Sollickers, B. S. 

Paullnettl A Plquo. 242 Franklin. Phlla. 

Pendletons, The, 133 Pittsburg. New Castle. 

Pero A Wilson, 830 Temple, Washington. O. 

Pesrl, Ksthryn, Sollickers, B. S. 

Pearl. Violet. Sollickers. B. B. 

Pelot, Fred A Annie, 161 Westminster, Atlantic 
City. 

Pepper Twins, Lindsay, Ont.. Csn. 

Perkins, David F., A Co., 222 Eastern Promenade. 
Portland, Me. 

Perry A White, Mlsa N. Y., Jr.. B. B. 

Perry, Frank L., 747 Buchanan, Minneapolis. 

Perry. Clayton, Ideals. B. S. 

Petchlng Bros., Orpheum, Kansas City. 

Peters, Phil A Nettle, Bennett's. Montreal. 

Phtlbrooka A Beynolda, 220 E. 78. N. Y. 

Phillips Sisters, Majesties. B. B. 

Plercy A Fulda. 1026 Patterson. Baltimore. 

Plks, Lester, Falrhaven, N. J. 

Plottla. The, Family, Seattle. 

Plum, Anna, Orpheum, Portland, Ore. 

Polrer'a Three, 12 Notre Dame, De Lourdes, Mon- 
treal. 

Pollard, Jeanne, World Beaters. B. B. 

"Polly Pickles' Pets In Petland," Cook's, Roches- 
ter. 

Posner, Allan H., 486 Central Park W., N. Y. 

Potter A Harris, Family, Chester, Pa. 

Potter A Hsrtwell, Champagne Girls, B. B. 

Powers Bros., 10 Trask, Providence. 

Power. Coletta A Co., travel. Lyric, Lincoln. 

Powers, Eddie. 26 Grand. Butte. 

Prampin Trio. 847 W. 40. N. Y. 

Price, Bob. Natlonoscope. Montreal. 

Price. John R.. A Co.. 211 E. 14. New York. 

Prltskow, Louis, Century Girls. B. B. 



Prosit Trio, E. Msln, Springfield, O. 
Pryors, The, 30 No. Msln, Providence. 
Psycho, Mile., Mansfield, O., lndef. 
Pudgle A Emmett, 464 Blewett, Seattle. 
Puiien. Louella, 104 Jefferson. Trenton. 
Pullman Porter Maids, Keith's, Providence. 



Quaker City Quartet, 408 Macon. Brooklyn. 

Quartette, The, Columbia, Cincinnati. 

Quigg A Mack, 113 E. 14, N. Y. 

Qulgg, Mackey A Nlckerson, Fenberg Stock Co. 

(Eaatern). 
Quinn A Mitchell, 20 Bay 26, Bensonhurst. L. I. 



Bedford A Valentine. Oxford. London, to Feb. 10. 

Radio's Monkeys, K. A P.. 08tb St., N. Y. 

Rain Dears. Columbia, St. Loula. 

Rainbow Sisters, Orpheum. Turtle Creek, Pa. 

Raleigh & Harrington, 233 Winter, Hageratown, 
Md. 

Ralston A Son. Orpheum, Lima, O. 

Rastua A Bunks, Palace, Cardiff, Wales. 

Ranfs, The, Bijou, Duluth. 

Rankin, Virginia. Orpheum, Urbans, O. 

Rawls A Von Kaufman, Vaudeville, Waterloo, la. 

Rawson A June, Phoenicia, N. Y. 

Raymond, Ruby, Keith's, Camden. 

Raymond A Harper. 6406 Lexington, Cleveland. 

Raynos', Al.. Bull Dogs, O. H., Honesdale, Pa. 

Razarfs, The, 4003 No. 20, Phlla. 

Ray, Fred, A Co., Olympic, Chicago. 

Baymond, Fredericks, 16 E. 88th, N. Y. 

Raynor, Val, Trana-Atlantlca, B. B. 

Reattlno A Stevens. 114 E. 11, N. Y. 

Beded A Hadley, World Beaters. B. B. 

Bed Saven Cadets, Chicago, 111. 

Bedford A Winchester, Shubert, Ctlca. 

Reed Bros., 48 Saxton, Dorchester, Mass. 

Reed A St. John, 454 Manbsttan, N. Y. 

Regal Trio, 116 W. Washington pi., N. Y. 

Reld Slaters. 08 Brosd, Elizabeth. 

Reed A Earl. Chute's Park, Los Angeles. 

Rego, Jlmmle. Family, Pittsburg. 

Reid, Berry, Lillian. A Co., 272 E. 35. Chicago. 

Reed, Harry !-., Washington. Buffalo, lndef. 

Reeves, Al, Reeves' Beauty Show. B. B. 

Semington. Mayme, Orpheum. Minneapolis. 

Renards. Three, Lyric, Terre Haute. 

Rennee Family, Lyric, Lincoln, Neb. 

Reno, Geo. B., A Co., Empire, Birmingham, Lon- 
don. 

Benshaw, Bert, Majestic, La Salle. 111., lndef. 

Reuzetta A Lyman, Trocadero, B. R. 

Rever A Yulr. Champagne Girla. B. B. 

Reynard, Ed F., G. O. H., Syracuse. 



Reynolds, Abe, Mias N. Y., Jr., B. B. 

Rhodes A Engel, Lincoln Sq., N. Y. 

Rice, Al, 262 Springfield, Newark. 

Rice A Cohen, Orpheum, Oakland. 

Rice, Fanny, 27. K. A P. 125th St., N. Y. 

Bice, True, 1223 State, Milwaukee. 

Rice A Elmer. 848 B. 142d. N. Y. 

Rice A Prevost, Trent, Trenton. 

Rice A Walters, Boston Belles. B. B. 

Richards, Chris, Valentine. Toledo. 

Rich Duo. 164 E. Randolph, Chicago. 

Bleb. Jack A Bertha, National, San Francisco. 

Richards, The Great, Moxart's, Braddock, Pa. 

Riley, Frank. Orientala, B. R. 

Richards A Grover, Majestic, La Salle. 

Ring A Williams, 102 Liberty. Baltimore. 

Bitter A Footer, Alhambra, Paris. France. 

Boberta, Four, Bijou, Muskegon, Mich. 

Roattlno A Stevens, Keeney's, New Britain. 

Boberta, Hayea A Roberts, Cedar Manor, Ja- 
malca, N. Y. 

Roberts, Signa, Mercedes, Cal. 

Robert-de-Mont Trio, 722 W. 14th PL, Grand 
Rapids. 

Robiscb A Childress. Bijou. Battle Creek. 

Robinson A Grant. 206 8th eve.. N. Y. 

Robinson, Tom. Scribner's Big Show, B. R. 

Rockaway A Conway, Olympic, Chicago. 

lingers A Mackintosh, Temple. Ft. Wayne. 

Romola, Bob, HI Jon. Davenport, la., lndef. 

Rooney & Bent, Proctor'a, Troy. 

Rnoney, Katie. Union Sq., N. Y. 

Ilomalue, Anna, Lid Lifters, B. R. 

Rooney Slstera, 807 N. Patterson Pk. Are., Bal- 
timore. 

Roscoe A Sims. Rents-Ssntley, B. S. 

Bose A Kills. Ysnkee Doodle Girls, B. S. 

Ross A Vack, 11 W. 114. N. Y. 

Rose. Elmer, French Maids. B. R. 

Rosso A Slmma, Bowery Burlesquers. B. B. 

Bousek, Jack, Air-Dome, Leavenworth, lndef. 

Bowland, 127 W. 27, N. Y. 

Royal Musical Five. 240 So. 9th. Brooklyn. 

Royce Bros., 874 N. Randolph, Chicago. 

Ryno A Emerson. Continental Hotel, Chicago. 

Russell A Held, Proctor's, Newark. 

Russell, Fred P.. 486 W. 136, \. Y. 

Russell, Fred, Bowery Burlesquers, B. R. 

Russell A Davis, Pastime, Atlanta, lndef. 

Ryan A Richfield, Alhambra, N. Y. 

Ryan, Nan A Co.. 27 Acme. Sacramento. 

Ryan A White. 504 E. 163. N. Y. 



Sattler, Chas., Lady Birds, B. B. 

Sanford A Darlington, 2422 So. Adler, Phlla. 

Salvaggls. 0, Mlsa N. Y., Jr., B. R. 



HOMER HOWARD 

AT 

LIBERTY 

Caused by the closing of the Chicago Office of JEBOME H. BEMJ.CK A CO. 
I wish to extend to the following friends my very sinoere thanks for their letters and telegrams, 
also those good friends who hare been in Chicago since Jan. 1st for their well wishes for the 
future: James J. Morton, Bert Leslie, Elisabeth Murray, Nat Wills, Geo. Evans, Charlie 
Grape win, Geo. Sidney, Lew Hawkins, Jack Norworth, Emil Subera, Geo. Van. Three Leigh tons, 
Arthur Deming, Lew Houaemann, Jake Bternad, Walter Xeefe, Edward Haymann, Ed Carruthera, 
Kerry Meager, Blanche McHaffey, Anna Geislev Woodward, John Weber (Weber's Band), Pat 
Conway (Conway'a Band), Geo. Holcombe (Holoombe'a Band), Charlie Case, Abe Jacobs. Kolb 
and Dill, Chris. 0. Brown, "Singing Four," Sam Morton, Jules Von Tilser, Abe Frank and 
plenty more. 

N. B.— Mail will reach me care SHERMAN HOUSE, CHICAGO, ILL., until further notice. 






When answering advertisement* kindly mention Vabhcty. 



VARIETY 



19 





AND 





Now Playing Keith - Proctor Circuit 



I 



SOME WALTZ SONG 1 

" WhenYou Find 
The Girl Who 
Loves But You" 



WORDS AND MUSIC 
BT 

JOSEPH SANTLEY 

PROFESSIONAL COPIES FREE. 
PUBLISHERS 

Thiebes-Stierlih Music Co. 

ST. LOUIS. NO. 



STRASSMAN, 

Attorney. 868 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



HARDIE 
LANCDON 

"THE PLUM-TREE 
GIRL" 

Big Success for 88 Weeks 

Western States Vaud. 
Assn. 




COMING EAST SOON 



THE KEMPS 

MAY and BOB 

SCORED HEAVILY at the NOVELTY THEATRE 

Is worth the admission to hear Bobby Kemp 
sing "Take Your Time." 




5«Kl Picture #•* Copy ** - •SMowy drier 
- V* FOR SO O 



POSTWRDS 

KfYOUR^^ ACT 



INCLUDING CUT 




\a> 



fomviiaiwii 



itauvim fji+»>*gZ** , ~ 



Ssndow A Lampert, Orientals, B. R. 

Schaar Trio, 8130 Commercial Ave., Chicago. 

Schack, Nat, Imperial. Fremont. O. 

8ohepp, Grover, Rolllckers, B. R. 

Scbmidllng. Harry H., 287 W. Monroe, Chicago. 

Schuster. Mil too, Palace, Boston, lndef. 

Scbrock A Rice, Criterion, Chicago. 

Scott, Great, Trent, Trenton. 

8cott, Bdouard, Grsnd, Reno, Nev., lndef. 

Sesrs, Gladys, Parisian Belles, B. R. 

Segnln. Wood, Eugenie, 2814 Hollywood, Tolede. 

Septette, Columbia, Cincinnati. 

Sevengala. N. Y. City. 

8eymour Sisters, Family, Wash., O. 

Seymour, O. G., A Co., 27, Majestic, Madison, 

Wis. 
Seyons, The, Psrlslsn Belles, B. R. 
Sharp*. Dollle, Family, ^ottavllle. Pa., lndef. 
Hharrocks, The, 521 Main, Lewlston, Ida. 
Shsws, Aerial. 264 W. 24, N. Y. 
Shea* * Warren, 81 Cheats*. Mt Vernon, IT. T. 
Sherman A Fuller. 808 N. 8. Reading, Pa. 
Sherman, He Forest, Co., Sherman Farm, Central 

Pk.. L. I. 
Shlrhart, Anson. Crystal, Detroit, lndef. 
Short A Edwards, 67 Mlddagh, Brooklyn. 
Shrodes, Chas. A Alice, Colonial.' Lawrence. 
Simpson, Cora, Majestic, Houston. 
Hluims. The Mystic, Box 868. Dobbs Perry, N. Y. 
Sieger. Lillian, Harry Bryant's, B. R. 
Si.imsn, Sam. Columbia, Osk.and, Cal.. lndef. 
Sldonne A Kellle, 424 E. Chicago aye., Chicago. 
Silver Stars, 61 Hsnover, Boston. 
Slneay»s Dogn A Cats, 101 W. 40, N. Y. 
Slater A Finch, Rock, Worcester. 
Smith A Arsdo. 326 Converse, E. St. Loots, in. 
Smltb A Convey, Trans-Atlsnttcs, B. R. 
Smith Bros., 66 Hawthorne. Hartford. 



Smith, Wm. M., Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Smith A Brown, Morning Glories, B. R. 

8mytbe, Wm. H., Gay Morning Glories, B. R. 

Snyder A Buckley, Lyric, Dubuque, la. 

Sommers A Storke, Ideals, B. R. 

Somers, Zslmsr, Pat White's Gslety Girls, B. R. 

Some Quartet, Merry Maidens, B. R. 

Sonnett. Aunette, City Sports, B. R. 

Song Birds, Orpheum, Brooklyn. 

Soper, Bert, Star, Altoona, Pa., lndef. 

Spencer, Lloyd, Lyric, Houston, lndef. 

Spoler, Lew H., Empire, B. R. 

Stanford, Billy, Dreamland, McKeesport, Pa. 

Stanley, Mr. A Mrs. W. H., Byersvllle, O. * 

Stanley, Minna, City Sports, B. R. 

Stsnton A Sandberg, 711 Oreo, Chicago. 

Steinert A Thomas, 120 W. 186, N. Y. 

Steger, Julius, A Co., Orpheum, Brooklyn. 

Sterns, Al., 258 W. 30. N. Y. 

Stevens, Leo, Washington Society Girls, B. A. 

Stevens A Boehm, 825 B. 14, N. Y. 

8tewsrts, Musical, Bohemians, B. R. 

Stewart, Harry, Rose Bydell. B. R. 

Stlckney's Pony A Dogs, Hempstead, L. I. 

Stlrk A Dan, 28 Hancock. Brockton, Mass. 

St. Elmo, Leo, Family, Wllliamsport, Pa. 

St. Onge Bros.. 22 Portlsnd. Worcester. 

Symphonla Musical Trio, 26 N. Jefferson, Dayton. 




SP1SSELL BROS. da. MACK 
IV "CAFE DE PARIS." 
Jan. 20, Keith's, Boston. * 



Stone. Beth, Orpheum, St. Paul. 

Stuart A Keeley. Temple. Ft. Wayne. 

Sturgls, Ida, Imperials. B. R. 

Stutzman A Crawford. Vaudeville, Eveleth, Minn. 

Sullivan, W. J., Bijou. Jamestown. N. D., ladef. 

Sully A Phelps, O. H.. Dover, N. J. 

Summers A Winters, Spellmsn, C. R. 

Sutcliffe Troupe, Empire, Newport, Wales. 

Sutton A Sutton. High School Girls. B. R. 

Sweet, Eugene, 25 Cherry, Providence. 

Sweeney, John 8., 452 Turner, Allentown. Pa. 

Swor Bros., Keith's, Columbus. 

Kylows. The, Parisian Relies. B. R. 

Symonds, Jack, Majestic. Mobile, Ala. 



Taneans, Wllliamsport, Pa. 

Tanean, Felix A Claxton, 331 E. 93d St., N. Y. 

Tsylor, Tell*. La Salle. Chicago, lndef. 

Togge A Daniel. Monroe, Elyrla, O. 

Tempest Trio, Bijou. La Crosse. 

Tenors, Four, Pat White's Gslety Girls, B. R. 

Thomss, David, c|o Moyer, Atlanta. 

Thompson A Carter, City Sports, B. R. 

Thompson, Hsrry, 112 Covert, Brooklyn. 

Thome, Mr. A Mrs. Harry, Hotel Braddock, N. Y. 

Thornton, George A., Lincoln Sq., N. Y. 

Tlddlewlnks A Dugan, 503 Hudson, N. Y. 

Tierney, Belle, 74 N. Msln, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Tlnney. Frank H., 812 Mooi-e. Phila. 

Tivoli Quartette, Orpheum, Des Moines. 

Tomkins, Wm., Orpheum, El Paso. 

Toys, Musical, Salem, Mass. 

Travers, Belle, Orientals, B. R. 

Trillers. The, Keith's, Phila. 

Troyer Lafe, Irwin, Goshen, Ind., lndef. 

Truesdell, Mr. A Mrs. Howard, Auditorium, Lynn. 

TrocHdero Quartet, Dixieland, Jacksonville. Fla. 

Tully, May. H. A S„ Toledo. 

Turner, Bert, Alvln, Mansfield, O. 

Tyce, Lillian, 733 Mt. Prospect. Newsrk. 

Tyroleans, Fourteen, Grand Madison, Wis. 



Ullrich, Fritz. 2418 N. 16. Phila. 

Usher, Claude A Fannie, 38 Henry, Jersey City. 



Vsladons, Aerial, 65 Sumner, Central Falls, 
R. I. 

Valdare A Varno, Vincennes, Ind. 

Valmore, Mildred, Toreadors, B. R. 

Valoise Bros., Lyceum. Meadvllle, Pa. 

Valveno Bros.. 107 E. 81. N. Y. 

Vsn Cleve. Denton A Pete, 286 E. 14, N. Y. 

Vsn Gofre A Cotrely, Iris, Globe, Aria. 

Van Lee. James, Yankee Doodle Girls, B. R. 

Vardamsn, 270 W. 89. N. Y. 

Vardon, Perry A Wilbur. Crackerjacka, B. B. 

Variety Quartet, Scmnton, Ps. 

Veda A Quintarow, Star, Homestead. Pa. 

Vedmars, The, 749 Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Vermette-Carpottle Trio, 451 Roe Breboenf, Mon- 
treal. 

Viola A Bro., 123 Montauk, Brooklyn. 

Voelker, Mr. A Mrs. Frederick. Union Sq., N. Y. 

Van Dell, Harry, 458 Notre Dame, Manchester, 
N. H. 

W 

Waddell, Fred A Mae, Bijou, Decatur, 111. 
Wahlund. Tekela Trio, 205 W. 22, N. Y. 
Walters, Harry, 1558 Bway, N. Y. 
Watson Sisters, Irwin Big Show, B. R. 
Waldorf A Mender. Alpha. Erie. Pa. 
Walton, Fred, A Co., Orpheum, Omaha. 
Walton, Irving R.. Irwin's Majestic, B. R. 



Waller A Maglll. 102 7th sve., N. Y. 

Ward, Alice Lillian, Denver, Col. 

Ward, Klare A Co., Denver. Col. 

Ward Trio. 640 82. Milwaukee. 

Warner, Stanley M., Bijou, La Crosse. 

Wsrren A Brockway, Rellly A Woods, B. B. 

Wangdoodle Four, Vanity Fair, B. R. 

Washer Bros., Osklsnd, Ky. 

Walsh Lynch A Co., Irwin's Big Show, B. R. 

Walsh, George, Toreadors, B. R. 

Washburn, Blanche, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Wsterbury Bros. A Tenney, Hammersteln's, N. Y. 

Waters. Harry. 1658 Broadway, N. Y. 

Watson. Joa. K., Rolllckers, B. R. 

Webb A Connelly. Majestic, Dallas. 

Webb, Hsrry L., Beatrice, Neb. 

Webb, Josle. Tiger Lilies. B. B. 

Webb. Mabel, Pat White's Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Weber, Chss. I)., Bowery Bnrlesquers, B. R. 

Weber, John, Broadway Gaiety Girls, B. R. 

Welch, Lem, Poll's, Hartford. 

Welch A Maltland, Vanity Fair, B. R. 

Wells, Pauline, Parisian Widows, B. R. 

Wells, Billy K.. Harry Bryant's, B. R. 

Wentworth, Vesta A Teddy. Hlmmclelne Stock Co. 

Werden A Taylor, Poll's, Worcester. 

West, John A., 161 W. 86, Chicago. 

West A Benton, Oak Park, Sacramento, lndef. 

Wesley A White, Gayety, Pittsburg. 

West A Van Slclen, travel, Majestic, Denver. 

West, Harry, Washington Society Girls, B. R. 

West. Ed., Parisian BeUes, B. R. 

Weston, Emma. Empire, B. B. 

Weston A Clare, travel. Acme, Sacramento. 

Weston, Ssdie, Psrlslsn Belles, B. R. 

Wheeler Children, 2614 No. 25, Phila. 

Wheeler, Little Children, 2514 No. 25. Phila. 

Wheeler A Rosey, 15 So. Clark. Chicago. 

Whalley A Whalley, Box 202, Fltchburg, Mass. 

Wbelan A Searles, 1520 Glenwood. Phila. 

White, Ed. A Rolla, 502 E. 79, N. Y. 

White Hswk, 750 Westchester, N. Y. 

White, Pat, Pat White's Gslety Girls. B. B. 

White. Tom, Lady Birds. B. B. 

Whitehead, Joe, 408 W. 83, N. Y. 

Whltely, James. Trans-Atlantlcs, B. B. 

Whiteside, Ethel, Hackney Empire, London. 

Whitman, Frank. Weber's Music Hall, N. Y. 

Wlggans, Joe, Imperials, B. R. 

Wilbur, Caryl, Hippodrome, Earllng, London. 

Wilder. Marshall P.. 256 W. 97. N. Y. 
Wilfred A Lottie, Majestic, Kalamazoo. 
Williams, C. W., 3313 Jamaica, Richmond Hill. 

L. I. 
Williams A Mayer. 309 W. 55, N. Y. 
Williams, Frank & Delia. Casino, Allegheny, Pa. 
Williams, Jud, Dodge's, Keokuk, la. 

Williams, Joe, Jersey Lilies, B. R. 
Williams, Sam, Keeney's, Brooklyn. 

Williams A West, High Jinks, B. R. 

Wilson, Tony, Helolse A Armoroa Sisters, 1 Prims 

rd., Brixton, London, S. E.. Eng. 
Wilson, Alf A Mabe. 256 W. 37. N. Y. 

Wilson Bros.. K. & P. 125th St., N. Y. 

Wilson, Jack, A Co.. Keith's, Scranton. 

Wilson. Lizzie N., 175 Franklin, Buffalo. 

Wilson. Sam. High Jinks. B. R. 

Wilton, Belle, Vanity Fair, B. R. 

Wlncherman. V. F., 201 E. 14. N. Y. 

Winkler A Kress, Park, Johnstown. Pa. 

Wlxon A Eaton. Empire, Indianapolis. 

Wood Bros., Lafayette, Buffalo. 

Wood, Ralph. Lyric. Ft. Smith. Ark., lndef. 

Woodford's Anlmsls. Rose Sydell. B. R. 

Woodford A Marlboro. Fremont. O. 

Wormser Tots, 502 W. 3, Davenport, la. 

Wordette, Estelle. A Co.. 40 W. 34. N. Y. 

World & Kingston, Temple. Detroit. 

Work A Ower. K. A P. 125th St.. N. Y. 

Worthier, Mlnthorne. 125 Lexington, N. Y. 

Wynn A Lewis, Poll's, Springfield. 



Yackley A Bunnel, Elm Villa, R. F. D. 6, Lan- 

caster Pa. 
Yalto Duo, 229 W. 38. N. Y. 
Yomamato Bros., Emerald, Adams Co., O. 
Young A De Vole, 8 Lower 5, Evsnsvllls. 
Young A Msnnlng, 2130 Grsnt, Denver. 
Young, Hsrry C, Lady Birds, B. R. 
Young, Ollle, A Bros., 58 Chittenden. Colnmbns, • 



Zamlocb A Co., 1080 62 St., Oakland, Cal. 
Zanoras. Cycling. Temple, Ft. Wayne. 
Zsras, 4, 104 W. 40, N. Y. 
Zeds, H. L., 211 E. 14. N. Y 
Zemo, Zemo Troupe, Orpheum, Lima, O. 
Zenda, Parlsisn Widows, B. B. 
Zeno, Bob. 848% 1. Portland, Ore. 
Zolss, The, People's, Cedar Rapids. 
Zimmermen. AL. Empire. B. B. 
Zlnrmer. John. 55 W. 116, N. Y. 
Zlnn's Famous Dancing Girls, Empire, 

clsco. 
Zlska A King. Orpheum, Easteren. Pa. 



BURLESQUE ROUTES 



WEEK JANUARY 20. 

When not otherwise indioated, "L. 0." afti 
■how indicates it is "laying off." 
Americana, Lafayette, Buffalo. 
Avenue Girls, 20 22, Des Moines; 23-25. St. Joe. 



HYDE & BEHNAN'S 

Amusement Enterprises 



Brooklyn 



»< 



<• 



it 



<» 



Bijou Theatre, 

Folly " 

Hyde & Beinnan's 

Olympic Theatre 

Star " 

Gayety " 

Newark M Newark, N. J. 

Gayety " Pittsburg 

^ & Garter Theatre, Chicago 

We Use High-Class, Extra and Special Fea- 
tures at All Times. Address All Communica- 
tions to the 

HYDE & BEHMAN AMUSEMENT (0., 

TEMPLE BAR BUILDING, 
BROOKLYN, H. Y. 



Bachelor Club, Palace, Boston. 
Behman Show, Greenwall, New Orleans. 
Blue Ribbons, 125th St. Music Hall, N. Y. 
Bon Tons, Gayety, St. Louis. 
Boston Belles, Westminster, Providence. 
Bohemians, L. ().; 27-29, Gayety, Albany; 80-1, 

Lyceum, Troy. 
Bowery Bnrlesquers, Gayety, Washington. 
Brigadiers, Star, St. Paul. 
Broadway Gaiety Girls, Columbia, Boston. 
Bryant's. Harry, Star, Brooklyn. 
Casino Girla, Garden, Buffalo. 
Century Girls, Park. Brooklyn. 
Champagne Girls, Bijou, Phila. 
Cherry Blossoms, 20-22, Star, Scranton; 23-29, 

Jacob's. Peterson. 
City Sports, 20-22, Gayety, Scranton; 28-25, Bljon, 

Reading. 



DIRECT FROM EUROPE 



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CLEMENT 



DE LIO 



Representative, H. H. FEIBER. 




When answering odvertitementi kindly mention Vabiety. 



20 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



HART TRIO 

INSTRUMENTALISTS A.NU VOCALISTS 



Exclusive Management 

MR. ALF. T. WILTON 



. 



Suite 920, St. James Building 
NEW YORK CITY 



The only juggler that went from Pastor's across the street to the Dewey. 





CHAMPAGNE GIRLS CO. 



JAN. 80. TROCADERO, PHILADELPHIA. 



Fiddler 



AND 



Shelton 



SUFFOCATED WITH DELIOHTNES8. 
Still being booked by Western Vaudeville Association. Big Hit at Haymarket, Chicago, Week Jan. 6. 

Clarence Sisters 

"THE AUSTRALIAN NUGGETS." 
BOOKED SOLID. Direction AL MATER. 



THE DANCING WONDERS 



BROWN! WRIGHT 



Par. Address. 844 W. 45th St.. V. T. a 



Management JACK LEVI. 



HARRY TATE'S C°. 

FISHING MOTORING 



INc 

England 

Australia 

Africa 



EIGHTEEN MINUTES OP COMEDY. 



HARRY L. WEBB 

THE MAM WHO TALKS AMD SINGS, KEEP YOUR EYE OM THE LAUGH PRODUCER. 
Scoring BIO on the Western Vaudeville Association time and a long route booked. 




Chas 



■ 





Burkhardt 



"The Man With the Funny Slide" 

Late off Joe Weber's Co. 

Is ready to consider offers for the balance of this season 

Address all communications to L. H. FRANK, care Variety, Chicago Office, Chicago Opera House Block. 



MORGAN and McGARRY 

Introducing Refined Singing, Expert Soft and Wooden Shoe and Aerobatlo Dancing. 

Exclusive Agent, ALP T. WILTON. 

OPEN TIME FOR CLUBS 

JANUARY SOtta TO MARCH 1st 

Klein, Ott Bros. & Nicholson 

Address, 16 W. 36lh St., Bsyonne, N.J. 



WILBUR AMOS 

THE CLEVER COMEDY JUGGLER. 

My act has been highly praised by managers and press in all the cities where I have appeared. 

THE CANDY KID OF THE WEST— Now Enjoying California. 



THE DAINTY SINGER OF DAINTY SONGS. 



MISS 



LILY LENA 



UNITED BOOKING 0FFICE8 TIME. 



SMITH and BAKER 



a 



Closing the olio of Bob Manchester's "Gay Masqueraders" and a big hit all along the line. 



INVITE OFFERS FOR NEXT SEASON. 



The Jolly 
Sailor Boys" 

- 
ADDRESS AS PER ROUTE. 




SCOTT 



THE DAINTIEST 
GIRL IN IRELAND 



riRST APPEARANCE IN NEW YORK AT THE ALHAMBRA THEATRE, NEXT WEEK (JAN. 20th) 






Correspondents Wanted Wherever There is a Variety Performance. 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Vabdity. 



VARIETY 



21 





A 



D 




WHITE 



18 MINS. IN "ONE" 



With "MISS NEW YORK, JR." 



DEWEY THEATRE, New York, NEXT WEEK (Jan. 20) 



Cobb's Comer 

SATURDAY, JAN. 18, 1908. 

No. 99. A Weekly Word with WILL the 
Wordwrtght. 



(OBB & EDWARDS' 

LATEST, VOW BEZVO 8UNO ST 

MAY IRWIN 

" The Peactt T&dt Tdstes the Sweetest 
HiihJs the finest on tie Tret." 

WILL D. COBB 

Wordwrlght, 
1518 Broadway, MXW YORX. 



Colonial Belles, Buckingham, Louisville. 

Cracker Jacks, Gayety, Columbus. 

Dainty Duchess, Gaiety, Brooklyn. 

Dreamlands, Star, Toronto. 

Empire Show, 20-22, Jacob's, Paterson; 23-25, 
Star, Scran ton. 

Fay Foster, Howard, Boston. 

Girl from Happyland, Murray Hill, N. Y. 

Golden Crook, Gayety, Toronto. 

High Jinks, Shubert, Newark. 

High School Girls, Theatre Royal, Montreal. 

Ideals. Eighth Ave., N. Y. 

Imperials, Monumental, Baltimore. 

Irwin's Big Show, Standard. Cincinnati. 

Jersey Lilies, Trocadero, Chicago. 

Jolly Grass Widows. Imperial, Providence. 

Jolly Girls, 20-22, Lyceum, Troy; 23-25, Gayety, 
Albany. 

Kentucky Belles, Standard, St. Louis. 

Knickerbockers, Empire, Cleveland. 

Lady Birds, Bowery, N. Y. 

Lid Lifters, Waldman's, Newark. 

Majesties, Gayety, Pittsburg. 

Mardi Gras Beauties, 20-22, Bijou, Reading; 23-25, 
Gayety, Scranton. 

Masqueradcrs, Empire, Toledo. 

Merry Maidens, 20-22, Gayety, Albany; 23-25, Ly- 
ceum, Troy. 

Merry Makers, Colonial, Cleveland. 

Miss New York, Jr., Dewey, N. Y. 

Morning Glories, Gayety, Detroit. 

New York Stars, Gayety, Milwaukee. 

Nightingales, 20-22, Evansvllle; 23-25, L. O.; 27, 
Folly, Chicago. 

Night Owls, L. O.; 27. Majestic, Kansas City. 

Orientals, Lyceum, Washington. 

Parisian Belles, Trocadero, Phlla. 

Parisian Widows, Gayety, Baltimore. 

Pat White's Gaiety Girls, Met. O. H.. Duluth. 

Reeves' Beauty Show, Gayety, Birmingham. 

Rellly & Woods, Avenue, Detroit. 

Rentss-Santley. Majestic, Kansas City. 

Ulalto Rounders, Empire, Chicago. 

Rice A Barton. Casino, Phlla. 

Rolllckers, Gotham, N. Y. 

Rose Hill, Gayety. Indianapolis. 

Rose Sydell, Gayety, Phlla. 

Runaway Girls, Olympic. Brooklyn. 

Sam Devere's, Dewey, Minneapolis. 

Scrlbner's Big Show, Euson's, Chicago. 

Star Show (J iris. Star, Milwaukee. 

Strollers. 20-22, Terre Haute: 23-25, Indianapolis. 

Thoroughbreds, Century, Kansas City. 

Tiger Lilies. London. N. Y. 

Toreadors, Folly, Chicago. 

Trans-Atlantlcs, 20-22, GHmore, Springfield; 23-25, 
Bijou, Reading. 

Trocaderos, Corinthian, Rochester. 

20th Century Maids, 20-22, Indianapolis; 23-25, 
Terre Haute. 

Vanity Fair, Lyceum, Boston. 

Washington Society Girls. People's. Cincinnati. 

Watson's Burlesquers, Bon -Ton, Jersey City. 

World Beaters, 20-22, Empire, Albany; 23-25, Em- 
pire, Holyoke. 

Yankee Doodle Girls, Academy, Pittsburg. 






Acuna, J. M.; Allison, Mrs.; Arden, Edwin. 

B 

Barnold. Charles: Buree. Jim; Bergulo, Nellie; 
Bohme, W. A.; Bunnln, Rose; Balrd and Dunn 
(Chicago office); Barry, W. H. (Chicago office); 



Bedini, Gelian; Backman, Marie; Baron, C. (Chi- 
cago office); Brown, Mrs.; Billington, E. C. ; 
Borfling, S.; Blair, Eugene, A Co.; Blake's Ani- 
mal Circus; Benson, Mrs. 

O 

Carain, Josiab; Conklin, Al.; Calhoun, William; 
Carleton and Terre (Chicago office); Claftin, 
Josle; Collins, M. D.; Crane, Lawrence; Charline 
and Charline; Curtis, W. D. (2); Cogswell, Sarah 
L. (1); Castellane, Tony; Carlisle, H.; Conley, 
Anna & Effie; Collins, Tommy. 



Darnell, Edith; Denby, Walter; Dumas, Flor- 
ence; Deming, Arthur; Donnelly, Henry V.; Dutch, 
Mr.: Dudley, Harry. 

E 

Evans, Charles; Emmet A McNeill; Edwards, 
Joe. 

P 

Fox, Mort; Fay, Elfle; Ford. John; Fay, 
Elfle (Chicago office); Fullam, Tom; Farren, 
George (2). 

O 

Gardener and Revere (Chicago office); Gaudy. 
Louise; Gilbert, John D.; Gluing water. Claude; 
Gallando; Gibbons, Thomas (Chicago office); 
Grant. Bert and Bertha; Griffin, Miss; Geer, J. 
II. (Chicago office); Guardot, Etiume A Co. 



Herbert, Will; Hunting. Tony; Hughes, Gene; 
Henry. William; Hale and Francis; Hill, Hamil- 
ton; Hale, George G. (Chicago office); Harlowe, 
Beatrice. 

J 

Johns, Llewalyn. 

m 

Kara. Mr.; Kelly, John W.; King, Gussie; 
Kent, Dorothy. 

L 

Lackey, Jas. ; Le Monts, The; Lawler, Charley, 
and daughters; Lacey, Harry, A Co.; Lang, Eddie; 
Lena, Lily. 

H 

Manton, George; Marks, Al. ; Mears, Grace; 
Moore, Frank; Moore, Rhodes H.; Mills, Beecher 
H.; Morrison. Altrea; Mead, Will; Murata, Toklo; 
Moll, Robt.; Myers, George; McWaters and Tyson; 
Mandell, Richard; McCord, Louis; McClalr, Cbas. ; 
Martlnette A Sylvester (5); Mack, John E. ; 
Moore, Carlyle. 

N 

Nobles, Milton and Dolly; Neaser, Gus. 

O 

Otulta, Mile.; Owen, Alice May (2). 

P 
Pringle, Aubrey; Palmer, Austin. 

Q 

Qulgley, Helen. 

a 

Rose, Mr. (Spencer, Kelly and Rose) ; Ross, 
Budd (Chicago office), Robinson. W. A.; Rice, 
James R. (2); Ray, Elizabeth; Rollins, Maybelle; 
Reidy, Jack. 

8 

St. Onge, Fred; Salter, Irving; Rarll, Tony; 
Shayne, John; Simonds, Teddy; Smith, Charles 
Stephens. Hal.; Sutton, Harry; Sterling, Evelyn; 
Sheck, E.; Seligmau, Minnie. 

T 

Tobln Sisters, The (2); Toledo, Gus; Tulsa: 
Tlson and Brown; Thomas, Wm. H.; Tenley, 
Elmer. 

U 

Ulpas A Hella. 

V 
Vasco; Vesta, Netta. 

W 

Wilson. Harry E. ; Williams, Estella (2): Wal- 
lace, Franklyn; White, Lou; Whltaker, Raymond; 
Weaver, Jack. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

% — 

Unless otherwise noted, the following 
reports are for the current week. 



GM1GAGO 

By FRANK WIESBERO. 

VARIETY'S Chicago Office, 
Chicago Opera House Block, 
(Phone Main 4380). 



AUDITORIUM (Klaw A Erlanger, mgrs.; Mil- 
ward Adams, director). — The final week of "ad- 
vanced" vaudeville is at hand. Every act has 
been seen here recently. The Ruppelts opened 
with a novel acrobatic turn, winning well earned 
applause. Among the nine other numbers, three 
are also acrobatic. Seymour and Hill's mixture 



of comedy and dexterity compared favorably with 
any on the bill. The Ralzers are acrobats and 
fairly good in the routine. The Duffln-Dedcay 
Troupe were last to appear, closing the show. 
This act is one of the best of its kind seen here. 
"That" Quartet returned after an absence of 
three months and duplicated their previous suc- 
cess with new songs. Klein, Ott Brothers, and 
Nicholson scored. Simon and Gardner Company 
also returned after a short absence and provided 
the same furious fun as formerly. Josephine 
Cohan and Company, headlined, held over, as arc 
Fred Niblo and Maidie Scott. 

SID J. EUSON'S (Sid J. Euson, mgr.).— "It 
Hoppened in Moonland," the opening category of 
"Greater New York Stars," might have hap- 
pened in Kenosha or any other place, if it hap- 
pened at all, so far as the material or action 
is concerned. It is called "musical comedy." 
The appellation is not deserving there at any 
time. Neither is the closing division, "A Day 
for a Knight," a "laugh producing farce." Pro- 
ducers err when they offer material that rather 
bores than entertains. It is not necessary to 
enumerate the antique devices employed, but 
the quantity Is more than sufficient. The show 
is obligated In a very large measure for what- 
ever merit it sustains to Harry Devlne, Maryland 
and Virginia Tyson, Buck Brothers and the 
chorus. This includes the olio. There are 10 
girls in the chorus. Most of these demure or 
solemn maidens are young and it Is evident their 
burlesque experience is limited. In looks and 
behavior they acquit themselves quite sufficiently. 
They work diligently, considering their frequent 
appearance on the stage, but should smile occa- 
sionally — as often as The Tyson Sisters — to 
stimulate the proceedings. The costumes are not 
particularly alluring. The blue dresses are pretty, 
but the repetition of the faded and soiled pink 
tights and mlsmated slippers in three changes 
shows parsimony and carelessness, in spite of the 
other shrouds which are evidently arranged to 
effect complete changes in attire. The tights 
were too obvious to be concealed, even by the 
regulation abbreviated dresses. Nothing adorns 
the stage more than a bunch of good-looking, 
active girls in clean and attractive garments. 
Harry Devlne is the principal comedian. He has 
too much of a burden and the fault is not his. 
One or two able assistants in the comedy end 
would improve all around. The brightest feminine 
spark Is Maryland Tyson. She Is spontaneously 
vivacious, and with her buxom sister, Virginia, 
the female department Is radiant and cheerful. 
Belle Williams should have more scope for her 
Beml-eccentricitles. Harry Emerson attempted to 
portray a Hebrew. His enunciation is good. In 
the olio, with Joe Buckley, Emerson did much 
better in eccentric comedy, while his partner In 
stereotyped "straight" was too aggressive and 
harsh. They need new material. The "grati- 
tude" Joke is quite old, among the others. De- 
vine and Williams showed their familiar comedy 
skit, always entertaining, and Bush Brothers 
were the feature In a series of difficult bounding 
acrobatic feats. The Bob White Quartet sang 
peacefully. 

EMPIRE (William A. Singer, mgr.).— A medley 
consisting of ditties from t li«* popular catalogues 
to "II Trovatore" starts the one-act melange 



The Ghas. K. Harris Courier 

Devoted to the interests of Songs and Singers. 
Address all communications to 



CHAS. K. HARRIS. 81 W. 81st St., V. Y. 

(Meyer Cohen, MgT.) 



Vol. 9. 



New York, Jan. 18, 1908. 



No. 7. 



Have you heard Chas. K. Harris' New 
Baby song 

" There's Another Picture 
In My Mamma's Frame" 

Write or call for it at once. Slides 
now ready for this beautiful baby song; 
every slide a hit with any audience. The 
best baby song since "ALWAYS IN THE 
WAY." Slides $5.00 per set. Write at 
once. 



"Dopey Dan" with unrestrained vim and dash 
by the "Star Show Girls," under the manage- 
ment of William Fennessy. The piece was used 
in the same show last season, but has been 
improved and modified, giving it more farcical 
complication and ginger. There Is some "spice," 
but not of the offending brand. "The Sultan's 
Harem" Is quite Oriental in embellishment, and 
the surroundings are effectively pretty. A praise- 
worthy feature Is the total absence of ungainly 
characters. The male principals dress well and 
play legitimately, in a measure due to the 
material furnished by Chas. Nichols. There is 
not much "story," but just enough plot to make 
the action interesting and consistently permit 
the obtrusion of the situations. Mr. Nichols 
gives a faithful interpretation of the typical 
"dope fiend" with an acquisition of laugh produc- 
ing vocabulary. He is surrounded by a capable 
company, prominent being John Baker, James C. 
Dixon and Jim Mackey. The latter as the Irate 
husband Is probably too Impetuous, but evidently 
follows the trait as exemplified by bubbles In 
other presentations. Mackey also figures in num- 
bers. Marie Croix, slender and prepossessing, was 
conspicuous In a congenial part and pert. John 
Cody appeared as a German when he had noth- 
ing else to do, and Lottie Lynn contributed. 
May Rose, a pretty and alert young woman, was 
mi enticing housemaid. Comely girls compose 
the chorus. Several can sing and all try In the 
frequent numbers. The "Myrry Widow Walts," 
rendered by Miss Croix and the girls, brought 
numerous encores, actuated by the choristers 
jocosely falling over each other and disclosing 



THE TOWN TOPIC 1ICKLE TALKERS. 



BARRY » WOLFORD 

THOSE SMART AGENTS, REICH A PLUNKETT. 

IDALENE COTTON I NICK LONG 



Week Jan. 20th. 



IN VAUDEVILLE, 

Presenting their latest artistic success, 

"MY WIFE'S DIAMONDS," 

By Edgar Allan Woolff. 



Hammerstein's, N. Y. City. 



WANTED: SINGERS 

Ladies and Gentlemen 

FOR ALL KINDS 

OF VAUDEVILLE WORK 

B. A. MYERS • . 31 West 31st St., NEW YORK 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Vabiety. 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




AND 



L J LIZZIB 

IHULVEY 



Under the Direction of MISS JRNIE JACOBS, 1402 Broadway, New YorK 



Curtis, Palmer 

In M MAMA'S DARLING BOY/* By AARON HOFFMAN 

Booked solid by our Mascot, Harry Leonhardt. 

Verdict of preaa and public, bigger bit tbaa tbo School Act. 



AND 
CO. 



JAMES 



AND 



LUCIA COOPER 



"CHATTERING OHTTM8." 
WEEK JAN. 80, OAYETY, DETROIT. "Goo, Blutch made me laugh." 

"Tom" Kelley 



PIANIST AT PASTOR'S THEATRE. 



JENNINGS and JEWELL 



Taoeiiii,felixi<Muii 

Open for Clubs and Sunday Nights, 
January, February. Week March gth 
and later open, 

Par Add., 881 Z. 93d Street, Vow York City. 
OPEN YOB SUNDAY NIGHTS AND CLUBS. 

Tel. 6480— 70th St. 




GERMAN COMEDIANS. 



Second Season Robie's "Knickerbocker*.' 



THE ASTRELLAS 

Predentin* Their Original Bon* and Dancing Novelty in Vaudeville. Address, ear* VARIETY. 

SNITZ MOORE 

In the Comedy-Dramatic Playlet "A SELF-MADE MAN." 
One of the best offerings of the new year, aa acknowledged by preaa and public everywhere. 

Addresa VARIETY, Obioago Office. 



Managers and Agents Are Invited to Look This Act Over 



John J. 





Madeline 



"THE TWO IN WHITE." AT PASTOR'S NEXT WEEK (Jan. 20th). Little Singing, Little Dancing and Little Talking; will entertain any audience for 17 minutes in "one." 



TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO NEW YORK 

HAMMERSTEIN'S, JANUARY 20 

MISS 

GRACE HAZARD 

in " Five Feet of Comic Opera " 



"New York. — The genuine, spon- 
taneous hit of the opening vaude- 
ville bill at the New York Theatre 
was Grace Hazard in the 'No. 2' 
position, and on the salary list the 
cheapest act in the show. Miss 
Hazard is practically new to Broad- 
way, and her act is new because It 
was designed and written by her- 
aelf. In 'Five Feet of Comic Opera' 
Mlas Hazard gave the audience some- 
thing to talk about, which they did 
throughout the intermission. She is 
a little girl, but a big act."— 
"Variety." 



F 
I 
V 

E 

F 
E 
E 
T 



The "Evening Mail," August 26, by 
C. F. Zlttel: 

"The next number proved to be 
the hit of the show. Grace Hazard in 
'Five Feet of Comic Opera* sings 
seven songs from old operas, and 
makes her changes In full view of 
the audiences. The applause she re- 
ceived was deafening, and when her 
act was over she received an ova- 
tion. Miss Hazard made a speech of 
thanks and she was fine, but when 
the show was over she was not for- 
gotten." 



GRACE HAZARD 



C 

o 



"A familiar performer was Miss 
Grace Hazard, known aa Five Feet 
of Comic Opera and every foot a 
mile."— "The Evening World." 



I 
C 

O 

P 
E 

R 

A 



"Mlas Grace Hazard waa a bit, 
•artorlal and musical." — "The Morn- 



ing World." 



"The sort of Entertainment thai Advances Vaudeville" 



CHAS 



PRESENTING 
GEORGE 
ARLISS' 
FARCE 



y. wW 

EVANS 



" ITS 
UP 
TO 
YOU. 
WILLIAM" 



C©M*Y. 



PERMANENT ADDRESS, CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS. 



Two NOVELTIES of MERIT I (in one act) Presented by 

JNO.ZOUBOULAKIS 

CLAY CARTOONIST AND MUSICAL VIRTUOSO 

. Id Minutes. (Seven In "one"; open or eloae.) 

POLK and MARTELLA 

ROUGH HOUSE COMEDIANS 
Watch the Bumps. En route Western States Vaudeville Circuit. 0. 8. BURNS, Agent, 

Empire Theatre, B. F. 




K/ETV 



KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY. 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADING OF 

" REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS " 

AT FOLLOWING RATES: 

S4.0O monthly, not 

7.00 M 

7.60 M 
12.60 M 

Larger Spaca Pro Rata 

No advertisement under this heading accepted for less than on* month and no preferred position 

given. Remittance must accompany advertisements forwarded by mail. 

Cash discount for 6 and IS months. 



1*2 Inoh single ool., 

Inch 
1 -2 Inoh double ool. 
1 Inoh " 



2 Inohes double ool., S22.50 monthly, not 
1-2 Inoh across page, 16.00 " 

1 Inoh ,r 26.00 " M 

2lnohee " 60.00 






When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



23 







T 



COMIC SONG HIT OF TK£ SEASON 



• "Put Me Amongst the Girls" • 



SUNG BY 



JOE CAWTHORNE 
FRANK FARRINGTON 



(ETHEL LEVEY) 



BILLIE GOULD 
ROBERT LETT 



Ac. 



dfcc. 



Ac. 



dfec. 




. St M. 

(the Firm that Delivers the Hits) 



FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER 

NEW YORK: 15 WEST 30th STREET 



Gus 
Edwards 

Says : 

That he is open to consider any novelty from 
any oomposer or author for his Circle Music 
Hall. He is on the lookout for REAL, live, 
meritorious talent. 

P. 8.— "The Blonde Typewriters" with 
JOHNNY STANLEY, have certainly attracted 
attention at Hammerstein's. The occupants 
of the front rows "just can't make their eyes 
behave." 

More P. 8 — "The Schoolboys and Girls" 
with that clever star comedian, HERMAN 
TIMBERO, have created a little earthquake 
of their own in San Francisco, in the way of 
unprecedented success at the Orpheum. 
Very truly yours, 

GUS EDWARDS MUSIC PUB. CO. 



elr ankles. The "travesty" song had an abrupt 
ding. MIhs Mackey, who Introduces the sc- 
ience of illustrations, should finish the last 
rse instead of leaving the stage suddenly. The 
nversation between Nichols and Cody, following 
e "amateur" turn, is too long, besides it Inter- 
ned in such a manner that the audience be- 
ived it was another "amateur" affair. There is 
song in which the occupants of the boxes are 
ged to kiss the singer, and osculation was 
dulged in freely to the ecstacy of the gallery, 
le "Cadet" finale of the first part was ef- 
ctlve. There are a number of attractive cos- 
me changes. The olio is opened by the La 
ille Trio, In striking acrobatic feats and ground 
mbling. Baker and Lynn extracted much 
ughter in "The Electric Boy," the same vehicle 

last season, and James C. Dixon impressed 
itb songs. Marie Croix and Girls gave a spec- 
cular military festival, arousing enthusiasm. 
OLYMPIC (Abe Jacob, mgr. Monday rehearsal 
. — Etlenne Girardot and Company, Cliff Gordon, 
enri French, Conn, Downey and Willard, Four 
irds, Jordan and Harvey, Cartmell and Harris, 
lett's Dogs, Leeds and Le Mar, Joe Garsa, 
>ckway and Conway, Solvall, Chalk Saunders. 
HAYMARKET (William Newklrk, mgr. Mon- 
ty rehearsal 9).— Eddie Clark and "Winning 
idows," Barnold's Dogs, Snyder and Buckley, 
•w Hawkins. Fred Ray and Company, Gardner 
d Revere, Teddy Trio, Avery and Pearl, Ram- 
y Sisters, Bert WIggIn, Coyne and Tinlln, Tulsa. 
NOTES. — The Harmonious Four are now a 
lo, having reduced the number last week. The 
t Is playing for Sulllvan-Considliie In Minnesota. 
Mabel Stnrr and E. II. Harner, of the "Yankee 
>odle Boy" Company, were married Dec. 24. — 
)ut All N'lght" Is the title of the new musical 
•lange presented by the Pekln Stock Company. 

has a farcical plot with amusing situations. 
ie musical numbers are catchy and Interpreted 

able vocalists and the best singing chorus 
nnl In a long time. Harrison Stewart, Matt 
irsliall and Abble Mitchell are the prominent 
K.vers. The Pekln Is a treat and the onlv real 
velty in Chicago theatricals.— H. M. Miller, 
innger of the Lyric Theatre. Lincoln. Neb., 
is in the city last week. — Mile. Natabe has 
loosed of her Interest In the Ideal Theatre, this 
y. and returned to vaudeville. — Hob Fargo and 
in I)u Vrles have arranged with the manage- 
Mit of the Opera House, Elgin, 111., to fill in 
i* open time fur the balance of the season 
th vaudeville. The experiment was made on 
'w Year's Day and proved to tie a success. It 
the Intention of the promoters to ultimately 
»ce vaudeville In a number of combination one- 
<ht stand houses In towns adjacent to Chicago. 
ie bill nt Elgin for Jan. 13 consisted of Paulus' 
ars and Ponies, Weber Troupe. Dcmorestlo 
others, William and Weston. Jack Prcsdlier. 
m Mack, Carlos and Alba, Packard and May 



Clark Company, Harmonious Trio and moving 
pictures. — McFarland and Murray closed with the 
"Champagne Girls" and are now playing dates 
in the East. — Matusmato and Agga Japanese 
Troupe are booked for parks in the West for the 
coming Hummer. — Cora Landis left the "Buster 
Brown" Company and is now in vaudeville.— 
Elverton is on his way East from the Coast, hav- 
ing played the Sulllvan-Consldlne circuit. — George 
Van closed with the Wm. II. West Minstrels and 
entered vaudeville, opening for the Western Vau- 
deville Association. — Myles McCarthy and Com- 
pany opened at the Orpheum, El Paso, this week. 
— H. W. Rogers, manager, Wonderland, Wheel- 
ing, W. Va., was In town last week. — Mounds- 
ville, W. Va., has a vaudeville theatre. It 
opened last week. — The Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, 
Ohio, closed Saturday for one week to allow 
enlargement of stage and alterations. W. A. 
High is the manager. — "That" Quartet contem- 
plates sailing for the other side in May. They 
are planning a trip around the world, opening 
in London and returning via San Francisco. They 
expect to be gone about a year. — Mr. and Mrs. 
Mort. H. Singer and Mr. and Mrs. Joe M. Harris 
left on Monday for a six weeks' vacation In 
Cuba, returning by way of New York at the 
end of their cruise. They will be joined in the 
metropolis by Harry Askin. 



SAN FRANGISGO 

By W. ALFRED WILSON. 
VARIETY'S San Francisco Office, 
1115 Van Ness avenue (Room 112). 

ORPnEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.).— Week 5: 
Eugenie Fougere, Parisian cbauteuse, was head- 
lined, Indifferent reception. Gus Edwards* School 
Boys and Girls, despite the fact that it has 
been seen here before, was one of the best liked 
numbers of the program. Herman Timberg, the 
boy star of the act, has Improved greatly since 
his last appearance. Bailey and Austin, eccentric 
comedians, registered strongly. Mullen and 
CorelU's acrobatic bout received a favorable ver- 
dict. George Wilson, blackface comedian, and the 
Juggling McBans held their own. Ralph John- 
stone, in a routine of sensational trick cycling, 
was the novelty feature. The Arlington Four 
were held over, and Lillian Burkhardt reappeared, 
offering her playlet, "A Deal on 'Change." 

NATIONAL (Sid Grauman, mgr.).— Week 6: 
Schooled by tradition to the proposition that the 
final curtain must fall upon a full stage act, the 
audience evinced an inclination to remain after 
the Columbia Four, a quartet, had brought the 
show to a conclusion In "one." This singing act 
has been seen at this house during the present 
season and made the same favorable impression 
as before. About as artistic a number as the 
house has ever had was the pantomimic one-act 
tragedy submitted by Estellita and Garcia. There 
was finish to the acting of both throughout, and 
in a Spanish dancing specialty Introduced, the 
woman displays herself as the embodiment of 
grace. The Three Alarcons were among those 
present, opening with a medley of Mexican airs 
on stringed instruments. This was their best. 
Their ensemble singing Is rendered discordant by 
the dominating voice of one of the women. This 
senortta scored a decided hit with a solo. Edward 
Barnes delighted the adherents of ragtime with 
some well chosen selections. Some clever trick 
playing was also Introduced. Gladys Van was on 
the bill, showing herself as the first real soubrette 
we have had for many a day. She at one stage 
threatened, by the Introduction of talking mater- 
ial, to develop Into a female monologist, but got 
back to form rapidly, closing amid demands for 
more. Felix Adler, singing comedian, carried 
off first honors. Possessing a pleasing personality. 
coupled with a well handled voice, the reception 
that greeted his efforts whs nattering. Lawrence 
and Harvey In "His Father's Son" also scored. 
Lawrence offered besides a series of Impersona- 
tions, his Cohan bit, which w:is somewhat shy 
of the original, but bis Junle McCrce was the 
real Ihlng. Booth and Gordan were In opening 
position, with a routine of trick Comedy bicycling 
that was well op to the standard and received Its 
pro rata of applause. Owing to the length of 
the bill Murphy and Whitman were on at the 
matinees only, though credited on the program 
as a special added attraction. 

WIGWAM (Sam Harris. mgr. ). — Week 0: 
Izetfa Jewel, offering, for Its initial production, 
a comedy playlet, "Solving the Question," was 
the headlined attraction (New Acts}, Gllday and 
Foo. Hebrew comedians, figured strongest on the 
well arranged bill. Both have good voices that 
blend well and place little reliance upon the 
"gag" branch of comedy. A bunch of clever 



parodies won out for tbem. Polk and Martell 
won responsive laughter with a good line of cross- 
fire and their "bumpty bump" close left them 
"laughing as they said good-bye." The Musical 
Simpsons had a well arranged instrumental 
musical act and were well received, as were 
McLeod and Skelly, who won honorable mention 
with a meritorious singing and dancing specialty. 
Like the National show, this house also closed the 
bill with a singing quartet, likewise in "one." 
The Atlas Four stood out well in both quartet 
work and solos, the bass possessing a voice of 
remarkable depth. 

VICTORY (I. Coleman Levey, mgr.).— Week 6: 
Leopold McLaglen, who won fame as a Jlu jltsu 
champion by defeating the local Japanese ex- 
perts, was the featured attraction. With his 
sturdy assistant, he offered an act that for 
bumps would put many a knockabout act to 
blush. Marie Rolf son was another feature of the 
bill. Elona Leonard, In character changes and 
songs, played a return date. The Aherus, head 
and hand balancers, and The Hawaiian Sextet 
completed the program. 

EMPIRE (Hal Curtis, mgr.).— Week 6: It fell 
to the Jas. P. Lee company of players to carry 
the comedy burden of the bill, which they did In 
goodly fashion. "All Mixed Up" was the title 
of their stock production, a bright one-act comedy 
that fulfilled its purpose as a laugh winner. The 
Florens Troupe of Acrobats topped the olio. They 
had a classy routine and scored a pronounced hit. 
Thomas and Payne, colored singing and dancing 
duo, far above the average of like teams. Allen, 
Belmaln and Allen showed up prominently ou 
the bill. 



BOSTON 



By ERNEST L. WAITT. 
VARIETY Ofllce, 278A Tremont St. 
KEITH S (II. D. Dupree, mgr.).— Post-anni- 
versary week brought out a comedy bill, with 
"sight" acts as the heavy under-pinning. Mar- 
cel's Life Studies, a series of really remark- 
able groupings, the best this house has ever 
shown, were headlined. McMahon and Chappelle'a 
"Pullman Porter Maids," a real hit, the girls 
dancing well and singing agreeably. Carrie De 
Mar has a singing act In "one" that goes great. 
In her final song, "Lonesome Fluffy Ruffles," she 
Impersonates a tipsy, lonesome girl In good shape. 
Carson and Willard bring some new stuff in the 
line of German patter and go especially well. 
Kemp's Tales of the Wild are always popular 
here. Foy and Clark have their amusing sketch. 
"SJrlngs of Youth," which goes well. It would 
be better if three minutes were trimmed from It. 
Herbert Cyril, first time here, made good. He 
Is full of life, but his fnn-maklng seems forced. 
Kelly and Asbby do their odd bounding billiard 
tricks to good applause. Frances Knight uses 
the time-honored plant In the "upper box," but 
it still goes here, notwithstanding the fact that 
Bessie Wynn used the same Idea last week. Rag 



CLARANCE 
SISTERS 

are one of Vaudeville's Biggest Hits, 

Singing JEROME & SCHWARTZ'S 

Best Irish Song, 

iss 
Killarney 

PUBLISHED BY 

FRANCIS, DAY ft HUNTER 

15 W. 30th ST., NEW TORE CITT 




pictures by the Trlllers were very Interesting. 
Mareena, Nevaro and Mareena get hands every 
minute for extra good equillbrlstic work. Blanche 
Sloan on the trapeze and The Kramers In a skit 
complete the bill. 

ORPHEUM (S. M. Mowry, mgr.).— Fully de- 
serving Its headline place Is "June," with Mayme 
Gehrue and Company. It Is one of the beet 
Western sketches ever brought here. It Is full 
of life, tells a strong story and "grips" the 
audience. The acting Is excellent, especially that 
by Miss Gebrue. Howard Truesdell and Com- 
pany return In their sprightly sketch, "Two Men 
and a bottle," and Work and Ower are back In 
their unique acrobatic act that pleases the crowds 
immensely. McMahon's Minstrel Maids and 
Watermelon Girls are too popular here to require 
further mention. Belle Blanche, with her Im- 
personations, Is the real Individual hit of the 
bill. She Is vastly Improved by the season's work 
and caught the crowd to the tune of half a 
dozen encores. The Four Hlanos In their odd 
acrobatic stunts. Willie Hale and "Buster" do 



OPEN FOR BURLESQUE 



JAOK IRNA/IFM 

CLOSING WITH "THE TIGER LILIES" WEEK JAN. 20TH. M „ nmn „ 

LOOK ME OVER AT LONDON THEATRE, BOWERY. 



tf 



KID HICKEY 



JJ WILL APPEAR AT 
PASTOR'S WEEK Of 
JAN. 27TH. 



AND HIS PAL 



BLOW IN AND LL 
TAKE A PEEK 
AT US. 



ELLA GANCE 



w 



WE POP OUT TWICE DAILY. 



morris MANLEY^ STERLING^ 



When ansvering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



24 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Eckhof f and 




THE MUSWAL LAUGH MAKERS 



REICH A PLUNXETT, 1133 Broadway, New York City, Exclusive Areata. 



WILFRED CLARKE 

Presenting Hie Sketches 

"NO KOBE TROUBLE" and "WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT!" 

Address, eare Lambs' Club, Hew York City. 




K 



A 
T 
E 




N 



Presenting "HIS DAY OFF." IN VAUDEVILLE. TIKE ALL FILLED. 

HABBY JACKSON. General State Director for JULES HUBBY. 

Address United Booking Office or Boom 1, New York Theatre Building-, H. Y. City. 



Freeman 



Bros. 



Those refined medley singers and danoers who do different styles of dancing . How on the Sullivan 
A Considine Circuit. Coming East soon. Open for Burlesque or Vaudeville for next season. 



FRED KARNOS Comedians 

Original London Comedy Company. 
Manager, ALF. REEVES. 

To whom address all communication!, en route. 

MONDAY, JAN. 80, KEENEY'8, BROOKLYN, "A NIGHT IN AN ENGLISH KU8IC 
HALL," with BILLIE BEEVES, original "Drunk," , 

Playing return dates everywhere with bigger success than ever. 

Slums of London, etc, in repertoire. 

Productions Copyrighted. Pirates keep off. 



J 



A HAPPY AND PB08PEB0U8 NEW YEAB TO ALL. 



Go-4th 



Swan 



THE ECCENTRIC BECBUTT8, 



AND 



Bambard 



"On Guard" with W. B. Watson's Army, playing Orogan and the Sheriff In "Krausemeyer's Alley." 
JAN. SO, BON TON, JERSEY CITY. Agents, WESLEY A PINCUS. 



AND 

Week Jan. 13, Kajestio, Dallas, Texas. ("All Bight.") Week Jan. 80, Kajestic, Huston, Texas. 




THE 8PEAKER OF TALK 



PHIL MILLS 

In LEW SULLY'S nonsensical narration entitled "ORATORICAL DISTURBANCES" 




COOK 



The 

Juggling 

Kid 



IN HIS OWN ORIGINAL NOVELTY, "JUGGLING IN THE DEPOT." 



Direction JACK LETT. 



LILLIAN HALE * «. 

IN "THE PHANTOM RIVAL," BY SAOEB DEAN. 

One of the best laughing sketches la vaudeville. Big suooess everywhere. 

JUST KIDS 

RAWSON and CLARE 

FEATURED WITH WEBEB A BUSH'S "BON TONS." 




KOBBIS 



DOLLY 



MANLEY and STERLING 

Presenting their Playlette, 
"KID HICKEY" (A Story in Slang) 

Yes, we wrote "I'D GIVE HE LIFE FOB A PAL LIKE YOU" 
for our own act. All singing rights reserved. 

SEYMOUR and NESTOR 




Character 8ongs and Chsnges. 



120 W. 110th St., New York. 



Phone 8470 Mornlngslde. 



Have Your Card in VARIETY 



Formerly off CARVER and POLLARD 



;|RCUSPAR0D! 



BARNUM 



BLI I.LI D 



r v v 



,<* 



-'; ;.... 



Playi»g Klaw H Erlang«r Circuit 



Open time after April lit 



IIMIM 



A SMART ACT SMABTLY DBE8RED. 




nd RYAN 



AT LIBEBTY. 



ADDBE8B CABE VARIETY. 



Formerly of GILLIHAN end MURRAY 



LOUISE CARVER / TOM MURRAY 

,.«. , NELSON THEATRE, SPRINGFIELD, MASS., WEEK JAN. 13tH 

The feature from a humorous viewpoint Is produced by Louise Csrrer and Tom Murray In their eccentricities In singing snd repertoire, possessing a delightful personality."— Brooklyn "Eagle," Jan. 7. 

When answering advertitemenU kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



25 



&}■ 

R 



"SHRP SHAVR" 

A eoMplct* Safely Raior for the price of a Hh»»« 




Or 13 

2Ct Stamps. 

Shrp Shavr 
Stropper 10c. 



No more apologies for a "Sunday growth" In a 
"Slab Town." The SHRP SHAVR Safety Razor 
U a full fledged Safety Rasor. No Toy. 
-5 ft _ Our complete outfit. Razor, <*A. 
DUCl •" eitra Blades & Stropper QUGl 
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION OR 
RETURN YOUR MONET. 

SCHROEDER-9PAHN CO. 

Dept. V, 820 Broadway, New York. 



JOS. W. COHENS 

UNREDEEMED 

Fine white DIAMONDS 85 par cent, lower than 
market value. Exchangeable at full price paid 
and RETURNABLE ANY TIME, lest 6 per oent. 

Diamond Broker 
62 7 PENN ST.* R FADING. FA. 





I 




of every description, belt make. 
Large illustrated catalogue, 
15c. Small illustrated cata- 
logue FREE. 

BAILEY * TRIPP CO., 

P. 0. Box 460, 

CAMBRIDGEPORT, MASS. 




I. MILLER* Manti>faactur«*r 

ot T hoof rlo al 
Boots and Shoes 
CLOG 
and 
BALLET 
SHOES a spe- 
cialty. All work 
made at short 
notice. 

309 W. 23d St.. New York. Tel. 100 Chelsea. 
Mention VARIETY. 



LOUIS WESLYN 

Author of "TWO MEN AND A BOTTLE." the 
farcical hit of Howard Ttuesdell and Company. 
Writer of sketches and songs for Nick Long and 
Idslene Cotton, Carter and Wsters, Hallen and 
Fuller, Willa Holt Wskefleld. Lillian Apel, Hearn 
and Duncan, Lillian Ashley, Innes and Ryan, 
and many others. 

LOUIS WE8LYN 

SKETCHES AND SONGS, 

Headquarters, Grand Opera House, Indianapolis. 



MATT WOODWARD 

Writer of MATTHEWS & ASHLEY'S great Dope 
Song, "Please Don't Wake Me!" Producer and 
Co-author of "BUSY IZZY." "ROYAL CHEF," 
RENTZ-SANTLEY BURLESQUES (7 seasons), 
Lyrics of BEHMAN SHOW (this season), etc. 

I make a specialty of Sketches with Plots, and 
Get-Pack Song-Finishes to Acts. "Nothing on 
hand." 

"Exclusive-Permit" PARODIES, limited num- 
ber sold. Send for list. 

Studio: 215 W. 49th St., N. Y. City. 



CHARLES HORWITZ 

Sketches from the pen of Horwlts are the best 
In vaudeville. Order your sketch, monologue or 
lyric from the autbnr of those great hits now 
being played by Frederick V. Bowers A Co., 
Harry First A Co., Gracie Emmett A Co., Chad- 
wick Trio, Henry and Young, Coombs and Stone, 
Le Roy and Clayton, Somen* and Storke and over 
one hundred other big successes. 

CHARLES HORWITZ, 
108-104 W. 38th St., 

Mark-Stern Building. New York. 

MATTHEW GOLDMAN 

SKETCH WRITER. 

Up-to-date writer with up-to-date Ideas. Char- 
acter, Jewish. Slang, Protean, Italian acts, eto. 
Author: "The Marriage Fee." "For the Lots 
of Mammy," "The Call of the Blood," "Stags 
Struck." "Behind the Footlights." 

High grade vaudeville acts a specialty. 
108 WEST 111TH 8T., N. Y. CITY. 



WIG MAKER 

ARTISTS' T0UPEE8. PAINTS. POWDERS, ETC. 

Good work, low prices. Stamp for price list. 

G. SCHINDHELM, 118 W. 26th St., New York. 



not seem to have the "go" to them that they 
had on the other circuit. Their act lacked spirit. 
Buster's musical act in "one" goes great, bow- 
ever. The boy is a wonder in his line. Spencer 
Kelley and Frederic Rose make a fairly good 
singing duo. 

PALACE (Chas. H. Waldron, mgr.).— Eddie 
Fitzgerald is not tbe whole of the Trans-Atlantic 
Burlesquer's show, but comes mighty near it. 
He is one of tbe best stage Irishmen this house 
has seen in many moons. He doubles with John 
Quinn in tbe olio and adds still more to bis 
I*opularity. As a whole the company ranks high 
and the show Is good. Mabel Leslie supplies the 
song part of the olio. Norma Bell and her 
Ponies have good position, while tbe Kallnowski 
Brothers, acrobats, are wonders. Clay Smith 
and Eddie Convey have a song and patter skit 
that goes well, and Raynor, Wbiteley and Kil- 
lion do a novelty singing turn. Lizzie Freligh is 
high card in the "tight" section. Tbe Palace's 
own show includes The Musical Macks, a fine act 
of Its kind;- Bert Howe, as a rube; The Angers, 
wooden shoe and skate dancers; Marion and 
Welser, comedy acrobats, and Jay Paige, clay 
modeler. 

HOWARD (Jay Hunt, mgr.).— Tbe Jolly Grass 
Widows is good, fairly clean, well costumed and 
tbe business Is bright and full of snap. In the 
olio are The Three Musketeers, Henry and Francis 
in "The First Rehearsal," The Three Del tons, 
gymnasts, and Folk and Coe, musicians. The 
Howard's own bill Is varied and strong. At tbe 
top are Brooks and Vedder In a lively sketch, 
"The New Housemaid"; Hathaway and Siegel, 
wooden shoe dancers; Austin Walsh in his "Rub- 
berneck Wagon" idea; Tbe Russets on tbe trapeze; 
Parker and Ward, sidewalk talkers; Rose Carlin, 
sonbrette; Lewis and Young, Price and Steele in a 
good sketch, and Alllni, crayonist, complete the 
bill. 

COLUMBIA (H. N. Farren, mgr. ) .—George P. 
Murphy towers above Tbe Tiger Lilies in the 
burlettas, and Carrie Ezier has the honors in 
the olio. Others in the olio are Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Ellsworth, Josle Webb, Jack Irwin In an 
odd monologue, John Marion and Grace Lillian, 
the latter in a very good dancing specialty. 

LYCEUM (G. H. Bachellor, mgr. ).— Clark's 
Runaway Girls, beaded by Georgia Cunningham, 
put up a pretty good offering. Milton Schuster 
heads the male portion. He would make any 
bill a success. The Bowery Comedy Quartet, 
Monahan and Monahan, Marlon and Thompson, 
The Livingstons, Risley Acrobats, and Estella 
Rose comprise the olio. Miss Rose Is far better 
this season than last, her impersonations being 
more finished. 



PHILADELPHIA 

By GEORGE M. YOUNG. 

KEITHS (II. T. Jordan, mgr.).— A bill which 
Involves everything in the category of vaudeville 
entertainment, from the sublime to tbe ridiculous 
and back again, with a trip between a police 
station and the White House, Is this week's offer- 
ing, and if the amount of enthusiasm evoked by" 
Monday evening's audience, which almost filled 
the theatre, Is evidence, no bill of more merit as 
an entertainer has been seen in this house In a 
long period. The sketch, "At tbe White House," 
presented by Benjamin Chapln Is replete with 
historical atmosphere, Interesting principally 
through the study of the character of Abraham 
Lincoln, portrayed with remarkable likeness by 
Chapln, so far as enabled to discern through 
portraits seen of the "War President." The 
sketch was exceedingly well liked. Joe Hart's 
"A Night In a Police Station" was another big 
scoring number. The piece has been cut several 
minutes and shows general improvement, though 
the girl with the rasping top notes and the dis- 
cordant rendition of the beautiful "Lucia" num- 
ber still remains. It is a much better sketch 
than when seen last and pleased Immensely. 
Clarice Vance, the best of all the "coon" song 
singers, returned with three new ones, scoring 
her usual pronounced hit. Miss Vance finished 
with "I'm Afraid to Go Home In the Park," 
which May Irwin used as her strongest card for 
two weeks, but the success of the "Southern 
Singer" was none the less marked. The musical 
offering of Frederick Voelker was the artistic 
treat of the show. Voelker, who was formerly 
located In this city, is an accomplished violinist 
and was accompanied on the piano by Mrs. 
Voelker. The selections offered Included difficult 
compositions, given excellent treatment, much ap- 
preciated by music lovers. Mignonette Kokln 
furnished delightful entertainment with her 
character change songs, her dance In Imitation 
of Fred Stone being a great piece of work for 
a woman. Tbe big laughing hit was Gallettl's 
Monkeys, the comical antics of the animals keep- 
ing the house in roars. Hawthorne and Burt 
won a goodly share of the laughs with their pat- 
ter and the comedian's excellent loose dancing. 
The Heras Family of Acrobats showed a number 
of striking tricks, the two and three-high figures 
being cleanly done. Tbe woman who acts as the 
principal understander deserves special mention. 
Martinetti and Sylvester follow too closely the 
work of Rice and Prevost. Their efforts are 
earnest If not original and the act is a hit. Joe 
Flynn had some new parodies with some new 
and much old talk, which pleased. Henry and 
Young did as well a" possible In their position In 
"one," with a singing and talking act, their 
sketch being omitted. Charles Howlson, whistler: 
The Hurleys, acrobatic specialty, and Bennler and 
Gourdler, "sister" act* also among the three a- 
dav numbers, passed with fair success. 

BIJOU (Lewis H. Baker, mgr.).— The widest 
latitude allowable In what Is known as "bur- 
lesque license" has been taken advantage of In 
the construction of "The Navigators," the two- 
act piece used by the "Miss New York Jr." 
Company, which had Its first big showing in tho 
East this week. "Burlesque license" is responsi- 
ble for many glaring inconsistencies which might 
easily be remedied with good results. The "Miss 
New York Jr." Company Is styled "A $10,000 
Beauty Show" and the best claim to this captlou 
is through the Rcenery carried. The expenditure 
of Just a trifle more money would have supplied 
another drop or two. which Is sorely needed. In 
the second act, near the finish, the scene jumps 



from among the Egyptian pyramids to the North 
Pole, by way of "the Road to Siberia," in Russia. 
For this a local street drop is used to allow for 
the full stage change and tbe effect is really lu- 
dicrous, even allowing for "burlesque license." 
There are four scenes in each act, the story of 
the piece being carried through to the finish with 
only the Interpolated numbers and specialties 
Interrupting. It is not a difficult story to follow, 
for the comedy Is almost straight and clean cut 
from start to finish, the abseuce of "slapstick" 
comedy and offensive features being one of the 
strongest assets of the show. It is the cleanest 
show that has visited this city this season, there 
being not one line of suggest iveness nor a pro- 
fane word used. There Is nothing about tbe cos- 
tuming that would prove that this item of expense 
cut much figure in. the $10,000 outlay, though 
the chorus makes a fairly good appearance and 
numerous changes are made. There are only 
two good comedy parts and at times the action 
drags through too lengthy dialogue. Dave Fergu- 
son has the role of "sissy," though It Is not 
the type usually found in burlesque*, at times be- 
ing almost straight comedy. The character is 
prominent throughout, occupying the stage as 
much, if not more than any other in the show, 
and at times It begins to grate on the nerves. 
Ferguson handles It In excellent style, however, 
following closely to the character without at 
any time becoming offensive, and with Abe 
Reynolds, in tbe familiar Hebrew role, takes good 
care of the comedy. Reynolds plays the Hebrew 
quietly and avoids the extreme style of burlesque 
dressing, which is commendable. George M. 
Perry is rather unconvincing as a professor, 
though the role given him is probably as much 
at fault as he is. Jack Davis has tbe "straight" 
part and plays it to the extreme, with no life or 
animation. Miss Lee White has the one principal 
female role and fills It most acceptably. She 
makes an attractive appearance, looking exceed- 
ingly well in each of the several costumes she 
wears, and sings several numbers in a voice of 
light but pleasing quality. Miss White shows 
apt ability in reading her lines and in the busi- 
ness, which suggests that she has not always 
been identified with burlesque. Helen Davis is 
the other female who has a part, and tbe lack 
of animation is as noticeable lu her case as in 
the man who afterwards appears as her partner 
in a specialty. Several of the chorus girls are 
given a chance to speak lines, v 1th the usual 
result. The chorus needs rehearsing. Less than 
half tbe number In the line work as If they meant 
it and there is a woeful lack of unison when 
they do make up their minds to get busy. One 
girl, on the end, works energetically throughout, 
wile another attracts attention by attempting 
"cooch" movements at every opportunity. With 
the cleanliness of the show In mind, it is diffi- 
cult to understand why it is allowed, for she 
Is not even graceful In her actions. Perry and 
White have the first specialty, introduced rather 
abruptly. The pair make good, chiefly through 
the efforts of Miss White and her neat, we.* 
dressed appearance. Perry also dresses neatly 
and the two work up a good finishing number. 
The Esterbrooks Introduce a musical specialty, 
playing duets on several instruments, tbe last 
used being a novel arrangement of something 
like auto-horns. The effect Is more novel than 
musical. The act was well liked. Jack and 
Helen Davis proved one of the big hits of the 
show In a dancing specialty. Miss Davis does 
some clever stepping and the pair finish with a 
buck dance on roller skates. This specialty Is 
Introduced In familiar dress ln>a scene represent- 
ing the Ice-bound country of the extreme North, 
and Miss Davis appears in soubrette costume 
directly after the comedians have appeared 
wrapped up In winter covering and used the 
cold weather for the base of their comedy. The 
dance should be given In "one," with a suitable 
drop, and a change to fur-trimmed costumes would 
make a capital dress for the finish, even thougu 
roller skates are used. The glaring Inconsistency 
In dress Is carried through to the finale, the 
girls last appearing In tights, led by Miss White 
garbed in the same manner, while there is no 
evidence that the weather has moderated. A 
"kind applause" finish brings down the curtain. 
The trip to the Pole by a party starting from 
a club Is an old theme, but In Its present form 
makes an excellent vehicle, and the pleasing In- 
cidental music with several popular melodies* 
lntcrjKdated forms an entertainment that should 
meet with general approval anywhere. As a 
special feature, "Ampere" gave a scientific ex- 
hibition of his skill In handling electricity, the 
tricks being similar to those exhibited by Volta, 
In vaudeville. 

CASINO (Ellas & Koenlg, mgrs.).— Consider- 
able Improvement has been made In the show 
given by the "Parisian Widows." which made 
its return visit to this city. Frank Abbott, who 
has been identified with the "legitimate" for 
years, has assumed the managerial reins and 
had made a number of changes for the letter. 
Fields and Wooley handle the principal comedy 
In excellent shape. The Hebrew character has 
been dropped, and James Rowland adds a good 
Irish character, also leading several numbers with 
success. Thomas Dugan has the "straight" role. 
The chorus Is working with more snap and vigor, 
the numbers being done as well as any seen here 
this season. Much well worn comedy material 
Is used In the first pHrt, but the burlesque Is 
worked up in pleasing fashion. Maggie Ross 
and I.lddy Berg have been taken from the chorus 
to Introduce a burlesque on the "Merry Widow 
Waltz" and do !{ cleverly, while the "Klddo" 
dance, which Is a new title for a "cooeh." done 
by Ollle Omega, was surpressed after the first 
show. A needed change In the living picture* 
poses wns being made this week. Roland and 
Dugan offered their familiar talking act In the 
olio. Jeanne Brooks Is still wearing her smile 
and with a change of songs proved one of the 
features of the show. The Lynotte Sisters made 
a good appearance In showy dresses, but need to 
display a little life to keep pace with the rest. 
There Is a long list of numbers. Fields and 
Wooley work hard from start to finish, as well 
as appearing In their Specialty, which made a 
hit. It Is a far different show than when It 
was seen at the dayety. and the well filled houses 
•were the mark of appreciation. 

TROCADBRO (Fred. Wlllson. mgr. 1 . -With sev- 
eral changes In the cast and olio specialties and 




First- Class Film 
Rental Service 

199 THIRD AVE., NEW YORK 

AGENTS FOR 

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12 V» CENTS FEB FOOT. 

"THE PERSEVERING LOVER" 

Agents for GAUMONT CHRONOPHONE. 
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1806 BROADWAY, 

Formerly with Max 
Telephone 4467 88th St. 



NEW YOBK. 



Jack Burnett 

GRAND OPEBA HOUSE, CHICAGO, 
The "ACTWRIGHT," Still 

WRITES 

BEAL SKETCHES. 

Any of my 100 "clients" will tell you 
I write absolutely 

NOTHING BUT HITS 

NOTICE 

DAN. O'BRIEN, 

The Leaner, 

HAS FURNI8HED B00MB, 

Bath. Steam Heat. 



260 W. 88TH ST.. NEW YORK. 

DIAMONDS 

Ask E. F. Carnithers. Ed. 0. lleyman, or W. F. 
Keefe, of the West. Vaudeville, Chicago Office, 
ahotit "DOC" WKNER. I sell Diamonds st 
wholesale prices to the profession; guaranteeing 
to return your money any time it looks better to 
you than the diamond. 

I will make TERMS If you can't pay all cash. 
Write whi-ii you will l><- in Chicago; I want you 
to have a look any way. 

"DOC" M. F. WEBER, 
K. 316, 260 Deirborn St., Chicago. 

Scenery 

Vandevills and Production. Largest Scenlo Concern la 
Warld. Water Color. aUlke and Dye. JJANIKLA 
S TUDIOS. CHICAGO. 

\A/AIM 

(20) Vaudeville Acts Weekly 

Tell all first letter. 

Come into Balmy South. 

Write in often 

GEO. WELLINGTON ENOLEBRETH, 
Permanent Address SAVANNAH, OA. 

wTTnted 

A PUNCH AND JUDY SHOW 

AND ILLUSIONS OR ANYTHING SUITABLE 

FOR CHILDREN, 

FOR "C0SM0VILLA," 

AT STATE ARMORY, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

ENTIRE WEEK OF FEB. 24TH. 

Send bids to 

DR. GERALD GRIFFIN, 

140 Washington Avenue, 
ALBANY, N. Y. 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



26 



VARIETY 



RCPRBSBNTATIVB ARTI8T8 



RBPRC9CINTATIVC AHTI«T» 



AL W. 



MADDOX 



AND MAYBELLE 



MELVIN 



STARRING BEAflON 1908-00 IN THE COMEDY DRAMA WITH MUSIC, " THE DAII DEVIL KID " B y JOHN P. RITTER. 

UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF JOSEPH KING, KNIOKZB BOOKER THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK 

WM. TULLY, GENERAL REPRESENTATIVE. WESLEY A PINOUB, VAUDEVILLE AGENTS. 






MAXIM No. 42 

Don't ret in a rut. Don't do a thin* limply 
because tome one else doe* it. Don't follow a 
leader unless you have chosen a high ideal. Out 
out your own pathway, and make your life in* 
dividual. 

BOOKED SOLID— WILTON, Agent. 



DcVcldc & Zelda 

.Artistic 6quilibri$h> 



BESSIE WYNN 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 
Direction of MR. E. P. ALBEE. 



ABNER 



HARRY 



ALI 



AND 



PEISER 



En Route T. W. Miner's "HIGH JINK8." ECCENTRIC COMEDY ACROBATS. 

WEEK JAN. 90, SHUBERT, NEWARK. 



WHAT THEY ALL BAY: A GREAT ACT. 



AL RAYNO 



A 
N 
D 



CO 



INTRODUCING THEIR WONDERFUL ACROBATIC BULL DOGS. Direction ALP T. WILTON. 

James R. Waters 

"THE SINGER OP THE GHETTO." 
MANCHESTER'S "VANITY FAIR" COMPANY JAN. 90, LYCEUM, BOSTON. 



KITTLE 



Welch-Francis 

Assisted by COYLE, BEATRICE and DYER. 

BOOKED SOLID. Direction JACK LEVY. 



Castellane 



AND 



Bro. 






THE MOST SENSATIONAL TRICK CYCLISTS IN VAUDEVILLE. 

Address Care VARIETY. 



ELLA 



Claus and Radcliffe 



CLAUDE 



At a regular theatre with a regular act. Made the audience laugh and applaud. Olympic Ohioago, Week Jan. 90. 

P. 8. — Doing a refined Hebrew in everything that the word implies and never pulled a hat down over the ears. 



SPECIAL FEATURE. 



Potter and Hart well 



THE MAN WITH THE TWO HEADS. 



NELLIE WALLACE 

The Inimitable, Eccentric Comedienne 

Re-opened December 30, Colonial Thoatre 



BILLY HART 



Principal comedian and producer of all the material in 

MANCHESTER'S "GAY MASQUCRAD1 

a show that is being so well talked about all along the line. 



• • 



PETER 



META 



Donald 



AND 



Carson 



DALY "° O'BRIEN 

THAT FUNNY "TANGLEFOOT" DANCING ACT. 

Not one in one like this ono. EUROPE JUNE 15th. 



ELLIS 



MONA 




"The man with the lamp-post and the bonnie Scotch lassie." 
January 18th, Orpheum, Brooklyn; January 20th, Alhambra, New York. 

LEON ROGEE 



Novelties of Musical Imitations. 
WEEK JAN. 80, PROCTOR'S, ALBANY. 



in and Hehr 



England's Premier High-Class Comedy Duettiits. 
Success, Cumberland, Md. (third week), special attraction. 
WeekJin, 20, Pastor's. N. Y. 



A NOISELESS UPROAR LAST WEEK KEITH & PROCTOR'S UNION SQUARE THEATRE. 

Chas. Howison 

World's Greatest Bird Warbler. 
This Week Keith's, Philadelphia. Week Jan. 20, Kathaway's, Brockton, Mass. 



RAY 



MAZIE 



DUNCAN and HOFFMAN 



Comedians. 17 Minutes in "One." 



HOPKINS'. LOUISVILLE, THIS WEEK. 



H/W/JB YOU SEEN XHB STAGE CARPENTER? 



CHARLES >«° FANNIE VAN 



in "A Case off 
Emergency" 



Assisted by JOC BLYL£R. Tim* All Filled. 



Personal Direction MAX HART, Hudson Theatre Bldrf. 



^Vhen ansiccring advertisements kindly mention Variety. 






VARIETY 



27 





Late Myers 
& Keller 





MYERS 

Vaudeville Agent 



Representing Only the Best Vaudeville Acts 
Can Use Acts That Can Play Sundays . • • . 



Back at the Old Address: 



3 1 West 3 1 st Street, New York 



TEL. 1 I 87 - MADISON. 



a new burlesque, the "High Jinks Burlcsquers" 
paid their return visit. Harvey Brooks has re- 
placed Charles Barrett In the first part and bur- 
lesque and also In the sketch presented by Beat- 
rice Marlowe and Company. Brooks Is a big Im- 
provement every way. Abner All does a small bit 
as a Hebrew In the first part. In the olio James 
Doherty, who Is the principal number-leader, offers 
an illustrated song specialty, doing nicely with 
It, while three girls, who also work In the chorus, 
offer a specialty calling themselves "Three Va- 
riety Girls. Two make an excellent appear- 
ance and with the third girl give a good im- 
pression with a song and dance number, which 
closes. The two have a number in which they are 
supported by the chorus, while the third introduces 
a harp and dance specialty. The act strengthens 
the olio considerably. "Roseland," the burlesque, 
lias been dropped altogether, and an old time 
afterpiece, with some revising, one or two num- 
bers, a lot of horse play which allows the co- 
medians more latitude, and a "Merry Widow" 
waltz number is used as the closing number, not 
to forget the patriotic finale with the "Spirit of 
'70" tableaux. The first part has been brightened 
up and here another old time burlesque piece, 
which might be called "The Mad Queen" or "The 
Kissing Bug," is introduced. Phil Mills shows to 
much better advantage than on the previous visit, 
being responsible for most of the laughs. The 
"High Jinks" show has been changed to one of 
the familiar style of burlesque shows, with ma- 
terial of the rougher class predominating, and it 
is handled better by the company than the original 
material. 



ASHLAND, PA. 

COMIQUE.— Hart and Burkert playing to big 
business; moving pictures and ill. songs; Geo. 

Sllliman, singer. SCENIC (Leiby and Martin, 

mgrs.). — Opposition to the above. Giving two 
complete performances for one admission. Singers, 
Misses Kellar and Oster. H. R. If. 



BEAUMONT, TEX. 

LYRIC (Frank Furlong, mgr.).— Trump, legless 
wonder, headllner, excellent; Curran ami De Gray, 
comedy sketch, very good; Gladys Mlddleton. 
mezzo-soprano, well received. Vanr and De Clair- 
ville. aerial, good.— —NEW MAJESTIC (Itupert 
Cox, mgr.). — Fred Hewitt, comedy Juggler, very 
good; The DeVltts. blackface, good; Frank Lnv- 
elle. illusions, well received; Miss Elliott, ill. 
songs, good. REKLAW. 

CAMDEN, N. J. 
BROADWAY (John C. Peebles, mgr.).— Stuart 
Barnes, hit of bill, one of the best yet offered. 
Marry Tate's "Motoring" big laugh winner; 
Aerial Smiths; Belle Hathaway's Monkey Circus; 
Eekoff and Gordon, character musical act; The 
IMots. Jugglers; Barry and Hughes in a lively 
sketch and moving pictures. G. M. YOUNG. 



CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA. 

PEOPLE'S (Vic Hugo, mgr.).— Week 1.1: Griff 
Brothers, rings, marvelous strength; Sullivan and 
Pasquelena, good; Clemenso Brothers, musical, 
laughs; Marie Clark, singer and conversationalist, 

pleased; Dudley and Dudley, neat singing. 

BIJOU and DELFHAS.— Moving pictures and 
111 *»»tfs. CHAS. II. LITTLE. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
By HARRY HESS. 

VARIETY'S Central Offce, 

107 Bell Block. 
PEOPLE'S (James E. Pennessy, mgr.).— Cali- 
fornia Girls (John Grieves, mgr.). There Is op- 
portunity for the making of a great show with 
« few good clean comedy lines in the opening 
burlesque, "The Sultan's Wives," but as it Is 
l"it on at present it Is lacking. Sam J. Adams 
and William Mausey are featured, but neither 
comes up to the requirements. The chorus is 
Particularly good looking as a whole. They are 
nclit,,.,! nt ( i me8 t0 ghlrk, and fall to 
bring out the best results. The women 
principals and Fred W. Taylor make the 
nest singing show that has appeared at 
People'! Theatre lately. Reba Donaldson, in 
|ne Opening, doe* a number of Scotch dances 
that are gracefully executed. Mav Orletta. 
Fred W. Taylor, La Belle Marie, Tillle Cohen, 
Grace Towner, Gladys St. John and Flossie 
Towner and chorus sang the "Miserere" from II 
J rovatOTO and brought the house down. Taylor 
and Orletta have fine voices and were especially 
good, in the olio were Gladys St. John and 
lillie Cohen, singing, good; La Belle Marie and 
M- J. O'Rourke have a clever specialty. She 
<I<>es a song and dance and then a disrobing act 
on the slack-wire, a great act. Orletta and 



Taylor sprang a surprise with their singing, be- 
ing compelled to respond to six encores. George 
A. Street, assisted by H. P. Kelly, Rae Cone and 
Mrs. George W. Street, has one of the biggest 
scenic numbers in burlesque. The closing 
burlesque, "The Girl from Chelsea," does not 
amount to much. A song by the Towner Sisters, 
two good looking girls, went big. 

COLUMBIA (II. M. Ziegler, mgr. Sunday re- 
hearsal 10). — Les Aublu-Leonel opened the bill. 
This is a French singing and dancing act, and 
may have been good to anybody who understood 
It, but the German element of this city has not 
been educated to appreciate the act. Barrows, 
Lancaster Company in "Tactics," good; Eleanor 
Falke, singing comedienne, excellent; O. liana 
San and Company, one of Joe Hart's novelties, 
a Japanese study of living pictures, good; Julius 
Tanuen in a monologue, a big hit; Chas. Guyer 
and Ida Crispl in their acrobatic and dancing 
sketch, entitled "Watch the Finish," are very 
clever; The Montrose Troupe of Acrobats, a hit; 
Harry Houdlni, commencing bis second week, 
went big all week. 

STANDARD (Frank Clements, house agent).— 
Al Reeves' Big Show. Mr. Reeves has brought 
the best show he has ever had to Cincinnati, but 
it abounds with smut and suggestiveuess. The 
"Pickwick Class" is a breezy burlesque in which 
Blanche Martin, Almeda Fowler, Maude Elliot, 
Ed Morris, Pete Lawreuce, Max Gordon, John 
Ekardt and Tom Fullam are principals. The 
chorus consists of 20 good looking girls who arc 
hustling all the time and do good work. A big 
hit was made with a song, "The Art of Self- 
Defense," in which the chorus donned boxing 
gloves and slugged away In lively fashion. In 
the olio, Al Reeves sang a number of parodies; 
Savoy Quartet, pleasing; Andy Lewis, assisted 
by Maude Elliot and Eva Millard, presented a 
sketch, "Won at the Wire," very clever. The 
close, "Conojogy," abounds with much vulgarity 
and kidding, but Andy Lewis keeps them in an 
uproar all the time. Next: Fred Irwin's Big 
Show. 



CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

KEITH'S (H. A. Daniels, mgr.).— Grace Hazard 
headlines the bill wilh her artistic hit, "Five 
Feet of Comic Opera"; James and Jennie Jee 
have a daring act on a tight wire; Joe and Sadie 
Britton do some lively eccentric dancing; Ned 
Wayburn's Pbantastic Phantoms went well; 
Robert L. Dailey a. id Company, "Fun on a 
Trolley," effective rough comedy; Mason and 
Keeler, "A Hero," full of slang sayings that 
seem to please; Elinore Sisters, burlesque, "The 
Actress and the Maid," Is full of good comedy 
and won favor; Kitty Traney has a very dainty 

novelty. HIPPODROME (Max FeatkeiHTuer, 

mgr.). — Mile. Liane d'Eve made her first ap- 
pearance in Cleveland at the Hippodrome. ller 
songs are all in French, but are understanding 
by the Jestures that go with them. Mile. d'Eve 
makes all her changes of costume In full view of 
the audience. "Temple of Music," a big musical 
act offered by Chas. Willard. is very good; 
Blake's Animal Circus, pleased; Powers' Elephants, 
"Coaching Days" and "The Cloudburst" still con- 
tinue.— 

WALTER D. HOLCOMB. 



DALLAS. TEXAS. 

THE MAJESTIC (E. F. Cairuthers. gen. mgr.; 
B. S. Mm •kenfuss. i<s. mgr. Monday rehearsal 
ll). — Week Jan. 5: Headed by Caron nnd Farum, 
who pleased in a slap-stick comedy acrobatic 
turn; James F. MacDunald. singing comedian and 
raconteur, drew a large share of the applause; 
Coletta Powers and Company, "The Poet. The 
Reporter and Tin' Maid." elaborately staged act, 
and one that affords considerable amusement; 
Charles De Camo and trained dog. and Esmeralda, 
expert xylophone player. 1h>Ui well received; 
Marlon and Pearl, comedians, clean and refresh- 
ing fun; The Burbanks. "Tile Automobile Tramp 
ami the Soubrette," added attraction. 

M. S. FIFE. 

DENVER, COL. 

ORI'MEl'M (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.). Week 
0: Nance O'.WHI and Company, presenting "The 
Jewess," hCQdlincr. Miss O'Neill, in the curse 
scene, displaying the great emotional power of 
which she Is poSSesse/JMSyd this. In combination 
with her strung v.. ice '■^kT<lu. »<1 a climax excep- 
tionally dramatic The bkabe Family, excellent 
acrobatics. The graceful anil clever trapeze per- 
formance of the Urina Sisters was noteworthy. 
"The" guartet. nl-o pleasing number. The four 
young men look mat and sing well, nnd it is a 
regret they are not given more time. The Bag- 
gesens, comedy Jugglers, were a laughing hit. 
Bertie Fowler did nicely. Clarence Slegel. musical, 
opened well. Business good. MAJESTIC (Juo. 







"THE MAD MUSICIAN" 
The Most Versatile Musician in the World 

The only man who plays in the orchestra, and performs on 30 Different Instruments. 

The Act that brings people in to see a Vaudeville Show for the first time. 

TALENT KNOWS NO COUNTRY. "Vasco" has performed and been the talk of 15 different 
countries within the last six years— AMERICA, ENGLAND, GERMANY, AUSTRALIA, SOUTH 
AFRICA, FRANCE, RUSSIA, HOLLAND, SPAIN, PORTUGAL, INDIA, CHINA, NORWAY, 
SWEDEN and BELGIUM. 
Next Week (Jan. 20th), ORPHEUM, BOSTON. MAY 25TH. EMPIRE, LONDON (8 WEEK8). 





RESTAURANT 
CHICAGO 



Mr. Abe Frank, for the past five years sole 
Manager of the Sherman House and College Inn. 
Chicago, which connection he has severed, 
announces his association with Rector's. Clark, 
and Monroe Streets. Chicago, as part owner 
and Managing Director. 

Mr. Frank extends to his friends and acquaint- 
ances among the profession a cordial welcome 
to Rector's, assuring them of a continuation of his 
personal solicitude for their comfort and entertainment. 



*# 



Majestic Circuit 

INTERSTATE AMUSEMENT CO. (PROPRIETORS). 

E. F. CARRUTHERS, General Manager. 

PLAYING MODERN VAUDEVILLE IN THE 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. 

Opena Mondays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. 

Opena Mondays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

DALLAS, Texas 

Opens Sundays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

FT. WORTH, Texas 

Opens Mondays. Daily Matineea. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

HOUSTON, Texas 

Daily Matineea. Opens 8undaya» 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas 

Opena Sundays. Daily Matineea. 
Popular Prices. 


LYRIC THEATRE, 

MOBILE, Ala. 

Opens Mondays. Daily Matinees. 
Popular Prices. 


MAJESTIC THEATRE, 

WACO, Texas 

Playing; Traveling- Companies. 
Popular Prices. 


OUR BOOKING DEPARTMENT IS PREPAB ED TO FURNISH BANDS, VAUDEVILLE ACTS, 
ETC., FOR ALL THEATRES AND OCCASIONS IN THE SOUTH ON 8H0RT NOTICE 
ADDRESS ALL MAIL TO 

E. F. CARRUTHERS, mjestii tiestre bloc. CHICAGO, ILL. 



When anstverinff advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



28 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



FRANK FOGERTY 



"Ain't I Right, Boys?" 

The Dublin Minstrel 



Booked Solid until June, 1908. K. & P. Circuit 




Aorlr 



$rtb 



3l|0 Afltaura 

3umnil* Artteta 




Prrernltnij a itoorl fringing and ianring Bnrrialtg 

Address m per route, or 848 W. 48th ft., V. T. Oity. 

Act staged by JStd (Oayburii 

SCOTT i WHALEY 

ECCENTRIC COLORED COMEDIANS. 

NOW ON KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



Leonard 



AND 



Ward 



In an orirlnal act in one. "THE HEBREW FATHER AND SON.' 



BOOKED SOLID. 



Alio do • novelty in Italian. 



JOE M. WOOD, Agent. 




McMAHON 



AND 



WELLES 

- 

"PULLMAN 
PORTER 
MAIDS" 



THE MAGNETIC 



MAIDA DUPREE 



"High School Girls." 



Singing and Dancing Comedienne. 

JAN. 20. THEATRE ROYAL. MONTREAL. 



A 12 MINUTE LAUGH. 

The Versatile Comedienne. 

Time filled until Feb. 15. 
Permanent address 875 Central Park West, New York. 'Phone 7518 River. 



DEARLY ARVILLE 



JOLLY 



VAVOEVILLt SURPRISE 




LARKINS 



ORIGINAL 
CONCEPTION IN ONE 

Wesley & Pincus 

Exclusive Agent* 




OZARTO 

Double Instrumentalist 

Presenting the most Artistic and 
Sensational Musical Novelties 
extant. 

The Act that has never been du- 
plicated A revelation to the 
musical worlds 

My latest noveltyt playing a quartet 
of Occarinas at one time. 

ALL AGENTS. 

Address MOZARTO 

257 West 84th St., NEW YORK. 
OPEN FOR SUNDAYS AND CLUBS. 



Nelson 



Return to Vaudeville 






California's Favorite Comediennes 



A REAL COMEDY ACT. 



UNDER PERSONAL DIRECTION 



REICH & PLUNKETT, vaudeville agents 



118S BWAY., V. Y. 0. 



THE 



A SENSATIONAL EUROPEAN NOVELTY. 




ERNESTS 



and 

With the "SAM DEVERE" show 

in "DR. NEARLY, A DOCTOR" 





TRAMPOLINE HORIZONTAL BAR ARTI8T8. 
A featured attraction on Sulliven-Considin* Circuit. Address ears VARIETY. 

ADAMINI - TAYLOR 

Italian Character Impersonator, assisted by Eminent Violiniste, presents 

"THE STROLLING MUSICIANS" 

JAN. 20, ORPHEUM, ALLENTOWN, PA. 



Correspondents Wanted Wherever There is a Variety Performance. 



GEO. J. 



LAMBERT 'WILLIAMS 



T T A 



LIGHT ENTERTA1NIRS 



Thil Wo«lf Gotham, Brooklyn 



Under Direction off JKNIX JACOBS, 1402 Broadway. Now York 

When answering advertisement* kindly mention VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



29 



EDWARD 




KELLER 



VAUDEVILLE AGENT 

Announces that he will continue in the same office as heretofore 

Shubert Bldg., B'way and 39th St., New York City 



(ROOM 204) 



Cordray. mgr.).— Porter J. White and Company, 
presenting "Tlie Visitor," head. Special scenery 
Is carried and the act la well presented. Fontl- 
Bonl Brothers, Italian street singers, went big; 
Mike Quinn and Dog, one of the best dog acts 
seen here this season; Cummlngs. Thornton and 
Company, comedy sketch. "A Mnll Order Wife," 
hearty reception: Delphlno and Delmoro, novelty 
musical, good; RIckrod, novelty gymnast, opened 

and did well. Business fair. CRYSTAL. (Wm. 

A. Weston, gen. mgr.). — Oalety Quartet, head, 
took several encores; Dancing Davey, the big hit 
and introduces many new steps; Lynn and Bonnie 
Hazzard, singing and dancing act, scored big; 
Hardie Langdon. comic songs, substantial hit; 
Drako's Sheep and Dogs, opened and went nice- 
ly. Business excellent. NOVELTY (Bert Pitt- 
man, mgr.). — Williams, Thompson and Copeland 
(second week), using another of the old black- 
face acts, and went big; Mansfield Brothers, sharp- 
shooters, very good; Sidney Forrester, monologue, 
on early but did nicely; Gabbert and Oarrett, 
acrobats, opened and were well received. Business 
excellent. If. X. B. 



DUBUQUE, IOWA. 

BIJOU (Jake Rosenthal, mgr.).— Charles Wayne 
and Company In "The Morning After," very good; 
Sunataro Japanese Troupe, illusions, very good; 
Master Slater, character changes, all right; Far- 
;ell and I-* Roy, musical, going great; Al. Tler- 
ney, vocalist, good; Kinodrome.— — Lyric (Wil- 
liam L. Bradley, mgr.). — Picture house, do- 
ing good business. NOTE. — Rumors of two 

more vaudeville houses to be built in Dubuque 
are going the rounds, sites being bargained for 
in one instance. VERA V. HAAS. 



DULUTH, MINN. 

BIJOU (Joe Malt land, mgr.).— Week 1.1: Golden 
and Hughes, blackface, fair; 'Hie Sidonias, comedy 
jugglers, well received, much applause; Hayes 
and Suits, clever singers and dancers; Eddie 
Towers, blackface, good; Lottie Meany and Com- 
pany, fair sketch; Isadore Silver, ill. song In good 

voice. METROPOLITAN (W. H. Longstreet. 

mgr.). — "Sara Devere's opened to large business. 

ABE. 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 

SHEEDY'S (Chas. E. Cook, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10).— Headliner this week bill, Julie 
Ring and Company, "The Wrong Room," ex- 
cellent; Gartelle Brothers, "skatorial" comedians, 
good; Laurie Ordway, "A Cure for the Blues," 
pleasing; Laveen and Cross, "Roman Sports and 
Pastimes, one of the best seen here this season; 
Elsie Harvey and The Field Boys, singing and 
dancing, well applauded; Black and Jones, colored 

comedians, good; Winston's Seals, a hit. 

PLEASANT ST. (Jas. Mason, mgr.).— Myer and 
Mason, high kicking, good; Marie Glrard, ill. 
songs, good; Darallo. magic, fair; Mason and 

Doran, held over. PURITAN (Hooper & Hill, 

mgrs.l. — Moving pictures and 111. songs by Mr. 

1-loulT. SCENIC (L. M. BOAS, mgr.).— III. 

songs by Miss Graham and Bert Gilbert and 

moving pictures. Premier (E. L. Perry, mgr.). 

—111. Bongs by Miss Marvin and moving pic- 
♦'ires. K. F. RAFFERTY. 



FORT WORTH, TEX. 

MAJESTIC (T. W. Mullaly, mgr.).— Week 0: 
Eddie Moon makes them all laugh; The Holds- 
worths, new and clever; the Oe Monte Trio, acro- 
bats, good; Goforth and Doyle, good; Herbert's 
Dogs, good; Ed and Cora Simpson, dramatic read- 
ings, very laughable. LYRIC (Geo. \\\ Barn- 
hart, mgr.).— King and Strange*, comedy sketch, 
please; Ver Valln, ventriloquist, rerj pleasing; 
Staple and Chancy, comedy, gcnwl; C. E. Able, ill. 

gongs. NOTES.— The Bailey Family Theatre has 

changed from vaudeville to travelling stock. C. O. 
I^uck, the boy comedian, celebrated his 20th 
birthday with people who live here. 

F. II. BARNES. 
* 

H0B0KEN, N. J. 

EMPIRE (A. M. Brugg«>mnnn. mgr. Monday 
rehearsal 10).— Fine bill, headed by Harry Cor- 
son. Clarke and Company In "Strategy"; Mar- 

zella's Birds, very clever, fine stage setting'; 
Fanny Itlee. novel singing net, excellent; Frank 
Fogerty, comedians, amused; Eekert and Berg, 
good singers and musicians; Carlettn, contortion? 
wtj and the Majestic Trio, singing and dancing. 

JOHN KAY. 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
GRAND (Shnfer Ziegler, res. mgr).— Bill is 
entertaining this week without being noteworthy 



for any particularly excellent feature. "Ye Co- 
lonial Septet" has been seen and heard here too 
often to constitute a novelty. The Plcchlanis 
Troupe of Italian acrobats put up a really fine 
performance, succeed In stirring up rounds of 
applause. The favorite contributor is Elizabeth 
Murray, always popular In Indiauapolis. Miss 
Murray has a splendid song repertory this season, 
and needless to say makes good use of her ma- 
terial. O'Brien Havel and Effle Lawrence offer 
n comedy skit that serves Its purpose, although 
there isn't much in It that Is worth while, an I 
Inez Macauley, assisted by Clarence Oliver, ap 
pears in Edmund Day's farce, "The Unexpected," 
which has gone the rounds of the houses out 
tills way so often its title' should be changed 
to "The Expected." Ferry Corwey, musical 
clown, well liked; Charlene and Charlene, in an 
act that combines juggling and xylophone playing, 
good entertainers. The Matweef-Hugoston Troupe. 
Russian singers, dancers and acrobats, Interesting 
only because they come from the Czar's domains - 

and look it. EMPIRE (Henry Burton, mgr.).— 

"The Gay Toreadors," return engagement, satis- 
factory business. With the company are Garden 
and Sommers, a musical team, which comes In for 
a hearty welcome because of the fact that Som- 
mers was for years the trap drummer of the 

Empire orchestra. GAYETY (Edward Shayne. 

mgr.).— "The Jersey Lilies," show enjoyed by 
the Gayety'a clientele. L. W. 



JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

MAJESTIC (L. B. Cool, mgr.).— Jewell's Mani- 
kins is the headliner and pleasing immensely; 
Greene and Werner are also featured and make 
a hit; Monroe, Mack and Lawrence have a pleas- 
ing farce; Wills and Hassan, equilibrists, are 
the best ever seen here. Hanson and Nelson in 
a little bit of everything, scored; Alsace and 
Lorraine have a novel and pleasing musical act: 
Patsy Doyle, with his quiet humor, soon had 
them going. Walsh, Mealy and Montrose were 
to have appeared, but owing to the illness of Mr. 
Montrose the act was unable to appear, and 

Greene and Werner were substituted. PARK 

(H. W. Scherer, mgr.). — Minerva, "The Handcuff 
Queen," Is retained for another week as the 
headliner, and Pauline Paull and her Five Bow- 
ery Boys are also featured. The act is good. 
Bartlett and Collins in a novel comedy act are 
good; Howard Poston In smoke pictures and 
clay modeling Is fair; Winkler and Kress, comedy 

acrobats, are good. CAMBRIA (If. W. Scherer, 

mgr.).— Kellar and Thurston, 16-17; Harry Hast- 
ings*. French Maids, 21; Howe's Pictures (re- 
turn), 24. JESTICAM. 



LEAVENWORTH, KAN. 

ORPHEUM (L. J. Pico, mgr.).— Good bill, with 
Frank Bacon and Company as headliners, "Easy 
Liar"; The Mascoglns take well in novelty danc- 
ing; Bessie Livingston, singing and dancing, very 

(food. PEOPLE'S (M. Cunningham, mgr.).— 

Swalu and Osterman, very good; Wilson and 
Doyle, blackfaee, get the applause; Mabel Gage 
and Frank Williams, please with their singing 
and dancing; Mile. Annassia, does a Globe rolling 

stunt that Is quite clever. NOTE.— L. J. Pico, 

manager of the Orpbenm, is confined in St. 
John's Hospital with typhoid fever. 

J. E. FAULKNER. 



LINCOLN, NEB. 

LYRIC (H. M. Miller).— Very strong bill. John 
Miller, contortionist, pleased. Shean and Williams. 
"Discovery of Nothing," fair; Noblette and Mar 
shall In "Hints on Soldiery," generous applause; 
Stafford and Stone, large hit in "A Hunter's 
Games"; Original Boot Black Quartet, clever act. 
not overdone; J. J. Wilde, ill, song.- — WON- 
DERLAND. JOYO, ELITE.— Moving pictures; 
good attendance. LEF J. LOGAN. 

LONDON, CAN. 

BENNETTS (J. D. Elms. res. mgr.).— Chas. 

II. Bradshaw and Company in "Fix In a Fix," 
an uproarious presentation of/* familiar theme, 
pleased fairly well; Vernon, ventriloquist, solid 
lilt; Spiller Musical Bumpers, very cordial recep- 
tion; Mazuz and Mazett, acrobatic, clever; Le 
Roy and Woodford, well liked; Olga Loralne, 
comedienne. disappointing; Farrell Brothers, 
comedy cyclists, very good. M. G. UUESTON. 

MALDEN, MASS. 
HATHA WAY'S (Samuel L. Tuck, mgr.).— 
Frederick V. Bowers and Company, "College 
Days," great drawing card; Roscoe W. Buzzell, 

III. songs, not well received; Ellen Richards, tight 
wire act. good; Charley Harris, character co- 
median, hearty reception; Billy Keene and Jessie 



WOOD 



AND 



LAWSON 



DOING NICELY 
BOOKED SOLID, UNITED BOOKING OFFICES' TIME 



Variety's Chicago Office 



IS IN THE 



Chicago Opera House Block 

Advertisements and subscription! received at regular rate!. 

Ncwi item! may be forwarded there, and will be promptly transmitted. 






EUGENE CLINE 

Stores Located as Follows: 



EUGENE CLINE. 
EUGENE CLINE, 



59 Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 

Third and Nicollet Aves., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

EUGENE CLINE, 268 S. State St., Salt Lake City. 

Utah 

6th and Olive Sts., St. Louis. Mo. 

1021-23 Grand Avenue, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

EUGENE CLINE, 717 Superior Ave., N. E., Cleve- 
land, Ohio 
EUGENE CLINE, 22] S. Broad St.. Atlanta. Ga. 



EUGENE CLINE. 
EUGENE CLINE. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



30 



VARIETY 






REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 





THE FAMOUS 

JACKSON 
FAMILY 

WORLD'S MOST MAR- 
VELOUS CYCLISTS. 



WILDER 



Marshall 



P. 



S58 W. 97th St., New York, 
Phone S188 Riverside. 




HERBERT LLOYD 

And His Principal Assistant 

LILLIAN LILYAN 

In Front of the "RAADHU8" (City Hall), 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 



It isn't the name that makes the act— 
It's the act that makes the name. 



. 



THE KINO OF IRELAND, 

JAMES B. DONOVAN 

AND 

RENA ARNOLD 

QUEEN OF VAUDEVILLE. 
DOINO WELL, THANK YOU. 



ALF T. WILTON, Agent. 



MORRIS AND MORRIS 

Up to-Date Quick-Fire Grotesquerians. 




JtVi'lslfc^, 



MBBK 



"FUN ON A BROOM HANDLE." 

KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 

Rep. GEO. HOMANS. 





MINNIE MARX, M*r. 
Jan. 20, Grand Opera House, Pittsburg. 

Clifton Crawford 



Direction JOE HART. 



WILBUR DOBBS 

Comedian— Miner's *' Americans " 




Chris 
Richards 

Cngland'i 
E,cce>rfct ric Comedian 

JAN. 20, TOLEDO. 

MARINELLI, AGENT. 



Rice «' Cohen 

Presenting "A Bachelor Wife." 
WEEK JAN. 20 , ORPHEUM, OAKLAND. 

SID 




NOVELTY ACROBATS. 

Watoh our "Mut" 
In Vaudeville. 



dick McAllister 

ORIGINAL 

SECOND 8EASON, Gut Hill's "Around the 
Clock" Company. 

America! Original "That Bad Boy (Late of 
Fred Karno's), "Night in an English Musical 

Hall." 

Permanent Address, care DI8BECKER, 
66 IRVING PLACE, NEW YORK CITY. 




George Connors 

"STRAIGHT MAM" 
With "Avenue Girls"— "The Hallway TenoT." 

Have Your Card in Variety 



RICE & PREVOST 



IN 



ii 



Bumpty Bumps 



If 



GRACE 



Ritterand Foster 

ACROSS THE POND. 

Address care SOMER & WARNER, 

1 Tottenham Court Road, London, Eng. 

ALT T. WILTON, American A* ent. 

Grace Orma 

SIX FEET TJT "ONE." 
DIRECTION OF 

JENIE JACOBS 

BalnoaodShaw 

BURLESQUE ECCENTRICS. 

N. Y. Hippodrome, indef. 

GREAT SCOTT 

THE JUGGLING MARVEL 
On the High Balancing- Ladder. 
K. P. Circuit until May. 
Week Jan. SO, Trent, Trenton, N. J. 

The Two Young Fellows. 
FRANK E. THOMAS J. 

MCNISH » KIM 

In a twenty minute oyolone of comedy in "one." 

Melville «nd Morgan 

TWO DANCING GIRL8, with "Avenue Girls." 

JANE GILBERT 

With MAY TULLY IN "Stop, Look and Listen" 
JAN. 20, SHEA'S, TORONTO. 



THE 




Stavordale Quintette 



NOW ON KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



ATTENTION ! ! 



Every one interested in the VAUDEVILLE SITUATION 

should have a copy of 






Handsomely bound in book form. The book is now going to press. All who wish copies ^^ ^% 
send name and address to Leo Corrillo, care of VARIETY. Book will be sent. Price %|# Wmm 



OO 






When answering advertisements kindly mention Vabiety. 



VARIETY 






31 





THAT CLEVER SINGING COMEDIAN IN BROWN 



PUBLISHED BY 




Broadway and 39th 
NEW YORK 



Adams, duetists and dancers, favorites; Mr. and 
Mrs. Mark Hart, comedy sketch, well applauded; 

Lane Trio, comedy acrobats, good. NOTE. — 

Bertie Herron, the minstrel Miss, was chosen to 
announce the aspiring amateurs here 10. — Maiden 
Lodge of Oddfellows hought out the theatre on 
Thursday evening and filled the house. 

THOS. C. KENNEY. 



MARION, O. 

FAMILY (II. S. Vail. mgr. Monday rehearsal 
10). — The Kneedlers, singing comedy sketch, 
good; RIely and Morgan, farcical singing and 
talking, pleased greatly; E. J. Appleby, banjoist, 
a fine player; The Oaafs. comedy and burlesque 
jugglers, clever and original; E. P. Rowe, 111. 

songs, good. NOTE.— H. S. Vail will open his 

now vaudeville house In Fostoria, 0., Feb. 1. It 
will be booked by Gus Sun. 

J. BAUMGARTEN. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

ORPIIEUM (G. E. Raymond, mgr.).— "Gen." 
Ed Lnvine, excellent comedy juggliug; Oterlta, 
graceful and beautiful; Glrard and Gardner, 
funny; Three Meers, novel wire act; Fred Walton 
and Company, pantomime, went well; Dumond 
Minstrels, picturesque and musical; Berzae, ponies 
and mule, fast and funny. LEWIS. 



MOBILE, ALA. 

LYRIC (rehearsal Monday 10).— Week 11 r Al- 
pine Troupe, wire, fine; Ensworth and Burt In 
"Domestic Pets," good; The Three Troubadours, 
excellent; Bowman Bros., singers, good; Lew 
Wells, monologist, funny; Herbert Deveans. very 
good. NAN. 



, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

rOLI'8 (S. Z. Poll. prop. F. J. Wlndlsch, res. 
mgr. Monday rehearsal 10). — The eccentric Gen- 
naro Is offering his eccentricities and his excel- 
lent band as the feature of the bill. The num- 
ber is pleasing and encores are demanded. Belle 
Chnmberlain assists with vocal numbers. Johnny 
Johns has some soups and sayings, and Is a hit 
as the boy from Dixie. "The Wall Between" is 
one of the daintiest playlets of the season. Agnes 
Scott, the authoress, and Horace Wight, are the 
characters and present the offering with splen- 
did grace and effect. Lewis and Green In a 
bunch of sayings and doings. "Engaging a Cook," 
were funny. Their restaurant menu is Immense. 
Countess Olga OssI and Mons. Paulo were ac- 
ceptable In a musical number. In which Imitations 
of prominent artists were featured. Ryan and 
White present the neatest turn of the season In a 
dame number, while The Labakans conclude the 
hill. E. J. TODD. 



PITT8T0N, PA. 

FAMILY (Harry Scott, res. mgr.) .— Italia, 
songs, good; Bessonctte and Newman, West Point 
Cadets, very good; Atwood and Terry, comedians, 
Rood; Harry Green, III. songs, good; James T. 
Kelly and Lillian Mnssey, assisted by Sheridan 
Holmes, in "Two Kings and a Queen."' the hit of 

the bill. DREAMLAND (Claude Westley. 

ingr.). — Moving pictures and 111. songs. Business 

food. THE GRM (M. F. Early, mgr.).— Moving 

pictures and 111. songs. Business fair. 

DAVE II EM AN. 



cc 



NEXT WEEK AT THE ALHAMBRA THEATRE, FEATURING 

YOU NEVER CAN TELL WHAT A 
GIRL IS GOING TO DO" 



PORTLAND, ORE. 

PANTAGE'S (Pohn A. Johnson, mgr.).— Week 
6: Tim Cronln, the headllner, has a novel sing- 
ing and talking act that Is new and deserves 
the applause; The Velde Trio, acrobats, with 
their "Loop the Loup" Dogs, the best act of 
the kind seen here; Phyllis Allen, contralto, well 
received; Coccla and Amato, "The Mixer and the 
Maid," a pretty singing and dancing specialty; 
Bert Page, comedy acrobat, very clever; Fred 

Bauer, 111. songs, very good. GRAND (James 

H. Errlckson, mgr.). — Preston Kendall, the pro- 
tean actor, "Across the Lines," kept the audience 
spellbound; The Four OnettI Sisters, novel gym- 
nastic performance; Gracey and Burnett, the 
laughing hit of the bill; Brothers De Van and 
Dog, clever acrobats, went big; Jacklln and 
Lange, "Partners for Life," scored heavily; Jack 
and Bertha Rich, singing and dancing, big fa- 
vorites; Joe Thompson, ill. songs, very good. 

FRITZ'S (Fred Frits, prop.).— Virginia Vernon, 
Jones and Ralvelle, Alberta Hadley, Rooney and 
Forrester, Lotta Goldman, Tommy La Rosa, 
Farmer Jones, Menlo, Bobby Pulliam, Birdie Dll- 
lard, Reed and Reed and stock, "McGlnty on 

Broadway." EDISONIA (Jos. St. Peter, prop.). 

—Motion pictures and 111. songs. ORPIIEUM 

AND HIPPODROME (Dlllwyn Daniels, mgr.).— 

Moving pictures and ill. songs. NOTES. — Mr. 

Jos. St. Peter resigned the management of the 
Nickelodion and will devote bis entire attention 
to the Edlsonia, bis new theatre.— The T. M. A. 
Lodge 36 opened their new hall Tuesday night 
with a grand ball and public Installation of offi- 
cers. Speeches were made by many prominent 
citizens. Charlie Connors was elected president, 
and Herbert Ashton, secretary. — Billy Noyes, of 
Noyes and Lyon, left for Chicago on receipt of 
telegram stating bis mother was not expected 
to live. W. R. B. 



way of talking nonsense; Bert Leslie In "Hogan's 
Visit" talks clever slang, and with him Maud 
Emery, as a graceful dancer, makes good; Adolpb 
Zink in Impersonations Is the same clever fellow; 
Mary Dupont and Company in "A Leap Year 
Leap" have a good sketch and do It well; Carlln 

and Otto, German comedy, are topnotchers. 

BON TON (J. H. Young, owner and mgr.).— The 
LeBertus have a good contortionist act; The Four 
Rosells play "My 15 Minute Husband" in rapid 
fire style; Baby Wande sings songs that delight; 
Little Dorothy Rayne sings the ill. song well. 

JAY E. JOHNSON. 



TERRE HAUTE, 
LYRIC (Jack Hoeffler. gen 
Plunkett and Company, comedy 
Mueller and Mueller, vocalists, 
key. Juggler and monologist, 
and Gormly. acrobatic, very good 
(Jack Hoeffler, gen. mgr.). — Llndsev's 



IND. 
mgr.).— Marlowe, 
sketch, very good; 
great; Clever Con- 
very good; Baker 
VARIETIES 
Dog and 



Monkey Circus very good: Rome and Ferguson, 
novelty singing and dancing, very good; Coving- 
ton and Wilbur, comedy sketch, very food; Josn 

Dreano. blackface comedian, great. COLI8EUM 

(J. H. Barnes, mgr.).— "The Colonial Belles," 
very good. Next "The Strolling Players." 

ROSS GARNER. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 

WASHINGTON (Geo. E. Blakeslee. mgr.).— 
H. L. Zeda, contortionist, good; Jas. R. Walte 
and Company. "At Light House Point," very 
good; Fred Primrose, monologist, ordinary; Arm- 
strong and Davis, "The Amateur Chauffeur," a 
hit; Thos. F. Donnelly and Zelda Rotall, "The 
Kid's Dream of tbe Boogie Man," excellent; 
Musical Hawailans, pleased: Pete Dunsworth, ill. 

songs. PANTAGES (E. Clarke Walker, mgr.). 

— The Vaughners, singers and dancers, good; 
Lorimer Johnstone and Caroline F. Cook, "After 
the Ball," very good; Jimmle Cowper, monologist. 
pleased; Titlo and Company, Jugglers, excellent; 
Two Georgis, comedy acrobats, very good; Clay- 
son Sisters, singers, well received; Leo White, 
ill. songs. J. J. HUGHES. 



PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

KEITH'S (Chas. Lovenberg, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 9). — Although not headliners, Spissel 
Brothers and Mack, comedy acrobats, the one big 
bit; Clayton White and Marie Stuart have an 
interesting sketch full of ginger; Lasky "Quin- 
tet," very good. Mme. Hermann, deserved bettor 
applause; Billy Single Clifford, good, as was 
Vinie Daly; Frank Bush, some good stories and re- 
ceived his share of applause; The Romanoffs, 
knife throwers, show skill and improve; Dudley 
and Cheslyn, Jim Dilks, Hills' Dogs and Goats. 
Ilia Grannon, Frank Benman, and motion pictures 

also. IMPERIAL (John P. Hill. mgr.).— 

"Broadway Gaiety Girls," clean show, neat cos- 
tumes and good singing. Only one comedian. John 
Weber, who makes up for four, as he is the best 

German comedian seen here In many moons. 

WESTMINSTER (Geo. H. Batcheller, prop.).— 
"Vanity Fair," only fair show. 

S. M. SAMUELS. 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 
OLYMPIC (C. J. McCann, mgr.).— Gebrueder 
and Cremona, magicians, very good; Grace Young, 
singer, pleased; Tom Flnnegan, Irish comedian, 
pleated; Kelly and Nibbe, comedians, fair; Kitty 
Wilson, ill. songs, well received; Bessie Skld- 
more, dancer, received applause; The Big Four, 
pleased; The Olympic Stock Company completes 

the bill. EMPIRE (Jno. Connors, mgr.).— 

Howard and Germalne, gymnastic act, the fea- 
ture; Eniile Edwards, Shannon and Straw, Bessie 
Smith, Eddy Sawyer, Carrie Scott, The Good- 
wins, and The Empire Stock Company. — NOTE. — 
The past week marked the end of Springfield's 
pioneer vaudeville house. The building is on 
South Sixth street and was changed from a store- 
room to a theatre about four years ago and 
opened by Messrs. Smith and Burton as the 
Gaiety. It continued prosperously under their 
management for three years. It was then leased 
to Meyer and Watts, Smith & Burton having built 
a new house. The house was entirely refitted by 
its new managers and opened Sept. 2, 11)07. After 
a very disastrous career of a few months the 
venture was abandoned. It was later rented 
by O. T. Crawford, of St. Louis, and run a few 
more losing weeks as a picture show. The build- 
ing is once more being turned into a storeroom. 

C. F. NORRED. 



TORONTO, ONT. 

SHEA'S (J. Shea. mgr. Monday rehearsal 10). 
— Another good bill drew large patronage all 
week. Minnie Sellgman and William Brammell 
presented a bright sketch named "A Dakota 
Widow," which is very amusing; Paul Conchas Is 
a wonder; John W. World and Mlndell Kingston 
are good; Dare Lewis hit them hard; Murphy ami 
Francis, good: Kramer and Bellclalr, very good; 

Dixon Brothers, funny; Kinetograph finis. 

STAR IF, W. Stair, mgr.).— Lanky Bob Flts- 
siinmons, assisted by his wife in a sketch, was 
the magnet that drew big crowds to see "The 
Ainerleans," and the company is a good one. 
Amateur night (Friday) Is a big feature here and 
Rube Bernstein, the hustling advertising agent, 
always lias a fine list of budding talent for tbe 

special night. GAYKTY (Thomas R. Henry, 

mgr.). — The Golden Crook Company is above the 
average and business was large all week. The 
only Jolin L. Sullivan received an ovation at every 
performance. He is assisted bv Jake Kllrain and 
Kid Cutler. P1CTURB HALL (F. Carter, mgr.). 

Business keeps increasing at this new resort. 

HARTLEY. 

TROY, N. Y. 
PROCTORS (G. A. Graves, mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10). — Walter C. Kelly, one of the best 
monploglst 8, won instant favors; Lisbe Leigh and 
Company. "The Kid Glove Man," very good; The 
Macart Sisters, wonders. Others on the bill are 
Paster and Taylor, In an amusing offering ; The 
Clarence Sisters, singers and dancers; Cameroff 
and Flanagan, and Adamini Taylor, strolling inn- 
gicluns. LYCEUM ( R. II. Keller, mgr. ). 
The Rolleckcrs is the offering for the first three 
days. A lavish scenic production is given. For 
the last half of the week we have High School 
Girls. J. J. M. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NEW LYCEUM (Eugene Kernan, mgr.). —H. 
W. and Sim Williams' Imperials are playing a 
return date at the Lyceum this week. The 
ope icr Is "A Night In Paris," which has been 
see i here before. Several changes nave been 



QUEBEC, CAN. 

BENNETT'S (J. II. Aloz. mgr. Monday re- 
hearsal 10). — Eugene Von Koenltsberg. wonder- 
ful piano player, but has not the right idea for 
vaudeville patrons; Katherine Bartlett, ordinary: 
E>telle Wordette and Company, "The Honeymoon 
In tbe Catskllls." very funny and a hit; Van 
Bros., first-class musical act; "The Bachelor and 
The Maid." by Wilbur Mack and Company, Is a 
first-class vehicle and serves to Introduce good 
singing and dancing; Anderson and Golnes, one 
of the best colored acts seen here this season 
and made a distinct lilt; Thompson's Elephants 
are a sensation and a big drawing card. 

J. GORDON HENRY. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

ORPIIECM (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.). Week 
B: The Okito Family as headliners in "The Build- 
ing of the Chinese House of Mystery" were con- 
vincing; Wm. Toinkins has a new and pleasing 



W. Earl-Vera Curtis and Co. 

Present their latest Playlette, "OAMEY CASS." by PORTER EMERSON BROWNE. 
Albany. N. Y-. Week Jan. 20. A T PASTOR'S WEEK JAN. 27. 

Send for Our Complete Illustrated Catalogue and Pri>e List of 

MADE TO ORDER 

SOUBRETTE DRESSES, ANKLE 

LENGTH GOWNS 

FANCY COATS AND STAGE GOWNS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
Catalogue sent to recognised artists only. Write on your own letterhead, or send latest program. 

VA/OLFF, FORDING & CO., 

61-65 ELIOT STREET, BOSTON. MASS 



MADDEN 



AND 



FITZPATRICK 



(C 



Presenting one of the most beautiful playlets in vaudeville 

THE TURN OF THE TIDE" 



Keith-Proctor Circuit 



BY MR. FITZPATRICK 
When answering advertisements kindly mention VaKIETT. 



Big success Everywhere 



32 



VARIETY 



BCPRB«BfNTrtTIVB ARTIST© 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE VENTRILOQUIST WITH A PRODUCTION 

Ed. F. 

REYNARD 

And His Famous Mechanical Figures. 
WEEK TAN. 20, GRAND 0. H., SYRACUSE. 

Elinore Sisters 

in new act in ONE, season of 1907-8, entitled 
"THE ACTRE8S AND THE MAID" 

Copyright Class D. XXC. No. 9*91. 

Direction of GEO. HOMANB. 

"THE MAN WITH THE FUNNY SLIDE." 
CHAB. J. 

BURKHARDT 

Russell: Held 

The Dancer and THE LADY MAGNETIC. 

ALF T. WILTON. Agent. 

JAN. 20, PROCTOR'S, NEWARK. 

m. MOZART 



Addrass VAUDEVILLE CLUB. LONDON. ENG. 



Wa carry apecial scenery and electrical affaots. 




MARK E. 



PRESENTING 



"A COUNTRY BOYS LUCK" 

A rural comedy playlet with original ideas and 
novel situations. 

ALT. T. WILTON. Agent. 



WILBUR 

MACK 

AND COMPANY 

KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 







GERMAN DIALECT COMEDIAN. 

"Avenue Girls," Presenting; "Tom, Dick and 

Harry," Season 1907-08. 




In Mirthful Acrobatics 
With "THE WORLD BEATERS." 

JUNO SALMO 

KEITH-PROCTOR CIRCUIT. 



"THE NARROW FELLS*.* 



The Italian and His Sweetheart 



T HE PIOTTIS 



CHARACTER SONGSTERS. 

18 Mins. in One. 
Address care VARIETY. 



f. Duly Burgess 

Going it alone onoe mora and always making 
good. What do you think of that! 

WORK § OWER 

Season of 1906-1907, with ORPHEUM ROAD 
SHOW. Season 1907-1908. KEITH * PROC- 
TOR'S. 

Repreaentative, ALBERT SUTHERLAND, 
St. James Building. 

tt W. [VERS 

"PORK CHOPS" 

Permanent Address, 
White Rats, 1558 Bway., N. Y. City. 

FINN-FORD 

NOVELTY ECCENTRIC DANCERS. 
Watch 'am on the Sullivan-Oonaldiaa Circuit. 



he 




fallbacks 



A Knockout In tha East. 
Booked solid till Feb. 8, 1908. Addrass all agents. 






All communications REICH & PLUNKETT, 
1138 Broadway, N. Y. 



BROWN 



AND 



NEVARRO 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



"Yell, I got anudder von." 

LEO ST. ELMO 

"Tha Musloal German." 
14 Minutes In "ONE." 

WIGGflN^PARM 

Apply to THE CHADWICK TRIO. 

PRINCESS CHINQUILLA 

and NEWELL 

JENIE JACOBS, Sole Representative. 



Gartelle Bros. 

• KATOR1ALI8/VI 

HOMES B. MASON 

AND 
MAROUERITE KEELER 




GAVIN, PLATT 

and PEACHES 



Presenting "THE STOLEN KID. 



», 



"Village (loir" 




THE FAMOUS 

HEIM CHILDREN 

The only act that gets their audience on the 
Impulse of the moment Rooked wol M ti ll July. 
1908. Management CHRI8 0. BROWN, N. Y. 



Have Your Card in Variety 



BILLIE REEVES 

ORIGINAL DRUNK. 

Fred Xarno Co., "A Night In English Musio Hall. " 
TIME ALL FILLED. 




Ein Abend in Einem Amerikanischen Tingle-Tangle 
Now Playing Klaw A Erlanger for 80 Weeks. 



STANLEY 



SCANLON 




ECCENTRIC MUSICAL ENTERTAINERS. 

OPEN for Eastern Wheel BURLESQUE cr 
FARCE COMEDY. A. W. Stanley plays respon- 
sible parts. Mayme Scanlon, one of the BEST 
DIALECT CHARACTER COMEDIENNES on the 
stage. 

Address, care VARIETY, Chicago. 

JAMES F. HAYES 

Character and Straight — Miner's "Americans." 




Pearl Evans 



INGENUE 



U~ 




fin 








_ . M 




SEASON 19O7-'08 




JAS. P. LEE 

"THAT COMEDIAN." 

Here's a record breaker — 25 weeks, Lyceum, 'Frisco; 104 weeks, Unique, 
Los Angeles; 26 weeks, People's, Los Angeles. Now in his sixth week of a 
successful engagement at the Empire Theatre, San Francisco. 

Address JAS. P. LEE, Comedy Players, Empire Theatre, San Francisco, Cal. 



NELLE 




And "The Six 
English Rockers" 






When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



33 



VAUDEVILLE THEATRE MANAGERS 

ATTENTION 

Do Not Allow Anjone to Make Ton BeUere That There it a Scarcity of 

Good, High-Class Acts 
in the Vaudeville Field 

I Have ib Abundance of the Boot Material ea My Books, aa aerial, and 

Can BooK Any Number of Theatres on 24 Hours' Notice 

ALL Houses Receive Equal Treatment in My Office. 

WILLIAM MORRIS 

Chicago Officw. 167 Dearborn St. 1440 Broedwtjr, Ne>w York 



BARBOUR— He Books the Acts 

For Vaudeville, Fairs and Parks. Manage™, tend for lists. Artists, send open tins*. 
Address E. L. Barbour, 119 La Salle St., Chicago. 

nrnrADMFnO traveling to Europe should take advantage of the exceptionally low 
rPKrl K Pn.l rates now prevailing and in effect until March 81tt, l»0k Call or 
■ ■■■■■ WiRBIESmislW writs for full particulars. 

PAUL TAUIIG, 104 C«>Bt 14tH Street, 
Tel. WW Stuyve. NEW YORK CITY 



Sid J. Euson's 



N. Clark and Kinxle Bts., JHICAOO. 
45 Seconds from Clark St. Bridge. 

BID J. ETJSON, Lessee and Manager. 



Playing in burlesque attractions of the Colum- 
bia Amusement Company. Matins* every day. 
Amateur nigbt Friday. 



FOLLY 

State Street near Congress 
CHICAGO 

EMPIRE CIRCUIT CO., LESSEE. 

John A. Fenneasy, Manager. 

The most popular burlesque theatre la Chicago, 
playing the attractions of the Empire Circuit. 
Nothing but the boat. Two show* every day. 
Amateurs Friday. 



Established 1SS0 



THE LEADING ENOLIE THEATRICAL AND VAUDEVILLE NEWSPAPER. 

Foreign Subscription, 
3/ 10(1. per Quarter. 



THE STAGE 



May be obtained at Samuel French's, 22-24 West 22nd Street, New York. 
ARTI8TS VISITING ENGLAND are cordially invited to register at "The Stage" offices imme- 
diately upon their arrival. The Editor of "The Stage" will always be pleased to welcome them. 
Advance notices of sailings and opening dates should be posted to the Editor. When an artist has 
registered at "The Stage" office, which may be regarded as his permanent London address, all cor- 
respondence will be immediately forwarded. 
London Offices: 16 York St., Covent Garden, London, W. C. 



FILMS TOR RENT=riLMS FOR SALE 

ALL THE LATEST 8UBJECTS CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
OUR 8BRVICB GU f\ F* f\ M T EE8 8UCCBSS 

Write, phone or Call. 

Manhattan .Film Rental Co. 



Phone 5502 — Gram. 



116 E. 23d STREET, NEW YORK. 



HART A DAVIS. Mgrs. 



made in the cast and the piece revised sonic- 
What. The lending comedian Is Larry MeCale, 
who is very amusing. He Is assisted by Harry 
Bentley, Ben Cook end Joe Lore, The soubrettcs 
are Margie Hilton. Julia Ilcintzinnn and Ida 
St urges, three dtsblng girls, who have pood 
figures and grace. They work with Ringer. Some 
good musical numbers are led by Margie Hilton. 
Ma St urges. Julia Helntzman and the entire 
female contingent of 14 pretty girls, whose voices 
arc weak, but the girls work with snap and are 
very lively. The olio contains the following: 
Margie Hilton, songs and (lames, good; Demora 
and Graccta, novelty acrobats, clever; T.arry Mr- 
<';i!.- ami Company, "A Quiet Family"; Harry 

Rentier , paradolst, scored. GAYBTY (W. S. 

Hark, mgr.). -—Fred Irwin's New Majesties are 
here this week and playing to capacity at every 
performance. The burlcttars are very x funny nnd 
seemed to catch the house. The comedians are 
«;us Fay, Jas. Wesley, V. 
Walton, Bert Rradley and 
are very fiinuv. The female 
!"• Milt. Evelyn Walker. 
Irdolle, Flo Hums nnd Dora Taylor, who are 
attractive and good workers. During the action 
'•f both burlesques plenty of good musical nutn- 
'•••rs are led b.v the prlclpals, with the assistance 
of n good looking chorus of 10. In the olio are 
Irwin H, Walton, comedian, good; Phillips Sis- 



<'. Rogers, Irwin 
Harry Stanley, who 
principal* are Gertie 

Ida Philips, Milli- 



ters, singers ami dancers, well received; The 
College Four. Immense; James F. Cook and Harry 

Madison, feature act. big hit. NOTES. — 

Charles B. Taylor's Parisian Belles Company are 
rehearsing a new burlesque which will be put 
on In several weeks. The title of the burlesque 
will be "The Court Martial."— Washington is 
now overflooded with five-cent theatres. Up to 
the present twenty of the moving pictures theatres 
are In operation. — The Washington Lodge No. 7, 
T. M. A., held their regular monthly meeting 
Sunday at the Belaseo Theatre and Installed 12 
new members. The lodge Is steadily on the 
increase. BILLY BOWMAN. 

WHEELING. W. VA. 

WONDERLAND (II. W. Rogers, mgr.). Bill 
for this week is a good one. Prof. Armud's San 
Francisco Disaster very good; Grace Edmonds and 
Company easily the lilt. MNs Edmonds has .1 
very good voice ami won encores with her rendi- 
tion of "Cnrlssma"; Emerson and Vnnhorn, "The 
First Rehearsal," well received; Shndrlck and 
Talbot! in singing ami comedy; Mile. Mable and 
her trained animals won applause, - -BLTOtl 
MIeo. Sihiffer. mgr. i.-Mr. ami Mrs. Geo, W. 

Hussey. ventriloquist, very z I. pohloff Bisters, 

singing and dancing, pleased; Cora Swains 
Cockatoos, extreme!) good; I.e Clrtlre and West, 



PASTOR'S 

14th St.. 8d At. Continuous. 20 A 30 Cts 

NEXT WEEK, MONDAY, JAN. 20. 1008. 

GERTRUDE MANSFIELD AND COMPANY. 

STODDARD AND WILSON. 

ELSIE GRESHAM AND COMPANY. 

Sperry and Ray. 

Birch and Ansel. 

BLAMPHIN AND HERR. 

Hodges and Launch- Elliott. 

mere. Ted and Clara Steele. 

Welsh and Earl. Tom Voce. 

Shaw, Bennett and Vitagrapb. 

KATHRYN MILEY. 



HAMMERSTEINS 

VICTORIA usEr^ 

Open the Year Around 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

OP tUatl CLASS VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 
M. MEYERFELD, JR., Preo. 

MARTIN BECK, General Manager. 

PRANK VINCENT, N. Y. Representative-. 

All Applications for Time Moot bo Addressed to 

O. B. BRAY, Booking Manager, 

Majestic Theatre bldg., Chicago, 111. 



Percy G. 




CIRCUIT 



COLONIAL 

ORPHEUM 
ALHAMBRA 
ORPHEUM 
NOVELTY 



New York 

Brooklyn 

Harlem 

Boston 



Williamsburg 
GOTHAM East How York 

Address all PERSONAL letters to 
PERCY 0. WILLIAMS. ST. JAMES 
BUILDING, 2*TH ST. AND BROAD- 
WAY, NEW YORK CITY 



VAUDtVlLLE HlADIINlRS 
a*. GOOD STANDARD ACT* 

If yon have an open week 70a want to All at 
short notice, write to W. L. DOCK 8T A DEB, 

Gar rich Theatre, Wilmington. Del. 

Can close Saturday night and make any city eaat 

of Chicago to open Monday alght. 



HENDERSON'S 

Theatrical Exchanga, 

91 LA BALLS ST., CHICAGO. 

Representing first class managora of Eastern aad 

Western vaudevllls theatres, vaudeville head- 

liners, novelties, big acts. Sand jour opsa time. 

Address W. T. HENDER80N, 

Prop, and Manager. 

CHAS. H. D0UTRICK. Asst. Mgr. 

F. Q. DOYLE, Representative. 




OZART 

Vaudeville Circuit. 

10— Theatres— 10 

FEATURE ACTS ALWAYS WANTED. 

All communications to Edward Mosart, Main Offloe 
Family Theatre. Lancaster. Pa. 



New E mpire 

Madison St real Near Maleled 
CHICAGO 

WILLIAM SINGER. MANAGER. 
Handsomest burlesque bouse la America, play- 
ing Empire Oirouit attractions exclusively. 
Shows changed every Sunday. Matlaeee daily. 



NEW STAR 

MILWAUKEE, Wit. 

FRANK R. TROTTMAN, Manager. 

Handsomest snd safest burlesque theatre la 
Amerlcs. Playing Empire Circuit Shows. Matinee 
Every Day. 

Visit the new Rathskeller Downstairs. 

The best In the West. 

I Want Performers 

To know that I build Sketches, Monologues, 
Parodies, etc., of quality. 

CHARLES E. WELCH 

Vaudeville Contractor. 
Per Address: 



COOK'S OPERA HOUSE. ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



BEST PLACES TO STOP AT. 



MEDEA HOTEL 

JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Half block from Majestio aad Cambria Theatres. 
Rooms with or without bath. Rates moderate. 
"The House Recommends itself*" European Plaa. 

J. F. KNUFF. Prop. 

Florenz t ouse 

(Mrs. F. Florenz, Prop.) 

The Home of the Profession, 

170 West 47th Street 

Near Broadway Now York 

First-class Rooms and Board. Reasonable 

Terms. Convenient to all Principal Theatres. 

Have Your Card in Variety 



#^» ARTISTS, NOTICE 

Hotel Fa u rot 

SCRANTON, PA. 

3 Minutes from Theatres 

American Plaa Rataa Moderate 

E. PAISLEY, 244 Adams St. 

Rational Rotel 

CHICAGO 

Cor. Van Buren St. and Wsbash Ave. 

Half block from Auditorium Theatre. In vlolnity 

of all theatres. Weekly rates made, 

D. A. DOOLEY, Prop. 



I 

WANT 

ACTS 



That are willing to keep going on "the small time," while waiting for the Mg 
place. No room for heavy scrobstlc acts. Comedy specialties ami novelty singles 
desired. Address 

NORMAN JEFFERIES, Ninth and Arch, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



corned) Sketch, eery clever, others on bill for 
balance of week, the Dcgans, Baby Vernon, La 
Rahb find Seotty, Devon and Kennedy, Cunning • 
ham and Smitii. Musical Irving and Franco* 
Swartx and IVftnpany. t\ M. II 

WORCESTER. MASS. 

rol.l s il. <'. Crlddle, mgr.). Uvrtrclle, a 
gymnast, does ;i little dancing end trapese work 
which i* new; i-< ii.-i Taylor sings several III. 
songs, I'l'icn's sovernl encores; Mr. ami Mv- 
(iiirduer Crone in "Aim 1 Y<>nr Wife'" full of 
comedy and well isirt rayed; Fred nnd. Bessie 
Lucler. vk« s « it . ure well known hero and scored s 
liit ; I»i\ie Sereiiiiderx, singing :>ii<l dancing, well 
liked, »'. \v. Mttlcneld, mimic, gives Im • 
1 1- <» 1 r- of ..bird* ami animal- and has to respond lo 



several encores. The Novel los' Clreus, (he biggest 
net «f its kinii seen here. The animals are well 
trained ami went bitf. 

WALTER M SIIKKMW. 

Y0NKER8, N. Y. 
oiri'lIKUM iKouls j. Fosse, res uigr.). Kdaa 

l.ieiiy. Impersonations, biggest Mi here this k.-.i- 
s«n; Mr. and Mrs. Itobym*, in "The Counsel fur 

the Defence," scored heavily; Valdare Troui t 

Cyclists, closed bill with Hying colon*; John and 
Iter tun fJloaMon nnd r'red Houlihan, In dances und 
iini-i"'. received several encores; Cooper a'nd 
lii'uwn. < "iti« •li.in-. good; Kddlc l.e.imau, in |>,>|>ii 
l.ir songs, |dcit«fd, and (int.- uml Nelson, with re- 
VolvillJ< globe, .'h.,| in l In , [telling iiimiiI,, 1 

11. N. K.Mtl I \K1 I . 



When answering advertisements kindly mention VARIETY* 



34 



VARIETY 



KEPRESENT/\TIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Week Jan. 20-22, Jacob's, Paterson; 23 25, 
Star, Scranton. 

HCUCI. & PENNIES VS 



a 



EMPIRE SHOW 



DIRECTION W. H. HIS8. 



AL ZIMMERMAN 

Character and Singing Comedian 



"IBS DOT BO?" 

IGE K 

BTILL WITH THE BIO SHOW 



"loo uv i out 

GEORGE KLEIN 



The Sensational Acrobatic Cooiodians. 

MONTAMBOand HUBL-FALLS 

The Peer of Comio Acrobats 

iiiii and ciiiiii 

"IN A STRANGE HOTEL" 

EMMA WESTON 

CONTRALTO, THAT'S ALL « 

THE TWO EXTREME8 
ED. JEANETTE 

JOHNSTON and BUCKLEY 

"Why, Ker-Soit-ny" 

LEW H. SPOOLER 



MUSICAL DIRECTOR 



AND 



ROGER IMHOF 



I 



WORLD FAMED 



Dunedin Troupe 

Marvellous, Artistic and Acrobetio Cyclists. 



O 

O- 



I 



OH 

n 







Challenge the World to Find Their Equal. 
Jas. E. Donegan, Mgr. .Address care Clipper. 



MR. 

ind 

MRS. 



dl HIKHS 



IN "SUPPRESSING THE PRES8." 
BOOKED SOLID. 



PHIL 



NETTIE 



PETERS 

JAN. 20, BENNETT'S, MONTREAL, CAN. 



THAT ACROBAT. 

True Rice 

IS STILL BUMPING WITH 
"8 BELLS." 

Address, WHITE RATS, 46TH 
ST. and B'WAY, NEW YORK. 




HARRY EARLE 



VETA 






Presenting "A DAUGHTER OF THE GODS." 
In Preparation, "The Chaperon" (4 People). 



WEEK JAN. 20, COLONIAL, CLEVELAND. 



THE "MERRY MAKERS" 

JOHN GRIEVES, Manager. 

WM. MAUSSEY 

THE SCOTCH CHARACTER COMEDIAN. 



GLADYS 



TILLIE 



St. John and Cohen 

THE RUFFY FLUFFY GIRLS. 

H. P. KELLY 



'THE MEDIUM BOY.' 



W. A. WOLF 

THE MIN8TREL BASSO. 

GEO. A. STREET 

Supported by Mrs. Geo. A. Street and Com- 
pany, in his elaborate scenic creation por- 
traying historic events in the careers of the 
world's great military commanders. 

SAM J. ADAMS 

"THE LONG BOY." 

La Belle Marie and 
M. J. 0'Rourke 

Singing, Dancing and Novelty Wire Act. 



SUTTON 



AND 



SUTTON 



The Rube and the 
Living Pumpkin 

En Route with the 

High School Girls 

JAN. 20, THEATRE ROYAL, MONTREAL. 



"15 




(FRANK MAJOR ft CO.) 

Address, FRANK MAJOR, 

COMEDY CLUB, N. Y. CITY. 



Le BRUN 



Grand 
Opera 
Trio 



Strongest Singing Aot la Vaudeville. 

Magnificently Costumed. 

Management ALBERT SUTHERLAND. 



Lillian Tyce 



IN VAUDEVILLE. 



The Really Fanny Monologist. 

JAMES J. MORTON 

Still OB the Theatrical Platform. 

KELLY ui KENT 

ORPHZUM ROAD SHOW. 



Week Jan. 20, Met. 0. H.. Duluth. 

Mf-MffrCAJHYOMS 



WM. 



MABEL 



JenningsandWebb 

Not. Ahead But Neck and Neck With the Beat 

Tommy O'Neill 

IN SONGS ANDDANCEB 

FourTerrors 

In Singing and Acrobatic Dancing 

Grace Addison 
Barrett 



CONTRALTO 



CHAS. B. 



AL. 



Watson and Bert 

"A Busy Business Man" 

5-Malvern Troupe-5 

WHIRLWIND ACROBATS 

Zelma Summers 

The Girl from the Golden West. 



WITH 



PAT WHITE 






Netta Vesta 



SINGING COMEDIAN 

Keith Circuit 
Address care VARIETY 




Seattle "Times," Nov. 28.— 
"Good fun and clever work 
characterize Bush and Elliott's 
acrobatic turn, which Is high 
class and very skillful. Good 
acrobatic work on the vaude- 
ville stage la becoming a mat- 
ter of course, and the murvelona 
Is becoming the rule, but this 
act belongs in the Coliseum's 
own category of 'extra good.' " 

ALF T. WILTON, Agent. 



SHEPPARD CAMP 

"The Man from Georgia" 



MR. AND MRS. 



TRUESDELL 

Time all filled. 

Address, care VAUDEVILLE COMEDY CLUB, 
147 W. 45th St, N. Y. City. 

"A CORKER IN CORK." 

GEORGE 
ATKINSON 

TIME ALL FILLED. 




YIP! YIP! YIP! 



GOING WEST, WHOf 



MeGLOIN - SHELLY 

Eccentrio Singing and Dancing Act. 

Guide, LOUIS PINCUS. 

First Scout, FRANK BOHM. 

A Good Singer of Good Songs. 

JOSIE AINSLEY 

Direction of JAMES J. MORTON. 

Bob Van Osten 

THE MAN WITH THE DUCK HOBS. 



Pete Curley 

PRINCIPAL COMEDIAN, 
The Behman Show. 

Management, Jack Singer. 
Season 1907-08. 



cc 



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IT? 



** 



Ryan-Richfield Co. 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 
DIRECTION MAG HAGGERTY'S FATHER. 




EDWIN STEVENS 

in 

"A Night Out." "Julius Caesar Up To Data." 

"An Evening with Dickens" "An American Raffles-' 

Assisted by MISS TINA wawwwav.T ri 

Time all filled till June 7, 1908. 

STUART BARNES 

Direction GEO. H0MAN8. 



'THE PLAYERS. 



»» 



MR. 
and 
MRS. 



John T. Powers 

VAUDEVILLE "TIT-BITS." 

Agent, ALF T. WILTON. 



MARION 



VICTORIA 






Direction AL SUTHERLAND. 



The White Rats is the way to salvation, because 
it is on Church-hills. (Loud cries of expostula- 
tion.) 




GRIFF 



THE IRRESPONSIBLE 



Hathaway 's Cottage, Lowell, Mass. 
Let England wait. 

ROBINSON 

PARQUETTE 



K. ft P. CIRCUIT. 



TRIO 

AL MAYER. Agt. 



MISS ST. GEORGE 

HUSSEY » CO 

Assisted by C. F. LORRAINE. 

A Startling Comedy Success in Vaudeville. 
Address WE8LEY ft PINCUS, Agents. 



THE BUSY GIRLS, 




Character Singing and Dancing. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



35 



fifi 



AIN'T I RIGHT, BOYS 



SSI 



/ 



Ana* I ORIGINATED that saying for STAGE USE aid I was alto the first to speak it 

on the stage in eonnoetion with MY "POLITICAL" SPEECH 




P 











The Dublin 

Minstrel 









II 



Ain't I Right, Boys? You Can Bet Your Life I Am 

Leave My Own Matter Alone 



II 



• 



That Goes for AlUM WilJtelaW in PailiGUlar, and all others in general 






When MONEY Talks 


E 


iVERYBO 


DYI 


Listens 

■ 


- 
• 


The 01 


RIGINAL . 


Jail 


Breaker 




The Greatest Box Office Attraction in Vaudeville 


Management BEN J. GREENE 



Whm iftcfr fa f Ucvrti—mm U kindly mention Vajubty. 



. 



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vill 



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FAREWELL 



EEAST 



CHI 



THE 
LAST 



AUDITOR! 



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fSBEWEa 



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THfiOUWI 



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HATS.I5S25+N10HTS I5.25&5Q NO HIGHER. 

THfeftM WIKWPVEER NEVER AGAIN CAN YOU SEE M\J0RUJ5 GREATEST TALENT COMBINED 
iNONLBKL AnfRTHl5V/EmTHEK.K.K.KlANANDII5aAPyiC^.ifa2lR^0ITl^UPPEI?ACI8 -' 

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^OIKiEOUS.OAY.OtfUWeAHOiutE WMIZ'.COOO-BYE WEEK 'AN UNEQUALLED. Vv 

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CHICAGO PAPERS PROCLAIM THIS TO BE THE 



of Vaudeville Stars 



EVER ASSEMBLED IN ONE THEATRE IN THE HISTORY OF THE STAGE 



SEATING CAPACITY, 4,200 



CROWDED DAY AND NIGHT 



When answering adveriiavment* kindly Mention Variety. 






TEN CENTS 




Entered a» second-class matter December 22, 1905, at the post office at New York, Jf. Y., under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



J • ' I ■ ,. - 



VARIETY 



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FOLLOW THE LUCKY HOUSE 



I vol) ;»rc bound tube ♦ he lucWv sinK«r of luckv h • .. vVr publi! cA more !.it<; w l r -<07 than a ' er house m 

the country W e have "lone the hanic thing cvm \ yem .since w ! .vl been in I • V. ^oing I < 

•he same thin;* in 1908. Vincent Bryan, who is bevond :< doubt America s . I mest >:•,•" .«!nte Iv 

writer, is row writing with Harry Von Til/cr, Watt i for ni w HITi. — wat< w iOKAS. 

Hrl"w air the first four o/ our I90d HITS, ana tr.rv a-r r« • uts 

In IQfti w* published he f-.rst Summer Wi on? HIT "ON A SUNDAY AFTERNOON." Ims . 

.*rc publishing the first bumnn-i March !.:■•:•>; f f I I entitled 



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Tbts ioiio will r»» Ihf quIckiM hit this country has ever ttta, Jusl slnn ' n « « hwruai imrr .mil you « ill U* v «' th« v\ hn» .• :i- .1 lence sin jlnu II »\ llh vuu 
on IhK hit qui. I. HLIDfc SlNCifcR^ : THE SLIDES 01 THIS SONG, HV SCOT I A \ \\ \1 11 N \. \KI A> lu\ Tl Y AS ANY EVER MAUt 



Here Is another knocMoui the nreatcftl comic song li» year*. Aim unc c*n sinn It! 



<,. t In 




inr lunnicit miiiu V.l.nccni Wry 



wrote VMIh bnt ul llarrv vom Tlhff J best nclodltn L)l-> Oh K\TH\ YhUSftS 



Here In another Cinch Hit n n» w style ul coon »ong. Louii. Urtstcr s blq hit In Lew Mc<ds' uruHucilon, '* r h« t.lrl Behind I « Counter ' entitled 







MI 



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• >id j. mi Mnfl. M WKA1 YOU LWINr r DO tVHIM THE KK>T COMrS ROLNI1 " ? Well, this »H1 



The last ol the blp; l«ur. i»ut not tht ie«st The greatest novelty song in vrars nod a worthy successor to mir oln bit. 



MiMlfiiil^flralJnl ralirnnHI lilfll 



bluuer hit (or sou. 



mm 



laic." Entitled 



M you sin« •MARIUTCB AT CONEY ISLE/' pet this quick. It will be a* big ■ hit lor you. 



*r j/.o ,ubi,sh the r u ng f,» "Bye, iye. Dearie." • Marlutcb at Coney 

hit,' "Take Me Back lo New York Town." "Lulu and Her La La La, * "Top 
ol (tie Mornhi'. Bridget Mc(uf," "Sacramento," "Spoony Sam." "You 
Are Itty Ule. My All." "Just Help Yourself." "Darling Sue," Etc, Lie. 



f Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing Company 



37 West Twenty eighth Street 



New York City 




Typewriters come and go, but the 
machine that always stays, always 
leads, always improves, always out= 
wears, and always outsells all others 
is the 

Remington 

Remington Typewriter Company 

(Incorporated) 

New York and Everywhere 






EUGENE CLINE 



Stores Located as Follows: 

EUGENE CLINE. 59 Dearborn St., Chicago. III. 

EUGENE CLINE. Third and Nicollet Aves.. Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

EUGENE CLINE. 268 S. State St:. Salt Lake City. 

Utah 

EUGENE CLINE, 6th and Olive Sts.. St. Louis, Mo. 

EUGENE CLINE, 1021-23 Grand Avenue. Kansas 

City. Mo. 

EUGENE CLINE. 7 1 7 Superior Ave.. N. E.. Cleve- 
land, Ohio 

EUGENE CLINE. 221 S. Broad St.. Atlanta. Ga. 



When anewerinp odvertUcmmU kindly mention Varott. 



Forty Pages 



TENj CENTS 




VOL. IX., NO. 7. 



JANUARY 25, 1908. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



REPORT THAT "GRAFTING" 

WILL BE STAMPED OUT 



Rumors Say An Investigation of Alleged "Grafting" 
in Agency End of Vaudeville Will Be Conducted 

by the United Offices. 



Reports during the week repeatedly told 
that an investigation by the United Book- 
ing Offices officials was impending to look 
into the many rumors of alleged "graft" 
now in vogue in the booking of vaudeville 
acts. 

These rumors, which alleged "grafting" 
on the part of different persons empowered 
to book acts, have been bruited about for 
some time, and were focused this week 
when two employees of the United Book- 
ing Offices received notice of dismissal. 

Charles Fitzpatrick, one of the former 
United employees, who left the office last 
Saturday, was in consultation with the 
general manager of the United on Wednes- 
day last. The report said he had been 
asked to tell all he knew of the inner 
workings of the booking system. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick, when seen by a Variety 
representative, admitted the question had 
been put to him, but denied having made 
any statements reflecting upon anyone in 
the United Offices. 

The smaller vaudeville act has made the 
most frequent complaint against the meth- 
ods employed in the booking of vaudeville 
shows. It is a matter of common talk 
that one of the artists' organizations holds 
incriminating evidence of a documentary 
nature against two persons in their busi- 
ness dealings with acts. 

It has also been a general report for 
some time that there has been collusion 
between "inside" and "outside" agents in 
the bookings made. No direct accusations 
have been made nor will an act having 
knowledge of any off-color transaction 
permit its name to be used. 

It has been repeatedly asserted since the 
vaudeville opposition subsided that the 
leading lights in the United Offices would 
institute a rigid investigation of all these 
reports, which have reached their ears a? 
well as the outside. 



Where "graft" is brought into the ques- 
tion, it follows the parties to the proceed- 
ings are mulcting someone of an amount 
of money at least equal to the extra 
profit, and this loss eventually must fall 
upon the manager who pays the salaries. 

There are numberless instances reported 
of acts which have been either "held up" 
or have "given up," and the general free 
manner in which these matters have been 
discussed among the artists has slowly 
led to a belief that unless extra payment 
were made work could not be obtained. 

In reference to his dismissal from the 
United Offices Mr. Fitzpatrick, when in- 
formed of the reports his leaving had oc- 
casioned, made a frank statement of the 
circumstances. 

He said he had been discharged without 
a hearing upon an allegation having been 
made against him to the effect he had 
been concerned in the making of a fic- 
titious contract price for a "Wild West" 
act which played around here during the 
latter part of November. 

In his conversation with the general 
manager of the United on Wednesday, the 
first opportunity he had had to present 
his version of the affair, Mr. Fitzpatrick 
said it was then made plain he could have 
had no interest in the act's salary for the 
reason it had not worked over two weeks 
on the United time this season. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick stated the cause of his 
dismissal was a matter of veracity be- 
tween himself and the manager for whom 
the act worked the two weeks, the accusa- 
tion against him dating since that time, 
and not before or during it. 

It is eight years since Fitzpatrick en- 
tered the employ of the booking office. 

The other employee who received a 
notification of dismissal concurrent with 
Fitzgerald's has had nothing said against 
him, as far as learned. 



PRODUCING SCHEME GOING 
THROUGH. 

With the final disposition of the Klaw 
& Erlanger acts with which the United 
Booking Offices has been saddled, there 
will be established in the St. James Build- 
ing as an adjunct to the booking agency a 
mammoth producing department for the 
presentment of vaudeville acts. 

This scheme was exclusively foreshad- 
owed in Variety almost a year ago, and 
the plan would then have been put into 
operation had it not been for the impend- 
ing fight which was forced by the invasion 
of Klaw & Erlanger into the variety field. 

The new department will be under the 
direction of Harry Leonhardt, in whose 
ability as a stage producer E. F. Albee has 
unbounded confidence. At present Leon- 
hardt is devoting his energies to assisting 
in unravelling the many knots and snarls 
wrought by the receipt of all the "ad- 
vanced vaudevillians." 

This congested condition is now being 
rapidly adjusted. Many acts have been 
nrevailed upon to cancel present agree- 
ments, receiving in exchange booking for 
next season. Others are being settled in 
various ways. 



HARRISON AND SEABROOKE 
TOGETHER. 

Louis Harrison, the musical comedy co- 
median, and Thomas Q. Seabrooke have 
arranged to open in vaudeville shortly in a 
sketch now being written by Mr. Harrison. 
It was Harrison who was in a large meas- 
ure responsible for the writing of "The Isle 
of Champagne," Seabrooke's notable musi- 
cal comedy success. 

The pair will make their first appearance 
in either Wilmington or Cleveland Feb. 10, 
with United time to follow. 



ANOTHER ZIEGFELD SHOW. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 23. 
It is said some of the members of "The 
Follies of 1007" company have been in- 
formed that they will open at the Audi- 
torium, Chicago, in about five weeks with 
a new production, styled "The Follies of 
1008." It will be under the same manape- 
men (Flor.'iiz Zio-jfeld, Jr.), and be a re- 
vision of the present piece, which will be 
abandoned, having played all the.desirablo 
time. 



HIPPODROME LOCATION IN DETROIT. 

Detroit, Jan. 23. 

It has just leaked out here that Max 
Faetkenhauer and his associates in the 
construction and management of the 
Cleveland Hippodrome, have acquired an 
option of the huge old armory on Lamed 
Street, which is now being used as a store- 
house by the Pittsburg Plate Glass Com- 
pany. 

The location is four blocks from the 
main thoroughfare, and show folks say it 
is not suitable for a playhouse. Mr. 
Faetkenhauer's architects have been 
prowling about the neighborhood taking 
measurements, making memoranda, and 
showing other unmistakable signs of busi- 
ness. 



KLAW GOING TO EUROPE. 

Next month, Marc Klaw, of Klaw & 
Erlanger, expects to leave for Europe. 
While there, and it said this is the object 
of his trip, Mr. Klaw will attempt to 
secure the release of Harry Lauder in order 
that his firm may play the Scotch com- 
edian over here once more, for a longer 
and earlier engagement than contemplated 
while Lauder was at the New York. If 
successful, K. & E. may have a production 
built around the Scotchman. 

On his previous visit to the other side, 
when Klaw & Erlanger had a vaudeville 
circuit, Mr. Klaw selected Adeline Genee 
and the Yuilians for an American tour. 
Both have triumphed, and the silent half 
of "The Syndicate" is now looked upon 
as a "good picker." 



AMELIA SUMMERVILLE'S "BRAIN- 
STORMS." 

"Brainstorms" is the title of a sketch 
written for vaudeville by Alice Ives in 
which Amelia Summerville trusts to re- 
appear in the variety theatres. 

Two men will assist her in the all-com- 
edy piece. MisH Summeiville's proposed 
Kuropean trip has been set aside indefi- 
nitely pending an engagement over here. 



CLOSES AFTER 18 YEARS. 

Chicago, Ian. 23. 
With a record of eighteen theatrical sea- 
sons to its credit, Byrne Brothers' "8 
Bells" is announced to end its tour the 
cominir week. 



VARIETY 



WHAT ARE THE BEST STEPS 
FOR ARTISTS' PROTECTION? 



I have read the article and letters on 

"The. Best Steps for Artists' Protection." 

I understand there is a movement on foot 

for all the organizations having to do 

with the variety business to meet for 

a general conference for the purpose of 
accomplishing a sweeping affiliation. Even 
though the report is wrong, why would 
this not be one of the best steps to 
make a start with? t 

Committees might be appointed by the 
many different orders which could confer, 
and perhaps find some plan where the 
concentration of united forces could be 
arrived at. 

A mutual understanding of some sort 
might lead to big developments for the 
artist. It seems to me that the artists' 
societies and those orders having close 
connection with them could find a scheme 
for a consolidation. 

Reading between the lines of Mr. 
DeVeaux's letter last week on this sub- 
ject, 1 concluded he had something of 
this sort in mind when he wrote it. 

I should think it is worth while to be 
taken up if that has not been done al- 
ready. Few artists excepting those who 
have been affected by the present condi- 
tions realize the great power of a one- 
man reign in vaudeville, with no oppo- 
sition or organization strong enough to 
offset it. Artist. 



I submit the following, gleaned from 
comment and observation: 

An article appeared in the Chicago 
"American," in Dec, '04, written by a 
well known theatrical manager of that 
city, wherein he stated, that, at that time 
"there were about 5,000 vaudeville acts 
in America, that approximately twenty 
per cent, were meritorious or available." 

Accepting the above statement, were 
the artists organized, with the potent fact 
staring us in the face, that he represents 
for the time he occupies the stage a sum 
total of his intelligence and power in his 
special line, and that twenty per cent., 
or one -fifth of the whole number would 
have to endure, combat and neutralize the 
other eighty per cent, or four-fifths. Is it 
feasible ? 

The "merit" of "availability" of an 
artist or act is in its individuality. All 
the organization obtainable would not in- 
crease the individuality of a number of 
artists. 

Relative to a contract without a give 
and take clause optional with either party 
thereto, such would be unAmerican. 

It may be said they do it in Europe. 
I would answer that what percentage of 
foreign acts accustomed to "cinch" con- 
tracts in their own country were and are 
considered "available" or "meritorious," 
according to the appearances of importa- 
tions this season? 

The "business," according to business 
methods used in the investment of money, 
is always alarming to a conservative, ow- 
ing to the amount netted on the invest- 
ment. 

In conclusion two emphatic points pre- 
sent themselves, both amenable to Emer- 
son's law of compensation. 

First, the artist must attain efficiency, 



through intelligently perfecting himself in 
his line to a degree which stamps his in- 
dividuality. Abnormal returns on invest- 
ments evidence that some one gets some- 
thing for nothing temporarily, although it 
costs more in the long run, than if the 
law of compensation had to be satisfied or 
complied with, for the law is working out, 
saying we cannot get something all the 
time for nothing, either as artist or man- 
ager. Integrity is the best step for all 
just now. Artiat. 



What are the best steps for artists' 
protection? Besides securing an equitable 
contract there is only one step needed. 
Abolition of the blacklist! 

But is there any such thing? Maybe. 
Anyhow, some months ago managers 
agreed to eliminate it. Why did they 
promise to do away with a mystical bug- 
aboo? Were they laughing in their 
sleeves at the gullible artist? 

And how is the latter to tell whether 
he's blacklisted or not? Surely no sane 
manager will admit openly that he has 
resorted to unlawful measures. The mere 
fact that an artist gets few or no dates 
is no proof that he is blacklisted. He 
may be incompetent, or he may not have 
a good act. 

But suppose, as sometimes happens, he 
has a first class act and still "lays off" 
most of the time? What, then, is the 
natural conclusion? If he's not black- 
listed he thinks he is, and the indications 
are that he thinks correctly. 



Favored artists secure in the temporary 
good will of the managers often have 
small sympathy for their less fortunate 
brethren. Such may declare the blacklist 
to be a chimera, never stopping to con- 
sider that their managerial friends would 
hardly make themselves ridiculous by 
promising to abolish something that never 
existed. 

To any artist who may complain that 
he is kept out of engagements the man- 
ager can always defend himself with one 
of these three stereotyped answers: 

"You are incompetent." 

"Your act is not suitable for my the- 
at re. 

"Your terms are exorbitant." 

Now it's certain that the manager is 
often right, but it's equally certain that, 
right or wrong, he can always give one of 
these excuses. So an artist who may be 
blacklisted can never prove it; and no 
matter how hard he strives he often finds 
it impossible to overcome the prejudice 
against him. 

In my opinion there is only one solution 
of the difficulty. Let any artist who 
thinks he has merit, but can't get work, 
be given a chance to prove his worth. If 
the managers deny him an opening he 
should be able to appeal successfully to 
one of the vaudeville organizations. 

Once a member, the artist should be 
judged by his peers. His offering should 
be given a trial before an impartial jury. 
If found wanting, he should be told the 
bitter truth, that industry, and not art, 
is his proper occupation. But if he pos- 
sesses talent and "makes good" every ef- 
fort should be made by his professional 
brothers to secure employment for him. 



IDLE ACTS CROWDING CHICAGO. 

Chicago, Jan. 23. 
Perhaps at no time in the history of lo- 
cal theatricals has the vaudeville situation 
been so chaotic as at present. The throngs 
crowding the hallways and lobbies of the 
various booking agencies in Chicago are 
enormous, and the mail from out of town 
acts for immediate or future engagements 

equally big. Many acts have offered their 
services at reduced figures to avoid being 
idle. 

The deplorable conditions are attributed 
to the poor business in the smaller towns. 
The chief sufferers are the small artists 
who depend on that time. 

The out-of-town theatres have been 
compelled to decrease the cost of shows. 
Where no satisfactory cut in salary can 
be made, the number of acts is reduced 
one-third or half. 

It is variously estimated by the booking 
agents between 200 and 300 acts are idle 
in Chicago every week — unlike a year ago 
when the demand exhausted the supply, 
and caused consternation among the 
agents and managers. 

Since the abdication of Klaw & Er- 
langer, making it necessary for the West- 
ern Vaudeville Association to assume part 
of the responsibility of placing the firm's 
contracted acts, a number of acts allegiant 
to the western people (and holding con- 
tracts) have been shifted to the smaller 
houses without cut in salaries, while others 
voluntarily agree to accept a reduction. 

This state of affairs may prevail until 
Spring. 



F0UGERE CANCELLED. 

San Francisco, Jan. 23. 



Upon opening at the Orpheum here, Mile. 
Eugenie Fougere, who has held headline 
position in most of the Orpheum houses on 
her trip to the Coast, found that Mme. 
Lucerne, a local operatic favorite, had been 
billed above her. 

The French chanteuse immediately went 
to the house manager and registered a pro- 
test. He declined to change the billing, 
and Mile. Fougere became still further in- 
censed. The argument waxed hot until 
M. Meyerfeld, Jr., settled matters with 
swiftness and dispatch by closing Mile. 
Fougere for remainder of the Orpheum's 
Pacific Ooast time, about five weeks. 

Fougere has appealed to the French 
Consul in this city for redress against the 
Orpheum Circuit. 



MORTON STILL OUT. 

James J. Morton, the monologist, is 
still out, though holding a K. & E. con- 
tract. 

It is said that Mr. Morton may remain 
away from vaudeville for the next two 
or three weeks, when he will have a route 
over the United time given him in settle- 
ment of his "Advanced Vaudeville" agree- 
ment. 

This understanding was given out as 
contingent upon Mr. Morton accepting the 
proposition when submitted. 



Concerted and persistent refusal to en- 
gage an artist so tested and endorsed by 
the White Rats, the Comedy Club or the 
Actors' Union would speedily convince the 
most skeptical that the merry little black- 
list is "♦ill in a flourishing condition. 

An Old Timer. 



DAN FISHEL, S.-C. GEN. MQR. 

Dan Fishel, who was house manager of 

several of Klaw & Erlanger's "Advanced 

Vaudeville" theatres, and last held the 

executive position at the Forrest Theatre, 

Philadelphia, left New York Thursday for 
Chicago, where he will take up the posi- 
tion of general manager for Sullivan & 
Considine, with headquarters in the Chi- 
cago offices of that concern. 

Following the shift of Chris O. Brown 
from Chicago to New York, Fred Lincoln 
was brought to the Chicago offices from 
Seattle, where he had directed the af- 
fairs of the circuit for some years. Mr. 
Lincoln's friends and family connections 
are in the Pacific Coast town, and it is at 
his request that he has been returned to 
that point. 



COOPER JUDGMENT APPEALED. 

The judgment recovered against Vesta 

Victoria for $1,250 by Bert Cooper, on a 

claim for commissions, in the City Court 

recently, was appealed to the Appellate 

Division of the Supreme Court this week 
by Henry J. Goldsmith, Miss Victoria's 
attorney. 

Harry Levey and Martin Engel became 
surety for the payment of the amount if 
affirmed by the higher court. 

A motion was also made by Mr. Gold- 
smith to reduce the amount to $500 on 
the ground that Cooper claimed five per 
cent, only for an amount over Miss Vic- 
toria's former salary of $1,500 weekly for 
ten weeks, whereas the jury returned a 
verdict in favor of Cooper based upon a 
computation of five per cent, upon the 
whole of her salary under the Klaw & 
Erlanger contract, $2,500 weekly. 

Denis O'Brien is attorney for Cooper. 
The appeal will be argued in a couple of 
months. 



LILY FLEXMORE'S NEW CONTRACT. 

Lily Flexmore opens at the Columbus, 
St. Louis, next week, preliminary to a 
trip of sixteen weeks in the west. 

Miss Flexmore is an English contor- 
tionist, who came over here under a 
K. & E. contract, which did not contain a 
"fare" clause. 

The contract to play the west is a 
new one, the K. & E. agreement having 
been destroyed. 



CHANGES IN "THE SOUL KISS." 
Philadelphia, Jan. 23. 
Several changes have been made in "The 
Soul Kiss" since the opening perform- 
ance. Lillian Shaw and John Keefe left 

the show on Tuesday. Miss Shaw may 
take Norah Bayes' place in "The Follies 
of 1907" next week. 

Collins and Hart left for New York 
to make up another aerial burlesque 
"strong act" for the New York opening. 

Other changes occurred, but the music 
of the piece, written by Maurice Levi, has 
been untouched. 



WASHINGTON RECORD BROKEN. 

Washington, Jan. 23. 
Montgomery and Stone in "The Red 
Mill" played to $26,000.75 at the National 
last week, breaking the record for the 
house. 









VARIETY 



wrIety 

A Variety Paper for Variety People. 

Published every Saturday by 
THB VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 

Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 
1102 Broadway, New York City. 

Telephone/^}. 3Sth St. 

SIME J. SILVERMAN, 
Editor and Proprietor. 



Entered as second-class matter December 22, 
1905, at the Poet Office at New York, N. Y„ 
under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

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Copyright, 1007, by Variety Publishing Co. 



Vol. IX. 



JANUARY 25. 



No. 7. 



Ross and Vack join Hyde's "Blue Rib- 
bon Girls" on Monday. 

Imro Fox makes his reappearance at the 
Nelson, Springfield, next week. 



Billy Spencer has signed for '"The Wash 
injrton Society Girls" next season. 



Russell and Dcverne will join the Hagen- 
beik Wallace show for the circus season. 



Hattie Stewart, Tom G Men's wife, is 
slowly recovering from an attack of grippe. 



Relle Blanche is giving an imitation of 
Harry Lauder at the Fifth Avenue this 
week. 



In April Bertie Ilerron will commence 
a tour of the Orpheum Circuit, going to the 
Coast. 



John W. Rausome has a new act, and 
would like to have a showing in New York 
with it. 



Rivers and Rochester, an Australian act, 
open at Pastor's, Feb. 3, booked by Alf. T. 
Wilton. 



Hathaway and Siegel sailed for England 
this week. They open at the new Hippo- 
drome, Sheffield. 



Lillian Lee expects to play vaudeville on 
Feb. 10 in a sketch written for her. Jack 
Levy is handling the act. 



The Four Rigo Brothers, for their first 
American appearance, play the Orpheum, 
Kansas City, week Jan. 27. 



Carlisle and Baker open at the Empire, 
'Frisco, Feb. 3, for a three months' trip 
over the Western States time. 



Melville and Higgins played six shows 
last Sunday, appearing twice at the Union 
Square, New York and Colonial. 



Gertie Hoffman will be the feature of the 
bill at the Fifth Avenue, week Feb. 3. 
Jack Levy is Miss Hoffman's agent. 



Pauline Hall has received contracts for 
15 weeks on the Orpheum Circuit, com- 
mencing next month. M. S. Bentham did 
it. 



Ted Snyder, of the music publishing 
firm of Rose & Snyder, left Sunday for 
Chicago, where he will introduce his firm's 
songs. 



Harry Mount ford and Maud Walsh, the 
English cross-fire talkers, are having their 
first engagement at the Novelty, Brooklyn, 
this week. 



P. J. Casey is booking the bill for an en- 
tertainment to be held at the banquet given 
by the Custom House Inspectors at the St. 
Regis, Feb. 1. 



The site for Percy G. Williams' new 
theatre in Greenpoint (Brooklyn) has been 
excavated. The house will not open be- 
fore next season. 



Virginia Earl is appearing in her new 
single act at Norfolk, Ya., this week. Three 
songs and the same number of swift changes 
are the important parts. 



The wife of Fred Brooks, musical di- 
rector of "The Champagne Girls," was 
granted a divorce by Judge Blanchard in 
the Supreme Court on Wednesday. 



"The Dainty Duchess" did $5,873 at the 
Gaiety last week. The house record is just 
over $0,200. One unimportant extra at- 
traction was in "The Duchess" olio. 



The Rooney Sisters were offered Euro- 
pean time by the Marinelli office if they 
could sail immediately. The girls nre in 
Baltimore, and could not arrange to accept. 



Victor Williams is in Aiken, S. C, Mr. 
Williams left on "Monday for a four weeks' 
trip to relieve himself of a settled cold. 
Before returning he will visit Palm Beach. 



Sam Drane has formed a partnership 
with his brother .lames, ami the pair will 
show a new act in vaudeville, opening at 
Pastor's Feb. 24, booked by Walter Pli in- 
ner. 



DeWitt Mott, from "The College Wid- 
ow" bag a sketch by Caroline Edwards. It 
requires a woman beside himself. Mr. 
Mott wishes to try it out on the vaudeville 
"dog." 



Hickey and Nelson and Polk and Kollins 
opened at the Empire, San Francisco, last 
Monday, commencing then a tour of twelve 
weeks each over the Western States cir- 
cuit. 



Joe Whitehead, who replaced Junie 
McCree in "The Girl Question" at the La 
Salle, Chicago, has been placed under con- 
tract for two years by Manager Mort 
Singer. 



Liane D'Eve has completed her time on 
the Klaw & E danger contract, under which 
she came over here. Miss D'Eve will 
return to her native France in a couple of 
weeks. •*• 



The mother of Rena Arnold (Mrs. 
James B. Donovan), of Donovan and Ar- 
nold, died at her home in Cleveland on 
Tan. 4. Airs. Donovan's mother had many 
friends in the profession. 



Howard Powers, formerly of Powers 
and Theobald, and last season manager 
"McFadden Flats," has been engaged to 
pilot "Gay New York" for the remainder 
of the season. 



Maidee Scott, the English artiste, has 
two more weeks to play under Klaw & 
Erlanger. She contemplates sailing for 
the other side immediatelv at the conclu- 



sion of the engagement. 



Justin Tanean, of Tanean, Felix and 
Claxton, has just recovered from the ef- 
fects of a recent accident, and the trio 
are prepared to return to work after an 
enforced term of idleness. 



"They Will All Be Waiting for You at 
the Train," by Williams and Van Alstyne, 
and "My Gal Irene," written by Ilapgood 
Burt, are two new songs to be published 
by Jerome II. Remick & Co. 



Murray Clayton and Lillian Drew have 
given up vaudeville for the remainder of 
the season, and will join Jacobs, Butler & 
I>owry's "Merry Maidens," playing parts 
and doinsr their turn in the olio. , 



The Zarrow Trio have closed with the 
Clara Turner Repertoire Company and 
vaudeville time is being arranged for 
them on the United Booking Oflices' con- 
nections through Alf. T. Wilton. 

Maximus, the strong man, who allows an 
automobile to run over him, rehearsed it 
wrong while playing at Pat ei son. The 
injuries received will oblige a postpone- 
ment of the Western States time. 



Jules Ruby will book the Sunday con- 
certs at the Lincoln Square, commencing 
to-morrow. M. Schlesinger, the former 
manager, is now traveling representative 
for C. E. Plain y, who holds the lease. 

It i-< estimated by someone on the in- 
side that the total cost t<> the United 
Booking Offices for fret* that already have 



and will "lay off" with Klaw & Erlanger 
contracts, foots up the sum of $00,000. 



Charles Leonard Fletcher concludes his 
American season in Pittsburg March 28, 
immediately sailing for London, where he 
will play in the Syndicate halls, after 
which he starts on his second tour of the 
world. 



Ed Blondell left this week for Beau- 
mont, Tex., where he" will inspect some oil 
wells. Mr. Blondell may bring one or two 
back with him as samples. He says "oil" 
Iq vaudeville ought to be valuable from 
now on. 



The Chadwick Trio, who headlined the 
opening bill at the Burtis Opera House, 
Auburn, last week, won a gold watch of- 
fered by the management to the most pop- 
ular number on the program, judged by the 
laughter and applause. 



Karl Tausig returned from Europe on 
the "Mauretania." Mr. Tausig arranged 
while abroad for the Pall Mall Forwarding 
Company to represent Tausig's Steamship 
Agency in London. Another business con- 
nection will be entered into for Berlin. 



The receipts for the three larger houses 
on P. G. Williams' circuit, up to Jan. 1 
last, are said to exceed by many thousands 
of dollars the previous season's box-office 
returns for the same period, notwithstand- 
ing the theatrical condition existing during 
November and December. 



Winston's Seals have been booked 
through the Marinelli office for an en- 
gagement at Circus Brown, Buenos Ay res, 
South America, together with Sie Hassan 
Ben Ali's Arabs. Both acts leave here in 
March and reach the South American city 
via Southampton, England. 



J. E. Dunne, until recently principal 
tenor with "The Toymakers," has a one- 
act Irish musical comedy written for him 
by Ernest L. Waitt. It is in rehearsal 
f<»r an early appearance in vaudeville. 
The music was written by Dan J. Sulli- 
van, composer of the "Miss Pocahontas" 
music. 



The engagement has been announced of 
Irving Charles Ackerman, of San Fran- 
cisco, son of Charles L. Ackerman, of the 
Orpheum Circuit, and Gertrude Sonner- 
fcld, a young society woman of San Fran- 
cisco and St. Louis. Mr. Ackerman is an 
attorney. The wedding will take place 
in the spring. 



Thai Percy Williams harbors no feelings 
towards "K. & E. arts" was demonstrated 
when Ollie Young and Brothers, whose 
baggage failed to arrive in time for 
the Monday matinee at the Alhamhra, were 
agreeably surprised to find that their 
envelope at the end of the engagement con- 
tained a full week's Biliary. 



Charlotte Parry, the protean actress, 
received a note while at Columbus, ()., 
from Charlotte Parry, dated from 1401 
Massachusetts Avenue, Washington. The 
actress was informed the second Miss 
Parry's home was in Columbus, and her 
family was besieged with Inquiries as to 
when their daughter went on the stage. 



VARIETY 



ATHLETIC CARNIVALS AGAINST 
OPPOSITION. 

The Western Burlesque Wheel is em- 
plying "Athletic carnivals," an idea of 
Tom Miner's, extensively where it has op- 
position fights or other unusual conditions 
to meet on its circuit. Mr. Miner is going 
into the scheme widely, offering to put in 
the feature for other managers. 

The scheme is an elaboration of the plan 
of putting up boxing or wrestling bouts 
with local favorites. Usually a big pugilis- 
tic star is provided, and surrounded with 
lesser lights of the ring or wrestling mat. 

'•Carnivals" are now being held regular- 
ly in the Western Wheel houses in New- 
ark, Brooklyn (Park), Jersey City, Bos- 
ton, Bowery Theatre, New York ; and next 
week will be introduced in Albany and 
Troy as feature of Tom Miner's "Bo- 
hemians." The week following, Montreal 
and Toronto will be added to the list. 

In Brooklyn the added feature is depend- 
ed upon to attract attention to the Park, 
very recently opened as a Western bur- 
lesque house. The Easterners have kept 
after the new opposition ever since its in- 
ception, in numerous instances having cov- 
ered up its paper. 

In Jersey City the "carnival" is designed 
to offset the attraction of "amateur nights" 
newly inaugurated at the Keith-Proctor 
vaudeville theatre. Miner is a firm be- 
liever in the plan's value in "boosting" 
business and points to his week in Scran- 
ton, Pa;, when with the feature his "Bo- 
hemians" rolled up a substantial profit as 
against the consistent losses of the other 
shows with few exceptions. 

Joe Gans, who is under the wing of 
Barney Gerard, manager of "The Bo- 
hemians," is used as the star in most of 
the exhibitions. Next week Mr. Lichten- 
stein, former manager of the Longacre 
Athletic Club, New York, is being sent 
ahead to boom the coming event. 

The manager of the Troy house refused 
to accept a share of the expense for the 
last three days of the week, and Miner 
bought him out. He will pay the house a 
lump sum for its share and himself take 
the gross. 



BANQUETTED SOUBRETTE. 

When "The Imperials" played here, 
Margie Hilton, the soubrette of the show, 
was tendered a banquet by the Treasurers' 
Club. Miss Hilton is a Washington girl. 

She received a diamond/ring during the 
evening. Members of the company and 
club attended, as well as many of Miss 
Hilton's old acquaintances. 



A POUND OF AFFIDAVITS. 

Fifty-five affidavits, weighing over one 
pound, were submitted by counsel for 
William B. Watson in the motion for an 
allowance of alimony and counsel fee 
asked for by his wife, Jeanette Dupre, in 
the divorce proceedings now pending be- 
tween the two. The motion was denied 
by Judge Newburger in the Supreme 
Court. 



EASTERN MANAGERS LEAVE. 

On Thursday, as scheduled, Sain A. 
Scribner, Gus Hill and L. Lawrence Weber 
started upon their ten days' trip over 
the Eastern Burlesque Wheel. 

The trio of managers will go as far 
west as Kansas City, making several 
stops, the first teing Chicago. 



SHEA BURLESQUE MANAGER. 

Martin A. Shea, booking agent for the 
Eastern Burlesque Wheel, and Ed Blon- 
dell this week bought control of "The 
Hyde Show" ("Blue Ribbon Girls"), an or- 
ganization in that concern, for a period 
beginning immediately, and running to the 
end of the season of 1010-11. The new 
owners pay Hyde a stated weekly sum for 
the use of the property and assume full 
control. 

The Hyde interests retire from the 
active management owing to the unwill- 
ingness of Richard Hyde to longer have the 
trouble of directing its management and 
the inconvenience of keeping James 
Hyde on the road in active direction of 
the organization. 

The v show is at Hurtig & Seamon's 
Music Hall this week. As soon as the 
necessary papers have been signed, an en- 
tirely new production will be put on. The 
show will not close for revision, but the 
revised offering will be put into use as 
soon as possible. 



ANOTHER EXECUTIVE MEETING. 

Harry Martell and Henry C. Miner left 
New York Tuesday to attend a meeting of 
the Empire Circuit Company Executive 
Committee, which met in Cincinnati on 
Wednesday. They are the only two mem- 
bers of the board living in New York. Last 
week James E. Fennessy was in New York. 

No information could be had as to the 
purpose of the meeting, although it was 
believed that it had to do with, the reported 
deal by which the Western and Eastern 
Burlesque Wheels are to get out of one city 
each, leaving the town without opposition. 

Eastern Wheel managers would not ad- 
mit that such an arrangement had been 
entered into. 



LULU BEESON'S PECULIAR AFFEC- 
TION. 

Albany, Jan. 23. 

While playing a return engagement 
here with "The Merry Maidens," Lulu 
Beeson, the dancer, was suddenly deprived 
of the use of her right leg through an 
•affection of the siatic nerve. 

Miss Beeson left for New York early in 
the week, to place herself under the care 
of Dr. O'Hanlon, in the doctor's private 
sanitarium on Lexington Avenue. A 
speedy recovery is looked for. 



CHANGES IN "GRASS WIDOWS." 

A number of changes will take place 
this week in the cast of "The Jolly Grass 
Widows" (Western Burlesque Wheel) 
when that company plays Boston. 

Henry and Frances, George Hackman 
and Estrella Wills will retire, and in their 
places will be Will Fox, Anette Wiltsie and 
Winnie Richards. Miss Wiltsie left "The 
Lady Birds" last week, her place in that 
organization being taken by Lilla Brennan. 



OFFERS FOR HETTY KING. 

On February 20, Hetty King, with her 
husband, Ernest Luck, will commence 
her homeward trip. 

Unless she arrives at a decision pre- 
vious to sailing, Miss King will carry 
back with her several offers for an Amer- 
ican reappearance. One is for a vaude- 
ville tour next season of 32 weeks, while 
others have been tendered by Broadway 
managers for musical comedies. 



SAM. SCRIBNER ON GRAND OPERA. 

Sam. Scribner, of the Columbia Amuse- 
ment Company, attended the first Ameri- 
can production of "Iris" at the Metropoli- 
tan Opera House Monday night. Tues- 
day morning he was heard to complain to 
a business associate: 

"I've been all the way from Grand 
Street to Grand Rapids, including the 
Grand Central Palace and Depot, but this 
was my look-in on grand opera. Can't see 
it for a minute." 

Another theatrical manager, also an 
opera enthusiast, reports that he saw 
Scribner in the Metropolitan before the 
rise of the curtain. The opera opens with 
a highly technical overture descriptive of 
an Oriental daybreak. The music is 
supposed to picture the stillness of night 
and the slow stealing up of dawn, end- 
ing in a crashing burst of music at the 
appearance of the sun. 

In describing the music the manager 
observed incidentally, "I turned to look at 
Scribner when the overture was finished, 
but he had ducked at 3:30." 

The yarn recalls a fabulous story in 
which "Pete" Clark is said to have fig- 
ured. He wandered into the Metropolitan 
once and later told his friends the pro- 
ceedings were so dull he couldn't "stick 
until the olio." 



OBITUARY 



OPENING SET FORWARD. 

Chicago, Jan. 23. 

The opening date of Hyde & Behman's 
"Star and Garter," the new Eastern 
Wheel burlesque house, has been shifted 
to Feb. 9. The interior decorations could 
not be completed in time to permit the 
inauguration as first scheduled. Paper 
announcing the opening for Sunday next 
has been distributed for a week. 

The "Rose Hill Folly" Company, which 
was to initiate the new theatre, will open 
at Euson's next week, instead of the "Bon 
Tons." The latter were scheduled to 
"jump" Indianapolis and play the North 
Side house, but will fill the week out in 
the Indiana capital, and come to Chicago 
a week later. "The Night Owls" will be 
the first attraction playing the new house. 



AN ENTHUSIASTIC BOOMER. 

Charles Grant Patton, advance agent for 
M. M. Thiese's "Rollickers" (Western Bur- 
lesque Wheel), was arrested in Albany last 
week for too enthusiastically booming his 
show. Young Patton, a brother of the 
show's manager, formerly was with a cir- 
cus, and anything that will hold a nail 
looks good to him for advertising purposes. 

That's why the local police found him 
in the early morning tacking "Rollickers" 
signs on the trees about the State Capitol 
building. He was promptly "pinched," but 
when he agreed not to be misled by his en- 
thusiasm the , magistrate discharged him, 
cautioning him not to paste eight-sheets 
on the Capitol itself. 



KNOWLES' LECTURE TOUR. 

The second season of R. G. Knowles' il- 
lustrated lectures commences March 5 at 
Carnegie Music Hall. 

On Thursdays of each week commencing 
then, and continuing until April 2, Mr. 
Knowles will talk about "Fisher Folk of 
France and Flanders," "Auld Scotland to 
New Zealand," "New York: Things You 
Haven't Seen," "A Visit, to South Africa" 
and 'Old Worlds Through New Ones." 



John J. Carey, known in the theatrical 
profession as Joe Morton and later as Joe 
J. Mackie, died in Adron Hospital, Punx- 
sutawney, Pa., Jan. 10, after an illness of 
two weeks. Death was due to typhoid 
pneumonia. The burial took place from 
the deceased's late home, at 108 Under- 
bill Avenue, Brooklyn. 

Mr. Carey's last theatrical connection 
was as Joe Mackie in the act of Mackie, 
Murphy and Mack, playing vaudeville 
with the sketch "My Son Tommy." Pre- 
viously he had played the newsboy in 
Kate Claxton's original "Two Orphans" 
Company, and had been connected with 
many other productions, among them 
being Murray tand Mack's "Breezy Times," 
"Muldoon's Picnic" and Tom Nawn's 
"Shantytown." 

His former partners will continue under 
the firm name of Murphy and Mack. 



San Francisco, Jan. 23. 

After suffering from an assault, G. D. 
Ackley, a composer of popular songs, some 
of which became famous, died in the Cen- 
tral Emergency Hospital. The body was 
taken, unclaimed, to the morgue, and he 
was buried by the county. 

Among the songs the composer had writ- 
ten are "The Red Cross Nurse," "My Sis- 
kiyou Beauty," "Things Are Not So Nice 
in 'Frisco," and "He Will Stand Up for 
His Country." 



Olive Evans, wife of Charles J. Stine, 
and of the vaudeville team of Stine and 
Evans, died last week in a hospital in this 
city. 

Miss Evans was comparatively a young 
woman. Her sudden demise was a great 
shock to her husband and friends. 



Galesburg, 111., Jan. 23. 

Jean Sheffer, a member of the Kellar 
Troupe of cyclists died here last week. 
The girl was 17 years old and a resident 
of Toronto, where she joined the bicycle 
act last summer. 

Norman Sheffer, a cousin, attained some 
note as a trick cyclist, being one of the 
early "loop-the-loop" riders. 



EASTERN TO BE SOLID WHEEL. 

With the opening of the Star and Gar- 
ter Theatre, the property of Hyde & Beh- 
man, in Chicago, Feb. 9, the Columbia 
Amusement Company will have a solid 
circuit of forty weeks without a lay-off 

There was some talk a few months ago 
of closing the Indianapolis house for the 
rest of the season upon the opening of the 
new show place, but it has now been de- 
cided to give up the opening performance 
in Kansas City on Sunday so as to allow 
time for a jump from New Orleans. 

Hereafter Eastern shows playing the 
Crescent City will get away on their lon^' 
Western jump into Kansas City about 
midnight on Saturday, opening in the Mis 
souri town on Monday. It is said the 
journey can be made in time to allow of 
a Monday matinee. 

Hitherto the jump has been filled in 
with one-night stands or the whole com 
pany has laid off. 



VARIETY 



K.-P. WIN INJUNCTION SUIT. 

Supreme Court Judge Davis decided this 
week it was lawful for Keith-Proctor 
theatres to exhibit moving pictures on 
Sundays. 

The decision was given in the injunciton 
proceedings brought by Maurice Goodman, 
attorney for the theatrical managers, re- 
straining the police from interfering with 
the Sunday performances in the Keith- 
Proctor theatres, if moving pictures were 
shown. 

Judge Davis in his written opinion said 
the conflict involved in the questions 
raised should have the appellate division of 
the Supreme Court to pass upon them. 
He made the temporary injunction per- 
manent pending the trial of the appeal. 

An injunction procured by the Eden 
Musee was also made permanent, giving 
that house of wax the privilege to re- 
main open on Sundays. 

The many injunctions obtained by the 
moving picture people, and the "omnibus" 
injunction secured by the local organiza- 
tion of film men was practically decided 
when Judge Davis gave as his opinion that 
the movng picture show conducted by 
Lazar Valense at 122 Park Row, and a 
"penny arcade" run by the same man at 
113 Third Avenue, could remain open on 
Sundays provided the peace of the com- 
munity should not be disturbed. 

The Supreme Court decision in these 
cases are in confirmation of the opinion 
expressed by the theatrical lawyers at the 
passage of the Doull ordinance. 

Last Sunday in the Percy G. Williams 
theatres no moving pictures were ex- 
hibited. It is probable though that to- 
morrow all houses will close the show 
with a picture series. 



MAKES RUBIES ON STAGE. 

On February 2, at the Orpheum, San 
Francisco, will appear for the first time in 
America, Alice Norton, who comes to this 
side from the Hippodrome, London, 
booked by II. B. Marinelli. 

Miss Nortou is to do something different 
for vaudeville patrons. She makes rubies, 
those blood-red jewels, upon the stage, in 
plain sight of the audience. 

It is claimed that this is not a glass- 
blowing exhibition, but that t'he young 
woman actually turns out the jewels in 
her performance. 



MABEL RUSSELL ALONE. 

Mabel Russell, formerly of Bruno and 
Russell, will open Feb. 3 on the United 
time with a single act in "one." Her part- 
ner, Gus Bruno, is seriously ill, and it is 
feared that he will not be able to return 
to the stage for some time. 



ELFIE FAY IN TOWN. 

In town again is Elfie Fay, and in 
<|iiest of vaudeville time. Jack Levy is 
commissioned to look out for it. 

Miss Fay was reported to have set 
about this time of the year for her wed- 
ding to a naval officer, with a trip to 
Japan for the honeymoon. 

— • ~~ ~~~ *■"■ 

MUSICAL COMEDY FOR SUMMER. 

Chicago, .Ian. 23. 

The Chicago Opera House will probably 
have musical comedy the coming sum- 
mer. C. K. Kohl, of Kohl & Castle, is 
considering it. 

Cliff Gordon and "That" Quartet are 
among those mentioned for the company. 



LIVELY TIMES AT COLONIAL. 

According to all reports stratas of 
seething blue air have been shooting in, 
around and about the Colonial Theatre 
this week, where Vesta Victoria and Eva 
Tanguay are equal headliners in the bill- 
ing. 

Percy G. Williams arranged his pro- 
gram at that house this week, and Mr. 
Williams is supposed to have ordered the 
billing. He has been impartial. 

On the bills their names are boxed in 
at the top, same size type and space. 
On one side of the electrical sign in front 
of the theatre, Miss Victoria is over Miss 
Tanguay, while on the other side, the po- 
sition of the names has been reversed. 

When one of Miss Victoria's lithographs 
is discovered on a board, adjoining it is 
one of Miss Tanguay. The only difference 
in the relative 'headline" position of the 
two women at the theatre this week is 
the place on the program, Miss Victoria 
first appearing. 

The English girl claims it is contrary to 
her Klaw & Erlanger contract, which calls, 
she says, for 'the" headline of each show, 
while the managers say the contract reads 
she shall be "a" headline feature wherever 
played. 

Miss Tanguay professes utter indiffer- 
ence. On Monday she received enough 
flowers to start a greenhouse. Some 
were marked with tags from out of town, 
and this is looked upon as "clever work.'' 

The controversy seems to have been out- 
side the theatre all week. It was not 
noticeable on the stage, no words having 
passed between the singers. Miss Vic- 
toria is reported to have said she is con- 
tent if her manager is, although consid- 
ering the spirit of her contract has not 
been lived up to. She was quite put out 
on Monday when appearing at the theatre 
late, she was sharply spoken to. Her 
place had been changed on the program 
from the position she occupied the pre- 
vious week in the same house. Not hav- 
ing l>een informed of this shift, she ar- 
rived at the theatre a little behind time. 

Next week Miss Victoria plays at the 
Alhambra; Miss Tanguay at the Orpheum. 
Brooklyn. Business has been enormous at 
the Colonial this week, hundreds of dol- 
lars being refused at the box office each 
show. 

Mr. Williams when asked if he would 
carry the two women around his circuit 
of theatres in the same way, answered 
he did not care to contract nervous pros- 
tration. 



WILLS IN VAUDEVILLE. 

Chicago, Jan. 23. 
Nat Wills closes his starring tour at 
Detroit on Feb. 1. The Monday follow- 
ing, he will appear at the Orpheum, 
Brooklyn, to fullfil his vaudeville en- 
gagements as per the agreement entered 
into between himself and the United 
Booking Offices last summer, when the 
difficulty over his contracts was settled. 



MOLINE HAS OPENED. 

Chicago, Jan. 23. 

The new Elite, Moline, 111., opened dan. 
20. The theatre cost $75,000 and is one 
of the finest in the State. 

Messrs. Friedenwald & Berkell, the own- 
ers, also operate the Elite theatres at Dav- 
enport and Bock Island, booking through 
Win. Morris' Chicago office. 



CANCELLED FOR BEING SOBER. 

At Keith's, Providence, this week, Mc- 
Mahon and Chappelle and their "Pullman 
Porter Maids" are absent from the pro- 
gram. The act played at Keith's, Boston, 
last week. It was routed to play Provi- 
dence commencing Monday. 

Last Saturday night in Boston, after 
the performance, Tim McMahon, telling 
his "Porter Maids" how to give the act in 
"two" for Sunday night at the Boston 
theatre, the customary place for the 
Keith weekly bill to appear on the Sab- 
bath, left for his home in New York on 
the midnight train. 

Mr. McMahon's wife, Edythe Chappelle, 
is in a delicate condition, and Tim wanted 
to be with her on Sunday. He returned to 
Providence on Sunday night to be told 
that another act had been ordered from 
New York in his place for the week's bill, 
a report coming in from Boston he could 
not be found, although he had informed 
the stage manager of Keith's that his 
home going was necessary, explaining 
why. 

Tim returned to New York with the 
girls, without complaint, feeling that 
while his visit to his wife was entirely 
justifiable under the circumstances, it had 
not carried weight in the Keith Boston 
house. 

"I've lost some engagements in the 
past," said Tim the other day, "for many 
different reasons, but I'm sure this is the 
first time in my life I was ever cancelled 
for being sober." 



NO BOOKINGS FROM CHICAGO. 

It is denied by Weber & Rush that they 
have any intention of booking their house 
in Atlanta or any Southern houses they 
may be interested in through the Western 
Vaudeville Association, Chicago. It was 
reported last week this move was in mind 
to save railroad transportation. 

The firm say they will continue to se- 
cure acts for the Southern city from the 
United Offices. 



ACTORS' UNION BRONX BRANCH. 

A branch of the New York organization 
of the Actors* Union will shortly be es- 
tablished in the Bronx. Quarters have 
been secured in a frame building at 140th 
Street and Trinity Avenue, and here 
"Local No. 10," as the branch will be 
known, will have its home. 

The movement was set on foot by a 
retired circus acrobat who discovered 
that there were not less than 50 vaude- 
ville artists and circus people, many re- 
tired from active work, all living within 
a radius of iive blocks from his home in 
the Bronx Borough. He secured the use 
of the building, and made application to 
the Union for a charter. Officers will be 
elected and installed next week, and the 
branch will start with a membership 
of 2S. 



"A VILLAGE LAWYER" ABOUT 
READY. 

The cast for "The Village lawyer," 
the bucolic play enlarged from Creasy 
Bind Pavne's vaudeville sketch, takes to 
the legitimate road earlv in February un- 
der the direction of the Shubert Brother*. 

other than Will M. Gressy and Blanche 
Dayne. the principals, Lowell P». Drew, 
Richard Webster, lack Gardner and 
Charles Lane are among those engaged. 



NO MOVE AGAINST MORRIS. 

No move has been made against the 
possession now held by William Morris, 
of the Nelson, Springfield, and the Frank- 
lin £<juare, Worcester. 

One of the causes why this has been 
so is said to be the injunction procured 
by Mr. Morris enjoining against his peace- 
ful possession being disturbed. The ar- 
gument on this order will come up be- 
fore the U. S. Circuit Court in either 
Springfield or Boston during February. 

Up to date, Mr.. Morris has paid no 
rent for the use of the premises since 
January 13. An official of the U. S. 
Amusement Company, which is the party 
to benefit through the payment by Poli 
of a bonus upon vaudeville's departure 
from the cities where he conducts houses, 
said this week no steps of any kind were 
contemplated against Morris by the 
K. & E. side. 

The report that was out to the con- 
trary was a mistake, said this officer, who 
had previously informed a Variety rep- 
resentative before the injunction proceed- 
ings were instituted that Morris would be 
evicted if he did not obey the order to 
leave. 

It was said this week that K. & E. 
had concluded to await developments, be- 
lieving Morris would leave of his own 
violition in course of time. 

This report signified that an agreement 
had been maxle with Mr. Poli extending 
the date from February 3", next, when he 
would have been privileged to withdraw 
his $15,000 posted for the departure of 
Morris' vaudeville from the New England 
theatres. 

The official of the U. S. Company de- 
clined to say whether the injunction 
would be argued by its attorney when 
the case came up. 

William Morris left town early in the 
week, with the objective point of his trip 
a secret